17/06/2016 The Papers


17/06/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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So welcome to look ahead at what the papers are bringing us tomorrow, we

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are joint and night by the media commentator at the Daily Telegraph

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Neal Mitchell and also we are joined by the former special adviser to

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Harriet Harman. Let us have a look at some of the front pages in

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detail, we are going to start, with the i, it has the headline united in

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grief and parliament is to be called on Monday. The Financial Times also

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highlights how the different critical parties have come together

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following the killing. The Telegraph says that female MPs have warned of

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the threat of fatal attacks. The Daily Express prints what it says

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was Jo Cox's last two words. And the Mira concentrates on the MP's role

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as a mother, a full-page picture of her with her children. The focus in

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a lot of the papers, is very much on Jo Cox. You actually knew her? Yes I

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knew her and I know her husband Brendan. She really was, at a time

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when people are very cynical about politics, she did represent the best

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about politics, she was bright, principled, passionate and also she

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came into politics having had already, lots of causes that she

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cared passionately about, a huge critical mission, she had campaigned

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on human rights issues, and I think the thing that summed it up, I was

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in the individual in Parliament Square and there were so many

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people. And there was a broad and people were writing things, saying

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things like "I was saddened by the death but I will be inspired by all

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life", that is how a lot of people saw it. What do you think she would

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have made the focus on her life as a campaigner, a politician and a

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mother, some of the words that came from her colleague's mouth, that she

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be allowed to leave a legacy. The language and behaviour of

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politicians needs to change and we need to look to Jo Cox as an

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example? She is a very humble person, she didn't want to ever be

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forcing herself to be a centre of attention but I think the legacy she

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must leave,, had those very beautiful words. She was very much

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about love overhead, everything she did, was to get to a compassionate

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and practical solution, and she railed against division and

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prejudice. If there is anything good that can come out of this sickening

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murder and assassination, it is for all of us involved in politics, just

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to perhaps be a bit more kind in how we conduct our politics, because

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there was a very and there is a very toxic atmosphere around any sort of

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discourse about public life and I think that is corroding democracy

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and has led to this terrible incident. That is what she would

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re-want. 100%. What do you make of the coming together of politicians

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today, often side-by-side, echoing tribute after tribute to a

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politician that was clearly really well thought of, not just as a

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person but a politician? Echoing, it is sad, it is an event like this

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that has too happen before politicians do come together. There

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are times at which you see, Jeremy Corbyn and David Cameron next to

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each other, is the Cenotaph, the State Opening of Parliament and a

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tragedy. And, her old boss Harriet Harman, we heard her same that we

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can be brisk and vigorous, in our political discourse, at the same

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time as, treating each other with tolerance and respect. I think,

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America is often ahead of us, I mean further down the track, rather than

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more enlightened in terms of their politics. So polarised now, to the

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extent that each half of the country doubts the other half's motives. In

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fact in Pewsey other half 's motives. I think that, a lot of

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politicians including Harriet Harman have been saying today, we can

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disagree with each other without believing that the other side are in

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some way keeling intention, or wish the worst of the country. -- kill

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intentions. Do you think, when campaigning for the EU referendum

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starts again, do you think we will see changes in the language used? I

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would absolutely hope so, I think that any advise involved in this,

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both campaigns, must have the wherewithal to say to everybody,

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everything has changed because of this. We are in a different country

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because of what has happened. Each side has got to dial down the over

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the top rhetoric and that has happened on both sides. And I think,

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think very carefully about the tone with which they campaign. I don't

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think anybody will want to see this horrible murder, politicised in

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anyway, Joe was a fierce campaigner for the remains side and also a

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fierce campaigner for Democritus seat, about making the arguments. As

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Harry was saying, we can make the arguments on both sides and make the

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way which is totally appropriate. And the call to Parliament on

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Monday, in many ways as we have done already today, get greater insight

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into a politician, a mother and a campaigner that some might not even

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have heard of. And certainly didn't know, but we are getting an insight

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into this quite unique person. And we will do further, many people

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hadn't read the article she wrote with Andrew Mitchell about Syria,

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Andrew Mitchell was known to most people, about the Downing Street

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incident, that he, and this very sensible Yorkshire lass, who was a

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social campaigner, far removed from the Tory party, the idea that they

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could work together on an issue as emotive as Syria, was really

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impressive. And Stephen Kinnock, her Parliamentary office mate, I think

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they share an office, barely able to contain his emotion when he was

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speaking. There will be much more of that and presumably it will be at

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the same time as the debate about politics, moves on about the

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security of MPs, the way that we talk about MPs, regard in which we

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hold them or don't hold them. It is only seven years, since the expenses

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crisis, when MPs were suddenly lower than bankers. In the nation's

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esteem, and it has been easy for people to forget. I wonder how it

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has been going down particularly with young people. There is a huge

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issue in trust in politics and output a cool class, it is

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incredibly interesting, it has given people a breath to stop for a minute

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and one of the interesting things on social media as B-nets hashtag

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#ThankYourMP where lots of people had taken the opportunity to try and

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recognise the good work that MPs do, and we have had quite if you

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articles over the last 24 hours reminding us that it is fashionable

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to say, snouts in the troughs and they are all in it for themselves.

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But actually, politicians of all political views tend to go into

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politics to do good, they make lots of personal sacrifices. They work

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pretty much every day of the week, they are not in it for the money and

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it is important to remember, that if you constantly denigrate politicians

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and politics, you will get the politics that you have asked for. On

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the safety issue, I think this will be an issue that is very important

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because most MPs will not want to have heavy security. Or the need to

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have security, you don't get American senators having surgeries

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about noisy neighbours. Know but congressmen and senators travel on

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public transport and walk around on the street. But British politics has

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a unique accessibility, but a lot of female MPs in particular, friends of

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mine, get death threats, rape threats, threats of extreme sexual

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violence on a daily basis. 12 of the daily papers reporting on female

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politicians stop you even today, I was looking at Jess Phillips's

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timeline, she's still getting the most horrific abuse. A lot of staff

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who run them, the constituencies, our young women. There is no

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security. There is an issue about how do you carry on and have that

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unique accessibility and openness, but how do you also look after the

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MPs and the staff also doing an important job? And you think that

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debate. Quite soon? I think it has already started. As you say, the

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front page of the Telegraph is talking tomorrow, about how female

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MPs warned that there could be a fatal incident if security was not

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improved. The correspondence between Theresa Mahan some senior police

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chiefs, you don't want to throw the Democratic baby out with the bath

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water. You don't want one incident, horrific and tragic as it is, to

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completely change the very good way in which we do politics, which is

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that you can go and see your MP about your noisy neighbour, all your

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Visa. That is what Stephen Timms said, he got varies seriously

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stabbed in his constituency by a woman a number of years ago -- very

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seriously. He still carries on the surgeries. He has been out today

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saying that he thinks it is very important that that culture

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continues. There seems to be a wave of change within the public as well,

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if you are across social media today, there was a hashtag trending

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highly. Not everyone was thinking the MP. But mainly, it was people

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saying, my local MPs in a fantastic job. You can tell, that those MPs

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were quite touched by some of the messages that they were getting.

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Particularly in this dark day after the death of Jo Cox. That is

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absolutely right, lots of MPs especially post-expenses, most of

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the MPs were badly caught up, they resigned all day went to prison but

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they have tended to be away from Parliament. There is a whole new

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generation of MPs who came in from 2015, and they I think a lot of them

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had been quite humbled by this #ThankYourMP, they say they have

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come into politics where they did not expect anyone to say thank you.

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Nobody wants a sanitised culture where the media just praises MPs, we

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want our MPs to be held to account in a rigorous way, in the way that

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the British press do. But there is something about if you constantly

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just denigrate MPs day in and day out, you do drip poison into the

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overall thing about where public opinion is. We want to end the

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programme showing the front cover of the times, the reason for this, is

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that they have made the call on the position on the EU referendum, which

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is not long away? The referendum campaign has restarted, tomorrow

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morning, the Times leader coming out forum Main, it is a four page

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editorial, we read it so you don't have to do. It is very much a hold

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your nose in Dorset of remains from the times. So the league campaign

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have made a great case. -- the Leave campaign. They say David Cameron

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needs to go back yet again, after the shuttle diplomacy that he did

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earlier in the year, to EU leaders to say that this is a common market.

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That is where they start from. That in 1975 we voted to remain in the

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common market, a capitalist project and it should be according to The

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Times again, and the French, specifically should not be allowed

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to stand in the way of free-market reforms, so they are really saying

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that David Cameron should go out and be a Tory in Europe, assuming that

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the vote goes remain on Thursday. You would know more than anything,

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what do you think we will see happen in politicians in the next few days

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as we head closer? I think campaigning will resume in all

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honesty Sunday into Monday definitely. I think that the remain

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campaign will stick on the message in the economy, I think this

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development of the time is coming out his incredibly helpful, Remain

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site and I think Leave will have two things very carefully about how they

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pitch their message. It will be very tight and both sides will be

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focusing heavily on the turnout, because that will make a huge swing

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of difference, and I think they will be targeting young people. A lot of

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young people are saying that they will not even vote. A lot of people

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say that the older vote will come out but it is who can motivate the

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younger people, I think you will only get to the younger people with

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a more positive message of hope. Thank you very much for that, thanks

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for watching. Don't forget, all of the front pages are wrong line where

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you can read a details review, seven days a week. You can seek us the

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two. Just shortly after we have finished. -- you can see us there

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too. We will be back with the latest headlines.

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Good evening, after a week of wild weather, things are

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