18/06/2016 The Papers


18/06/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Caroline Wheeler, political editor of the Sunday

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Express and Martin Bentham, home affairs editor

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Tomorrow's front pages are starting to come in.

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The Mail on Sunday leaves on the court appearance of the man charged

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with the murder of Labour MPs Jo Cox. That story also leaves

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tomorrow's Sunday express. The Sunday Telegraph shows a picture of

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the late MP 's parents visiting a sea of flowers close to where their

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daughter was killed. The Observer leads on the EU referendum. The

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Sunday Times shows a picture of British astronaut Tim Peake who has

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returned to Earth after six months in space. The independent says

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weapons and explosives stored at a safe house in Belgium with the

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intention of being used by terrorists during Euro 2016 are yet

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to be found. That's plunged straight in with the Telegraph. That very

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moving picture, I can't imagine anyone wasn't moved by the dignity

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with which Jo Cox's family presented themselves in Birstall today to

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admire the tributes left to their daughter and also to say a very warm

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thank you to people for all the support they have received and this

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extraordinary outpouring of grief over the last couple of days. I

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don't think anyone can imagine any thing worse happening to your

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daughter or son. The young thinkable has happened. This family have shown

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it enormous strength in the face of just the most utterly appalling

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crime. Her sister led the tributes today as they laid flowers at the

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spot where she was murdered on Thursday and it is the word that she

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uses, she talks about being so grateful for the outpouring of

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support for the family and they have drawn such enormous strength from

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this. The siblings and the parents who were out of about today, her

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husband Brendan was back at home with those poor children and I think

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it is another example of the kind of family that they are where the

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children are really at the centre of it. Your heart absolutely goes out

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to them. It is just an unimaginable thing. I hear the art pouring has

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been so much that the Talmud out of flowers yesterday. They had a

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restock and they ran out again. This is the kind of emotion that is

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around this. The impression that is left as a result of the last couple

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of days is that Birstall is a strong community and that that community is

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pouring its heart into supporting the family. I think the whole

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country, actually. It is just such a horrible thing that has happened and

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as you say, the sister's was today were absolutely beautiful. They were

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saying that good should conquer evil, they want to be positive, even

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in the light of something so horrendous as this, fabulously

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brave. And she was unequivocally brave and positive person. It is an

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incredible message, really. Yes, and quite a tribute to her. One of the

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effects of her death was the suspension of campaigning in the EU

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referendum. Inevitably, it's begins again tomorrow morning, and it

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begins in the papers with Michael Gove, Martin, trying to project a

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very positive message for the league campaign which you might say a lot

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of the campaigning on both side has been quite negative but he is saying

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this would be a positive vote for written. I think that has always

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been a flavour of it. You can have argue the immigration is a -1. But

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at the same time there has been this strong argument about taking back

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sovereignty, that is a strong card, and they try to counter the

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arguments that have been thrown at them by the Remain side that we will

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have some kind of economic setback and Michael Gove is saying,

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actually, no, we will be freed from the shackles of the EU, as he sees

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it, and that we can be a success. Going back to the Boris Johnson

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Michael Gove argument of free trading world world outlook and that

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is their message. It is a potentially difficult territory for

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them because perhaps the strongest weapon for the remaining camp is the

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economy and their warnings. However exaggerated some of them are, it is

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still a powerful message and one that is perhaps difficult... The

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campaign is going in a slightly cool -- different direction. It has been

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widely accepted that the Brexit campaigners haven't succeeded in

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making their immigration argument... This exception -- perception that

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the economy is weak. I spoke to Mr Gove today and one of the things he

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wanted to save was that a vote to leave the European Union was a vote

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of confidence in Britain so are marked change of tone and style. No

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turning back, warns Cameron. A couple of things I thought were

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interesting. One, the very straightforward message, this is it,

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you won't get a second chance. But also, this line, if you are not

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sure, in other words, if you are one of the don't knows, don't risk it.

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Is it now down to the don't knows when you look at the polls? I think

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it has been for some time. Quite possibly. Because of the polls are

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correct, we don't know if they are, but are the way, they are still

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close and therefore, there was about 10% of people showing undecided. If

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it is 1% either way in all the polls, then that is a critical

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thing. It is interesting that his message is still a little bit

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negative. Also, we talk about this more sober and sombre less critical

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tone, but we still have this broadside against Boris and goes,

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basically comparing them to irresponsible parents who put their

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children's lives in danger in the car. So it is back a little bit

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business as usual here. Just on the front of the Observer, to pick up on

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what you were saying, Martin, to use that hackneyed old phrase, it is too

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close to call. That Observer poll suggests it really is too close to

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call. 44% on either side and 10% undecided. The interesting detail of

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this, it suggests the polls suggest that among the undecided, more are

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inclined to vote Remain than Leave. It that what people have talked

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about, maybe that people that are shy Remainers. I think it is if you

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are courses, the fact that you are a Brexit vote, it is a very bold vote,

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it is an optimistic vote because it is saying we believe this country

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can succeed on its own, it doesn't have to be part of a bigger

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organisation but at the same time, by definition, it is more of a

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gamble. So, obviously, you've got to be bold, brave and so on to take

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that way. So if you are undecided, it then you are probally going to go

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with Remain. Yes, you are more likely to be more risk averse. And

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then these arguments cut coming in about the economy, how am I going to

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afford the mortgage? Will there be a massive spirited drive? Those are

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all the things that will come into play. As I'm sure you both

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remembered, it is Father's Day tomorrow. The Sunday express, a

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father who is also a son, of course, and a grandson, talking about the

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pressures on modern day dads. Yes, this is a bit of a coup for the

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paper. We've got Prince William writing exclusively for us. We are

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keen for him to do it because we have a mental health campaign.

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William has set himself as a bit of a campaign around male suicide. But

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he is using this as an opportunity to said that on Father's Day, take a

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moment out of your time, out of your day, to talk to your sons,

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daughters, and ask them, how are they doing? How are they finding

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fatherhood? It is all about breaking the taboo and treating mental health

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in the same vein as physical health. It is a serious issue, isn't it? I

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was slightly horrified when I thought I was going to be asked

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about my feelings tomorrow! We would ask you tonight. We'll leave it

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there but Tim Peake is back on Earth, I don't know if he is a dad

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but if he is, happy Father's Day. Where back at 11:30pm with more on

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the papers. Now, let's take a look at what has been happening with

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reporters.

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