19/07/2016 The Papers


19/07/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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That is all from Sportsday. Coming up at a moment... The papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Liam Halligan, columnist from The Telegraph,

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and the journalist and broadcaster Rachel Shabi.

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Let's take a look at the front pages...

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The Telegraph is reporting that the government will scrap

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its target to reduce net migration to below a hundred thousand a year.

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The Express urges the new Home Secretary, Amber Rudd,

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The Metro leads with the shooting in Spalding in Lincolnshire

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The Financial Times focuses on the IMF reducing Britain's growth

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forecasts after the vote to leave the European Union.

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The I dedicates its front page to the fight between Owen Smith

:01:00.:01:02.

and Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour leadership.

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The Guardian's front page has an image from

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Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson's press conference with US Secretary

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The Times leads with a story about Owen Smith's past, when he

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That gives you a flavour, let's dive in, and we find battle lines drawn

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between Owen Smith and Jeremy Corbyn. Yes, battle lines strong

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because Angela Eagle dropped out of the leadership bid earlier today.

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One of them was always going to drop out, that was always going to be the

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plan, they want to just the one candidate, what they are calling a

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unity candidate to stand up against Jeremy Corbyn. The trouble for this

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candidate is that it doesn't seem to really matter who it is by that many

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percentage points in the sense that Corbyn is still the preferred

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leadership candidate amongst the Labour Party membership. Interesting

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that the fight for the soul of labour... Getting to grips with the

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idea of the Battle of ideology, essentially, the purity of the

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Labour vision versus the pragmatism of how one gets elected, perhaps?

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The Parliamentary Labour Party, the MPs who don't back Jeremy Corbyn's

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leadership, they have fallen out with him on Trident with the lot of

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MPs backing the renewal of Trident and Corbyn himself being against

:02:38.:02:43.

Angela Eagle, a very experienced MP from the north-west, she got 72 MEPs

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and MPs supporting her and Owen Smith, relative new,, bin in the

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house since 2010 from a safe seat and Pontypridd, going forward to

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battle with Jeremy Corbyn, with and illegal as part of the deal, will

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get some kind of senior role but I think a lot of outsiders from

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outside the Labour Party looking on both think OK, clearly Jeremy Corbyn

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will probably become leader again but even though he is popular

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amongst Labour activists, he hasn't got any chance of winning a general

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election. Do they want to win this ideological battle or do they want

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power? Although it's kind of false paradigms as is the purity versus

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pragmatism set up in the sense that it seems to be what the centre

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slashed left of the party has failed to learn from the last few elections

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and the EU referendum is that the centre has collapsed, the jig is up,

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people are not buying that style of politics in a more, people are not

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interested in these reasonable looking centre is to present

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themselves in nice suits and give us spin. That clearly isn't working any

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more and that is what is explaining Jeremy Corbyn's success, it's not

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about him, it's the fact that he represents a kind of politics that

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hasn't been represented in the mainstream for so long and people

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are hungry for it. Of course it's going to be a pretty long summer of

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this because September, is when it all happens at in the meantime, in

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the Times, the lead story, Labour feud over Corbyn rival's pastors

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lobbyist... We will see a lot of this on both sides, no doubt, a bit

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of concern raising, shall we say about the former role that Owen

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Smith had for the US drug company Pfizer. The Corbyn eased as one to

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paint him as Blair like, he has come back saying I am radical, similar to

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Jeremy Corbyn in many ways but the Corbyn eased as say you've been a

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lobbyist for a big pharmaceutical firm and paid a great deal of money,

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the firm was fined, you're not part of the Labour tradition and so on. I

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think what I'd say, as an outsider, is that Owen Smith, while he may

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present himself as also to Corbyn than he is to Blair, seems to be a

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lot like the other Labour candidates that Corbyn beat so convincingly

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nine or ten months ago. What has he ever really done outside politics?

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He's been a journalist for a while, worked as a lobbyist, again in

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politics... It is... I would very much agree with you, he seems to be

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more of the same but on the other hand, I just want a fantastic HM

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opposition to go up against because I think that's what they need and

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filed Corbyn may appeal to the Labour activists, he's still got

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appalling ratings amongst the general publics that are done with

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Michael Foot when I was a kid. That is the problem. It's no surprise he

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has low polling ratings in the middle of this chaos amongst the

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party but I agree with you, they desperately need an opposition and

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you kind of think, if we are going to end up with the same result in

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two months' time, Corbyn will be leader, we have to go through this

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train wreck? As regards the Brexit debate, the UK debating with Europe,

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but we've also got to debate with ourselves, as we debate... In the

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middle of an identity crisis. We are, aren't we? Take us on to the

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Daily Telegraph, Rachel. We turn our attention to the Tories, this

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headline about Tory migration target axed, the focus today on the new

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Home Secretary Amber Rudd and what her view might be on the targets are

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met migration. Amber Rudd, the new Home Secretary, signalled and Boris

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Johnson later backed up, that the target of hitting below 100,000

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migrants per year coming into the UK was not reasonable and that it was

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going to be dropped and that it was unrealistic and it would set up a

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sort of false expectation that would only be disappointed and I suppose

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this has to be seen in the context of Brexit. And managing people's

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expectations around that cause so much of that Brexit debate was

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premised on regaining control of borders and reducing migration

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whereas the reality is... Neither of those things may come to pass. In

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the sort of formulation of leaving the EU. Your paper... Before the

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last election, David Cameron famously said I will reduce net

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migration to double-digit thousands for example 100,000 below and then

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it went to 330,020 15 and that is net migration and many, many more if

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you went to people who didn't stay a year but got a national insurance

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number and this has to be seen in the context of Brexit, to try and

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see off Ukip before the election, Cameron making the promise and he

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promised the referendum, of course. I am sure many people voted to leave

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because they wanted to see less net immigration but there would be this

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negotiation that we spoke about before, the basic leader of the

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negotiation, free movement of people on one hand and control of borders

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and trade on the other hand. And going into any negotiation you don't

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want to see what your target is, obviously but I think it's furry

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clear that we will get somewhere between 150 and 250,000 so more

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sustainable that you can plan better with the UK Government in some kind

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of control to give people more confidence. But that Cameron

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pre-election promise to head off Ukip is probably too difficult to

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deliver any time soon. They don't want to be held to a figure. Talking

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about people held to things they said in the past... Very nice link.

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Enjoying your new job, Mr Johnson? Boris had a bed of a rough fried

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with journalists. He had a bit of a rough ride, didn't he, the new

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Foreign Secretary. The bit I really liked, it was bad enough he was

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basically trolled by US journalists holding into account for various

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insulting remarks particularly in relation to Barack Obama and Hillary

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Clinton but there was a stage at which John Kerry was being kind to

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our Foreign Secretary over something at which point Boris Langton and

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John Kerry said, it's called clumsy, Boris! And I thought that was such a

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great part, this is how you do it! Not what you have been doing! Boris

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was caught out for making rude remarks about Hillary Clinton and

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Barack Obama and he said there isn't time to issue the litany of

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apologies, the global apologies I will have to make to account for my

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30 years after a listen. And he is probably right. He tried to turn it

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into a joke but the US... The US press did not really get it. They

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don't speak Latin and they don't understand sarcasm. We jumped to the

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Daily Mail. Something a little closer to home. This story of

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patients being dropped their GPs for being too healthy. GPs tend to get

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something like ?136 a year for every registered patient and of course

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those registered patients don't turn up and some of them unfortunately

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may not be with us any more or may have moved so we hear now of moves

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by the Department of Health to hire cab at the outsourcing in order to

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go through lists and write to people twice and if they don't reply to

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remove them from lists so if you haven't been to your GP for more

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than five years, according to the story and you don't respond to two

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letters or one of two letters to say you still want to be treated, you

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can be taken off the list and find it much order to get an appointment,

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it's a cost saving measure but some people will find it worrying, Norman

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Lamb the leading Lib Dem, well-known for his interventions on the NHS has

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called it outrageous and I'm sure many others well but on the other

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hand, people and the government said we have got to save money and why

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are we giving money to doctors at a time when we are trying to control

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the payroll to hospital doctors, fire be giving money to GPs and

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patients they are no longer looking after in any way? Because we are

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tight on time, Rachel, take us back to the Daily Telegraph, we've had

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such a hard day, too hot for some but they have this barmy or barmy?

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All of it. Is that Aberystwyth? It's really beautifully composed picture.

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But yes, so unexpected. This image. Now it's too hard. Social media is

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full of how to... Put a bottle of frozen water in front of your fan

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for indoor, do-it-yourself air-conditioning. We have just had

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one of our reporters. They were rubbing suncream on a pig. Thank you

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both for a much. That is it for the papers. All of the front pages

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online on the BBC News website. You can read a detailed review. Olver,

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seven days a week. You can see us there as well. Posted on the page.

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My thanks to Liam and Rachel. Good evening. What a day it was.

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Most of us enjoyed a lot of sunshine. Temperatures rocketing up

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