04/09/2016 The Papers


04/09/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Tom Bergin, who's Reuters' Business Correspondent and

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the Senior Political Correspondent at the Times, Lucy Fisher.

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Is that what you were the last time you came in? I think we give you

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many different titles! Welcome to both of you, fresh from a summer

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break! Tomorrow's front pages now... The Daily Express leads on words

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of optimism by the prime minister about Brexit

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and the UK's economic future. Allegations against Labour MP -

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and Chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee -

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Keith Vaz paying to meet male more on the Keith Vaz story -

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but a smiling Theresa May enjoying the limelight in China

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takes centre stage. Brexit makes the lead

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in the Guardian - the paper claims the Prime Minister has declined

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to endorse pledges made by the Vote Leave camp for a points

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based immigration system. The Times continues the theme,

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saying Theresa May has ruled out a points-based system

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for EU migrants. It also has a picture of the

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impressive replica of the Great Fire of London, set alight to commemorate

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their epic blaze that happened in 1666.

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Finally, the Daily Mail also runs the Keith Vaz

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So, let's begin with a few of the stories to do with the Prime

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Minister and Brexit. Warnings that are coming from various members of

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the G20, in particular. Let's begin with the Daily Express, may, no fear

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over a year exit but Prime Minister warns off watering the deal down

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with Brussels. What would that look like according to the Daily Express?

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They've been pretty clear that means we cannot stay in the single market.

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What is also interesting is coming onto the front pages of The Daily

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Telegraph, and whether she will accept some of the pledges made by

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the league campaign through the EU referendum, of course they were

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supported by the big beasts in the government by John Whittingdale,

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Chris Grayling, but it was not government pledges -- Leave

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Campaign. The idea that 100 million extra pounds a week would be given

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to the NHS after leaving the EU. VAT should be cut, she's not giving into

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those ideas and leaving the door open at the moment. Watering down is

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not necessarily Britain's choice, is it? There are people in other parts

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of the EU we had to negotiate with? Obviously, the Brexit campaigns were

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clear that they wanted to have a single example with Boris Johnson

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describing it as having your cake and eating it. But we live in a

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real-world, and our partners, or potential partners, have ground

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rules. They say that you can have free movement of access if you want

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it to the market. And you have other things are potentially not just

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mutually exclusive, but they also said that they wanted access to

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regulated markets without following regulations of those markets. This

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means Theresa May is in a difficult position as she has so many

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conflicting objectives that it is very difficult for them to achieve

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theirs. The Daily Express does not want her to compromise on anything

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and achieve everything at the same time. But some in favour of Brexit

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don't want to be part of the single market anyway? Because of all of the

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other elements that have to go along with that, like freedom of movement?

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Absolutely, there is such a plurality of opinion, Theresa May

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can continue to say Brexit means Brexit but we are no more clear on

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what that means. I understand David Davis, the Secretary of State, will

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make a statement in the house tomorrow, I don't think we will see

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more detail then but it's interesting, the tone of the Daily

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Express is still a paper that pushed leaving the EU, they have had that

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is a key agenda for years now, they are optimistic, reporting her

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optimism, telling the G20 that Britain is open for business.

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Everyone is waiting to see what happens, pressure is behind her.

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Everyone is weighing up what is going on. But she can only wait so

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long, the reality is people of investing as the Japanese pointed

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out, but we don't know what will happen. The ex-head of the European

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bank has said that you have to get a move on with this. The Daily

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Telegraph, PM could stop Boris is plan for a points-based immigration

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system, this was muted by Boris Johnson during the campaign to

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suggest that we could have something like the Australian system where you

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get access to Australia if you meet certain criteria and gain certain

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points. Why is she thinking this would work for us? A couple of

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things, there's this watering down question, is this a possible

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trade-off? Basically, the Financial Times goes into more detail, Theresa

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May may have a more relaxed system for EU citizens, so they can come to

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the UK without fulfilling all of the criteria that non-EU people would

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make. She would be doing that with a view to getting access to the single

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market. On the other hand, the other reason she may want to do it is if

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you talk to businesses, if they've spoken to international businesses

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since the vote, they make it clear that one aspect they like about

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Britain is that they can get a lot of people in easily. It's all very

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well talking about these systems but the easiest ones to get still take

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six months. If you are a business that relies a lot on bringing in

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talent, you don't like these kinds of systems. It might be another

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factor Theresa May is thinking of, if the economy goes south, she won't

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want to bring in new elements that could slow it down further. And

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seasonal workers who come in to help, particularly with agriculture?

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You are right, if she tries to curb immigration, that is what many

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Brexiteers are saying, she gets net migration to come down, but today

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she said there was no evidence that a points-based system works. The

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suggestion may be that Number ten is looking more and quotas for work

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permits, the idea being that if you judge people by age and skills, they

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have to tick the boxes and many people could fulfil those criteria

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so it may be better to set a concrete upper level for people

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coming in. Let's look at The Guardian on this story, Mae refuses

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to guarantee Brexit pledges, promises on NHS and immigration in

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doubt. Another subheading, Japan and US warned Prime Minister of exit

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risks to Britain. Barack Obama not going back on what he said during

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the campaign, saying we would negotiate with the EU before we talk

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to the UK. A stern warning from Japan? Yes, it's interesting,

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doubling down on his warning, making it clear he believes Britain made

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the wrong decision in the EU referendum, they not only is it more

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important for the US to negotiate with the EU, but also in the block

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of Pacific nations, he's making clear that we are at the back of the

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queue. And Japan have said we have a lot of workers in the UK, in the,

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new factoring and technological industries, we expect the same

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privileges and access that we currently enjoy -- in the car

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manufacturing business. Won't this smack of more interference by

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foreign countries? That really got people's backs up in the campaign?

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Possibly, but we have a statement coming out today, Britain will lead

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the way on free trade. There's the idea that Britain can push ahead

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through sheer determination. It does not really fit with the way that

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trade deals work. You cannot lead a trade deal, you need two people.

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The whole perception in how it works, what is being depicted is

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that it is very much by good. Trade deals now are about regulation and

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not tariffs, they are pretty passed as an issue since the WTO. There is

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the fundamental problem when you negotiate trade deals like

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regulation, that is what they are about now. And they take a lot of

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time, the WTO is still going on! The Metro, a very different story,

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this is what has been happening with the story surrounding Keith Vaz, the

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Leicester East MP, a Labour MP, here is chair of the home affairs select

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committee or he has been. It says that he steps down as head

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of home affairs committee after paying for male ex-Scots.

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They are all allegations, nothing is against the law -- escorts.

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Nothing has been confirmed, but there are whisperings that he's

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planning to step down on Tuesday when the committee meets. He's been

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head of the committee for nine years.

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One of the most influential in Westminster, but it does of course

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mean dealing with the Home Office and policies looking into those, it

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deals with advice and there's an enquiry on prostitution and laws

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around sex workers. There will be questions raised about

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appropriateness of him remaining as head when he is alleged to have

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engaged with prostitutes. Over the weekend it has been stated

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over and over again that there is nothing illegal about paying for

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sex, it is illegal in some parts of the UK?

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It is a difficult area. Had he solicited a prostitute from a car it

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would be illegal, in certain circumstances in the UK and Northern

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Ireland it is illegal to pay for sex in most circumstances. It's a tricky

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legal area to be in. It seems, as Jeremy Corbyn said, even if the

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allegations are true, Mr Vaz has not done anything illegal. But the fact

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that this is an area where the legality of alleged activity, there

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is a broad dispute over it, and it puts them in a difficult position.

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Yes, these are all allegations at the moment, nothing confirmed but

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also Mr Vaz has said he is deeply disturbed by The Sunday Mirror

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choosing to pay for access to this story.

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Let's move on and look at The Times newspaper. NHS blows nearly ?2

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million in payoffs to bosses, who is getting these hand-outs? It seems

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these are the bosses of NHS various units, who are getting very

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significant pay-outs for leaving their jobs, partly because there was

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a rationalisation and more people were made redundant than might

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normally be the case. In one sense, the NHS... It is big,

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or the numbers will be big and we will be outraged by the payoffs to

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bosses who we may not feel huge amounts of sympathy for. The

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government said that there would be payoffs that would be capped at a

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certain level of ?95,000. It seems we had pay-outs going up to

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several times that amount. There seems to be a case to answer,

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as to why the rules have been broken and the figure is big not just

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because the NHS is big but because rules were not followed.

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We don't know exactly what their individual contractual agreements

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were with some people and if they were entitled to these bonuses and

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payoffs? We do not have the details here but the real nub of the story

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is that this goes back to the widely criticised top-down reorganisation

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implement it by Andrew Lansley in 2010 during the coalition

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government. That is when he abolished 150 bodies, and created

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more. It was the largest restructure in the history of their NHS and has

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led to payments that people have said are down to the restructuring.

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There's been a revolving door system in many cases, people leaving one

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unit only to become re-employed by the health service in another

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capacity, some people have said it smacks of waste. Let's look at the

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Express, page two, Mother Teresa, she was made a saint.

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It attracted huge crowds in the Vatican.

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In 2016, the canonisation of the woman who died in 1997, it has been

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greeted with great enthusiasm. And the

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compassion that she had for the working Kolkata, it has captured the

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public's imagination. -- the poor in Kolkata. It is a touching moment,

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whether you are Catholic or not, seeing someone canonised who gave so

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much of their life to eliminating poverty. She is controversial in

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some of the things she did, some think that her legacy was entirely

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good? Growing up in Ireland, people took for granted that she was

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already a saint, she was a significant figure among Catholics

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for a long period of time. The controversy, yes, that's been here,

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you made the point of alleviating poverty, the accusation was that she

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did not tackle the causes of poverty.

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Regarding compassion, the questions around alleviation of pain, and in

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Ireland, in the past, one of the issues was that in Catholicism,

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Payne brings you closer to God. That may have led to pain relief not

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being distributed as otherwise it would have done -- pain. The whole

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issue of sainthood is difficult for some Catholics as the idea of

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granting miracles is something that maybe does not tell nowadays with

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our scientific outlook. It's not without controversy but as Lucy

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said, is hugely popular to the faithful.

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And The Daily Star, Struck the winner decided already, and the

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dancers have not even taken to the floor yet, they've been rehearsing.

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A fixed claim made by James Jordan, who used to be one of the

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professionals on the show. It is shocking. The late has gone off,

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what can you believe in! Fairies! Obviously you can, I'm not a major

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Struck a fan, but it captured my attention, if they are reading a

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contest based on career political trajectories, it can be serious.

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Similar claims made last year during the competition that it was a fix?

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It overlooks the fact the audience gets to vote? I'm not sure on the

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basis of this former dancer who no longer appears on the show... I

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don't know their claims, but as we approach the anniversary of 9/11

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Mac, conspiracies of truth, Jeremy Corbyn supporters...

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People see conspiracies and wrecked contests where there are none.

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Amanda is our editors tonight, and a fishy order low of Stictly, they

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have not even began to dance yet. -- aficionado. That's all for now,

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but Tom and Lucy will be back in an hour but now, time for Meet The

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