13/10/2016 The Papers


13/10/2016

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Pippa Crerar, political correspondent

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at the London Evening Standard, and Liam Halligan, economics

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Before we talk to them, let's have a look at the front pages.

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The Guardian features a picture of the new Nobel Prize

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winner for Literature, Bob Dylan, but leads

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with Michelle Obama's comments condemning Donald Trump's

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The FT also features Dylan on it's front page,

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but leads with Tesco once again selling Marmite online

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after the grocer ended a 24-hour stand-off with Unilever.

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Following her retirement annoucement, The Metro carries

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a picture of Jessica Ennis-Hill and claims Donald Trump was caught

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The Daily Telegraph has an exclusive, saying Britain's most

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senior police officer has issued an apology

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to Field Marshal Lord Bramall and admitted it was wrong

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to raid his home over false paedophile allegations.

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There's a giant picture of Kumbuka the gorilla in the Mirror,

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apparently taken minutes before he escaped from his

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He is also in the Daily Mail and the paper says MPs are told an

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unprecedented vote on whether the former BHS boss Philip Green should

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be stripped of his knighthood. Let's go straight to the gorilla! We will

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save the best for last! It is tempting but let's start... Is the

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gorilla pro Brexit! Let's start with Nicola Sturgeon and her warning, as

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it is put in the FT, that she is going to bring forward at least

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consideration of legislation for a second independent referendum

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because of the Brexit vote. This is at the SNP conference and she had

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said that she will consult on a new independent referendum Bill after

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months of Wilshere, won't she. The key here is just because she is

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consulting does not mean it is going to happen -- of will she. It is

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about threatening or putting pressure on Theresa May to make sure

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that Scotland gets a seat at the table and it's concerned are

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listened to when it comes to things like access to the single market. If

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she pursued another referendum, all other polls suggest that Scotland at

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the moment would vote in a similar way to how did at the referendum. It

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was said earlier that judging by the current range of opinion polls, for

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every vote that has shifted as a result of Brexit towards

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independence, there is another that has gone the other way. There is

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this mix of people who felt initially that Brexit might make

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them more inclined to stay within the EU by another means, ie

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independent Scotland, and for those for whom it meant stability was an

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even more important factor and they would rather have the Deva -- the

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devil they know status quo than something uncertain. They did vote

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62-38 to remain but there is a lot of economic is always here. Scotland

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have a really big deficit, about 10% of GDP if it left now, without the

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Barnett Formula money. The polls are against independence. But Nicola

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Sturgeon is a very shrewd politician. Why is she saying it

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now? Oil has just gone back up above $50 a barrel. That SNP plan for

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independence starts to just about make some kind of economic sense.

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What about the political risk for her? Is Theresa May the kind of

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politician to respond well to this kind of pressure question at the

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first thing when Theresa May was by Minister, she went to Scotland and

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then Wales, very smart thing to do -- became Prime Minister. There is a

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good connection between them but Nicola Sturgeon will do everything

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she can to keep the pressure up for this referendum. It will not be the

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first time we say her on the front pages that she is about to call a

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referendum on independence. If she can with it, she would call it

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straightaway. She will not rush into it, she is too cautious for that.

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And it would finish her if she loses. Not just her, it really would

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be another generation. There is a reference in the headline to Donald

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Tusk, the president of the European Council. He will want to stay when

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the reality of Brexit hits. Boris Johnson, they are becoming the

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Waldorf and Statler of European politics. They are the two old boys

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in the box in the Muppets normally commenting negatively on what is

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going on! Boris took a pop at Donald Tusk in his conference speech,

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saying a man called Tusk does not even want to save the elephant! He

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is a heavyweight politician within the European project. He is saying

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there is either no Brexit or a hard Brexit and it will be painful for

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Britain, you cannot have your cake and eat it, you will end up with

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salt and vinegar crisps! That is a reference to Boris's famous phrase

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of having your cake and eating it. It is rhetorical sparring between

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two pretty big political beasts. He has this odd job, president of the

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council which means he chairs the meetings of the different leaders of

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the EU and technically they also represent Britain at the moment

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because we are still in the EU. But no doubt that there is growing

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tension, even though we are months away from the beginning of

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negotiations. That is absolutely the case. And what is increasingly in

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parrot -- apparent is that at least publicly the other EU countries

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don't seem to be wanting to play ball with Britain. They are thinking

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we wanted to leave, why would will be rewarded for that? And they might

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fear that others might follow. And in their own countries, especially

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France, there is a rise in sentiment against the EU with elections also

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coming up in Germany. A lot of concern among the existing EU

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leaders that they cannot be seen to give anything to Britain. Whether

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that is in formal negotiations or behind the scenes talks that are

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being conducted at the moment, they will not want much to come out that

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appears favourable to Britain. But Unilever have backed down and

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Marmite is coming back! This is the best thing in the paper most days,

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the cartoon from Matt. They went without Marmite so Britain could be

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free! We will try to show people at home because it is quite small. They

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went without Marmite so Britain could be free! You can't see it from

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the glare from your tie! This is one for betting men and women

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everywhere, this story, rather more interesting in some ways. One of

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those wonderful geo- economic stories, one of the big American

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ratings agencies saying that sterling could lose it reserve

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currency status which means, sterling is the third most important

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reserve currency in the world after the dollar down the Europe between

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central banks keep their reserves in those currencies because they are

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solid. We are about four or 5% of central bank reserves, the dollar is

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about 65 and the euro is about 20 and emerging markets as well. If we

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lose that status, that means our borrowing costs will go up and it

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also means that there is less reason for people to demand sterling so it

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could lose some value. SMP wheelbase out occasionally, they did the same

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thing in May ahead of the referendum -- wheel this story out. It is misty

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vista talk about it now when sterling is clearly on skids --

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mischievous to talk about it. The pound is down about 6% Saint Theresa

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May's conference speech. -- since Theresa May's speech. Let's go to

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the Guardian. This is a terrific photograph on the front. And about

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Bob Dylan being made Nobel laureate for literature. This is by Richard

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Williams who was the first presenter of The Old Grey Whistle Test. In the

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days when Bob Dylan was a young man! On BBC Two! You remember it well.

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But nonetheless, his view is that this is a good thing. What is yours?

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I think I agree. Maybe you could give us a musical accompaniment that

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Liam was threatening to sing along! Many do view Dylan as a poet as much

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as a musician and certainly his writings have always been as much

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about the lyrics at anything else. Of course there have been some real

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anthems, anti-war protests and civil rights movement so it has been

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political as well and he has always been interested in the human

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condition. You get people tracing the price today and I think many

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people would be quite happy with the fact that the committee have decided

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to go for a rock star. And for the first time. The novelist Irvin was

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booted it was an ill-conceived nostalgia award even by gibbering

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hippies -- Irvin Welsh. But is it really literature? People will be

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listening to Bob Dylan in 50, 100 years, a huge chronicler of American

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history. The first American to win this since Toni Morrison in the

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early 90s. That is a good thing given their cultural reach. I was a

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bit sniffy about it when I first heard them it seemed a bit gimmicky,

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but he is a towering cultural figure. We have had accusations

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before, when Obama got the peace prize, sort of in expectation that

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he might do something and he didn't actually achieve anything. But we

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cannot let discussion of these prizes pass without, I think in

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previous years... Last year it went to the woman from Belarus. But

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across the board there were only two out of 14. And only 48 women have

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won any of the prices compare to 822 men. -- at the prizes. And surely in

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2016, if there are not women out there considered worthy of such

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prizes, there is something wrong. It is clearly not very reflective or I

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think they need to up their diversity quote a bit. -- quota. The

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Daily Mail, this is a photograph of the gorilla, Kumbuka, who went for a

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wander this evening. They gorilla in the mirror! This is newspaper gold.

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It is in its cage and suddenly he has escaped. Nobody was hurt, unlike

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in Cincinnati where an unfortunate ruler was shot after a little boy

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fell into his enclosure. The staff at London zoo used tranquilliser

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guns, is fine and of course it is a fantastic picture story. I'm a bit

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ambivalent about zoos in general. This is a magnificent beast and it

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must get so wound up living in a cage all the time. Thankfully nobody

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was hurt including Kumbuka himself. Apparently he came from Paignton

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zoo. I can understand why he felt a bit of wanderlust! That is what the

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smoke can do to you! And finally a lovely photograph on the front of

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the Metro of Jessica Ennis-Hill who is quitting while she is ahead.

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There was some discussion as to whether she would go after the Rio

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Olympics where she won the silver medal, pipped to the post by a young

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athlete. She has obviously taken the decision that she is going to

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retire. There was some discussion about whether she might concentrate

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on the best event which is the huddles but Lily decided she would

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rather go out at the top -- hurdles but clearly decided. What a role

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model, becoming a mother and coming back to become world champion in

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Beijing, astonishing. Thank you very much for being with us this evening.

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Don't forget all the front pages are online on the BBC News website

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where you can read a detailed review of the papers.

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It's all there for you, seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers,

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and you can see us there too, with each night's edition

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of The Papers being posted on the page shortly

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I will be back with the main news at the top of the hour.

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