21/11/2016 The Papers


21/11/2016

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at the University College London. The Japanese Prime Minister has said

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they are ready to deal with whatever they have to deal with. We will keep

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you updated. Time for the papers. Welcome to our look ahead to what

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the papers are bringing us tomorrow, we're joined by a correspondent from

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the London Evening Standard, and European features reporter at the

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Wall Street Journal. Before we hear they have to say about the papers

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that have a quick, brief look at what they are bringing us. The

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Financial Times leads on the prime Minster's speech at the CBI

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conference, telling business leaders she wants to avoid a cliff edge

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after Brexit. The Metro leads with the news that the number of

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polyester bags left on beaches have halved after shot. Giving them away

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for free. And the Guardian paper writes about a new NHS initiative

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that might require patients to bring our ID if they require medical

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treatment in hospital. And the times warns that Russia is deploying

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ballistic missiles to a small region bordering Poland and Lithuania, the

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paper claims it is in retaliation for Nato expansion. Let's begin with

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the Financial Times. A leap of faith as the FT described Theresa May

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hinting at a soft landing to avoid a Brexit cliff edge. The phrase has

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been used by a number of people now. She is trying to reassure the

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business world. There's no league, no jump. I hope that she is

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stretching tonight because she was doing some impressive verbal

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gymnastics today. Talking about this cliff edge, suggesting, or

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interpreting that they would perhaps be a transition period after article

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50 is triggered, which is confusing, she is backpedalling, and also

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talking about how employees and consumers may be represented on

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corporate boards, but it sort of an abstract way. She did a lots of

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backpedalling today. It is interesting because the original

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intention was for the Prime Minister to reassure the CBI after her

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anti-business rhetoric of the party conference, some of them were quite

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unnerved by that, so she went into reassure them, and she said to them

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there will not be a cliff edge, we understand you have concerns, and

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business was delighted with that, and then just a few hours later

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number ten was backpedalling and Downing Street, in the afternoon

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lobby briefing, saying, actually, that is not quite what she meant, we

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are not hinting at specific measures to avoid the cliff edge, they will

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not necessarily be a long, transitional deal, which Brexit MPs

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fear will become permanent, and that we will be out by 2019 and stick to

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the original timetable. So it is more a timeline we're talking about?

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Yes, and for a lot of people this will exemplify the fact that they

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are desperate to find out some detail on the timeline, and what

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crunch points are going to be in the negotiation. The Prime Minister said

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several times in her speech, and in her response to questions, that she

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would not give a running commentary, and I think people are actually

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beginning to ask for more meat on the bones. The problem is that that

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is exactly what it is, negotiations, so she cannot promise anything right

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now, because she does not know what she can promise. Yes, but business

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leaders do not make plans for two years, they make them for five, ten

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years. This was a missed opportunity for Theresa May who has not yet

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earned the trust of corporate leaders, they are still waiting for

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more information, and saying one thing then changing later on the

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day, it is no way to establish trust. That is probably why she

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doesn't want to get daily updates, because it will keep happening.

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Another story you have spotted, US banks face higher costs after eight

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it for tat Brussels row. Explain this to me. This is a response by

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the European Union to some rules which were brought in by Washington

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back in 2014, which the EU claim basically amounted to protectionism,

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and at the time they threatened to retaliate, and what it is is the

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banks are having to keep capital, they will be made to keep more

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capital in the EU, as collateral, if you like, for them fleeing at some

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point. And this is potentially going to hurt the City of London, one of

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the biggest financial centres in the world, because not only will these

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large foreign banks which are based here have to retain capital here,

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but they will also have to keep some in the EU, and that could make life

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difficult for them. This is a huge drag if you are a US bank. Because

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banks want to have their money out in the world, they want to use it to

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surprise surprise, make more money. What we are hearing is the EU

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saying, no, we want you to give a big pool of your money in the EU so

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that if there is some sort of a crisis, JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs,

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you can cover yourselves. It is the most produced product in the world,

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the $1 note. Produced even more than coat hangers. We move the. This is

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worrying, if it stands up, that in their boots in a new threat to

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Europe, action challenging Nato, according to the Times, this is the

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area of a build-up of tension is, isn't it? Nato have had quite a

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presence there for some time. Yes, they have upped their troops and

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equipment to the eastern eastern edge of of its domain, and Russia is

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claiming that it is responding to that action by moving missiles into

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an area between Poland and Lithuania. So, right on the border.

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And it is worrying, it was going to make life uncomfortable for many

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European leaders... But it is not unexpected. It is not unexpected but

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in the current climate where we don't yet know what the new

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relationship will be between President-elect Donald Trump when he

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takes power in the White House, and the Kremlin, it is pretty unnerving,

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I think, for Europe, which is stuck in the middle, and the Nato

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Secretary General today said, well, this is entirely defensive and

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proportionate, we have absolutely no plans to expand, it is just about as

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protecting our own interests, and the defending them, but, what

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happens when President Trump takes over? This is almost like, is the

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Kremlin calling his bluff? Is it trying to test him to see if he will

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stand up to them or not? It is quite difficult and complicated and an

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uncomfortable interplay between the major superpowers, and Europe is

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kind of stuck in the middle. What we know about Donald Trump so far is

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that he is not a big fan of war but he is not a big fan of Nato either.

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It'll take time to figure out what he feels. One of the weirdest things

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about this story is that this news comes from an interview with the

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film-maker, Oliver Stone. That is where these quotes come from. OK,

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interesting. The Daily Mail, show your passport if you want hospital

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treatment. This goes back to an ongoing problem which has been

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highlighted for a long time now, particularly by the Daily Mail, it

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is to try to curb health tourism. Yes, this comes out of a Public

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Accounts Committee report, a meeting of MPs today, they had the permanent

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Secretary of the Department of Health in, and he suggested that

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from now on, if you are not a British national you will have to

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show your passport in order to get medical treatment. The idea being

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that they want to crack down on medical tourism. And according to

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recent government paid ?674 million to other European countries, just

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Europe, not the rest of the world, for treatment that the British

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received in those countries, but has only got ?50 million in return. Now,

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obviously hundreds of millions of pounds could be hugely beneficial to

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the NHS, but there are a couple of concerns, one is that it is against

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the culture of the NHS to turn people away, and then the government

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will have to be very careful to make sure that it is not for emergency

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treatment, and obviously Theresa May said at PMQ last month, when this

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came up regarding maternity care and a south London hospital that

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obviously for emergency treatment people will still be treated, but it

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will be interesting to see if this goes beyond operations, scans, test,

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what they decide to do then, will you need to turn up with your birth

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certificate and your passport and goodness knows what else? Well it is

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all going to change after Brexit anyway. This makes a great Daily

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Mail headline but my question is a reader is, is this a structural

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change? Or is it just a surface level change. Reminding people to

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bring a passport seems very surface level to me. The other issue is

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enforcement. Perhaps you will recruit more costs from foreign

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people receiving medical care but it costs a lot of money to enforce

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policies like this, what sort of computer setup do need to check the

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validity by passport, and all that... It is not in the bones of

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the NHS to turn away those who need treatment. It is not, and that is

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why my point about emergency care is crucial because people will be able

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to stomach people aboard bin charge for a test or a hip operation or

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something like that, but if they turn up about to give birth or

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something... It happens in America, which is very different, but it does

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happen in America. There are always always stories about that. Horrific

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stories. And it is happening here. Pita bread is an area with a high

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level of immigration and Saint Georges Hospital in tooting also,

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where there are maternity care pilots to make sure this is already

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in place, and certainly in Peterborough where it has been going

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on a bit longer, they cling to have been making savings, so we will need

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to see. We have only got two minutes left so can we do hyper fast

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broadband? The Daily Telegraph. Essentially the government is going

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to... Cracker! More high-speed and in it. But the government for me has

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a hard time picking winners and comes to technology. So investing ?2

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billion in high-speed broadband could be great day but what of

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technology changes and there's a better way to get Internet in the

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future? And is it reaching everyone who needs to reach? Some people

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don't even yet have broadband. Absolutely. What is interesting is

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that although most of the focus of this campaign is on rural England,

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Central London is a massive problem. London is 26 in the league of

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European capitals when it comes to superfast broadband. Partly because

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we have ageing buildings, it can be difficult to dig up, the

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infrastructure is very complicated, but they certainly need to do more.

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That was brilliant. Really fast. Metro. Halving our beach litter. A

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huge problem across the world. I have a plastic bag use, I admit it,

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I use them as trash bags, but I do pay the 5p charge. They make good

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poop bags if you have a dog as well. And it saves money. Or, not anymore,

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because you had to pay for them. But it proves it is working. Yes,

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beaches are cleaner, much better for marine wildlife, and if it continues

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hopefully other countries follow suit. Thank you both for taking us

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through tomorrow's papers and thank you for watching. All of the front

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pages are online on our website, where you can read a detailed review

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of the papers, it is all there for you, seven days

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per week, at the BBC website, and you can see is there also if you

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want to watch again. With each night's edition of the papers posted

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on the page shortly after we finish. Thank you both, from me, and the

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team, good night. Hello, quiet weather, dry weather on the way for

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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