07/12/2016 The Papers


07/12/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Ben Riley-Smith, Assistant Political Editor

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at The Daily Telegraph and Lindsay Razaq.

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Westminster Correspondent at the Scottish newspaper,

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Let's look at some of the front pages.

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The Telegraph says tonight's Brexit vote in the Commons has handed

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Theresa May a 'blank cheque' for leaving the EU.

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The Prime Minister's victory also dominates the front of the i -

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it says the government will now set out a strategic Brexit plan.

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And the most jubilant headline on the story comes from the Express.

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The Financial Times reports on the deal to save the Tata

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Steelworks in Port Talbot, which will keep the blast

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An image of the out-going HMS Illustrious dominates

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the front of the Times, which also has a story

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on consultancy companies earning billions from overseas aid.

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And the Metro leads on the fines handed down to two pharmaceutical

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companies for over-charging the NHS for drugs.

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We are going to start, where else, with Brexit. Lindsay, victory for

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the promised, the Commons backs her, and MPs show support for Downing

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Street on Article 50. There is no going back now, it is going to

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happen. That is what the Brexiteers would

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like to think. It has been a significant day, a significant vote

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in the House of Commons today. It is the first time MPs have shown

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support for Article 50. Clever politics from Theresa May. It came

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from a Labour motion calling on the government to publish its plan for

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Brexit. She was fearful of a rebellion from the backbenches, and

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came in with an amendment of her own, which said, yes, OK, but in

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exchange, we want you to commit to our timetable for Brexit, Article 50

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being triggered. It gives her breathing space.

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A bit of breathing space, Ben, the fact is we have a few months before

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31st March, there could be a lot of pitfalls and barriers, and hurdles

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up to that point. For instance, the Labour motion said they wanted a

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plan. That plan has got to be detailed enough, hasn't it? To

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satisfy those critics who feel the party, the Tory party is not putting

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out enough details as to what it is going to do.

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That is one of the big question is, we are in a big spin operation after

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the vote to work out what it means, which side has won. Whatever happens

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in the Supreme Court, whatever legislation, whatever decision is

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taken, the others are saying, hang on, there needs to be a piece of

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legislation, that is what we are arguing for in the Supreme Court.

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The second is how detail should the plan be? Labour appear to want to

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say, do you want to be in and out of the customs union, the single

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market, be specific about what you want. You can imagine, Theresa May

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will keep it broadbrush. Some conservatives? Ken Clarke voted

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against. One conservative. He voted against the government

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today. He is a well-known Europhile, which is not surprising. Others that

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did back the Prime Minister, it might not prevent them from being

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vocal, the Lib Dems are demanding a vote on the final referendum on the

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final deal, so people know they voted to leave, but now they want to

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know what the next stage will be. They want to have a vote on that.

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The pressure isn't going to go away. I suppose it is a momentary pause

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for her where she can reflect and think, OK, this is under my belt.

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Fact is, critics, the Labour Party, Plaid Cymru, they might say that

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there is not enough detail, they want a Bill. We will get to the

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Supreme Court in a minute. We know it has to be done by 31st March, we

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have agreed to that, but they could be big problems.

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It becomes incredibly hard labour and the critics which is where

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Theresa May has been clever. She has said, you backed 5-1 that we should

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begin the talks, if they begin to amendments down saying, OK, we are

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not going to talk again until you reveal the plan, she will ask why?

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You are undermining the agreement that we made a couple of weeks ago.

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It is hard for Labour to say, yes, we will force you to reveal the

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plan, but agree that you have total authority to begin it.

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Keir Starmer initiated the motion in the first place. Although Labour

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will claim it as a victory, it has backfired a little bit, potentially.

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The papers seem to think it has backfired. They are talking about as

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we talk about the Daily Telegraph, MP s hand made blank check for

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Brexit. Whatever happens in the Supreme Court, it doesn't matter.

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In theory, it does, because the vote we had today in Parliament isn't

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binding. It is utterly meaningless. In reality, it is not. But if the

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Supreme Court says she has two consult parliament before triggering

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Article 50, we have to have a Bill. I understand the government has

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prepared a three line Bill on the back burner in case they are obliged

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to do this. Even one of the justices is conceding that it would appear

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odd now if the Supreme Court were to say, "This is what we think". That

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is in contradiction to what the MPs have voted.

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You can see the way the Tories are beginning to put it, the Brexiteers,

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the Supreme Court ruling is now irrelevant. Iain Duncan Smith saying

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the government have a blank cheque. They are saying, case closed, job

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done, move on. The numbers are interesting. Like you said earlier,

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5-1, backed exit. If you look at Labour, this year, who has been the

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party with the biggest split over Europe, the Tories will thought one

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Tory refused to vote with the government. Most of Labour voted

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with them, 50 Labour MPs refusing to take a decision, and 23 Labour MPs

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voting against the motion. They are the most spit party.

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Why are we surprised at the size of the victory here? I was going to say

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that no one in their right mind, there was Tim Farron and others

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saying we should have a second referendum. The bottom line is, the

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vast majority of people did not say, we should overturn the will of the

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British people, and rerun the whole thing, they didn't.

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And remember, the key thing is that MPs are accountable at the ballot

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box. If you are at an MP in a constituency that is proper exit,

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you cannot stand up in Parliament and say your constituents are wrong.

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Anyone that wants to get elected again shouldn't be doing that.

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What these headlines are suggesting is that there was nervous and is on

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the part of Brexiteers that there could be some mechanism whereby the

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vote was overturned -- nervousness. That was seriously real.

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The greater fear was not that the vote would be overturned, that was

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the ultimate fear. It is two fold, one that they could use the vote to

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force Theresa May to be really specific about what she wants. Once

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she is public with that, they can chip away at it. The second one is,

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can you delay the process by withholding their support? Maybe she

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will miss her March deadline. Those two things become less likely with

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this boat. They are not out of the woods yet.

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The mention of the devolved nations, we heard from the lawyer for the

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Scottish Government, who is arguing that there should be a vote in

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Holyrood as well. Is that going to fly?

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We will have to wait and see. We are going to prejudge the most

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eminent minds in the Supreme Court, it is worth a go on the part of the

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SNP, no question about that. Let's go to Tata Steel. On the face of it,

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Ben, a good news story. Thousands of jobs look as though they will be

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saved. As with businesses up and down the land, the pension scheme

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has been the real stumbling block here. That seems to have been taken

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out of the equation now because the old scheme is the past.

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It is such a turnaround from when the announcement seemed sudden when

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the plant could be closed. The government was caught on the hop.

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Sajid Javid came in for criticism because he was abroad when the

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announcement was made. Critics said this looks fantastic on the face of

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it, 1 billion over the next ten years, 8000 jobs secured until 2021.

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The sticking point, I think, will be the pension scheme. Tata Steel are

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saying let's close the ?15 billion pension scheme that was spiralling

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away. Let's replace it with a new contributory scheme. It has not yet

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gone to the trade union, so we are only halfway there, which is why

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Greg Clark is cautious. Let's wait and see. On the face of it, very

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good news. Indeed. What the steel industry is

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saying is that Tata Steel have moved a long way here, secured some jobs,

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now the government has got to step in. Got to deal with Chinese

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dumping, deal with green energy, taxes, corporation tax, energy

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costs, a whole host of things. The head of UK steel was telling me

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tonight that he hasn't heard, as part of Theresa May's industrial

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policy, an idea of where steel fits in, and that is what he wants to

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hear. There has not been a huge amount of

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detail with strategy, as with the Brexit plan. Certainly, the

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government will be under pressure off the back of this because there

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is momentum with this. Theresa May has stood outside Downing Street and

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said she is on the side of ordinary, working people, as she called it,

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the people that are just about managing. These are the very people

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she is talking about when she says that. There will be pressure for her

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to do more. All right, OK. Back to the

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Telegraph, commuters on rail strike line lose job offers, what is this

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about? Extraordinary story, the problems at

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Southern Rail have been well but committed, terrible delays, people

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spending hours getting to work and getting home. We are seeing some of

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the terrible repercussions but that is having on people. Specifically,

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job offers are being removed when employees here that the people they

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were going to employ are travelling on Southern Rail. There is a woman

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who is an IT Trainer quoted in the paper, telling me could not have the

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role because users Southern Rail. This person has done nothing more,

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they may be perfectly qualified, the problems of somebody else, other

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than them, has stripped them of the chance of getting a is worrying.

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It is horrific. If you are a boss, the point of having a worker is that

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they will come and be able to do the job on time and when he you require

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them to do so. If that cannot be guaranteed because the trains are

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rubbish, what are you going to do? It does seem extraordinarily harsh

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that people are being dismissed as candidates, they might be the best

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candidate going, but may be dismissed because of this. If you

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are the boss, you are counting the pennies, and you have to make sure

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your employees are at work on time. In one sense, I guess, it could be

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perceived as reasonable. When I first read it, I wondered if,

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legally, employers can disconnect on this basis. I don't know if there is

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an illegal reason. Any lawyers out there, if Lord

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Pannick is watching, tell us what is going on with this story.

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The Metro, we have a little picture in the corner, Donald Trump, Person

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of the year on the cover of Time magazine. There he is on the front

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of the Metro. He is Person of the year. That picture is taken from the

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front page of Time. There it is will stop he is upset lips is who is that

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fellow? Is it a contributor from the United States? He is upset that at

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the bottom of Time magazine it says that Donald Trump is president of a

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divided States of America. He is suggesting that he did not divide

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America, he is bringing America back together.

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I don't think he would argue that it is divided, that is essentially the

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reason why he won. But he is taking issue with the reason, I guess,

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behind it. He did say it was a great honour, but has taken issue with

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that description of him, unsurprising really. It is like Time

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magazine having their cake and eating it, giving it to the

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controversial person and... the editor said it was a

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straightforward decision, and a choice of the person that has had

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the greatest influence on events for better or worse.

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If you speak to Nigel for while -- he beat Nigel Farage to the title.

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Donald Trump call the list a joke in 2014.

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No one is surprised any more. Thank you so much for the stories and

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headlines, many thanks for that. Stay with us on BBC News.

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Don't forget all the front pages are online on the BBC News website

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where you can read a detailed review of the papers.

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It's all there for you, seven days a week

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at bbc.co.uk/papers - and you can see us there, too -

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with each night's edition of The Papers being posted

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on the page shortly after we've finished.

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Thank you to you for watching. Goodbye.

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Good evening. The last 36 hours has felt like going from early winter to

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