23/01/2017 The Papers


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23/01/2017

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from Sportsday. Coming up in a moment, The Papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Peter Spiegel, the UK news editor of the Financial Times

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and the broadcaster and campaigner Lynn Faulds Wood.

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Good to have you both. Let's look at some of the front pages.

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Peter's paper, the Financial Times, leads with Donald

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out of a free trade deal with Pacific Rim countries.

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The paper says he's signalling he will put protectionism

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The Telegraph says the new US President has vowed

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to make the special relationship between Britain and

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The 'i' concentrates on the political row

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following reports that a Trident missile test went wrong last year.

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It says the whole thing has descended into farce

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to discuss the matter in the Commons.

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The Metro quotes a White House Official who has

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apparently told CNN that the unarmed missile DID blow itself up off

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The Guardian also focuses on that missile yet looks ahead to

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tomorrow's Supreme Court judgment as to whether the government needs to

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consult MPs before invoking Article 50.

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And the Express goes it alone, hailing a revolutionary

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It is not ladies first tonight, its Americans first tonight. Peter,

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we'll start with you. Sorry! Trump's Pacific trade exit, putting

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protection at the heart of policy. If I may say so, your spin on it,

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he's putting America first. That's right. It's not just the specific

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trade deal, he announced today, he gathered a group of CEOs at the

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White House, the first official meeting of his presidency and says

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that if they move their plants overseas he will tax them. He said

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he would call the Mexican and Canadian Prime ministers and

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renegotiate Nafta. He has signalled that this is the most important

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thing he will do. Economic experts are worried about this. This is how

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the great depression happened, imposing tariffs up front. There's a

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lot of nervousness in this global system which has been established

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since World War II, being at risk and it is symbolic that he has made

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this his first action. Lynn, experts don't matter, do they! It's America

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first and he is the American president. This guide, if so clever,

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he can't put figures, he says it will be a major border tax and then

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says to these elite business people, almost all men, come on, let's get

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some women in, trump. Clever women. I don't see that happening... One of

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them, named Dale, he turned to him and said, Dale, you can build

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monstrous... I wouldn't to the American accent, you can do

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monstrance buildings, we will fast track you. Monstrous? What is this

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for a president to talk? It resonates with voters, simple

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language using small words, when you talk to political communicators in

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the US, they say he's quite effective at this. A lot of

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criticism comes from his own party which is interesting because it has

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advocated for free trade the generations. One thing that one

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previous Republican nominee for president said was, this is as much

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about geo- strategy as trade, getting our allies in Asia,

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Australia, New Zealand, against the Chinese. The argument is that he

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doesn't see that bigger picture, everything is transactional for him.

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It's all about him and his business. He will be filthy rich. One point

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that I agree with him on, one criticism I made, it's all about and

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save dangerous products and recourse, we have neglected

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business, I think because every single thing I seem to buy is made

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overseas, we don't have manufacturing any more so to that

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extent I agree with him. That's the point, Peter, I was in Los Angeles

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correspondent for the BBC in the 1990s, Nafta came in and jobs went.

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Nothing was done about the communities with their jobs went

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from. Like Scotland. There is a sense from his supporters that he is

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on their side. He talked about Pennsylvania, Ohio. States that he

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won because of these voters, working class white voters. Those who lost

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their manufacturing jobs since Nafta. There is no doubt that even

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people who are against Trump agreed that there are problems with local

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trade policy. It's the same type of voter in middle England who voted

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for Brexit, you see the same voters in France supporting Marine Le Pen.

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This is a problem they have not addressed. That's the problem with

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Scotland because the industry all went. Thank God for North Sea oil,

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some would say. Interesting that you say that the workers work up to the

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problems of globalisation. At Davos that did not look like it. Mainly

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blokes again having a nice time. Right! Staying with the FT. Looking

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forward to a pledge to nurture worlds leading industries. --

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lukewarm welcome. Jumping to the end of it, one woman, Director General

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of the CBI, Caroline Fairburn, said it was better than not to have an

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industrial strategy. It's been done by all sorts of problem, praising

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the industrial strategy, giving that industrial spending accounts for 43%

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of gross domestic product we need a plan on how to invest that money.

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This does not look like a new plan, it looks like a mishmash of old

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stuff. According to business sources, this has been hyped to the

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hilt. It basically was a warmed over announcement of things announced

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before. I think it was important to have that upfront, this is our

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response, to the same voter that we're talking about with Trump, this

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middle England voter, this response seems a bit empty. I think we had a

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caller on that. You compare it to Trump. Would he call it a discussion

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document? He would not come he would say, we are having this and then

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argue about it later. Is that a good thing or a bad thing? Sometimes a

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good thing when you get a mealy-mouthed piece of stuff like

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this which is only on your front page, no one else's. Let's go to the

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Daily Telegraph. Trump promises closer ties with UK. They are making

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it clear that this bilateral relationship is going to be

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pre-eminent. But it's going to work. Your view? Interesting that they

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have invited Theresa May is the first foreign leader to come over.

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It is symbolic. The Brits are obsessed with this special

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relationship. We are deluding ourselves by thinking that we will

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be at the front of the queue, we have to years before Brexit happens,

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we're talking about specific trade deals, other things high on the

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agenda now when it comes to trade, suddenly turning round and asking

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what will happen, even two countries that like each other, these things

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take almost a decade. We saw it with Canada, this evil trade monster! I

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think we have a lot of nice words coming out of the White House today

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and Sean Spicer said nice things about the Prime Minister but...

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Lynn, how does that square with what you said earlier, I win, you lose,

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how will we get a great trade deal if he's looking out for American

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workers? If you look at the bottom line we've never had a great trade

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deal with the United States. We deal more with Scotland which is 5

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million people than we do with 300 million people in the USA. We talk

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about the special relationship, they never talk about it in the States,

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do they? Honestly. I would say, on trade and economics, No. I spent

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years in the Pentagon and frequently you would go in and see people in

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senior positions, and they would be British. So on military intelligence

:10:09.:10:13.

there is that special relationship. There is intelligence sharing

:10:14.:10:19.

between two countries that no other two countries share. Liverpool we

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all speak English. About Michael Fallon he says he can't say anything

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but Americans are spilling the beans. I did actually watch this.

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Michael Fallon, is see a Sir, or a lord, I don't like titles I will

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call Michael. He was talking in the House of Commons today, and

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apparently not knowing that the Americans were spilling the beans

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because one backbencher stood up and said, do you know there's an

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American spilling the beans? Why were they not better briefed and

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also yesterday when you saw Theresa May when she was asked four times on

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the Andrew Marr show, that was a pathetic response for a minister who

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still enjoys some credibility from us. She's got to sharpen up act and

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get PR advisers. The Trident missile system is from the USA. The US Navy

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has two overs either testing because it was in Florida. I do have some

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sympathy that the government because first of all missile failures

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happen. This just happened to be very badly timed. The other thing

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is, if you are having a nuclear deterrent don't tell the world it

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doesn't work! I have some sympathy with the Prime Minister, you don't

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go public about this. I suppose the point is, for national security

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reasons... We don't fire these missiles often because they are very

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expensive. We have a huge investment in something, we are not even sure

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it works that way. Crash test dummies, the USA trips up Theresa

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May and Michael Fallon. The Metro is showing the other papers the way. We

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are running out of time so I think we will be going to, a very quick

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look at the Daily Express. Main must fast-track Brexit, a big decision

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from the Supreme Court tomorrow morning. This is one of the routes

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we expect the government to go down, if they lose, and the High Court

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says, you must go to parliament before you invoke the divorce close,

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they will put out a one sentence law, which says, we give the Prime

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Minister the right to trigger Article 50. That's basically what

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Tory backbenchers are suggesting. The Guardian has an interesting

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story which makes the point not very convincingly that legal advice says

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you cannot go that way. Not very well drafted legislation and we

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could end up with more. You need to go to a longer process than a one

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sentence piece of legislation. Now we will link two stories, Trident

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and another story that has been running throughout the day, problems

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potentially with browning your food a bit too much and the possibility

:13:55.:14:00.

that it might show signs of cancer in a test animal. This is the Matt

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cartoon. The latest submarine, armed with lethal overcooked roast

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potatoes. There is a real sense that the roast potatoes might work better

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than the rest. I think this is a terrible story, in a way. We've got

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to stop battling people with all the things that are bad for them because

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they just give up, smoking, drinking too much and being overweight. If

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you can crack those three things written would be much happier.

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Peter, you weren't brown your toast too much tomorrow? I've stopped.

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It's got to be gold. Thank you both for joining us for a look at Fleet

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Street's finest work. That's it for the papers, many thanks to our

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guests, Peter and Lynn. Much more coming up. Now it's time for the

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weather.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.