24/02/2017 The Papers


24/02/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 24/02/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bring us

:00:18.:00:24.

tomorrow morning, with me is the economic Senator of the Independent

:00:25.:00:28.

and the public affairs consultant Alex Deane. The Times leads with an

:00:29.:00:34.

interview with David Miliband who says that Labour is the weakest it

:00:35.:00:38.

has been for 50 years following the party 's defeat in the Copeland

:00:39.:00:42.

by-election. And there is more on Labour, in the i Cena Jeremy Corbyn

:00:43.:00:48.

refuses to stand down as the party leader despite losing that seed

:00:49.:00:52.

Copeland for the first time in 80 years. The Telegraph focuses on the

:00:53.:00:57.

Tory victory and Theresa May's declaration that the Conservatives

:00:58.:01:01.

are now the party of working people. Staying with the Prime Minister, the

:01:02.:01:04.

front page of the Financial Times talks about the pressure on her to

:01:05.:01:09.

cut disability benefits. The Daily Mail reports that motorists should

:01:10.:01:14.

be wary of buying diesel vehicles after a warning from Chris Grayling.

:01:15.:01:20.

Express highlights what is a looming pension crisis, as UK taxpayers are

:01:21.:01:25.

subsidising low paid jobs for foreign workers. The Daily Mail

:01:26.:01:29.

front page says she is one of several residents that has been made

:01:30.:01:36.

homeless because of a fire caused by a whirlpool dryer. In the Guardian

:01:37.:01:39.

warns that tens of thousands of schoolchildren are being put at risk

:01:40.:01:45.

due to toxic fumes. Let us begin. Perhaps you would kick us off. The

:01:46.:01:50.

Daily Telegraph, the front page, we are the workers party now. Theresa

:01:51.:01:56.

May. Very ominous words if you are a Labour supporter or Labour MP, she

:01:57.:02:01.

has been saying this theme, she has been putting her tanks on Labour's

:02:02.:02:06.

drawn, she is saying now it is really, really true because of this

:02:07.:02:10.

catastrophic performance by Labour losing this seat of Copeland which

:02:11.:02:15.

has been in power for 73 years, and a pretty poor showing in Stoke

:02:16.:02:19.

although they held onto the seat. They basically halved their

:02:20.:02:23.

majority. She's reinforcing that message. Labour is out of touch,

:02:24.:02:28.

Jeremy Corbyn doesn't speak for working class communities.

:02:29.:02:31.

Haemorrhaging support, not winning elections they should be winning and

:02:32.:02:35.

we are riding high as the Conservative Party. Good for her,

:02:36.:02:39.

going into the Brexit negotiations. The domestic Philip. Governments are

:02:40.:02:46.

usually in the position of by-elections, suddenly this one does

:02:47.:02:51.

matter? Normally the day after we are discussing these things and

:02:52.:02:55.

explaining why the government lost. It is against form, let's be clear

:02:56.:02:59.

on the facts. These are both seats that Labour should have won, on the

:03:00.:03:02.

messaging, Labour has been in trouble in what they say for some

:03:03.:03:07.

time. It is not just Jeremy Corbyn, in the last parliament Labour

:03:08.:03:11.

allowed the Conservative Party to own the idea of the northern

:03:12.:03:12.

powerhouse. Many people on the left was saying how did we

:03:13.:03:27.

let this happen? George Osborne looks like the champion of working

:03:28.:03:30.

people in the North. This is the next stage of that. Theresa May is

:03:31.:03:32.

seeking to message working people with a party that really cares about

:03:33.:03:35.

you, now eight conservative traditional interpretation of that

:03:36.:03:37.

is that taxes too- something that I believe and working people will hear

:03:38.:03:42.

and feel. But she's very good at broadening, David Cameron didn't

:03:43.:03:47.

message as well to the tabloid has Theresa May. People care about these

:03:48.:03:51.

issues that are fought over, she's doing very well. She is but Copeland

:03:52.:03:56.

is a slightly special case, we shouldn't ignore that, Sellafield

:03:57.:04:00.

nuclear plant and whatever else we would think about Labour, knowing

:04:01.:04:05.

about the nuclear policy is one of the more perplexing things? There

:04:06.:04:09.

are always local factors, but the big messages that Labour should be

:04:10.:04:13.

winning the seat is very comfortably. From across the water I

:04:14.:04:20.

think, I think David Miliband, still in New York. David Miliband saying

:04:21.:04:25.

that Labour is at the weakest for 50 years. I can't figure out, whether

:04:26.:04:31.

this is efforts by those within Labour, in very searingly positions,

:04:32.:04:35.

trying to shake all been out of his position at last. Or if it is simply

:04:36.:04:40.

more moaning from the sidelines for those who are not in the battle.

:04:41.:04:44.

Actually the funny thing about politics is that both may be true.

:04:45.:04:51.

David Miliband is off on his Thunderbirds International rescue

:04:52.:04:55.

job in New York, comes back to the UK, and just in time to kick Labour

:04:56.:04:59.

and say you are the weakest UI and 50 years to which many people will

:05:00.:05:05.

say, you didn't stay and fight, you were our most promising person at OK

:05:06.:05:09.

you lost your own brother, debt over it, you could have been helping us

:05:10.:05:14.

instead of living it up on the other side of the pond. I think the other

:05:15.:05:18.

thing to say about David Miliband, while he was a very promising

:05:19.:05:23.

leadership candidate, I see no real appetite to see him back, I do see.

:05:24.:05:29.

But the point that Jeremy Corbyn keeps on making is that he has got

:05:30.:05:34.

this wonderful bedrock of support. That doesn't change no matter what

:05:35.:05:41.

is happening in the by-elections. And David Miliband about his future,

:05:42.:05:45.

we don't know what is going to happen but what is the point of

:05:46.:05:49.

saying never? Is there a possibility of him coming back? I think the

:05:50.:06:01.

bedrock of support. Not happy. But the cadre, is gone, the almost

:06:02.:06:08.

cultish enthusiasm for him as their saviour. I think not the majority

:06:09.:06:12.

but I think some of them will be looking at this, thinking Hang on,

:06:13.:06:15.

maybe some of these doubts are right. This cannot go on, maybe the

:06:16.:06:23.

penny is finally dropping. It is dropping among the union movement.

:06:24.:06:28.

Indeed, you are queueing up the i, the front page. Here we have got,

:06:29.:06:37.

Corbin given final warning. We can only see the front page, we don't

:06:38.:06:40.

know who it is, but we think you probably know who it is. Yes it is

:06:41.:06:48.

probably Dave Prentice, head of the public services union. Variant on

:06:49.:06:51.

land the unions were very much behind Corbyn. So, any union guy,

:06:52.:06:59.

big senior union guy who comes out and says, they are worried about

:07:00.:07:06.

Jeremy Corbyn, final warning. That is significant because that is an

:07:07.:07:09.

important part of his base and if these guys are starting to say this

:07:10.:07:13.

can't go on. That will be very worrying. Is it down to Jeremy

:07:14.:07:22.

Corbyn's departure? I don't know about that, I don't know whether

:07:23.:07:26.

this is going to shake the tree on the next step, because of course he

:07:27.:07:30.

still does have the Len McCluskey 's of this world. And even if they came

:07:31.:07:36.

out against him, they don't control their members votes, for a long time

:07:37.:07:41.

the union block vote was to cried as anti-democratic. Now the bosses may

:07:42.:07:45.

feel that even if they come out against a leader like Corbin, their

:07:46.:07:48.

members might still vote for him had in fact they would be quite likely

:07:49.:07:53.

to. Let's move on, we talked about Theresa May, great day, wonderful

:07:54.:07:57.

victory. But lots of things around the corner. We think Brexit, but the

:07:58.:08:03.

FT has a slightly different thing, that she faces a disability benefits

:08:04.:08:09.

battle. What is this about? Theresa May and her government, it is funny

:08:10.:08:13.

that politics always wants to personalise and make it about the

:08:14.:08:16.

leader. Actually this is about the government and an initiative that

:08:17.:08:20.

began with Iain Duncan Smith and his attempt to change the welfare

:08:21.:08:23.

system. The point that the government made in opposition under

:08:24.:08:28.

IDS and his Centre for Social Justice is that many people when

:08:29.:08:30.

they get onto benefits never come off them. In effect, you were

:08:31.:08:36.

trapped in an environment where, you would never be asked in again if you

:08:37.:08:39.

are sick and you are financially centre buys never to rejoin the

:08:40.:08:44.

workforce. An attempt to fix that has led to an enormous backlash

:08:45.:08:46.

saying that many people who should never be forced into work or even to

:08:47.:08:51.

have an assessment are being assessed and assessed unfairly.

:08:52.:08:55.

Theresa may now and her government now face a situation where there is

:08:56.:09:01.

a significant deficit, as there is in every department in government.

:09:02.:09:07.

?3.7 billion hole. Lure we had to be able to help those who can work back

:09:08.:09:11.

into work and that instinct is admirable, but on the other hand

:09:12.:09:15.

there has to be a point below nobody can fall. And taxes the price that

:09:16.:09:19.

we pay to be in a civilised society. Wedding that balance right and being

:09:20.:09:23.

seen to get that balance right is something that the Conservative

:09:24.:09:30.

Party has to try to do. OK, then? This is interesting because this is

:09:31.:09:34.

the reality behind some of the rhetoric, the party of the working

:09:35.:09:38.

people, the compassionate face of the Conservatives because these are

:09:39.:09:42.

benefit cuts that date back to George Osborne time. He trained

:09:43.:09:46.

these cuts, and they are integral to his plan of balancing the budget.

:09:47.:09:51.

Theresa May has not reversed those, this is one element of them. But the

:09:52.:09:56.

big element is the cuts to tax credits which will fall on a lot of

:09:57.:10:01.

working people. The idea. That is different to these disability

:10:02.:10:06.

benefits. The package that George Osborne put through, it is part of

:10:07.:10:12.

the legacy. I can agree with you about tax benefits that might

:10:13.:10:16.

disincentive eyes people, but, I think the government is right to

:10:17.:10:22.

say, a disability. It is a hard message to make. The disability

:10:23.:10:26.

packages too generous and people who are not sick, claimed to be sick or

:10:27.:10:32.

stay on sick. It is the old problem. Facing governments, particularly

:10:33.:10:37.

Tory ones. And the Daily Telegraph story, about the Netherlands. The

:10:38.:10:41.

Netherlands holds in quarry on whether it could ditch your row.

:10:42.:10:46.

This is something that could be the beginning of something really big?

:10:47.:10:51.

Explain to us what could happen. The Netherlands have elections on the

:10:52.:10:55.

15th of March, important Parliamentary elections to decide

:10:56.:10:58.

the composition of a new government and they have very powerful forces

:10:59.:11:02.

of your scepticism bubbling up, the Netherlands is one of the core

:11:03.:11:07.

countries of the Eurozone -- of Euroscepticism. The assumption is

:11:08.:11:10.

that if countries like that start to leave, the whole edifice could

:11:11.:11:14.

collapse to the fact that they are having a Parliamentary enquiring

:11:15.:11:20.

into it, and they will discuss it after the new elections. Implies

:11:21.:11:22.

that it would be a big issue potentially at those elections, and

:11:23.:11:28.

if this is your sceptic further, gets built up a head of steam, there

:11:29.:11:33.

is no telling where it might end. This is all about how planking this

:11:34.:11:39.

character girt builders. This is an attempt to trawl the sting out of

:11:40.:11:49.

the Eurosceptic movement. This is about forcing people to be able to

:11:50.:11:54.

say, don't worry, we can do with that after the election. Dealing

:11:55.:11:58.

with that thing that is most strong for the Eurosceptic movement. Most

:11:59.:12:01.

people don't question the EU but they do question the impact of the

:12:02.:12:07.

euro. In wealthy nations like the Netherlands they deeply resent

:12:08.:12:09.

bailing out poorer countries like Greece. It is worth reflecting it is

:12:10.:12:14.

not just bailing them out, the Greeks spend the money themselves

:12:15.:12:17.

that got them into debt but keeping them in a currency in which they

:12:18.:12:22.

plainly have no place, that is the EU's Falls and degeneration of Greek

:12:23.:12:30.

youth have been sacrificed on the altar of the European Union. Any

:12:31.:12:32.

decent minded Dutchman would look at that and say is this what we want to

:12:33.:12:36.

be part of? Yes but this could be something, we know all about us

:12:37.:12:41.

exiting, but one of the mainstays of the European Union, if it starts to

:12:42.:12:48.

move away from the currency. RIP the euro? We saw how the markets react.

:12:49.:12:55.

Potentially, crumbling, breaking apart, it is trade is going really

:12:56.:13:05.

nuts about the prospect. Four. They forced the Greeks to stay in for

:13:06.:13:08.

political reasons. The Greeks would have come out and devalued. They

:13:09.:13:13.

were forced to stay in because of the project, not just economic.

:13:14.:13:19.

Let's move on, the Daily Mail, minister says beware of buying a

:13:20.:13:23.

diesel. This is Chris Grayling, the trust for secretary. It is worth

:13:24.:13:29.

saying on the inside pages the Department for Transport guy is

:13:30.:13:34.

saying this is in no way saying that you shouldn't buy diesel. This is

:13:35.:13:38.

the minister saying that people should be environmentally aware in

:13:39.:13:41.

making the decisions they had to make. Chris Grayling has said that

:13:42.:13:44.

people should be aware of and alive to the point that if you are making

:13:45.:13:49.

busy journeys and city environments than The Habs there is a better

:13:50.:13:52.

environmental choice for you than diesel. Dad is probably true, it on

:13:53.:13:58.

the other hand it is another mood music move against diesel, after a

:13:59.:14:06.

time where people were positively encouraged to go to diesel. That is

:14:07.:14:10.

what is unfair, many people up and down the country thought they were

:14:11.:14:13.

doing the right thing, OK they thought they were getting many more

:14:14.:14:16.

miles to the gallon, but they thought they were doing the right

:14:17.:14:19.

thing when they bought a diesel car, but they have seen environments in

:14:20.:14:24.

which government is up and down the land, ministers in Westminster and

:14:25.:14:28.

Merrill in many cities are looking at how. Pretty diesel cars into an

:14:29.:14:34.

environment even having them on the road, it is far too fast to be fair

:14:35.:14:39.

because many people bought diesel in an environment where they were

:14:40.:14:43.

positively encourage. At the same time, you would think that people's

:14:44.:14:47.

attention should be drawn to the polluting effect. Governments have

:14:48.:14:50.

been doing similar things for many years touring courage in the

:14:51.:14:54.

congestion charge, in London is based on how much the outfit from

:14:55.:14:58.

their car, search it is just a move from lack. You can look at it in two

:14:59.:15:05.

ways, on the surface you can say that it looks like Arthur Daley, but

:15:06.:15:10.

on the other hand you might be right comedies pushing on an open door. It

:15:11.:15:15.

is well known that diesel is not the panacea for the environment, or for

:15:16.:15:19.

the driver that it was once presented as. We have had the whole

:15:20.:15:25.

VW scandal has totally tarnished the brand of diesel. So in that sense

:15:26.:15:29.

you might argue that it is the bit of a nudge policy. The diesel

:15:30.:15:34.

scrapping scheme, and I suspect this is all part and parcel of bad agenda

:15:35.:15:40.

so maybe he is trying to nudge things in the right ways. The other

:15:41.:15:43.

reason why they mean notches because they've lost the case over their

:15:44.:15:49.

environmental emissions, controlled to clean earth, saying they are not

:15:50.:15:53.

moving far enough. And they may not want to lose a game like that. The

:15:54.:16:00.

Daily Mail is talking about business rates. Not just business rate. Small

:16:01.:16:05.

firms may be forced to work out their own rates. Li there is the

:16:06.:16:10.

suggestion that firms who ready face enormous hikes, not quite as

:16:11.:16:15.

enormous as the mail says, it is 300%. Never wrong for long. These

:16:16.:16:29.

firms may then have to try to their own rate. As we all know, if the

:16:30.:16:33.

taxman makes an error in your favour, you don't get paid interest

:16:34.:16:38.

on it and nobody gets into trouble when it is finally corrected but if

:16:39.:16:41.

you make an error that is contrary to the taxman's favour then you had

:16:42.:16:47.

to pay up in retrospect a quite a lot of money. Imagine that you are a

:16:48.:16:51.

small business com you debt have a full-time accountancy department, we

:16:52.:16:54.

don't have somebody working on this, you have not only to work out your

:16:55.:16:59.

own rate but if you get it wrong, you may face punitive punishment

:17:00.:17:03.

going back years. I had to say, it is a bit of a complex matter, it is

:17:04.:17:08.

worth reading to the end, the Revenue and Customs, and the

:17:09.:17:14.

Treasury. They say "It does not indicate a government preference."

:17:15.:17:21.

It is quiet is the context in the way that small businesses work with

:17:22.:17:25.

business rates, they have this very infrequent evaluations, one of the

:17:26.:17:29.

reasons why there is such a furore, they're not done it in seven years,

:17:30.:17:36.

it is done on this way. He paid is often successful. It is possible, it

:17:37.:17:40.

is possible that it might be better for firms to say, this is what we

:17:41.:17:48.

think. If they disagree with that. The trouble is that local government

:17:49.:17:53.

doesn't have enough money, what we are doing is forcing local

:17:54.:17:57.

businesses to take on the risk of these calculations. One story we

:17:58.:18:01.

must do is go to the back pages, all papers have this story about Paul

:18:02.:18:07.

Rolf Ranieri getting the boot. -- poor old Ranieri. Interesting slant

:18:08.:18:13.

on it in the express, who wants to have a go at this? Jose Mourinho

:18:14.:18:20.

wading in? Key has been there, he has been in that position, players

:18:21.:18:24.

don't perform and then he gets the boot. As a winning manager. It is

:18:25.:18:30.

really interesting, that for the players, he is saying they are out.

:18:31.:18:33.

They started thinking about money and they started not performing and

:18:34.:18:39.

they let Ranieri down. That is what happened in the Chelsea Boot room, I

:18:40.:18:44.

will be at Palace against Middlesbrough and everybody will be

:18:45.:18:48.

talking about Ranieri going. It is such a rich is to Iraq story and it

:18:49.:18:53.

is so sad, win the title and out next season, that is modern

:18:54.:18:57.

football, if I owned the club, could you guarantee wouldn't do it? Thank

:18:58.:19:01.

you very much indeed, we have to leave it there. That is it for the

:19:02.:19:08.

papers tonight. Don't forget you can see the front pages online. And if

:19:09.:19:18.

you missed the programme, any evening you can watch it later on

:19:19.:19:23.

the BBC I play. From us all, goodbye.

:19:24.:19:35.

So after the storm: we have got some sunshine, nor absolutely everywhere

:19:36.:19:42.

but overall, a pretty good day across most of the UK, a few

:19:43.:19:44.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS