25/02/2017 The Papers


25/02/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello there. This is BBC News.

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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment,

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says now is not the time for a leadership contest,

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but warns the party must do better at winning over voters.

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that he will not be attending the White House Correspondents

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A man has died and two other people injured

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after a man drove a car into pedestrians

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Three men have appeared in court on slavery charges

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after the discovery of a cannabis factory

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at a disused nuclear bunker in Wiltshire.

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And coming up at 10.45pm, a round-up of this week's

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best stories from across the globe in Reporters.

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So welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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the Political Editor of the Sunday Express,

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and Anne Ashworth, Assistant Editor at the Times.

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The Sunday Telegraph has an interview with

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the new independent reviewer of terrorism legislation,

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Max Hill who warns that the threat of terror attacks is at its highest

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Not so many newspapers are in just yet. These are the ones we have.

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Changes to visa regulations for migrants is the lead

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The paper says plans include limiting access to benefits

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The Sunday Express has more details about the man

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who murdered the children's author Helen Bailey.

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Let us begin with the Sunday Telegraph, interesting story about

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the Lords, really, and the "Brexit" Bill, saying the peers are uniting

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to soft "Brexit", to soften "Brexit", Theresa May may not like

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this. McIlroy she was hanging over their shoulders, imploring them to

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do the right thing, and available of the people. Unlike in the House of

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Commons, where there were not any amendments put forward to the bill,

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and it passed through the House of Commons, now there will be

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opportunities for peers to put down amendments and in fact they have,

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many of them, but the ones gaining the most support include one which

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promises to guarantee rights of EU citizens already living here, and

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also one which would give everyone in Parliament an opportunity to sort

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of vote on the final deal when it is done. And it's interesting because

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if you think about the composition of the House of Lords, they don't

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have the same issue of patronage that they do in the House of

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Commons, in that sense they are a lot more free to vote with their

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conscience. Indeed, many of them are now telling the Sunday Telegraph

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that they are going to put forward these amendments and vote for them,

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and that they are saying, basically, they feel this is such a big issue,

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that the timetable is too short for them to look at the issue and they

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want to be given the opportunity to make amendments and do the job they

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are there for. Some people have said, the British people voted on

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this, the House of Commons pushed this bill through without amendment,

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without change, how can it be that the unelected Lords should amend it?

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This is why there is going to be so much fuss about the intervention of

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the Lords into this. I think we are going to have a very exciting

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political battle. These people have little to lose, they can be the

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awkward squad, in this age of protest, that is the role that they

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can fulfil. I think there are a great many people who would have

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supported Brexit, but not necessarily hard Brexit, and those

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people want to see it done on terms. How we do this, how we except the EU

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will determine our political and economic life and it needs to be

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done carefully. Some of the issues that maybe we should have a second

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look at the final deal, before we sign, or whatever it is, to exit, is

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maybe they think that even some people who voted for Brexit will

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support. Gina Miller, businesswoman who brought the legal case that I

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was following at the Supreme Court, that ended with all of this being

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debated in parliament, she has said the Lords need to show some backbone

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on the "Brexit" Bill. In a sense you would expect this, she led the

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battle, as it were, through the courts, to make sure Parliament got

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a say on whether or not we trigger Article 50. That is now what the

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bill is going to be. Going through the Lords. In this piece to the

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Independent, she is imploring the Lords to do what she considers is

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their role, they are there as a revising chamber, as a scrutinising

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chamber, she is saying, basically the Prime Minister is being a bully,

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she is using the idea that she turned up, it is unusual for a Prime

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Minister to turn up at the House of Lords under those circumstances, you

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need to show your muscle now, if you are not happy with aspects of the

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bill, vote for the amendments. She is a bit survey heroine, Julia

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Miller, on investment charges, she did some good work into that, and

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there is the for her but this will be a massive battle, this is going

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to keep us going throughout March, April May, and beyond. Gina Miller,

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in the independent front page, you admire her, as the woman who brought

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this case, she came in for a lot of stick from certain quarters? She has

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had a lot of stick, a lot of people will say into response what she did,

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the public had their say, they were very clear, they voted for "Brexit"

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and the idea that it has to be brought back before Parliament is

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kind of unnecessary, because it is almost a hurdle that is not

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warranted, given that people had their direct say. Yes, she is

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clearly standing up for principles she thinks are very important, she

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thinks that this is something that she must do, and the fact she went

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to such lengths to do it, whether you are on either side of the

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"Brexit" fans, you have got to admire her for doing it, it has not

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been an easy thing to do, I am sure that she has suffered. She has faced

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down the most extraordinary social media torrent... Death threats, in

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fact. She cannot go safely to a public place, she has been told,

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that shows the depth of emotion. Nigel Farage, on the opposite side

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of the fence, he says the same thing, he says he is vilified in the

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same way she has been. Cannot go out of the house for fear of the liberal

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press, that is the phrase! Still on the "Brexit" story, Tim Shipman,

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political editor, here, talking about there is going to be a Visa

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revolution for foreign workers, that is his angle on at. Yes, migration

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is never far away from agenda when we talk about "Brexit", lots of

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people say that was the main people Racing people were rejecting when

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they voted for "Brexit", that they wanted to have control on who comes

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into the country. Of course this week we saw David Davis admitting

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that it was going to take some time for us to bring down the level of

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migration that we already have. This is suggesting that it will be sector

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by sector arrangements for migration which is something we have heard

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before. But there will also be new arrangements in terms of benefits

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and restricting benefits for new arrivals. This was also something

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David Cameron had started prior to the referendum. The most interesting

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bit of this article is actually about what we do with the people

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that are already here, the people that have come here from Europe,

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living here, settled here, working, and what it is suggesting is that

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actually, there will be a cut-off date, and many people thought it

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might have been June 23, it seems that the lawyers have suggested this

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is not lawful, and actually, the date that we trigger Article 50,

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which Tim Shipman seems to think will be March 15, that is on the

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cards. Not far away. That will be the day, after that point, people

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who come in will not have their rights guaranteed. It is very

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interesting, how the rights of migrants and who can stay and who

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cannot, and who can stay in the future, is going up the agenda, the

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trade deals have suddenly been shoved into the background, and

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there is a kind of consternation as to wondering how we will do with all

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these workers... How will we get on without them? A few of the other

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stories? The Sunday Times have the Labour Party and the fallout from

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the Labour Party by-elections, the deputy leader, Tom Watson, saying

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that they risk their wipe-out in England as they had in Scotland and

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is they take a long hard look at the way that they have alienated

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traditional supporters of the party. What will they actually do about it,

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and awful lot of public hand-wringing on the part of the

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Labour Party members but they do not seem to be able to get rid of Jeremy

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Corbyn. I would love to know what Tom Watson has privately told Jeremy

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Corbyn about, time for you to go, or has he? The Labour moderates, when

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you speak with them, you ask if there is a plan, and they look at

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you like mournfully and say, there simply is not a plan. From Labour to

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Ukip, and we have the express, who say that, the Sunday Express, they

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say Nigel and I, Nigel Farage and Arron Banks, are fed up with

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Ukip...? This is one of my stories... Yes, yes it is! I hadn't

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spotted that! What a brilliant story! Sunday Express! Had a chat

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with errant banks, in the wake of the Stoke by-election, -- Arron

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Banks, Paul Nuttall, leader of the party, unsuccessful in his attempts

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to be elected as the party's second MP, he says he will quit and take

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his minions and not be part of Ukip unless they let him become chairman

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of the party so that they can professionalise and modernise the

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party and move forward with it. He has a bit of a beef with Douglas

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Carswell, as we have known for a long time, and this issue that aired

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on question Time about whether or not Douglas Carswell indeed blocks

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Nigel Farage's knighthood, has reared its ugly head again, and

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Arron Banks told me that if he becomes chairman, then his first act

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will be to expel Douglas Carswell. It's all bitter infighting again.

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Certainly is. Sunday Telegraph, they have written's new terror chief...

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Max Hill, talking about Islamic State and the threat of terror being

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the worst for a generation, his first interview since being

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appointed. The independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, the man

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who looks essentially to see whether the people who are keeping us safe

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will be able to do this, and he is talking about a level of terror

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threat akin to that in the 1970s, 1974, at the height of the IRA

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bombing. Maybe this is maybe not a surprise to some people but it is a

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rather sobering report on just the level of threat from Isis, and also,

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the age at which people are becoming radicalised, the age of 14, people

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are watching Isil videos and signing up, trying to leave Britain... To

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join up... Terrorism has been on the agenda, the story about the man who

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came back from Guantanamo Bay, living here for ten years, and then

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escaped to Syria and was blown up in a suicide bomb attack in Iraq. The

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thing I would like to know from him, because it crossed my mind, what is

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going to do in terms of the surveillance powers of these people

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slipping in and out of the country. Very quick, last look at the

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Telegraph, Emma Stone, picture of her, just ahead of the Oscars, hot

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favourite to be best actress. La La Land. You saw it and did not like

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it? I am that person who did not like it, Hollywood did because it is

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a love song to Hollywood, to how beautiful California is...

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Everything that Hollywood stands for. So one would imagine that it

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would do incredibly well, but it would not get my vote, maybe I am

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just not enough of a romantic. Caroline, great filmgoer? I wish I

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could be but having three children, this is my idea of a great night

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out! LAUGHTER The papers, better than the movies,

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perhaps we can get an Oscar! LAUGHTER

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We will be back at 11:30pm, for another look at the stories making

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the news. Coming up next on the BBC news channel, it is Reporters.

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