25/02/2017 The Papers


25/02/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment.

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First, the headlines: Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson says now

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is not the time for a leadership contest, but warns the party must do

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President Trump announces he will not be attending

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the White House Correspondents dinner this year.

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A man has died and two other people injured after a man drove a car

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into pedestrians in the German city of Heidelberg.

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Three men have appeared in court on slavery charges

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after the discovery of a cannabis factory at a disused nuclear

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And coming up after the Papers, we'll get Jason Solomon's take

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on Patriot's Day, the Hollywood blockbuster based on the Boston

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Caroline Wheeler, the political editor

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of the Sunday Express, and Anne Ashworth, assistant editor

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Let's take a look at the front pages that have arrived

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The Sunday Telegraph has an interview with

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the new independent reviewer of terrorism

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That's Max Hill, who warns that the threat of terror attacks

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In the Sunday Times - changes to visa regulations

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The paper says plans include limiting access to benefits

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The Sunday Express has more details about the man who murdered

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Kicking off with the Telegraph and the story about Brexit, Lord uniting

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potentially to soften Brexit. That will pause consternation for some

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people? Of course. It seems like this has been going on for ages,

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these debates around Brexit, and we still haven't triggered Article 50,

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the formal mechanism by which we leave the European Union. The

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withdrawal from the EU bill has already been driven House of

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Commons, it went through unamended and is now going through the House

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of Lords, where the relationship is different and the arrangements about

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patronage, they will get voted out if they don't follow the will of the

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people as it were. It doesn't quite apply to the House of Lords, so of

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course they are little bit freer to tinker with the legislation. They

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have put through a raft of amendments. One of them concerns the

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rights of Europeans over here and one is about having a vote on the

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entire deal once we get there. These are the things the Telegraph is

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telling us there will be some cross-party support for as they try

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to have their influence over the bill. They are free to tinker, but

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at the same time they have to be careful because this is a referendum

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with a huge exercise in democracy. The House of Commons pass the bill

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without change? You might say they have to be careful, but I don't

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think they are minded to be. They are almost becoming like an

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opposition party. They will be asking questions about migrants'

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writes, about the very fine detail and under exactly what terms the

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exit. I think it will be a very interesting process. Is that

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democratic? They are there to review legislation and they see that as

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being difficult in this crucial piece of legislation. They see that

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as their role. Whether they have any great success with this is still

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very much up for debate. There will be this process of ping-pong with a

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meant legislation and it will then be cast again by MPs, who will

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reject it, as they did beforehand, and of course the whole intrigue

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around this is that it will affect the timing of triggering Article 50.

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We have to get this bill passed before we get Article 50 enacted and

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it was suggested that good we done as early as March the ninth, the

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suggestion is now that it will be pushed later, possibly towards March

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17. You wonder what Theresa May will think about that. She was there at

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the beginning of the debate in the lords, looking at the peers as they

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were debating it. Now of course Jean Miller, the businesswoman in the

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Independent's front page. She is pictured and the Independent say

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that she says the lords need to show backbone on the Brexit bill. She was

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the woman who of course brought the original legal case, which then went

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to the Supreme Court, that the parliament had to debate this and

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pass this legislation. An extraordinaire woman in her own way

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who has put herself into the limelight and received a huge

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torrent of abuse over it, over her questioning of Brexit. She has once

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more in merged to say that the lords must do their job. She sees it very

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much as their role to be the irritant in this process. She is a

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Marmite person. People are very divided about her, but on a lot of

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people who really admire her for the Percat Henning on the amount we pay

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for pensions. -- for all of the things she has done. People on both

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sides of the debate. Nigel Farage says he can't go to the pub any more

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because he gets a torrent of abuse when he goes out. But she is an

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interesting figure because it takes an enormous amount of courage I

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think on an issue as divisive as the one we've just seen in terms of the

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referendum to actually then take up the mantle and take this to the High

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Court. Then of course the government took it to the High Court. So a

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great deal of courage. In many ways what she is saying is what we would

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expect it to say. She is going to the lords to try to soften Brexit

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and she sees the Prime Minister... Cheesy turning up in House of Lords

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as somehow being a bully, breathing down their next. It will be

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increasingly divisive. A quick look at the Sunday Times. They've got

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another angle on the whole Brexit story. A story about an offence from

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migrants and of this revolution. An interesting story that we just

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seeing. Trade deals on the sidelines. What we are talking about

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is the right to migrants, both those who might come in the future and

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those who are already here, but we think this is most interesting for a

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very interesting date. Is the cut-off date at which you can stay

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here, if you are an EU migrant, the date of the referendum, or is it the

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date on which we trigger Article 50? I think this is going to be a cause

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of huge dispute. This particular article suggests that the lawyers

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have looked at this and what they are saying is that it could be the

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date that we trickle Article 50. Which could be a couple of weeks

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away. Exactly. Much to be determined. If everything goes well.

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Another story is about the Labour Party, which we have been discussing

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since the fallout from the by-elections. Tom Watson, the deputy

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leader, suggesting they could face wipeout in England as they have done

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Scotland. Yes, the analysis, if you look at the level of swing we saw in

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Koh plant, would suggest scores of Labour seats under threat. --

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Copeland. Who will naturally be pooling their resources together. It

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is interesting to see how Theresa May discussed the idea of the

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Conservative Party now be the workers party. The Conservatives are

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very much trying to... This is a major concern to those in the party

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at the moment, especially the moderates who don't see any way out

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of this. There is no kind of white knights charging to their rescue,

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that anyone can see. Nobody really thinks that any candidate other than

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another from the left will actually win out, should there be another

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leadership contest. If David Miliband going to enter the fray?

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Very big comment in my paper this morning, this is the darkest time he

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has seen the Labour and he sees it as impossible. Will Tony Blair come

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back? That's been another one around the fringes. Come back to rescue the

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party. But with the party elect David Miliband? It would depend. The

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interesting thing about this is the reason they want to Jeremy Corbyn to

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hang around is because there is more change they want to instigate in

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September, which is the John McDonnell rule, which will mean they

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don't have to reach such a high threshold in order to get another

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left-winger onto the ballot paper. Quick word. You got a story in the

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Express. You have the summit up about Ukip. There were two

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by-elections. The fallout from Labour. Paul Nuttall obviously

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didn't win the seat of Stoke and basically party's biggest donor will

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issue an ultimatum and say, there could be chairman, that's me

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modernise the parties we can become electable and if you don't do that I

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will set up a rival party that will basically destroy Ukip. He has set

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up a rival log. But would he actually like to be Prime Minister?

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Does he see himself as the leader of Ukip? And the Sunday Telegraph. The

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terrorism chief, as they call him, talking about the threat of terror,

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the worst in a generation. This is an extraordinary story. Max Hill,

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the new independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, the man who

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keeps an eye on the people who keep us safe. He has said that the

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terrorist threat is at its worst since the 1970s. Now, you might

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expect him to say that he has a serious job and a great deal to do,

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but it's a very, very sobering tale. However, there are lots of things

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that they don't seem to ask him in the story. One of the things I would

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have liked to have heard from this interview is what about all of the

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Isis fighters who have returned to Britain? The people who have been

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radicalised and returned? Is he going to be keeping a special eye on

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them? Does he want new measures, new surveillance techniques? It is

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interesting you should say that. One of the things I was saying before is

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the reason terror is back on the agenda is because of the death of

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the Guantanamo Bay detainee who had gone out and blew himself up in

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Iraq. Of course I would have wanted him to talk more about surveillance

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and what we are doing to make sure people don't give out of the country

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when they have been a cause for concern. But from your point, the

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thing that alarms me is that actually he talks about reviewing

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terrorism prevention and investigation measures, which are

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the most Draconian, although not as Draconian as the control orders,

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because he thinks they are an extraordinarily serious infringement

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on freedom. He seems to feel he will go the other way and actually look

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at Civil Liberties, rather than looking at the angle of these people

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posing a grave threat to us and what we can do to keep us safe. A quick

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look at the Sunday Telegraph. The Oscars. La la land is tipped to

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sweep the board. The picture of Emma Stone, the hot favourite to be named

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best dress. You went to see it and you didn't like it? I didn't like

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it, but I think the interest will be in what sort of level of virtue

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signalling we see from the stars. How many impassioned anti-Trump

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speeches will we see? Usually I can get really focused on the frocks.

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That's what really interests me. But I will be wondering how beautifully

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choreographed and scripted all of these impassioned, seemingly

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off-the-cuff, speeches are. But, no, I didn't enjoy La La Land, but it's

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a Hollywood film. There will be frocks and politics tomorrow. There

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will be. We've seen a bit of that already. We've seen some protest

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today with the likes of Michael J Fox and Jodie Kidd making speeches

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about Trump. That will be a feature of the Oscars tomorrow. They will

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probably be looking at the frocks. I don't get to go to the movies very

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often. You haven't seen anything for ages, have you? No, very

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disappointed. As I was saying, this is the best night out at had in

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ages! Thanks very much. That's it for The Papers. Coming up next, The

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Film Review.

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