26/02/2017 The Papers


26/02/2017

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Josie Delap of The Economist and Prashant Rao,

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Deputy Europe Business Editor for the International

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Tomorrow's front pages starting with...

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The Sunday Telegraph has an interview with

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the new independent reviewer of terrorism legislation who says

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the threat of terror attacks is at its highest in a generation.

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The Sunday Times reports on a leaked report that

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Sir Mo Farah's coach, Alberto Salazar, may have broken

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anti-doping rules to boost the performance of some

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Both Salazar and Farah deny any wrongdoing.

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The Sunday Express has more details about the man who murdered

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the children's author Helen Bailey. The Mail on Sunday claims that

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a critically ill little girl died hours after a GP refused

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to see her because she turned up a few minutes late

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And The Sunday Mirror reports that the fiancee of notorious

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prisoner Charles Bronson is also working as an escort.

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So, let's begin. We are starting with the Observer newspaper and a

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big headline across the front. Jeremy Corbyn to take the blame, or

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we face disaster. That word disaster has been thrown around a lot in the

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last 24 hours. It has, and this is after Labour won one of the

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by-election seat, but it lost Copeland which it has held since

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1935 and it is very unusual for a government to seize a by-election

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seat. We have now seen the deputy leader, Tom Watson, and Keir

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Starmer, Labour's Brexit spokesman, criticising Jeremy Corbyn, who when

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asked after the results who should be taking responsibility, was it

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him? He said no. There is increasing pressure from other members of the

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party for him to take some of the blame. And pressure for him to stay.

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He has got a small piece in the Sunday Mirror where he talks about

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how he takes his share of responsibility. But he makes clear

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he was re-elected as the leader not too long ago. It is interesting what

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is happening with the Labour Party. In the last paragraph in the

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Observer it says about one third of Labour voters would be more likely

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to vote for his replacement. If he is part of the problem, it is not

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clear what the solution is. Do you think there is a growing group

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against him? These are pretty open and against him in terms of being

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critical of him either bleakly or directly. Do you get the sense

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Jeremy Corbyn is better in opposition and he would be in

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government if you know what I mean? Yes, he is a rebel. He was a Labour

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rebel for many years. He was not part of the Tony Blair government,

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not part of that leading group of Labour MPs and it was a great

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surprise when he won the election. For a long time he was very

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comfortable with that important position of questioning your party,

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of raising descent, but that does not necessarily win elections. It

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does not seem to be working for him at the moment. In the Sunday Times,

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you mentioned Tom Watson talking about the possibility of a wipe-out.

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Let's talk about that a bit more. For people like that to say that,

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what does that say about the state of the people at the top of the

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party for a start? Is Jeremy Corbyn not listening? It sets out how

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worried they are and compares the fears of Labour in Scotland where it

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was totally wiped out by the SNP. That is what they are fearing in the

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north of England where labour is losing its long-held seeds. What

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about who is coming through? Who would replace him? We had a

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discussion earlier, there are interesting people who may

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potentially replace Jeremy Corbyn. But last summer the list of people

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who came up were wiped out. Labour's supporters support Jeremy Corbyn, or

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they did last summer. The number of people who are not tainted by the

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Tony Blair years or indeed Iraq war, and those who came through an

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incredibly green after the last election, there is not a crossover

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of people who are saved on both sides, the experience, but not being

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tainted. We are hearing advance notice of what he will say this

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afternoon and he will admit the loss underlined what he said the scale of

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how hard the task is of persuading people of the message. This is why

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we stood up to hatred and division. I cannot lie and say that the result

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in Copeland was what we wanted, but now is not the time to run away or

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give up. He is saying they cannot run away from their message, but the

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question for many people is what is their message at the moment? It is

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not clear whether they oppose or support Brexit. He is saying Labour

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supports it, but there are many people who do not like Labour's

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stance on Brexit. Working out what Labour stands for at the moment is

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one of their major challenges. The second story from the Sunday Times,

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the benefits for migrants replace the act. What is this? This is the

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new revolution after the last revolution. It is the biggest change

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in a generation. The immigration debate is constant. This is an

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interesting change that they are proposing and it kind of makes it a

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little more technocratic by removing the number of Visas from the

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government's control in theory. I am curious about this committee that

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will recommend these is. What if it is too low or too high? What about

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if you have to bring in 100,000 engineers? Who is going to advise

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them? This as immigration is a technocratic thing, but at the

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moment immigration is an extraordinarily political issue in

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Britain. This reaffirms the government's desire to rid reduce

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immigration down to 10,000 people. It does really means stopping lots

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of family reunification is happening and stopping refugees happening,

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cutting international students, cutting and skilled migration and

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also skilled migration. This is when Theresa May is trying to do trade

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deals with people like India and America who send skilled people

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here. If they start accepting people from these countries, this is not

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clear. Theresa May says that all those here at the moment on the

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triggering of Article 50, they will remain. This goes to the point that

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immigration feeds into everything. It is in every single debate in one

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way or the other. When Theresa May went to India, the Indian government

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was asking about Visas. This does not stop at the water's edge. Other

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countries are asking, will our students be able to go to British

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universities? Will our entrepreneurs be able to setup? Let's go do

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something lighter. A bit of trouble in Cambridge. This is a college

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where students have been complaining about items on the menu like

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Jamaican stew and Tunisian rice, arguing they are cultural

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misrepresentations and they do not exist in the countries that are

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being referenced. I mean it is sort of easy to laugh at these kinds of

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things. It is hard to imagine that these are deliberately

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disrespectful, that this is the college trying to impose some sort

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of colonial idea on its culture. If the point of this is to make

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students feel at home, if it is to educate other students about

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different cuisines, this is a bit cack-handed. It sounds just like a

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recipe to be honest. The Pembroke catering staff, stop mixing mango

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and beef and calling it Jamaican stew. That came from the students.

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If you are going to do it, get it right, get the name right. It sounds

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foolishly inaccurate rather than deliberate. It also sounds

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delicious. Have we gone politically correct mad? Where does political

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correctness begin and what is too much? There are reasonable things

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that are of a different era that should not be set any more that are

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offensive to minorities and that are helpful. I am not sure if this

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college was trying to hurt people. This was just not handled terribly

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well. The editorial in the Sunday Times is not forgiving on the

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students. There is danger everywhere. Think what might happen

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in Pembroke College if a student from someone else is asked if they

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want a bit of Bakewell tart. This is more serious, terror chief threat. A

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bigger and greater terror threat that we are facing. This is the new

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independent overseer of the country's terrorism, a watchdog. You

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cannot question his credentials, he has been a barrister for 30 years

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and has prosecuted these cases. When he says something like this, you

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have to take notice. The headline is warning of the risk of attacks in

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Britain is at its highest since the dark days of the IRA. It is a stark

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warning. It is. What we talk about these things we talk about the level

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of threat and how serious it is, but you do not get a strong sense of

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exactly what that represents in terms of the kinds of attacks. You

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have to assume that the threat level was very high after the 7/7

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bombings. Did that mean we would see more bombings in the line of 9/11?

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Now it is about lone wolf attacks and British people who have been

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radicalised and have spent time fighting in Syria. It is a very

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sophisticated threat level, even though it is described in broad

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terms. It has changed over 30 years, we are facing different threats now.

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We are dealing with it in a different way. That is right. One of

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the things in the interview is Max Hill points out there has been one

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fatality in Britain through terrorism. It is remarkable how

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successful Britain has been at preventing or heading off these

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kinds of attacks. It is easy to lose sight of that with these constant

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warnings of terrorism. People in Britain have largely been able to

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lead their lives in peace and security since the 7/7 attacks. You

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only realise when something might have been happening is when you hear

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the court case. Let's move onto another story. We

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have heard from Michael Heseltine today this. The peers are uniting to

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soften Brexit. This could be potentially embarrassing for Theresa

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May. It is going to be embarrassing for Theresa May because the

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Conservatives do not have a majority in the House of Lords, so we will

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see a lot of debate amongst people who oppose Brexit and Michael

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Heseltine and other Tory rebels are planning to vote against it. I do

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not think in the end the House of Lords will vote it down, but they

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will do their best to put some amendments onto it. It illustrates

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the astonishing perplexity that Brexit brings. It is not just a

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negotiation with 27 other countries, it is a negotiation with the House

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of Lords, the House of Commons, there are so many different actors

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which we do not appreciate. This is getting complicated really fast. The

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stakes are high for her, and she was there on the first day in the House

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of Lords watching and you would be if this was your first big piece of

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legislation, but it shows what is at stake. Absolutely, this is the

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greatest political change that Britain has had to face in many

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generations. It is an extraordinarily complicated,

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difficult task. And we will hear about it every day until it happens.

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Let's finish off on a funny note. You cannot beat a cartoon. We are

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talking about Highgate. And the pie eating goalkeeper who was spotted

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eating pie on television and has since been sacked because he was

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betting on it. It says a bet that Meryl Streep will eat meat pie

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during the Oscars ceremony. There has been a lot of talk about meat

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pies. I will not tell you what we keep under the desk. I am not sure

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about this story, the original story about the goalkeeper, because it is

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bittersweet. He lost his job. It is hard to see who was really badly

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affected. Everyone loves a sports story of the plucky small team. It

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was heart-warming. It is hard to imagine who wanted him fired. He

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cried, I feel sorry for him. We have had Jamaican stew and pies and

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everything else in between. Thank you very much for joining us this

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week. Just a reminder we take a look

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at tomorrow's front pages every The weather is going to throw

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everything at us over the next couple of days. Rain, Gayle, snow,

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ice, hail and blunder.

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