27/02/2017 The Papers


27/02/2017

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Laura Perrins, Co-Editor of The Conservative Women

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and Joe Watts, Political Editor at The Independent.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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The i leads with John Major's first speech since the Brexit vote,

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The Express reports reports that the government could announce

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an end to the free movement of people on the day it

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The Telegraph picks up the story that UKIP is facing civil war

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after Nigel Farage called on the party to oust its sole

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The Metro shows the shock that last night's Oscar

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And the Daily Mail says that TV licence inspectors are targeting

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vulnerable people. John Major's speech at Chatham

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House. The i pretty summed it up. John Major is second-guessing the

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British people as what the best way is to approach Brexit. We have moved

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from project fear, to project smear and B are now at project pathetic.

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We had Tony Blair last week. I think things are getting a bit desperate.

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No one is showing contempt for the 40% who voted to remain. What's

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important is the 60% who were polled last week who said they want the

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Prime Minister to get on with Brexit, which is what she is doing.

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It was suggested that in London, which voted Remain, they thought

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immigration should be the priority and not trade. Was John Major out of

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the public? I then think so. I think what we are seeing here... Let him

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talk. I can feel the heat coming off of her. There has been some real

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opposition and the government is being held to account in a way we

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have not seen the elected politicians in the House of Commons

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doing. We've had Tony Blair making a speech, Lord Mandelson has been

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writing all over the place, now John Major. They are making real point

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about the way the government is approaching Brexit, about the way

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they are trying to railroad the Article 50 bill through without it

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being amended. Now they are trying to suggest... I knew she would not

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last long. Laurie, what -- Laura what is unhealthy about the country

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debating what Brexit means? Nobody knew until the last few weeks what

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it meant. They can continue to debate, I'd does them think people

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will listen to him or Tony Blair or whoever they will at next week. They

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are not very credible. John Major's record in Europe has been

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disastrous. He railroaded Britain into Maastricht. It is not about

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John Major or Tony Blair it's about the message. The messenger is very

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important, as we all know in politics. These two former prime

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ministers are discredited. If is the tactic, it's fine. Fill your boots.

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If that is the best they've got, I will be sleeping easy tonight. I

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would suggest that as time goes on and the economy starts to feel some

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of the strain of Brexit, then the message will carry a bit more

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weight. The Telegraph picks up on the fact that Mr major says leaving

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the EU is an historic mistake. He did also say in his speech that he

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accept the EU is not perfect. It's not all fantastic, but he was

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highlighting what he felt were major concerns about the government's

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handling of the Brexit negotiations and the dealings with EU leaders as

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well. Quite a scathing attack. Its scathing and bitter. It says more

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about him than it does about the Prime Minister, who I think is doing

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a fantastic job. I think he is going to come out of this worse off than

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the Prime Minister is. He is entitled to his opinion and people

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like yourself like to hear it, but it's amazing how the BBC now love

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John Major. When he was in power they hated him. They absolutely

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slammed him. We absolutely never take sides. We are very impartial,

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Laura. It is a cheek for you to say that. The government and Theresa May

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are talking about what they want from the Brexit deal. They haven't

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said anything about what we will have to pay. No one is being told

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that at the moment. That is a massive black hole in the debate and

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all he is doing is saying look, will be to start talking about this. The

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Daily Telegraph also poses the question, what now. They've

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interviewed Nigel Farage. How do you keep go forward now that Brexit is

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happening. Nigel Farage suggesting they get rid of the only standing

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MP. That is Ukip's problem. Theresa May is going forward with Brexit in

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a coherent fashion. If there is any slippage on the part of May, they'll

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be relevant and important again. I don't know how you can get rid of

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Douglas Carswell. He is either unelected by his constituents or he

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withdraws the whip from himself, which seems unlikely. It points to

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the underlying ridiculousness of Ukip. They only have this one MP who

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is a constant odds with other people in the party, people like Nigel

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Farage and Adam Banks, who is always demanding to take over the party.

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You never know with Ukip. At any moment Nigel Farage cle comeback. It

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looks as if he had Aaron Banks on his side. Tough new migrant rules.

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Free movement could be ended within weeks. This is something that may be

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not everyone thought about, that the rules kick in when article $50. It

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will be interesting to see if it is when Article 50 is triggered or at

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the end of the negotiations. Whatever the migration rules are,

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they need to be decided in Westminster and not Brussels. It's

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decided by democracy as opposed to bureaucracy in Brussels. When the

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bill goes through there will be suitable scrutiny and an examination

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of what the law should be, which is how democracy works. Whether or not

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it does happen when Article 50 is triggered, everybody... The

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important point is that everyone is given adequate notice, it can be

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done retroactively and if rules change when Article 50 is triggered,

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that is there enough in terms of notice given to people coming into

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the country. Let's move the Times. The headline there that will worry

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many people. Don't lock-up loneliest paedophiles. This is a quote from

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the police. The public will be horrified. Give us the background.

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This is Britain's most senior child protection officer saying the police

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have been inundated with investigations into child sex abuse,

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into paedophilia and the rise has been 80% in three years. They are

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getting 112 new complaint today and they expect a further 40,000 to the

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official enquiry that is happening into historic child sex abuse. They

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are saying they are over spilling and they can't do with it and

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because of that some of the lesser offences will have to be

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decriminalised. That is going to horrify most people and even he

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acknowledges that this stance will horrified a lot of people. He is

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saying we have no choice. The question seems to be of resources,

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or at least he is raising that here. Is it the simply a question of

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money? Can you solve this problem by hiring more police officers? I don't

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know if it will be as simple as that, nonetheless it will be a

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shocking story. In some ways it's reassuring that people are

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overwhelmed with stories because people feel they can step forward

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and report. It's not just the question of not locking them up

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because if you are convicted of something you can also receive a

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non-custodial sentence, but what worries me about this is that he is

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saying they shouldn't be given any criminal sanction which could have a

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knock-on effect. If it is not on your record you will be free to what

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were children. That is the first issue, and also looking at indecent

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images, it is wrong to say that this is a victimless crime. The poor

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children in those images, and there is a scale from minor to incredibly

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dangerous image eens -- images, and I think they are level five, to say

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it is victimless is wrong. It points to this idea that they are trying to

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slightly change the way society views these crimes and I think a lot

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of people across the political spectrum will probably agree that

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actually the way we see it as a horrific crime at the moment is

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right. You can deal with the sentencing in a different way, but

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there should be a criminal sanction. The Guardian. It devotes a lot of

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hits from to politics in America, unlike other papers. Trump plans a

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huge increase in US military spending. A wonderful you have to

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give credit to Trump. He made a lot of promises in his election campaign

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and he is delivering on his bonkers promises. He said he will remove

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spending from environmental policy and from eight spending as well.

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They're trying to redirect spending in those areas to be military. Trump

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has promised to reinvigorate industry in a Rocca as well and it's

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a very easy way to do that, by building new tanks, ships, whatever

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the needs. Defending your country is not a bonkers promise. I like the

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protection that the United States give us, as you do also. Italy take

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advantage of it, even though they spent hardly anything on the

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military. People are being protected by the American military, who

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liberated Europe from fascism. Putting that to one side, he is

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entitled to fulfil his electoral promise to defend his country and I

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think anybody who doesn't think defending your own country, liberty

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and security should take a long hard look at themselves. But it comes at

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eight cost to other areas. It is causing a lot of concern. It's only

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causing concern to those opposed to Trump. We have to leave it there,

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but many thanks for the interesting discussion. We will continue that.

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Don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online

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It's all there for you - 7 days a week at bbc dot co uk

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forward slash papers - and if you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it later on BBC iPlayer.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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