12/03/2017 The Papers


12/03/2017

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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Bad luck to them. That's all this board. Now on BBC News, here is the

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papers. -- that is all the sport. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what The Papers will be With me are Dave Wooding, political

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editor at the Sun on Sunday, is under fire by MPs who fear

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she has no back-up plan if the UK fails to get

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a trade deal with the EU. The Mail on Sunday also leads

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on the Prime Minister's impending it says she'll fire

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the starting gun on Tuesday. The Sunday Telegraph's top story

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is what it calls a war with ministers reportedly furious

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at the Chancellor for not warning them that he was planning to break

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a manifesto promise with a rise in National Insurance

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for self-employed workers. The front page of the Sunday

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Times has rugby hero Danny Care flying through the air

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as he scores in England's victory against Scotland

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in the Rugby Six Nations. And the Sunday Express reports

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on a potential new lead in the hunt The paper says police have been

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given extra funding to follow it up. Right, so let's begin and we are

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going to start with the mail on Sunday and Brexit has got all the

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headlines. A dereliction of duty if there is not a plan. It is all

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Brexit, Brexit. This story is about the House of Commons Health Select

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Committee report, chaired by a conservative, who have put out a

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report that there is no plan B for Brexit. In other words, what do we

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do if there is no deal? The Prime Minister has said she is prepared to

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walk away if there is no deal. She has used the phrase no deal is

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better than a bad dill. There are reasonable point is what contingency

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planning have you done about this? They say there has been no

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contingency planning as far as evidence suggests and they say that

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is a dereliction of duty if you were not to plan for the worst-case

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scenario and they are recommending, this all-party committee, that every

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department in government should be looking at contingency plans in case

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we go over a cliff edge. What we do about Northern Ireland with the

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Borders? What do we do about trade? The trade being it exactly right.

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Workforces, but Andre said this year it would take them ten years to get

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a workforce that was entirely British and one out of 50

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applications came from a British person. These are things which are

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really going to hit straightaway, aren't they? -- a sandwich shop said

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this week. Even looking at copyright for music, written pieces, and

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tangling all of that is really difficult. I think that brings home

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how many things there are. Also, this arrogance. We can't decide this

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deal. This is a deal which will have to be agreed with all the nations in

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the EU and they have oversimplified everything here for the people of

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this country. The deal has to be made would the agreement of other

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people. And getting that amount of agreement could be difficult? The

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difficulty here, I can see the government's side and also the

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all-party group's perspective as well. If you go to buy a car, you

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never show your hand when you are negotiating. We don't know what

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Theresa May's is and where she will go. She needs to be prepared to walk

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out. If you are buying something and want to drive a hard bargain, you

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need to drive a hard bargain. Should we know these publicly already? Yes,

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or at least the MPs should. Parliamentarians are there to make

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sure that whatever happens, whether it is internally, with foreign

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affairs or with this deal, that what happened makes sense in the

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long-term. There has been such an emotional rise long-term pro and

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against Brexit that I think good sense is very difficult to bring

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back to the table. Let's move the times and this is the headline,

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may's EU payback. This is more of the nitty-gritty of the

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negotiations. Theresa May is saying that Brussels should hand back ?9

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billion worth of British assets which are held by the European Union

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bank. This to me sounds like another bargaining chip. She is saying, we

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have got this and the European Union are saying you have to keep paying

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until 2020, and if they say that, she will say, we want this back.

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This is all to do with jockeying and positioning when we come to a deal.

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It's going to get really interesting. She has fired an

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opening salvo. I think she wants to be, she is modelling herself on

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Margaret Thatcher. Margaret Thatcher got back this rebate and the picture

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-- the people cheered. I think she's subconsciously modelling herself on

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national memory up to a point. It's a bit of PR as well. She comes over

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a bit as shy vicar's daughter. What? She is not a shy person. She is

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arrogant! People I spoke to when she worked at the Home Office, they say

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what a tough cookie she is. She doesn't take any messing. If people

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get things wrong, their beat don't touch the ground. She will be a

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formidable negotiator. David Davis is talking about the Brexit rebels,

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isn't he? The times -- timetable this week is that tomorrow, the two

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amendments from the Lords go back to the comments, they will be shoved

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back to the Lords, then if it gets put through, they will get royal

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assent and Theresa May could be triggering Article 50 by Tuesday.

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She probably won't do it on Wednesday because there are the

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Dutch elections. Do you have secret information? No, we have all tried

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to find that out because knowing what day she will trigger it would

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be a great Sunday paper story but Downing Street are not telling us. A

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lot of people have used the phrase, as early as Tuesday. Do you reckon

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it will definitely come this week? It could be Tuesday or Thursday. It

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is the Dutch elections on Wednesday and she has a speech on Friday. She

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has got to get Royal assent, so Tuesday could be early. What about

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this report? Would she not pay any attention? She responded last night

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saying that they have got contingency plans, she does not

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telling anyone what they are. Now, a Cabinet war over the budget? There

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is a lot of bad feeling because this is felt by a lot of Tories to be a

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very un-conservative thing to do, putting up taxes, particularly for

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those striving. I think they're well have to be a rethink. Something very

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slow and it will be kicked away. I don't think they will go ahead with

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this. The more important things in the budget are being ignored.

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Creating a whole education system which is completely going to divide

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out as -- our children into fragments, sections of society, is

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the more worrying thing and there has been no comment on that. The

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national insurance contributions of course have taken the headlines. The

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Tories are saying that the election pledge was actually bore people who

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were employees and not the self-employed. Well, a bit of rowing

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back on this. What happened effectively is that Philip Hammond,

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the Chancellor, outlined the plan is to be Cabinet on Wednesday morning,

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hours before he delivered the budget and his people are saying, we did

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not hear a peep from any of the Cabinet group or the Prime Minister.

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Then all hell breaks loose quantities delivered it. But they

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are saying, what good we do at this late stage? They are also saying, he

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didn't make clear it was a manifesto pledge. You do wonder why the

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Cabinet didn't know what was in the manifesto. Exactly. And remember,

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the tuition fees. The Lib Dems were unforgiving because of that failure.

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This is a very fundamental thing. White Van man, as we call it in the

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sun, these are the grafters, these drivers. Me! I was reading at being

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in the week about start-ups and the higher percentage at the moment is

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women with start-ups. We also don't get the benefits because they are

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saying they are trying to make it fair because PAYE employees pay a

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certain amount, but you don't get the holiday, sickness pay, maternity

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pay. Well, you get maternity allowance because of Europe. But

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it's a very unfair comparison, it seems to me. Just a quickie, yes or

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no public view, will this the party? Yes, it's his first budget. Remember

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he pointed out Norman Lamont was gone a few weeks afterwards. Newman

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-- we heard from Norman Lamont yesterday and he said this was a

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huge mistake. I think so too. It's an unforced error. Now, Prince

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Philip. I love this story. Prince Philip meets Prince -- meets Philip

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Hammond. The papers have been having fun. Yes, Philip goes up and he is

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never one to miss sticking his oar in. He pulled his leg, a bit of

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joshing about the budget. We don't know what he said but we can

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probably guess. There is a rather funny caption in there. Yes, it

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says, you will never find yourself a plumber now. We were all trying to

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work out what was said but they were keeping tight-lipped about what was

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said between these two Phillips. I suppose one good thing is that they

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are all laughing. That is quite good. Moving along, a Russian cyber

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threat in the times. What is this one about? We have heard recently

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with the US presidential elections that the Russians were involved in

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hacking into the campaign and maybe even swaying it. And there has been

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a conference call by GCHQ cheats, these by leaders that are listening

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as opposed in Cheltenham, to discuss the real and present threat of

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Russians hacking political databases during the next general election and

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actually influencing the result. There is a guy called Kieran Martin,

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chief executive of the National cyber Security Centre, who will be

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warning that it poses a threat to the democratic process in this

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country. It seems to be something that is spreading and worldwide? It

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is and I don't think it's just Russia. There is a lot of hacking

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going on. A kind of the world in which we think we have early element

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of privacy -- any element of Properzi and we don't. Everything

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from wiki leaks to Russia's games, I think they are weak, and the far

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right in America, who are very, very rich people. There is a new book

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about this and Western democracies are under severe attack and we

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should worry very much about it. Does this report give us an answer

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as to what a solution to this might be? No, it says it's about outlining

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the potential for hostile action and saying what political parties can do

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to make their systems more robust and how to protect and safeguard

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everything, but it's just a case of being one step ahead. It's like

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terrorism. You have to be one step ahead and as they progress, you

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progress. It's a very sophisticated area. It's kind of back to the Cold

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War but with more sophisticated technology online. Let's have a look

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at the Observer and this is an interesting story about how Finland

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deals with homelessness. Yes, they have a system in Finland called

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Housing first. What they do is rough sleepers are sent into

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accommodation, they are given accommodation. The government do

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deals with housing companies and they move them in without any of the

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restrictions that people have when they try to get on the housing

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ladder. Sometimes people who are rough sleeping have mental health

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issues, drug issues, alcohol issues, and their lives are rock bottom and

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they don't have the necessary paperwork to get housing. They shot

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them into this housing, get them treatment and it has dramatically

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reduced rough sleeping in Finland as a result. The Centre for Justice has

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done a very thoughtful report on this and says it would cost ?101

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million a year but the money would be recouped after three years and

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Sabbir Javed is so impressed by this, he is going to go to Finland

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to have a look at this and is considering doing this in Britain.

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It has become a huge problem in Britain. Everywhere. I saw a couple

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sleeping on the streets not far from here in Oxford Street and I am very

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pleased to see the gentle side of the Tories emerging, finally, and of

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course Finland has some really brilliant ideas. I think Finland has

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this national income that they give everybody. Is that right? Yes. And

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they have found extraordinary benefits coming from that. It's a

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whole different way of looking at it, isn't it? I have never known the

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Tories to go to a Scandinavian country so it's a very good thing. I

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want to pop to be mirror and Paul Burrell now. What is he up to? What

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would we do without him. He is would we do without him. He is

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coming up with more and more allegations about what the Queen

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told him and these strange goings-on on a yacht. They love him in America

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because he's like a living soap opera and they love the family. He

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gives them all this stuff. And the thing here is that the Queen told

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him to find a woman, because of course he came out, Paul Burrell, a

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view years back. But it's just fun to read. At these times we need

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fantasy. He was in a view stories this week, wasn't he? He said Diana

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talks to him at night. Yes, I think he has a book coming out. He was

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never off the front pages if you years ago. Diana famously described

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him as her rock. And he doesn't age. How? Maybe he will tell us in the

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next instalment. Thanks to our guests today -

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Dave Wooding, political editor at the Sun on Sunday,

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and journalist Yasmin Alibhai Brown. Just a reminder we take a look

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at tomorrow's front pages every

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