29/03/2017 The Papers


29/03/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Henry Mance, Political Correspondent

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For the first time, enjoying his momentous day, the first appearance

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on the Tapers! It's supposed to be fun!

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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The Telegraph reports jubilation as Article 50 was triggered,

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but it reports immediate tension between Britain and Brussels.

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The Metro reports on the Prime Minister's warning that failure

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to reach a deal with the EU within the two-year time limit

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could "weaken" cooperation in the fight against

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crime and terrorism. The FT says Theresa May's letter

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was seen in Brussels as conciliatory and flexible.

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The Mirror reports on the tension, with Germany's Angela Merkel

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rejecting an early start to talks on a new trade deal.

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The i has a picture of Britain's ambassador handing over the Article

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And Nigel Farage beams from the front of the Express

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on security cooperation were seen by many in Brussels as blackmail.

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And Nigel Farage beams from the front of the Express

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Beginning with the Express, he looks very happy. No turning back on EU

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exit, 2316 days after the Express started its historic crusade to free

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Britain from Brussels, Theresa May insists there is no turning back.

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Caroline, this is your sister paper. They have said this several times,

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once we get going we are not going to change our minds, and Theresa May

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said the same. What they are drawing attention to is that the Daily

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Express and to a lesser extent the Sunday Express really led the agenda

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on Brexit. If you look at that 2316 days, that is eight years plus it

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has taken them and they have been calling for the withdrawal of the UK

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from the EU from all of that period of time. Today they see this as

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being in momentous occasion. We are scratching our heads and wondering

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what changes today other than the fact that those divorce papers in

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effect have been delivered to the EU. This is the day we are all going

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to Mark, some people are calling it Brexit date. You know, fair play,

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campaigns are what newspapers live and die by and this has been a very

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successful campaign by the Daily Express which culminated in that

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vote on the 23rd of June. Henry, let's talk about the Daily

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Telegraph, it says it is a magnificent moment, an interesting

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choice of photographs that have appeared on various papers, some of

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them showing that moment that the letter was handed over. Others

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showing Donald Tusk and Sir Tim heading in other directions. It was

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an interesting performance by Donald Tusk. He is not a big federalist,

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not the kind of Eurocrat that you might think of, like Jean-Claude

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Junker or someone. His tone was a slightly sad one. The photos on the

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Telegraph suggest that, even if the headline is triumphant, Boris

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He has written a piece, it is time He has written a piece, it is time

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to back Britain and go lowball. It is very positive. We were just

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reading it. -- go global. We are going to blast off for an

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extraordinary voyage. He talks about it being historic and, as I see it,

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a magnificent moment. We can only see some of his comment piece, but

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he looks more balanced towards the end, acknowledging that not

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everybody in the country is voting for Brexit. He talks about what we

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do now in terms of pulling together and kind of achieving this great

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moment is future for the country. The i treats us to goodbye in many

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of the languages that are spoken across the European Union. I won't

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even attempt to pronounce some of them! There we have the picture of

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the moment that the letter was handed over to Donald Tusk, as

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talking for three hours. I was talking for three hours. I was

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impressed. It marked a week since the terrorist attack advertisements

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do. It was a really strange occasion this afternoon. Theresa May took

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questions from 113 MPs. Some of them are in the papers. She also went on

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to do interviews afterwards. It was quite an exhausting start to two

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years of negotiations. Onto your paper, the Financial Times. Donald

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Tusk again looking forlorn at one point. He said, we are missing you

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already. Do you think? We seem to relish the theatre of it. Did they

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have the handover this letter in full view of all the cameras was

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white of course they did, surely! They hand delivered it, they sent it

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was quite theatrical. There has been was quite theatrical. There has been

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lots of this, talking about missing you already, the Treaty of Rome

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celebrations overshadowing the negative, Jean-Claude Junker talking

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about it being a tragedy, how he was heartbroken that the UK weren't

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there to celebrate with them. It is more of that kind of narrative. You

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have written a sketch piece here called, dear Europe. Such letters

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have a tainted history. What are you comparing this to? This has a couple

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of references, one to Neville Chamberlain's message to Adolf

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Hitler, a personal message. And also the nobleman surrounding Henry VIII,

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trying to ask for an annulment to his marriage from the Pope. This is

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a very current situation and we have moved on but we don't always seek

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the world from the point of view of Europe. Both Neville Chamberlain and

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Henry VIII were very optimistic about what they could achieve just

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by writing to Europe and get their way. It is going to be wrote tough

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and there are going to be things that they don't like. We were told

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at one point this letter was consolatory and shows that civility

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and yet there are tensions emerging already, as you would expect. The

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papers have picked up on this notion that what Theresa May is in effect

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saying is that, while we want to have a kind of nice divorce, a Team

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Zoeller to divorce, at the end of the day we have something that they

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want, which is that we are a key player in Europol and we have a much

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more significant security service and we play a huge role in the

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fighting of crime and terrorism across Europe. That point was made

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very much on the Daily Mirror. Brexit battle begins, trading blows,

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security threat to EU if UK cannot secure a deal. Theresa May did not

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make many speeches in the run-up to the referendum, but she did talk

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about the importance of the EU and our relationship for security. Would

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she do anything that brilliant danger the lives of British

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citizens? I think it's unlikely, but this is a negotiation and you have

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to pretend you are willing. The counterargument is, why not show

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some goodwill? Why not say, we definitely won't put in danger

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European lives, British lives, given what has happened in Brussels, Paris

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and London. Let's talk about the Westminster attacks which you

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mentioned, back on the i. Thousands joined hands as the inquests hear

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how they die. A week on ordinarily from that her attacks it would have

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featured much more. But because of the timing of it it is only an very

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few of the front pages. But again, it is extraordinary that this only

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happened one week ago. It really struck me, being there today, that

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it was just one week ago, because we it was just one week ago, because we

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were all there last Wednesday. In a funny way, you know, the whole

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Brexit thing has overshadowed the attack story today in the same way

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that the attack massively overshadowed what the Goverment's

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was expecting to be a full one week leading up into Brexit being

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launched, certainly in the Sunday newspapers we pencilled in that it

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would be a Brexit splash across the board, aeons of pages on Brexit on

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Sunday, but actually what we did was beyond the pages on the para packs

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instead. The notion that everybody was in that packed chamber today,

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there was no room for anybody else to get in, as you say, more than 100

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MPs actually spoke. They were sat in the chamber where they have been

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locked for five hours just one week ago. I mean, it seems... It was

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reminiscent of when Jo Cox was murdered. We had a very sombre day

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in the House of Commons, and then a few days later you could remember,

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given how fierce the debate had become. And here it is, if events

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take their course and these guys are very busy now. It was the point they

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made after the terrorist attacks. You know, as much as this was a

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terrible shock for those there are, ultimately it is the seat of

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democracy and life must go on. We cannot let the terrorists stop this

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very important occasions and discussions that politicians are

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having about the very future of this country on the future of the country

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inside and outside of European Union. What is obvious is that the

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police of course and many members the public haven't forgotten that it

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was one week on and did turn out. I think there are still questions to

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be asked about the attacker, about the impact it has on community

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relations, what happens to Westminster security. Those things

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are happening in the background. Jeremy Corbyn as the Prime Minister,

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are you sure the police have the resources, given the cuts that

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happens to budgets? It literally was the thing before dinner, we were

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waiting from the historic announcement. Contrary to the trail

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we showed before we came on air, we will be back with a much longer

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review, 24 minutes Rob tells me, at 11:30pm. A bumper edition! Coming up

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next, the weather. Hello there, good evening. The winds

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are more from the south. That drags up some warm air to achieve high

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temperatures we need some sunshine. There wasn't a great deal of that

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