22/05/2017 The Papers


22/05/2017

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Paul Johnson, Deputy Editor of the Guardian

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And Director of Bell Pottinger, Tim Collins.

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Good to see you both. Let's have a look at some of the front pages.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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The Financial Times leads with the undisputed

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political story of the day - the Conservatives'

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It says it's "rattled" the Tory campaign.

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It reports there's confusion about exactly what the new social

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It calls it "May's manifesto meltdown".

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Pensioners will pay for the new policy,

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according to the Times, but it reports that Tory sources say

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it won't require tax rises or spending cuts.

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The Metro says that the Prime Minister has denied accusations that

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she's not so much "strong and stable" as "weak and wobbly".

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The Mirror asks, how can we ever trust Mrs U-turn? A different lead

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investigation reveals vulnerable investigation reveals vulnerable

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teenagers have been exposed to pornography through Facebook.

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A rather topical front page from the Express,

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although it's not actually about the so-called dementia tax.

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It says scientists have found dementia runs in the family.

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Tim, I'm going to start with you. Theresa May, strong and stable all

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week and wobbly, like jelly on a plate, so goes the nursery rhyme!

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This plays against the very thing that she was trying to put forward

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in this campaign, it's all about leadership, that it's about a strong

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negotiating hand, that you want Boadicea leading us into these

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Brexit talks. Jolyon a plate, according to the Metro? -- jelly on

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a plate. Brexit more than anything else was about politicians not

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listening. For decades they wouldn't listen to what the public was saying

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about emigration and power is going to Brussels. We do have a prominence

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to now who clearly has listened. -- we do have a Prime Minister. The

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reaction of particularly Tory leaning voters on the doorstep was

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very negative to this, and she has listened. The thing about the U-turn

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bit, that element of the policy that is new today actually takes us

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straight back to David Cameron's policy and what was the Goverment's

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policy until a week ago, that there should be a cap. It's not as if she

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has plucked an idea out of nowhere. That used to be a Tory Party policy,

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I thought about it further and we will go back to it. Paul, it was

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clear what Tory cause was under David Cameron last week. In fact,

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Quadri days ago -- what Tory policy was. She decided to pass it out and

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now she has brought it back in again. I was looking forward to see

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how Tim would spin his way out of that one! This is a complete

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shambles. The first time in history that a manifesto promise has been

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broken even before the election. It's just been a day of complete

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confusion. You've had a very angry Prime Minister, ministers running

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away from BBC TV cameras shown on screen. You had anger, blame gaming,

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you've had finger-pointing, the whole thing. It is a meltdown. It's

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being called meltdown Monday. This is not a rational act, it was forced

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upon Theresa May on the Government. Tim, come on, the front page of the

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Telegraph, chaos. The fact is, there were people within her own party,

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people within the Cabinet to thought it was a bad idea. Is she just not

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listening to anyone? I do think one of the lesson that has come out of

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this is that we know, this is true with Tony Blair and probably with

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David Cameron, he had a very sort of gilded circle, it does seem that

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prime ministers of all parties are to you eager to just listen to a

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very few voices and they tend to govern much better when they listen

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to a wider Cabinet and consult a bit more. That is probably a lesson that

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needed to be learned by Mrs May, as it was learned by her predecessor. I

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suspect after this, she will... One thing that is good about her is that

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she does listen. She campaigned for a Mane and now she is carrying

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through Lees, but she listened,. I don't think she will make this

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mistake again. They get up this morning and say, Prime Minister,

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we've got to get rid of this, how do we get rid of the policy? What we

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do, Prime Minister, we ditched the policy, how do we explain that? We

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say that nothing has changed. But who do we blame? We can't blame

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Cabinet ministers or the head of policy at Downing Street, they had

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nothing to do with it. We will blame Jeremy Corbyn! How do we do that?

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Say it is fake news, that is how we get out of it. By the way, you have

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a half an hour slot in your diary this afternoon to explain all of

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this to Andrew Neil! I bet that went down well! It is a difficult day. Is

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it a mortal wound? No, the reality is we are going to come on later to

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the story about opinion polls. It is important but all of this in

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context. She remains further ahead even in the worst opinion polls that

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were above is a work published over the weekend than Margaret Thatcher

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was before her general election landslide, more than Tony Blair was

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in his worst poll before the 1997 landslide. The reality is, most

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general elections over the last 30 or 40 years, in fact, every general

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election, you have had the result in the end that you did in the middle.

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We get very excited about these things, but most rotors have made up

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their minds already. They decided that they prefer Mrs May to Mr

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Corbyn. This hasn't been a great day for her but it won't change

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anything. Left-leaning press, Paul, playing this. Your front page in the

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Guardian is doing so, the Daily Mirror as well. How can we ever

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trust Mrs U-turn? Not the most flattering picture of the Prime

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Minister. PM flip-flops again. The fact is, she still is, according to

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the polls, we ahead of the Labour Party. This has been a good day for

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them. -- we ahead. We seeing an element of hubris here on behalf of

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the Prime Minister, because she was so far ahead, we have the changes to

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getting rid of free school lunches we have means testing winter fuel

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payment, winter fuel allowance is. And we've now got this U-turn as a

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result of the belief that she could potentially scare her core vote.

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Yes, it is quite extraordinary. You could characterise this as callous

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or as complacent, you could characterise it as a trust issue.

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You could characterise it as the right thing to do! There is no doubt

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she did the right thing by introducing the future of social

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care into the rational conversation, there's no doubt something has to be

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done about intergenerational wealth. But to do it in this way was very,

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very or indeed. To say to a big ball of the country, to say to a big pull

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of your constituency -- you're going to have to pay, I'll tell you how

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much after the election. I understand why Tories like me or

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upset with the idea of undermining the principle of inheritance. What I

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genuinely don't understand is how socialists like John McDonnell or

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Jeremy Corbyn can say, we're going to fight for the right of

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multimillionaires in the south of England to hand over the entire

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value of their homes. We're going to fight to make sure that

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multimillionaires keep the winter fuel allowance is. Why is the left

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saying, we are keeping every privilege for the rich? I thought

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Jeremy Corbyn's allowance is that the system is rigged for the rich.

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It's mad! I think we are in argument about whether the rights or

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wrongs... The triple lock. The Conservative sums don't add up. In

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the Andrew Neil grilling we saw, tell us about taxes. I can't give

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you any promises. Tell us about the NHS and the extra ?8 billion. I

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can't tell you where it is coming from or whether it is new money or

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not. There two default position is that the primers has. Number one is

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evasion, number two is blame Corbyn. The most important sadistic she out

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with in that interview was she said, in the next ten years there will be

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2 million more people over the age of 75 needing care. We can't expect

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people in work to pay higher taxes because the tax burden is the

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highest it has been for 30 years. We can't borrow it because our or ring

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is far too high. Where do we get it? At least the Tories have some ideas

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about. Labour is the magic money tree and a free unicorn for

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everyone! If we had got to the Don Lock cap, it could have been costed.

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-- the Andrew Dilnot cap. Ministers yesterday was on... Gentlemen,

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please! I need a whistle or something! We are back to the cap,

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but we don't know what the cap is, the interesting debate, no limit has

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been set by the Conservatives so far. Paul, interesting, this poll.

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This is the Huffington Post suggesting that in Wales Labour are

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racing ahead with Welsh voters stop your yes, this is curious, this

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poll. They are talking about an extraordinary 16 points swing to

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Jeremy Corbyn's favour in Wales. Now, we've been here before with

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swings. We've been here before with poles. We are quite a way out from

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polling day. These figures are doubtless moving around, but they

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are only moving in one way. The Tory vote is staying basically steady, or

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so it seems. Labour seems to be inching up. And the other parties

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seem to be involved in a third-place play-off. Polls are just polls,

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that's it. Lets not forget, the polls called the referendum wrong,

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they called Trump from, they called the last general election wrong, I

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wouldn't get too excited. I know you are looking forward to the great

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socialist republic, but it ain't going to happen. You were talking

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only about how far ahead Theresa May was in the polls. If she is as far

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ahead as Mrs Thatcher was, it she didn't do very well either. Let's

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move on to the Financial Times, Trump at the wall. I hope we can get

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this picture on screen. Can you imagine from tweeting this out to

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say, number one he is made stopping a flood by holding back the waters!

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-- here is me. Number two, I told you I would build a wall! It is

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significant, though. It is significant and very interesting,

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the significance has been underwhelmed, it has got into

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difficulties. Because Trump, his approach to secrecy has been

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encapsulated in this visit. In a trip to talk to the Russians he

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talks about secret intelligence being passed on from Syria. He then

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gets other people to deny it. He then confirms it himself, and today

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he says in public, oh, but I'm never mentioned Israel, it wasn't me,

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honest. It's! It was an incredible clanger. One issue of substance. At

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the weekend he was in Saudi Arabia, he spoke at a conference of 40

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Islamic countries, all of whom are delighted that under him US foreign

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policy is going back to its traditional stance of backing the

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Saudi view of the Middle East rather than the Iranian view of the Middle

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East. Although that will be unpopular with some, he is amazingly

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popular in the Gulf states, because they feel that America is back being

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their friend against. The Times, apparently storms and tea on not

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going to be part of the break between cricket matches as people

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thought they would. When I saw this on page three I wondered why it

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wasn't on the front page! And act like this ripping apart the very

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fabric of society, this has got to be another thing that Jeremy Corbyn

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has come up with! But it isn't. There is a reason it is the bottom

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of page three, it is talking about doing away with cucumber Sam Wood

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is, but it comes from Tony Oxley of fear of Cricket club. -- cucumber

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sandwiches. -- fare Roque Cricket club. If it was the Test matches, it

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would be the most important story of the day. I wonder why the Theresa

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May to boggle is not on the front of the Daily Mail. -- De Bock all.

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Don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online

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It's all there for you, seven days a week, at bbc.co.uk/papers.

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And if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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