10/06/2017 The Papers


10/06/2017

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Jack Blanchard, political editor of the Mirror

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and Caroline Wheeler, political editor of

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Tomorrow's front pages: The Observer says May's Premiership is in Peril.

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The paper leads with its editorial comment saying

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Mrs May is discredited, humiliated, and diminished.

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It concludes she has lost credibility and leverage.

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The Daily Mail says the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson,

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is set to launch a bid to become Prime Minister.

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It also carries a picture of former Top Gear presenter Richard Hammond

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who is in a serious condition after being involved in a car crash

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The Telegraph says Theresa May may be in Downing Street

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but she has no power after losing her

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The paper says senior tories are jostling in an unofficial

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The Sunday Times claims as many as five Cabinet ministers are urging

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The Express leads with the resignation of Theresa May's two

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closest advisers Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill - it's headline

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By the way, we will be with you for 20 minutes tonight, I hope you are

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pleased. The Observer... I should calm down a bit. The Observer,

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made's premiership in peril. We know we've got this mechanism called

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confidence and supply, Caroline, who would or wouldn't want a DUP

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coalition? It would be more stable, wouldn't it? That is the pro of

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having a coalition deal, she could have confidence, although not great

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confidence, that she can get some legislation through the House of

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Commons, but it would only give her a majority of two. That means that

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if people didn't turn up, she would still struggle to command that

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majority. There are concerns about the DUP stance it particularly in

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things like abortion, gay rights and climate change. There has been lots

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of Twitter activity with MPs, Sarah Woollaston was one of them, really

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being very bad vocal about their opposition to this kind of

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opposition of the party and their stance on these particular issues so

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they have urged her to proceed with caution. But she needs back-up from

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somewhere and her options are limited. Very limited but this was a

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Prime Minister who spent the last seven weeks shrieking about a

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coalition of chaos, Labour were supposed to be a big threat to the

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nation. She also tried to target your position as a terrorist

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sympathiser and there she is trying to find a coalition with the pretty

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unpleasant party who has rather close ties to pretty unpleasant

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people in Northern Ireland. The hypocrisy is unbelievable. But the

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DUP have tendencies, they are only judgment party, they are a natural

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fit, in some ways? They are certainly a conservative with a

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small C party but they are ultraconservative. They are not

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mainstream by any sort of measure. The sort of stuff they talk about in

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terms of climate change, denying it exists, and gay rights, really

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unpleasant things some of their politicians have said. David Cameron

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spent a long time trying to detoxify the Conservative Party and it was

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semi successful. Theresa May was the one who warned they were seen as the

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nasty party and now they are getting into bed with some of the most

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unpleasant people in Parliament. At the extremes of all parties, there

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are less liberally minded types. In any party. Some of the things that

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Ukip, remember them? Some of the things they talked about, a lot of

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people felt they were distasteful. Remember the holder baklava Donald

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Trump, when he came to power, Nigel Farage was the only person talking

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to him from this side of the pond. They were very here they would not

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do business with him, there were not going to make him an unofficial

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adviser, they have resisted those kinds of moves before. The other

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really serious point, even when you get away from talking about that as

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a shield on women's rights, for example, is the whole peace process.

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The current peacekeeping agreement ends at the end of this month and

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does not compromise our neutrality on this position completely if the

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government is side in with one particular party? There are more and

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more voices coming out on this. The former Northern Ireland Secretary

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Peter Hain has said the prospect of this could be really calamitous for

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the peace process moving forward. Sinn Fein said there were to start

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talks immediately about power-sharing again and their view

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is that this kind of association between the DUP and the

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Conservatives isn't permissible because of the Good Friday

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agreement. Exactly. The Westminster government are supposed to be

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neutral to try and find a balance between them. John Major had no

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majority in the House of Commons when he was Prime Minister but he

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because he knew how damaging it because he knew how damaging it

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would be. Theresa May comes out on the early hours of Friday morning

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with no sleep, she is straight on the phone to them, she doesn't care.

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What she cares about insuring up her... Power. She cares about how

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power. The other story on the front page is drop hard exit, demand MPs.

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There will be pressure from all sides, Remainers, leave us,... This

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is a massive problem she has, even with the DUP, she has this time

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majority in parliament and it means every time she comes to Parliament

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with the big vote over Brexit, there will be a fraction over one side of

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the other on her own backbenches who say, I don't like that. If they

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don't vote for it, she won't get it through. She needs every single one

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of her MPs to support her. And there is no way you can unify the party on

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some of those positions. And the robber you've got there is it is not

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just her own backbench that will be missing. -- the problem. Ruth

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Davidson is talking about more ( it. Some of those think it is a failed

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bid for dropping the single market. She knows that she not only saved

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the union but she actually said Theresa May from an even more

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punishing defeat, had she not got those seats in Scotland, she would

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not have been able to get anywhere near trying to form a majority

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government. You've got the Labour Party, Green MPs, they could all

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unite together all to make the Great Repeal Bill which we understand will

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be the centrepiece still of the Queen's speech, simply because it

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has to be, and they could make the passage of that bill which will be

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in credibly complex very difficult and inflict defeat upon defeat upon

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defeat. And never mind the Lords. Never mind the Lords because if she

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had got her manifesto through she would have been able to rely on the

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Salisbury Convention. The Salisbury convention means that if you have a

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manifesto, your pledges don't have to go under the same scrutiny by the

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House of Lords as pledges that aren't in the manifesto which makes

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it easier to pass unpopular legislation. She was relying on this

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with her grammar schools legislation because it meant she could

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circumvent the House of Lords. In 2010, they didn't honour the

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Salisbury Convention which means that anything related to Brexit that

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you put in that manifesto will have to go through the Lords. And the

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Lords famously and controversially stood in the way of welfare changes.

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And that is because when they aren't put in the manifesto, the laws can

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say, nobody has voted for this, and we are going to have our say. If it

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was in the manifesto and lots a lot of people voted on it, they haven't

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got a leg to stand on, but Theresa May haven't got a mandate, people

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haven't voted on it. The Sunday Telegraph, in office, but not in

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power. Her fragile leadership suffers a further blow with these

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two aides resigning. Because it appears, Caroline, that they were

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senior Tories were saying that these two have to go. This all started

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during pretty much from the moment the manifesto was launched. MPs were

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utterly serious that the social care policy. That also thought some of

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the other proposals that had led the call vote, the abandonment of the

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winter fuel allowance, was and said they got -- unforgivable. People

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were describing it as going round on the doorstep like a cold bucket of

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sick. Offering the choice to voters between syphilis and bubonic plague

:10:40.:10:44.

was how one voter put it to me. There was a question about even if

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she won slightly convincingly by 40 to the votes if they would actually

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survive. As soon as we knew this was heading towards the coalitions

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government, it was seen as catastrophic from the policy

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narrative, these two would always be... Your fabulous report this

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morning that we all leapt upon, there was a real ultimatum issued by

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Theresa May to say that unless they go, you go. They handed in their

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resignations and the letters and statements were public today. More

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on this in the Sunday express. Make's toxic aid resigns. But

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ultimately they are only aids and all ministers have advisers, don't

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they? But the Minister or the Prime Minister in this case, the buck

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stops there. Absolutely. Inside Westminster and Whitehall, people

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know how powerful these two people were. They were two of the most

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powerful people in this country, along with Theresa May. Unelected.

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Unelected. To normal people looking at this, Hank on, you have had a bad

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election result and you have sacked your advisers, that is not a good

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look, she has not... This is the moment where she has dispatched her

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Chief Whip to go fast to basically shore up a majority for her to try

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and basically save her of and, save her skin, her aides have fallen on

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their sword to save her, and she goes shopping. There is a sense that

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it hasn't really sunk in. She is probably exhausted because of the

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time they have had. I do think that Caroline is right and there was a

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sense that she is in denial. Anyone that saw that statement outside

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Downing Street yesterday, it was embarrassing, she had a crushing

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result,... She couldn't believe what happened. She has to be able to

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process it. You have to realise and relate. It was the same speech she

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could have been given in she had a majority. People were watching

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open-mouthed. They were expecting conciliation. She got shoved back

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out the door to do an interview because she forgot to apologise. You

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cannot respond in that way to such a big situation. The Mail on Sunday,

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Boris sets launch it to be PM as Theresa May clings on. How far along

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as this bit? When are we are likely to see it? How long is a piece of

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string? This is the least surprising story. We have been braced her Boris

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ever since the referendum. They tried to keep him tucked away and

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till the last couple of weeks when they let him out of his box a little

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bit. It was noticeable on Friday morning when he wasn't giving his

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backing to the Prime Minister even when people were asking him. We know

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that Boris has been desperate to be Prime Minister at least 15 years,

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bubbly his whole life. The question is when is it coming. It is more

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likely to be in maybe a few months' time. The idea that she is going to

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be PM for a long time, we know she won't fight another election, so, as

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we know, that is to lease sires -- fires the starting gun. As soon as

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the exit poll came out, we started talking about when she would resign.

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It is when the dust settles that you think about it logically, about what

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this actually means. In terms of taking over the party in the current

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state it is now, it would be a huge gamble and it would make the

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likelihood of a second general action, a rapid one, much more

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likely. This is the thing that the Tory MPs want to avoid, particularly

:15:10.:15:15.

the ones that supported Brexit, because they are fearful that if

:15:16.:15:20.

there is a second pole and one quite rapidly, that Labour will winds, and

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they want to avoid that at all costs. Boris won't be the only one

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who wants to be Prime Minister. Only in his own mind, probably. How

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appealing to the wider party will Boris be as their candidate? He will

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be appealing for a certain reason. One of the things that she wasn't

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was at the Dixie dynamic character and one of the things that has come

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up in the recriminations after the election results is that Jeremy

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Corbyn came across as being very personable, he was human, he was

:15:52.:15:58.

speaking from the heart, he had great empathy, he gave great

:15:59.:16:02.

campaign speeches, he and cigarette public, all of those things he can

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do well. -- he invigorated the public. The interesting thing about

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Boris is he has always been seen as a uplift, he can reach out beyond

:16:17.:16:21.

the Conservative ace, people love him, but we don't know how strongly

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backlash against him will be from people who supported remain. For a

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lot of people, Boris is a hate figure. And they will associate him

:16:34.:16:39.

with a pledge he made on the bus about the NHS. There is the anyone

:16:40.:16:51.

but Boris idea. That is after the referendum as well. The Sunday

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Times, SMS Tory, five Cabinet ministers urging him to topple

:16:57.:17:02.

Theresa May, but also the chance of delivering a sub. Brexit for

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business. -- a softer Brexit is this. Philip Hammond is a bit

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emboldened. Politics is so interesting like that. Philip

:17:16.:17:20.

Hammond, his career looked on the rocks after the disastrous budget,

:17:21.:17:30.

he was supposed to be sacked. And suddenly she comes away from this

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election result... He said, Hank on a second, you are basically asking

:17:35.:17:39.

me to support you as Prime Minister word you about to sack me? Haven't

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you spent the last aids spending time briefing against me? That

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conversation must be wonderful. And now, she has -- he has the power and

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he gets to but his demands to her. I will support you but this is what I

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want. He is telling the Prime Minister you change the way you do

:18:05.:18:09.

Brexit, you put the economy centre stage. She hasn't got Nick, she

:18:10.:18:16.

hasn't got the owner, she hasn't got the three people left in the world

:18:17.:18:23.

that she trust. She does have Gavin Barwell, people say he is very attic

:18:24.:18:32.

and well liked. You can lose your job as an MP one day and double your

:18:33.:18:38.

salary the next. Finally, away from this, it is a week ago since the

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London Bridge attack happened. It feels like longer because of what

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has been happening, and ordinarily, we would have been talking about it

:18:48.:18:51.

a great deal more. Hospitals warned that they are tourist targets. The

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shocking headline, and suddenly, it seems perfectly plausible. If you

:19:00.:19:05.

are looking to make headlines and shock people, of course, the idea

:19:06.:19:09.

that people working around the clock trying to help people, the thought

:19:10.:19:12.

that they could be targeted is horrific. You see it abroad. The

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number of times in Syria, in much worse circumstances, they are

:19:20.:19:24.

targeted, and this little haven that is trying to patch people up, they

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are targeted. The truth of it is Everything is a target. We have

:19:32.:19:35.

heard reports of hospitals and schools being put on alert. Let's

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look at the Sunday express again. This is Jeff Ho, one of your

:19:44.:19:48.

generous. Injured in this attack last week. I read something

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wonderful today, that all 48 people who went to hospital with injuries

:19:55.:20:01.

will survive them. They will survive because of the extraordinary care.

:20:02.:20:07.

And they might not have done some time ago. This is Jeff Ho, this is

:20:08.:20:16.

our business editor. He has written for us today, he sent his copy along

:20:17.:20:21.

with a little note, he is still quite poorly, he is in hospital, he

:20:22.:20:28.

is not long out of intensive care, he dashed his throat was slashed, he

:20:29.:20:36.

is not able to talk properly yet. He said it helps him to bright this. We

:20:37.:20:40.

read every word of it and many of us, after completing it was in

:20:41.:20:46.

floods of tears, it is incredibly moving and powerful because this guy

:20:47.:20:51.

walked into the first altercation, somebody was having a go at a answer

:20:52.:20:56.

and he stepped in to help this bouncer, turned around, walked five

:20:57.:21:02.

doors down into a restaurant and straight in to an assault. He says

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he got a jab to the guy in the Arsenal shirt before they started

:21:11.:21:13.

coming at him and he tried to take these guys down as he knew there

:21:14.:21:19.

were people behind him who couldn't defend themselves. We need to rip

:21:20.:21:24.

things like that after something so horrific. Well worth the read. And

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he has joined tinder now. If he cannot find a nice lady friend after

:21:35.:21:39.

this there was something wrong with the world!

:21:40.:21:43.

They'll both be back at 11.30pm for another look at the stories

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I'll be back with the headlines after the weather.

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Hello, there. Cooler tomorrow but if you had rain today, it will be

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brighter and

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