10/06/2017 The Papers


10/06/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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revealed the London Bridge attackers tried to hire a 7.5 ton lorry to

:00:00.:00:09.

carry out the attack, but the payment was declined.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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It will be extended compared to usual.

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With me are Jack Blanchard, political editor of the Mirror

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and Caroline Wheeler, political editor of the Sunday

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The Observer says May's Premiership is in peril.

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The paper leads with its editorial comment saying Mrs May

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is discredited, humiliated, and diminished.

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It says she is now weak, with rivals and opponents no

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The Daily Mail focusses on the Foreign Secretary Boris

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Johnson saying he is set to launch a bid to become Prime Minister.

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It also carries a picture of former Top Gear presenter,

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Richard Hammond, who was involved in a car crash during filming in

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The Telegraph says Theresa May may be in Downing Street but she has no

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power after losing her majority in Parliament.

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The paper says senior tories are jostling in an unofficial race

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The Sunday Times claims as many as five cabinet ministers are urging

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The Express leads with the resignation of Theresa May's two

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closest advisers Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill.

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It's headline refers to them as "toxic."

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A great deal to discuss, mostly focusing on the Conservatives. We

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will also mention Labour at some point. The Observer. Blocking the

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DUP coalition. I wonder how or the DUP would have been on the

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coalition. The experience the Lib Dems had in 2015, the formal

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coalition running the country for five years, it was disastrous for

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them. They were almost completely wiped out as a party. There is no

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appetite to repeat that because of the impact it had among the major

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parties. We now have a loose arrangement. The problem with that

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is it is anything but strong and stable in the words of Theresa May.

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It is weekend wobbly. It could fall apart at any moment. -- weak and

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wobbly. We don't know how much you will get through, not much, I

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imagine. For some in the party that clearly think the DUP I'm not the

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right bedfellows... Absolutely. Ruth Davidson broke ranks yesterday to

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support she was very concerned about their stance on gay rights. That

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started many others coming out. There is similar rhetoric about

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women. Many have come out to speak vocally about fears of getting into

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bed with the party whose track record on those issues is quite

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concerning to them. They are antiabortion and also they have a

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problem with gay marriage and issues like that. There is genuine concern

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about this. That is aside from the overarching issue about the peace

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process. Think about where we are at the moment. It is a very fragile

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peace process. The current power-sharing arrangements and this

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month. The government previously has been a neutral arbiter of the

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process. If we get into one, it is shattered. Yes. They are supposed to

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be neutral and sit above it all. It is easy to sit in London and forget

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how fragile it is. But people involved in a process for 20 years

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are coming out this weekend saying it is dangerous and stupid. Jonathan

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Powell, Tony Blair's Chief of Staff, he was central to making the peace

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happen. This is a bad idea. You don't know where this goes further

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down the track. The last thing we want is this peace process to fall

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apart. Peter said the same thing in our newspaper. He talked about civil

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servants intrinsically involved in the process raising fear and alarm

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about the damage this could do to the process moving forward. There

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are genuine concerns now it could be absolutely, in his words,

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calamitous. The DUP say they don't want a hard Brexit, because they

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don't want a border between Northern Ireland and the republic. That might

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prove to be some leverage they can apply with regards to Brexit which

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would please a lot of people. They could do that in all sorts of

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things, some might please people and others not. Now people in Northern

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Ireland are wagging the dog of the entire country. It is what the

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Conservatives have said Labour will do with Scotland. And then half an

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hour on a Friday morning, let us do that. Reckless. They are not

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thinking about the implications for the peace process and what it will

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look like. Professor John Curtice, who never seems to be wrong about

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this, he called it right away. He said that is where she could go to

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for support. UKIP... I mean, in politics, don't you sometimes have

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to make allegiances were you never expected to? They're restricting

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that. But the Conservatives have been running a seven-week campaign

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about that. Four hours later, they are doing exactly what they said

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they would not do. It is hypocrisy. They would argue it is an

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arrangement which has been informal for some time. You often find the

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DUP go behind the Conservatives on lots of things. The difference if it

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is a very cynical bid to shore up her own power base and majority.

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That is what people are taking exception to as opposed to... I just

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want to say, the DUP saw off the Ulster Unionist Party. Exactly.

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There is only ten of them. It is enough to get her over the line just

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if every one of her MPs it supports us. There might be ten DUP MPs.

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There are 19 openly gay Tory MPs. They are furious to see their leader

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jumping into bed with this very anti-gay rights party. If they

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decide to vote against Theresa May, the majority has gone straightaway.

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These concerns have been raised with her already, especially the LB GT

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rights issue. I know she has had assurances, Ruth Davidson, that

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those issues will not be on the table. But if you are in a situation

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where you are desperate to shore up votes on a particular issue, for

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example, a vote on a Brexit deal on the grand repeal bill, for example,

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how far would she go to guarantee she gets that through the house if

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it became a confidence issue? It became about her leadership again?

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She would do pretty much anything, I would imagine, to get that through.

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They use the expression jump on the bed so many times. We need a

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different phrase for it. -- jump into. Via The Observer. She has no

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mandate. It is up to negotiation. I had an interview on Friday with

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David Davis. He said this is all about Brexit and she wanted to

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strengthen her hand with this election. How many votes does she

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need to claim she has the mandate for what happens next? He said to me

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a majority of one was enough. Of course, she does not have a majority

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of one. There are serious question marks about whether she has a

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mandate. Having said that, lots of people are saying this is academic,

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that she went to the polls for different reasons and used Brexit as

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the general excuse for doing it. There are other things a play. The

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threat from Scotland. The expenses scandal that was nipping her toes.

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It will be tough for her to get through the kind of Brexit she has

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wanted to pursue and said she would. I know Whitehall insiders, lots of

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them have said they are literally ripping up the plans they had made.

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They are saying those plans are pretty much dead in the water. We

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have not heard much about it, happily? They now realise they have

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to make concessions. The most important bits, getting out of the

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custom union, it is hard. This is the first time in this election we

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have had a chance to vote on what type of Brexit... Were they really

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voting on that? Many people said it is the NHS and education and social

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care. That is why they liked Jeremy Corbyn. There were people in the

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referendum voting on the NHS as well. How can you do sting which

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these things? A party puts forward a manifesto... Distinguish Yarmouk --

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distinguish. It is the first time they have had a chance to vote on a

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type of Brexit. Theresa May said this is why we are going to the

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polls, specifically for support for Brexit and her planned. She did not

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get it. It is hard to argue now that we will leave the EU in this way.

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She needs more of a consensus than the way she has tried to do it. What

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has happened during the course of the day. The Sunday Telegraph. In

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office and not in power. Fragile leadership. Her two chiefs have to

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resign. Another bit of pressure added. The feeling is that senior

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services thought Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill had too much say. Yes. It

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was a settling of scores as well. It is hard to overstate how powerful

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these two people were. They were running the country with Theresa May

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almost exclusively. That upset other member is of the cabinet and Tory

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party and people in Whitehall who felt they should have had more say

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and could not get near the Prime Minister because these two people

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were basically running the country. -- members. They could not wait to

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wield the axe so to speak when the opportunity arose. It was not just

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the election result. We were talking about how fragile the power base was

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right from the moment the Tory manifesto was published three weeks

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before polling day. People lapped onto the front pages of newspapers

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about it. -- lept. MPs were taking this policy onto the doorstep. They

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were finding it was absolutely monstered and savaged. Many said it

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was going down like a bucket of cold sick among Conservatives voters.

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Like the triple lock for example. They have been seen as culpable for

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that. The Sunday Express, your paper, May's toxic aides resign. And

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incomes Gavin Barwell, who lost his seat, finding himself with a good

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job as Chief of Staff. -- in comes. Twice the money. They are not paying

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to of them. They are saving money. Austerity is working. Yes. He is

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reasonably popular among Tory MPs. They have been getting along well

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over the past two years. It is seen as a conciliatory measure. You have

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to understand these two aides were the life of the reason made. Along

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with her husband. Now she is looking isolated. -- Theresa May. They were

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her sounding board. Now that is taken away and she is left standing

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alone. But Barwell is like. He will have to be a critical friend. He

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dubbed Theresa the freezer. He said she left everyone out except for

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those two. MPs are saying it is time to thaw and to stop that freezing

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out of people, bringing them back into the tent. That is possibly what

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this appointment signals. The other people we have heard from today have

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said that. It is a brave decision she has made. She kept her powder

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dry since leaving Downing Street, the former Director of

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Communications, who broke cover to talk about her own experience of

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working in Downing Street and how she felt, that they were very

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dysfunctional, that they were not very inclusive, that they ruled

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everything with an iron fist, that there was not much negotiation

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discussion, and everything was rubberstamped and went through them

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and that made life pretty umpires and for her and others. -- pretty

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unpleasant. Ultimately they are AIDS, not the

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Prime Minister or Deputy Prime Minister? That's how they were

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acting. Looking at the public, they will say while on you carrying the

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can, you didn't win the vote on your leadership by the margin needed, you

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need to be walking away, not sacking your advisers and blaming them.

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There are rumours Theresa May wanted to resign but was persuaded to stay.

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Moving onto the Mail on Sunday, Boris is set to launch bid to BPM as

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Theresa May clings on. His team is circling a wounded leader. That's

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not a surprise that people, notably the Foreign Secretary, are thinking

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about having a shot. Literally from when the exit poll came out we

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started talking about Boris on manoeuvres. There was further

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speculation when he came out and didn't say things supportive of

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Theresa May in the aftermath of the election results. The story

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inevitably moves on whenever there's a wounded Prime Minister, it's a

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sign there is a leadership contest brewing. Fires are starting. The one

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thing we know about Boris is it in his DNA that he wants to be Prime

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Minister, there's no doubt that is the top job he wants and he's almost

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willing to trample over anybody to get their. No, it's not a particular

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surprise that this is the story featuring both in the mail and the

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Sunday Times but what is a surprise is the idea he is set to launch it,

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which suggests something imminent -- Mail. I don't know what your

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soundings are like from MPs but certainly Conservative MPs,

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especially the more critical ones, of Theresa May's premiership, are

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quite clear this isn't the time to get rid of her and it would be

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damaging for both country and party and would make the prospect of a

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general election all the more likely, which of course they feared

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desperately would lead to a Labour government. I'm going to put a cat

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amongst the pigeons and change the order, we will do the times, the

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Mirror and then back to the Times. That's what we'll do -- Times. I

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have missed something out. I'm supposed to be honest! We're doing

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the Times next. That is also about Boris Johnson, we must call him by

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his Paul Mayne, people get quite cross when we give him not his

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nickname, just his first name -- full name. Five ministers urging

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Boris to topple Theresa May. He has tweeted today that the Mail on

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Sunday is tripe, I am backing Theresa May, let's get on with the

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job so whether these ministers will persuade him? This won't take a lot

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of persuading for him, this is about timing, when is the right time? How

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will it look when he does go for it? There's suggestion that he might be

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looking at having a stalking horse candidate, somebody else makes a

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challenge to Theresa May's premiership first, someone who

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doesn't think they will win but triggers the leadership contest so

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the process gets under way, the MPs start to consider it, start to vote

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and at that point Boris goes in and says, if you're having a leadership

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contest, why don't I put my name in the hat and he romps to victory!

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That's the most likely thing. Others will want to stop him, not everyone

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will want him. There are other names like Amber Rudd and David Davis

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particularly but I want to point out in Tim Shipman's excellent story, he

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says although he has had these calls from these five Cabinet ministers

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urging him to stand, he decided on Friday challenging May would

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destabilise the government and catapulting Corbyn into Downing

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Street and that's what the fear is, if you have a leadership contest you

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make the possibility of a second general election more likely. I was

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talking to a couple of Tory contacts today and there is genuine fear

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among some of them that if there was another general election, which is

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possible, this one hasn't created a result, they could lose and that's

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the worst thing, losing to Jeremy Corbyn and having him in Number 10.

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The Daily Mirror exclusive says we might not have to wait that long

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according to Jeremy Corbyn. He thinks he could be Prime Minister

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within days, that is what he has told my Sunday Mirror colleagues. He

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is of the opinion that Theresa May is not going to be able to do this,

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she has stitched together this coalition of crackpots as we

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memorably dubbed it in the Mirror yesterday and is it really going to

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hold? She's got a tiny majority in the Commons with the help of the

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DUP. But the party is in turmoil. She's not going to be able to get

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things through, can she get her Queen's speech through unamended

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Quanne a budget? Maybe, maybe not, it could fall apart quickly and the

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Leader of the Opposition is within his rights to try to form a

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government. But he doesn't have the numbers either, he can say what he

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likes to the Mirror, even with the support of the SNP and the Lib Dems

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he doesn't have enough. He is waiting in the wings and snapping at

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her heels and there's another revelation today he is already

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putting together his alternative Queen's speech if there was an

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opportunity for him to put his forward over the one now Theresa May

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must literally be tearing up, the one they had prepared before, there

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are huge question marks about her policy agenda, for example the

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grammar school revolution, can she get that through, no, the DUP can't

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vote on education reforms anyway because it is a devolved issue.

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There's huge question marks about some of those policies. The other

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thing with Labour, suddenly the Conservative Party are taking Jeremy

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Corbyn seriously. So is the Parliamentary Labour Party! That's

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absolutely true. So is the press, they have laughed at him and mocked

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him, the Conservative Party were overjoyed he was the Labour leader,

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they thought they would not him out of the park and suddenly it's not so

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funny any more and suddenly they are seeing him as a genuine threat who

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could genuinely be in Downing Street if another election happens or even

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if it doesn't. Suddenly the dynamic has changed. One Labour MP told me

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we are all Corbyn Easter is now. Something they weren't saying a few

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days ago. There's a sense the party is going to pull behind him because

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they can sense Tory blood, and they now think there's a realistic

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opportunity they could form the next government whenever the next

:20:52.:20:55.

opportunity arises. Labour is more united now than in a long time.

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Let's pull you away from this story. Do you want me to do the Sunday

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Times? Charlie Hollis it up? It is connected to the Sunday Express

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story we will do in a second -- shall I hold it up. Hospitals warn

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they are terrorist targets. A week since the horrific attack in London

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Bridge and Southwark killing eight. How do you protect public buildings?

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Hospitals and other buildings are open, you just walk in. But you have

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to do, people are using things like kitchen knives, vans and cars,

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everyday things, you can't ban these things, you can't have armed guards

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on the front doors of every building so I don't know how you protect

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against it. The trick is in the end catching these people before they

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act. Stopping the radicalisation as well, which is the real problem with

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this happening online, not people meeting people on the streets all

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going to see hate preachers but sitting in their bedrooms and seeing

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this hate that mobilises them to commit these terrible atrocities.

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Let's finish on a more positive note that has come out of those awful

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events of last week because Geoff Ho, one of your colleagues, he has

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been writing about his involvement in trying to stop these attackers? I

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know I am biased but even if it weren't my particular paper I would

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urge everyone to read Geoff's Tory. Geoff is a trusted colleague and a

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good friend -- story. What he did this time last week was incredibly

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brave. Now for the first time in his own words he has told the story of

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what happened to him when he took on the three jihadists in a pub in

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Borough Market just moments after he intervened in another fight,

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stepping in between a bouncer and some troublemakers as he describes

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it in his own words, he made the fateful decision to follow up that

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little altercation with a little snifter in another pub rather than

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getting the train home. That fateful moment led him to walk into what...

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It's just an unimaginable thing, I don't think many of us could imagine

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what it would be like. The way he describes what happened, he

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literally used his own body, his own skill, he is a martial arts expert,

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to fend off these attackers. He took the decision very, very consciously

:23:30.:23:34.

that the only way to stop a huge loss of life was to keep these guys

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talking, to try to distract them, to play for time, to make sure, praying

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the police were on their way, that they would do as little damage to

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him as possible as he kept others hiding behind barstools and tables

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safe. That's exactly what happened. He had his throat slashed. He was

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very lucky to be alive. I work up to the news on Sunday morning he had

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been very badly injured and was in intensive care -- I woke. We didn't

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know his prospects but I'm really pleased to tell you he is sitting up

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in bed, he is accepting visitors, there are queues outside the

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hospital ward to see him, we are all struggling to see him. If he is

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watching, best wishes to Geoff and speedy recovery. Thank you to the

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gallery crew for following my front-page bingo. I love that shot

:24:28.:24:32.

from over there! Use that again! Thank you, that's it for the papers

:24:33.:24:36.

tonight. Don't forget you can see the front pages online at the BBC

:24:37.:24:41.

News website and we have colleagues that tweet them on Twitter every

:24:42.:24:46.

night. All of the papers are there seven days a week and all the

:24:47.:24:50.

additions are posted there and on iPlayer if you missed them. Thank

:24:51.:24:54.

you to Jack and Caroline. Time for the weather forecast next. Good

:24:55.:24:56.

night. Good evening. Mateen always keeps us

:24:57.:25:10.

on our toes and the weather does as well. Different day tomorrow

:25:11.:25:14.

whatever you had today --

:25:15.:25:15.

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