11/06/2017 The Papers


11/06/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello. This is BBC News with Martine Croxall.

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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment,

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first the headlines at just after 11pm.

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Theresa May battles back amid speculation over her leadership

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a full five-year term as prime minister, and says it's time

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What I am feeling is that actually there is a job to be done.

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And I think what the public want is to

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ensure that the government is getting on with the job.

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Meanwhile, he's back in the cabinet -

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Michael Gove returns in a reshuffle, a year after Theresa may sacked him.

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Police investigating the Manchester concert

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bombing say they're now sure the attacker, Salman Abedi,

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And further success for France's Emmanuel Macron

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as his party looks set to secure a huge majority

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in the country's parliamentary elections.

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Still dizzy from the experience of an hour ago, hello and welcome to

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what to make our look at what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With us are Yasmin Alibhai Brown and Economic Adviser for Arbuthnot Ruth

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Lea. Welcome to you both. Rebecca Hunter and an Jarran Reed

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believe you should have your own show! There you go! Let's begin.

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Tomorrow's front pages starting with the i...

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It leads with the news that one of the big hitters of the Leave

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campaign is back in government as Michael Gove is made environment

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The Metro uses George Osborne's description

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of the Prime Minister as a "dead woman walking" for its headline,

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with the former chancellor saying she could be out within days.

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The Express focuses on Boris Johnson's plea to the party

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to get behind the Prime Minister over fears Tory infighting

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over her leadership will damage the party further.

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The Telegraph's reports that Michael Gove has been drafted

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potential leadership challenges, the paper claiming it's

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the Prime Minister's way of showing she can work with her critics.

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of Remainer Damien Green to First Secretary of State

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is a sign her position on Brexit is softening,

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with a possible rethink on remaining in the customs union.

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The Guardian says the Prime Minister plans to win

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back support from her party by adopting a more collegiate style

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of leadership following criticism that senior colleagues had been shut

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And the Daily Mail says she will go even further,

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throwing out whole chunks of the manifesto in a bid to keep

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The Financial Times repeats George Osborne's claim Theresa May

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is a dead woman walking, signalling that business leaders

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will take her weakness as an opportunity to push

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for the softer Brexit the City favours.

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Nods and shakes of heads? It is all very balanced around this table.

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Let's begin with the Telegraph. Just because you have somebody inside the

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current ten doesn't mean that you can keep them in line. No, but you

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can keep your eye on them. I'm surprised that she brought in some

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DeLaet Michael Gove, who has betrayed everybody in the party.

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But, as an interesting set of decisions, there were certainly no

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changes. -- like Michael Gove. I think she is trying very hard not to

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make any new enemies. He is a good communicator, though, Michael Gove,

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is he? I am a big fan of Michael Gove. I think is terrific guy. It is

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interesting the Telegraph has put the headline here, but it just sort

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of confirms in my view that I think Theresa May's and to be Prime

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Minister for some time yet. I don't think there is any eminent challenge

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to her leadership. -- imminent. They need to get the Queens Beach out the

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weight, the Brexit talks under way, and see how it goes. I think the

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other aspect that is interesting about this story is that the

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promised brings in others in this reshuffle. -- Queen's Speech. The

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Telegraph, perhaps because this is its wish list, says that coming back

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in. If we look at the times, it is the opposite. Yesterday, at Gavin

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Barwell, who lost the seat, Croydon Central, on Thursday, he was a

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remain, he has been pointed chief of staff days we -- been appointed

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chief of staff at Downing Street. Yes, this is interesting. The two

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major papers disagreeing with each other. I personally believe that

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Theresa May set out her stall on negotiating stance when she wrote to

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Donald Tusk, when she was triggering Article 50, at the end of March. She

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said out of the single market, after the customs union, and of course,

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having a close trade relationship, a free-trade agreement, and eight

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close agreement on security, and I personally believe that is right.

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And I don't think that Greenies make a big difference. It is not just

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Green. So Michael Fallon said, and I wash it, and it was an interesting

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moment, he has been very loyal, that he is now shifting and now saying

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that he is after a more business friendly Brexit. -- Green. Do you

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know what? Economists are not always right. They are. I am. Please give

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the talking stick to Ruth, just a moment. I am not always right, but I

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write most of the time. I am more right than most economists are. But

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I think when I said, you that Theresa May wanted a close trade

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relationship with Europe, I think that is what Michael Fallon is talk

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about. And I would like to see a continuation of tariff free trade.

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If we are at the customs union, Art of the single market, I think there

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will be some control of immigration from the EU. Full-back for a moment,

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because much earlier in the evening, we were asked why it you are so

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convinced, as an economist, that being outside the EU in the hardest

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Brexit will not be a problem for Britain? -- out of the single

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market. I would like a free-trade agreement. There are some people who

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are harder than I am. They don't want any free-trade agreement at

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all. I don't think that would be optimal. But having a trade

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agreement, I don't see really why our trade should suffer from that.

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And if you think about it, they're actually quite a lot of countries

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that trade with the EU that are not even in a trade agreement with the

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EU. And you know how long it takes them to negotiate? Stop, stop, stop.

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They are not even in a trade agreement. And the fact is that

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trade is actually flourishing. Look at new Chinese trade. Look at EU

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trade with the US. But even that the point that if we're talking about

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happy to have a trade agreement, it could take years to negotiate? I

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think with the EU, it could be done within two or three years. I love

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you dearly, I really do. You are some of the love talking to. You are

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taking this country down a line which, when things fall apart, are

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you going to take responsibility? I will have to admit that I would have

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been wrong. That will be too late! People will be lose their jobs! It

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is going to happen. Brexit will happen. And I hope that I pray and I

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do believe that there will be a very good trade agreement between

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ourselves and EU and the UK. Because it is in the EU's interest to do so?

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Absolutely. They have the greatest trade surplus with us. Key pledges

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being axed as the price of Cabinet support? It will be interesting,

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Yasmin, to see what she can go through with, given that she doesn't

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have a majority? I think the policy that really got the Pensioners will

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go. I your pension? Yes. OK, that is to us. -- are you a pensioner. She

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will please the Daily Mail. But now she is going to care that... I think

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we would now get a much shorter Queens Beach, one that will focus

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more on Brexit. I don't think she will dare. They are all furious. But

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in the as much time all leadership. At a national do this. In a way, I

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feel for her. Have anything about Brexit, and happy to think about a

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fast put together manifested. I don't know how they will tell. I

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think it was a pity that it was released. I know I was here we go,

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and will tell me the attack on pensioners, and I was being slightly

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facetious, but more to the point, it looked like an absolute attack on

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the core vote. Can Sergio Mattarella I so agree that a policy. That was a

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thing. But that was great, because we're getting far too much money as

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pensioners. -- can I tell you something? I so agree with that

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policy. It was toxic. And as for foxhunting, why on earth do they

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mention that? They can come into my garden, because I have a fox with

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Main Beach -- with mange. Let's not get to gain on local issues. Here we

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have a call for unity with the Foreign Secretary. How old is he

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now, at 45, 50? Is that all? Ye has more than that. He should be around

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for sometime yet how long, I am not sure. But they are distributing

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myself now. I they just want to let the dust settle. In my repeating

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myself? Just like me, repeating yourself. I can't help it. His 53

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this month. Can you imagine Boris Johnson being our Prime Minister? --

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he is 53. Did or they talk about his period as Foreign Minister. --

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do you know what they talk about? His period as Foreign Minister. I

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don't think this is imminent, whatever happens. I don't think

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anyone in the Conservative Party would've wanted him as primers,

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surely. Nobody but Boris... Let's look at the ie, at the bottom. --

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the i. We have had the idea of the hard Brexit, the soft Brexit, a red

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white and blue Brexit, and now the open Brexit. What that mean? I was

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Kertes a god only knows. I think Ruth Davidson is terrific. She had a

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fantastic, fantastic election. She and Jeremy Corbyn were the winners

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out of this. And she stood out well in the referendum debate. Yes, she

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did, and she was a manner. I think when she is talk about the hard

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Brexit, here, there are perhaps two things. Firstly, she doesn't want us

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to walk away from the EU. Either one that neither does Theresa May. The

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second point is she is just sort of saying I am here, and I want to be

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involved, and I think she should be involved, because she is a success,

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and is one of the Tory's raiders access at the moment. -- Tories'. --

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greatest assets. The DUP, which, as we know, is going to in to some sort

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of relationship with Theresa May... They talk about it on Tuesday. But I

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agree with you, they're no deal is no deal, because they want at the

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very manner in some agreement over the border. So just walking away

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from the EU is not acceptable to the DUP. They are very sensible party.

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I am going to go on the demonstrations, being 21. The

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demonstrations against their recognition -- position on abortion.

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That won't come into play with this confidence and supply arrangement.

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But when you make them your fundamental allies, there are people

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who are upset, including Ruth Davidson. You can have a protest

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but, so what? In present-day Britain, our youth vote... I have

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never protested in my life. You must come to a demonstration with me. I

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would like to be there when you make your placards. I have been on 45

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protest in my life and stop good God. Jeremy Corbyn saying he could

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be Prime Minister in months. Either the Conservatives need to fall apart

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or he can try this hand as a minority government. How likely is

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it? Anything is possible and likely now. That is the great thing. Just

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like in France we thought nothing was possible and what I love now is

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that the possibility of possibility has been opened up. So, who is? If

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Theresa May fails... Is she fails they will be an election within the

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Conservative Party and then the question is whether the government

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will come down? Probably not. He did quite well in the campaign, nobody

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disputes that. But is still well short of the 326 he needs. If you

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take that current configuration with a shocking results for the SNP, he

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would have a long way to catch up, if he really wanted the prime

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ministership. There is a narrative doing the rounds that you would be

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mad to want to take on the Brexit negotiations given that the members

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who want to stay are not going to make it easy. Let them have a go at

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it... It is interesting because he has not come out... And I was angry

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with Jeremy Corbyn because it did not, properly on a position on

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Brexit, remain or otherwise. Nor did Theresa May. They both played quite

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quietly. I think he would have a problem with negotiations because he

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would have to take a tough position. But he does have had good people on

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his team, such as Starmer, a professional man who knows about the

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law and deals. But I think we are in such a different political

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landscape, this man was written off even two weeks ago and we're not

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talking that any more about him. But he is a politician and politicians

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like power. The Guardian. Donald Trump delaying his state visit over

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protest fears. Downing Street said it still going ahead but Mr Trump

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wants us to like him. He does not want people protesting so we must

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not go on protest. Would you? Of course I will be. I have special

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protest shoes that I where! -- that I wear. Why shouldn't he have a

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state visit? Here's the elected head of one of our biggest allies. Yes.

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But the majority of the people in this country do not want this to

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happen. We live in a democracy where the will of the people matters and I

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think it will come from quite visit that if he wants to sit in a golden

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carriage! You remember the Chinese visit when Prince Charles acted up

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over it? You want to know why we were entertaining these people. It's

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not as if we have always welcomed everybody here. I know there is a

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petition not wanting him to come. But then there was a petition that

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said he should come. I signed that once. Put your fingers away, please.

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But he is the head of state. Why should he not come? There are things

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happening in America at the moment... In America they are not

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moving on. There are many things happening. Many Americans are

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against their own president. You know what? At the end of the

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election Americans always come together as a people. They have not

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been able to do that. He may not want to come. He may not want to

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come as he sees protests. Finally a different story in France. While

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things are a little tricky here Emmanuel Macron seems to have gotten

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everything stitched up. The first round of the parliamentary

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elections, heading towards a land lies for a party, or a movement,

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that was only set up one year ago. Quite an extraordinary political

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journey. It is. He has caught the mood of the country and it says

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something about the established parties, be it the socialists or the

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party of Sarkozy. They must have just lost all credibility. The

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socialists in particular of expected to do quite badly so that is a

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summing up of the views of the French people. Marine Le Pen will be

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a marginal group in Parliament as well. I think it is connected in

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many ways and I am not suggesting that Ukip are the same as the

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National Front. The people really thought that Ukip would get a number

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of seeds because millions voted for them. -- a number of seats. We

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thought we were drifting rightwards and now there are all sorts of

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surprises happening. I'm not an expert on Emmanuel Macron or French

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politics but it is amazing what has happened and then there is another

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election coming up, perhaps more crucial to us, the German election.

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The turnouts at this today was very low so the idea that his movement

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has re-energised politics may be hollow. It seems... I think some

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people think the business is done now that the President has been

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elected. Even to get so many candidates in place in quite a short

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time is a feat. An indication of how he will approach Brexit, he does not

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want to give any quarter to Britain. Well, do they want to sell us wine,

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or don't they? I would like some wine. But, also, there is another

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site. We need them as much as they need us and that has been a problem

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with the Brexit argument. I know you are going to accuse me of repeating

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myself, there will be a mutually beneficial agreement, I am convinced

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about that. It is in the interests of everybody. These are our friends.

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They don't look at it like that, the way we spoke about them during the

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campaign. The debates we had were shocking. They were terrible. But

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bygones are bygones. Now, they are not. Placards again? Could you bring

:22:46.:22:56.

your? I have 45. I will choose the best one. I reuse them. They recycle

:22:57.:23:08.

them. They are such good things to go to. You must come with me. She

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does not look convinced. Ladies, lovely to see you both to thank you.

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