13/06/2017 The Papers


13/06/2017

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welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us

:00:18.:00:23.

tomorrow. I'm joined by Katie balls from the Spectator and David Davis

:00:24.:00:30.

the broadcaster. Have you recovered from the election? Just! Still

:00:31.:00:36.

shell-shocked! We are going to start with The Telegraph which declares

:00:37.:00:39.

the Prime Minister will stick to her pre-election plans for a hard

:00:40.:00:43.

Brexit, despite calls for a change of approach following the election

:00:44.:00:46.

result. The Times says things could go in the opposite direction as it

:00:47.:00:51.

sources claim. The Chancellor is preparing to fight to persuade

:00:52.:00:56.

members of the government to support a softer Brexit instead. The i

:00:57.:01:03.

points to pressure from Michel Barnier to begin talks as Theresa

:01:04.:01:08.

May is still to finalise a deal for support for her government from the

:01:09.:01:12.

DUP. The Financial Times claims Emmanuel Macron is also putting

:01:13.:01:17.

pressure on Mrs May to begin talks. The Metro focuses on the DUP and the

:01:18.:01:22.

status of their negotiations with the Conservatives. The paper says

:01:23.:01:25.

deals with the party could lead to further problems for Theresa May's

:01:26.:01:30.

government. Diane Abbott is on the front page of The Guardian. The

:01:31.:01:33.

paper has an exclusive interview with her there. Although that's The

:01:34.:01:37.

Daily Mail! The Daily Mail leads with claims that medical assistance

:01:38.:01:42.

are treating patients as part of an NHS cost-cutting measure leaving

:01:43.:01:46.

many at risk. We are going to start with The Telegraph. May says she's

:01:47.:01:54.

sticking to her Brexit blueprint. She's in France, but she's talking

:01:55.:02:02.

to a serious Europhile fan of the European Union, yet she's making it

:02:03.:02:06.

clear she'll stick to what people are describing as a hard Brexit.

:02:07.:02:11.

Yes, it's worth noting in her meeting with Macron today that it

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was quite a friendly handshake. Unlike the one he had with Mr Trump!

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There do seem to be warmer relations. There's been a lot of

:02:22.:02:24.

speculation since the results about what it means for Brexit. Lots of

:02:25.:02:29.

people in her own party want her to rethink her approach but The

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Telegraph is saying that's not going to happen. Why? You could point to

:02:33.:02:40.

the fact, David, that 80% of voters voted for parties, labour and the

:02:41.:02:44.

Conservatives, who are advocating leaving the single market. Yes, but

:02:45.:02:51.

what's been going on since the election result and the outcome,

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which shocked just about everybody. I think that's a fair comment. I've

:02:57.:03:05.

been abroad in recent weeks and it shocked people abroad. They still

:03:06.:03:12.

don't understand why the Brits, a British Prime Minister has an

:03:13.:03:15.

election she doesn't need to have. Anyway, putting that aside, I was

:03:16.:03:22.

going to sit it I can say there's been a lot of briefing today and

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indeed a few speeches and interviews, from Conservatives

:03:28.:03:35.

saying soften your tone, Mrs May. A hard Brexit is off the agenda. And

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what happened tonight very clearly is that the hard Brexiteers are

:03:41.:03:43.

fighting back and there's been this briefing to The Telegraph saying the

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Prime Minister is absolutely sticking to her guns and a threat

:03:49.:04:01.

that Britain could leave the EU without securing a trade deal. Issue

:04:02.:04:06.

trying to keep those backbenchers onside? Is that what this is all

:04:07.:04:11.

about? I think she's trying to keep a lot of backbenchers and side at

:04:12.:04:16.

the moment. We saw in her shuffle today of ministerial appointments,

:04:17.:04:21.

we saw some remain porters, in, some Brexit supporters come in. It's hard

:04:22.:04:26.

to did you switch side shoes on. Even if she wants to lead us out,

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it's whether she actually can. May has never looked weaker as Prime

:04:32.:04:35.

Minister than she does now and it's the cabinet making a lot of

:04:36.:04:38.

decisions. Which takes off onto the other story, David on the front page

:04:39.:04:44.

of The Times. Hammond pushes Tories to ditch Brexit trade plan. The real

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Brexiteers are going to hold sway according to The Telegraph, but The

:04:57.:05:00.

Times is now saying it could be Hammond. This is exactly the point.

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Is it only a week ago it was Philip Hammond who was for the chop as

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Chancellor? Now he is preparing to lead a battle within the government

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to soften Brexit by keeping Britain inside the EU customs union. This is

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what people like Boris Johnson have fought tooth and nail against. And

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then of course President Macron who we mentioned earlier, he added to

:05:34.:05:40.

the fire tonight by saying that the EU's doors remain open for Britain

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to reverse Brexit, if things go on like this. I have to say, the result

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is a night of the football match, France three with ten men, England

:05:52.:05:56.

two with 11 men, I hope that wasn't an omen for Mrs May! Katie, is

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Theresa May's debating style the way that she feels she should conduct

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these talks on Brexit, is to go in there and say if we don't get a deal

:06:12.:06:15.

where going to walk away and that's it. Hard Brexit. That is what

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underpins her whole strategy, that they are going to be too scared not

:06:21.:06:26.

to give us a deal. Is that what this is about? That was part of her

:06:27.:06:31.

pitch. It's quite funny that during the election campaign, which

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everyone admits was now quite a bad campaign, she said if you don't vote

:06:36.:06:39.

for me you will have Jeremy Corbyn in the negotiations so you need me.

:06:40.:06:43.

If you look at how she's been depicted in the foreign media since

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the results and you do think she's more a laughing stock right now than

:06:48.:06:52.

this Iron Lady. That could change but I think you can't deny although

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she called this election to strengthen her hand, it's weakened

:06:57.:07:00.

it massively. Of course, there's a bloke called David Davis who is

:07:01.:07:11.

Secretary of State for Brexit. He is presenting a rather softer line in

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the past few days than he had to follow the May line until last

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Thursday. But now, it will be very interesting to see what tone he

:07:23.:07:28.

takes and what approach he takes. I still don't understand why she has

:07:29.:07:32.

the tone she has. What is the reasoning for going in there, making

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it clear it's going to be a hard Brexit if I don't get what I want?

:07:41.:07:44.

The idea is you have to be able to walk away from the table in order to

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get a good deal. I think that wine is wearing weaker and weaker,

:07:50.:07:52.

particularly now. We saw Michael Gove today, everyone seems to be

:07:53.:07:58.

softening their language a little and talking about this need for more

:07:59.:08:03.

conversation with everyone and all the different parties. It's all

:08:04.:08:09.

talk, but there seems to be a conscious effort to make it seem

:08:10.:08:13.

less hard. I don't know if Theresa May herself has got the memo. There

:08:14.:08:17.

are a lot of Conservative hardliners on this matter and she now has to

:08:18.:08:22.

keep them somehow onside, though history teaches us that the

:08:23.:08:28.

Conservative Party's way of self-preservation is a considerable

:08:29.:08:33.

way. Given the majority she's got now, next to none, even with the DUP

:08:34.:08:42.

she's got to keep them on side as well. It feels a bit unlike the

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Major years when he was held ransom by the blokes beginning with B, as

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it were! We shouldn't underestimate the role of Ruth Davidson in this.

:08:56.:09:01.

Without the games in Scotland with the Scottish Conservatives, May

:09:02.:09:04.

wouldn't have been able to form a minority government. Ruth Davidson

:09:05.:09:08.

is in favour of a soft Brexit. She wants to focus on the economy so she

:09:09.:09:12.

isn't in the big Brexit camp. The front page of the Financial Times,

:09:13.:09:17.

Cameron turns heat on May with call to consult Labour for a softer

:09:18.:09:22.

Brexit. We'll go on to The Guardian. Interview with Diane Abbott on

:09:23.:09:29.

diabetes and life as chief target of a vicious Tory campaign. We saw the

:09:30.:09:35.

day before the election, Diane Abbott was moved temporarily from

:09:36.:09:40.

the Home Office brief, after a bad interview on Sky. They said it was

:09:41.:09:49.

health reasons. Now she says she suffers from type two diabetes. In

:09:50.:09:52.

the stress of the campaign have blood sugar levels were all over the

:09:53.:09:55.

place which affected her performance. The irony of that is

:09:56.:10:01.

that the Prime Minister has, for many years, suffered from a

:10:02.:10:05.

different type of diabetes as well. This whole question of the media,

:10:06.:10:12.

particularly the press's approach to Diane Abbott, and other Labour

:10:13.:10:19.

figures, was that counter-productive? In previous

:10:20.:10:21.

campaigns certain newspapers claimed they won the campaign for the

:10:22.:10:27.

Conservatives. I seem to remember somebody what one it was the

:10:28.:10:32.

headline. Who was it what lost it this time, one wonders? Perhaps that

:10:33.:10:36.

isn't a question to be asking tonight. Yes, on a programme called

:10:37.:10:47.

The Papers! LAUGHTER Are you saying the papers have no influence? I'm

:10:48.:10:52.

saying it's a very interesting question academically. I'll see you

:10:53.:10:58.

at Birmingham University to discuss it! Talking about people wanting to

:10:59.:11:03.

get into the press and the papers, Nick Clegg is now a columnist with

:11:04.:11:10.

the i. Yes, the i is still print. It's The Independent that is online.

:11:11.:11:16.

There he is, Nick Clegg, new columnist. Great news because he

:11:17.:11:21.

lost his job last week. No need to go to the Job Centre! It's quite

:11:22.:11:27.

traditional for politicians to have columns. Less common is what George

:11:28.:11:32.

Osborne did, obviously, when you take on the editorship. I imagine

:11:33.:11:39.

George Osborne might be kicking himself. Isn't it the same owner? No

:11:40.:11:45.

it's not actually. You want complaining about politicians doing

:11:46.:11:50.

new jobs? Television people have endlessly gone into. Politics have

:11:51.:11:56.

they? I can go back as far as Geoffrey Johnson Smith, who was an

:11:57.:12:00.

early TV presenter, who was a Conservative MP for years. I'm going

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to have to wrap this up otherwise be looking for a new job as well!

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LAUGHTER Thank you. That's it for The Papers tonight. Thank you to you

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watching, goodbye. Hello. A bit of summer warmth on the

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way for many of you tomorrow. The skies across the UK looking a bit

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more like this at times. Certainly in areas where skies have been

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particularly

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