25/06/2017 The Papers


25/06/2017

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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will keep running the team and I'm determined that we will get the

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America's Cup back. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the the papers will be With me are the political

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commentator and journalist, and the Foreign Editor

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of the Sunday Times, Peter Conradi. Welcome to both of you. Let's have a

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look at the front pages. The Observer leads with fire safety

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in schools, saying proposals to relax standards are to be

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dropped by ministers. Prince Harry dominates the front

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page of the The Mail of Sunday, saying he considered

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quitting his Royal role, The Sunday Telegraph headlines

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"Blackmail fears after MPs The cyber attack is also the main

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story on the Sunday Times, who report there was fury

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at the time it took And the Express leads

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with an image of Jeremy Corbyn - saying he ignored Armed Forces Day

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invitations to appear Let's dip into at least some of

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those over the next 15 minutes. Let's kick off with the Observer.

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Bezy, take is to their front page, whether used the word "Panic" to

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describe what ministers facing over fire safety. It is quite an apt word

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for a lot of what has been going on in Whitehall and Council buildings

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up and down the country, obviously still trying to work out what on

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earth went one at Grenfell and what measures should have been put in

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place before Grenfell and need to be put in place now. The Observer

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kicking off by saying this is all about fire safety in schools

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specifically. One of the shocking things is that in, I think, between

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2007 and 2010, 70% of new school buildings that were being built were

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installed with sprinklers. That has gone down to 35% because of this

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loosening of the regulations that the accusation is the Conservative

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Government was putting in place. Their argument was there are fewer

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fires in schools, schools are better built, the sprinklers are

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unnecessary, and unnecessary cost. Obviously everything has changed

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now. David James, the Conservative chairman of the Conservative

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all-party fire safety group has been saying for a number of years that

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these new regulations were absolutely mad, "Crazy" was the word

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he used, so he will be applauding this U-turn. So we are looking at a

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complete change in attitude, Peter? I think we are. Reading the Observer

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story, there is a quote in there, "School buildings don't need to be

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sprinkler protected to achieve a reasonable standard of life safety."

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As a parent, I think what is a reasonable standard of life safety?

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I think the problem is that what started in an awful -- with an awful

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fire in a tower block is go to spread across all of our buildings.

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We're talking about schools here, elsewhere they are talking about

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hospitals, the extent to which how many hospitals are clad? How many

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other public buildings which Mark I think this is going to grow and grow

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and be a bigger and bigger problem. And in the Telegraph, with more

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reference here specifically to tower blocks and warnings over the

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compulsory testing of some about installation. Precisely. What we had

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with Grenfell Tower is we had insulation and we had cladding on

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top of it and the attention so far has been focused on the cladding,

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but looking at the installation now and the insulation is highly

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flammable. That is the scary think you combine that with the chimney

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effect and it is shocking stuff, really. And the problem is, as we

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know, an inquest has been announced but if they are going to do their

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job thoroughly, it is going to take a considerable amount of time. On

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the other hand, people are saying lives are at risk and if we have any

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repetition Grenfell, we will all, the political classes, will be held

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culpable, so there is real tension between the two sides and also, of

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course, after a disaster like this, if anybody starts to say we don't

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need these extra regulations, they will be immediately accused of

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putting lives in danger, so the politicisation of it is very

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difficult to manage when you are looking at it from the regulators'

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point of view. And the public inquiry, of course will be held, but

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they take time and there might be an interim statement of some

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description from that inquiry. But weirdly satisfy some of those who

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want more urgent... It will give some cancers, then you are so many

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people calling out conspiracy and cover-up and until you get some of

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those answers out there, that will continue to feed into the story --

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it'll give some cancers. And you have people living in tower blocks

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who are being told they have to be evacuated and saying no, my tower

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hasn't suddenly become dangerous since Grenfell went up. It is such a

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issue. Let's talk politics more specifically with regard to the

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Conservative Party. Daisy, staying with the Telegraph, Tory quote to

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skip "Toxic generation" and installing a younger face as leader,

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which would suggest going past the likes of Boris Johnson and David

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Davis. Saying that generation are all tainted by the failure of the

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Conservative Party to win the outright majority. It's like he

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makes you smile, hopes are turning to the "Golden generation". Who are

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saying this? And who is this golden generation? The Tory MPs, we are

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told, who were elected in 2010, so... And also some of the more

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junior Cabinet ministers, Dominic Raab, Priti Patel, Sajid Javid

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Orrell mentioned. Jessye Norman is one of the 2010 alleged golden

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generation and I do think he is an impressive man. Boris Johnson's

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brother also mooted. We all know that if you are mentioned as a

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possible leader, it probably is the kiss of death and it will probably

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never happen but I agree that people of Theresa May's generation and the

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big beasts, David Davies, whether it is David Davis or Boris Johnson, I

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suspect they are... That they probably has passed. Interesting

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that there is a reference to David Cameron in the peas, that when he

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joined the leadership race in 2005 that he wasn't very well-known. That

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is true but as Daisy says, talking about this golden generation but

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that is a new definition of Goldemann, it is difficult to feel

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inspired by anyone. -- of Goldemann. The only one I think who were

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genuinely have a chance is Ruth Davidson, the leader in Scotland but

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she is not an MP and she has said on many occasions she is getting

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married, she wants to have a child, her life is in Scotland and that is

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where she once the state. I have seen at least two commentators in

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today's paper saying route, your country and your party need you and

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of course, they could force a by-election, they could get her in.

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It is possible. It looks a bit desperate, doesn't it, really? Joe

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Johnson would be great, Joe against Boris, the Miliband brothers all

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over again. But does the country want another if Tony and running the

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party -- I suspect possibly not. Talking of Boris Johnson, he

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features in the Mail on Sunday, which I have thrown open on pages 16

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and 17, not entirely by accident, this is talking about further plots

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and this is... Well, secret Tory battle cry of DD 4pm, David Davies,

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and we have a photograph of him and Boris Johnson with Biff and Bob

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alongside them. It is wonderful stuff. It all seems to be based on a

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party that happened after the Queen's speech and for me, the best

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bits in it is the role played by Sir Desmond Swain, a backbench Tory MP

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for the New Forest West. Pictured with a marvellous hat on. A

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marvellous Holmberg. We are told that he wears a homburg hat around

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Westminster, swims a quarter of a mile in the Serpentine and he has

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apparently said Theresa May is the only person who stands between us

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and Bolshevism, in this 100th anniversary of the Russian

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Revolution, but he is basically singing David Davis's praises. I'm

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not entirely sure, I like Desmond Swain very much and he is one of the

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more gullible members of the Conservative Party in every way but

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I'm not sure he is in tune with what the general public one. I think

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there are rumours that the Tories now have fewer members than the Lib

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Dems. We don't know because the latest figures... As in party

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members? Party members. And we know Jeremy Corbyn is getting party

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members by the thousands by the day, so I just think they have got a real

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problem with that and Conservative backers, I see in the Telegraph,

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Alexander Timerco, Ukraine born businessman who has given the Tories

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have ?1 million, he is calling for a dynamic, young and articulate new

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leader and we all know... That is the same in every walk of life.

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Money does speak in politics when your backers lose weight. What have

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the Sunday Times written? Another twist on the saga, so much plotting

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going on. This version suggests that Theresa May will step down and that

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Phil Hammond will come in as a sort of interim leader. But not for a

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full five years. No, it is a bizarre strategy, suggesting he is not

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re-electable either but let's have him for a bit and we will have

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someone else who is. Make that gives them time to mind the golden

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generation. So he would take is passed the end of the Brexit

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negotiations is the theory. But he would agree in advance that he would

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stand down, so he would be totally lame duck, as bad as what we have

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got and I love this quote that says "He told me, he beat Phil Hammond,

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"That it Theresa May could be Prime Minister, so could he." There is a

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ringing endorsement, because most people would agree she is not doing

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a fantastic job. I would love to be a wall in the conversations between

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those two. I wonder where these bits and pieces come from, briefings and

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nudges and winks that go on in the Palace of Westminster. It is all so

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unattractive and at a time when we have got serious problems, Grenfell,

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Brexit negotiations, no Government to speak up, the deal with the DUP

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still hasn't done, Northern Ireland still doesn't have a Government and

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you think, really, I load of Tory leadership navel-gazing, is that

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what we need? In Parliament, the other story highlighted, blackmail

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danger, this cyber attack. Yes, the Sunday Times, a couple of minutes

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they are making -- a couple of points they are making, the most

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damning news is that it happen on Friday morning, they are having a go

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at the Parliamentary Digital director, Rob Gray, who we are in

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form earns ?110,000 a year and used to work for the Royal Opera house.

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The complaint is he didn't tell MPs about this until 10:30pm, for fears

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of the thing being compromised. I am not sure... If it was the Russians

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what done it, I'm not sure what they would've made a correspondence

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between MPs and their constituents, they probably would have been a

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little underwhelmed by some of it but as ever, it shows how vulnerable

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all institutions are to hacking. And people nowadays tend to be so much

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more careful and more aware of the paper Trail, the e-mail Trail, that

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can be left. But because most people suspect that there isn't anything

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that interesting within most MPs' inboxes as far as Government or

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party politics, they are concentrating on the fact that there

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could be something juicy as far as blackmail or inappropriate messages

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going back and forth and I suspect there will be a lot of nervous

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researchers. "Did I really write that?" It couldn't possibly be me,

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someone must have accessed my computer. Page two of the Mail on

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Sunday, this is Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury with his

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thoughts on the Brexit negotiations. I'm a big fan of the Archbishop of

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Canterbury. I think he is brave and has been very outspoken on a lot of

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issues since he took office and he is calling for, he says, to draw the

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poison from Brexit, for a coalition and I think he is absolutely right

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on that message, because Brexit is such a big deal and it should be, in

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theory, above party politics. On the other hand, I've absolutely no faith

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that anything will happen on this because it's been made such a

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political issue over the last generation, Europe, leaving Europe,

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after the referendum, that the parties are set up to fight punch

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and Judy style with each other and I would say are totally incapable of

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joining a coalition. These kinds of coalitions are needed on pensions,

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the future of the NHS, there are so many issues that should in theory be

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above party politics. It is part of a longer interview he has done. It

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is a comment piece he has written that goes from the solidarity shown

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over Grenfell to the lack of solidarity, the opposite, over

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Brexit. Peter, take is to the Sunday Times, because you highlighted this

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story outside the studio, this is with reference to what a Dutch

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doctor is saying about end of life care. Yes, it is. A chap called

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Marcel Levy, the chief executive of University College London Hospitals

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and he looks at the huge amount of resources that are devoted to

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patients in the last moments, the last months or weeks of their lives,

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or whatever, and not obviously only from the point of view of cost but

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from the point of view of suffering and says should we really be doing

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this? Is it really worth it for people, to put them through that

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last bit of dialysis, that last treatment, just to prolong their

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life for another week, another two weeks, if they are going to spend

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most of those weeks being treated? Why not just accept it is all over,

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make the most of it, go on holiday with your family instead? My father

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was in a hospice when he was dying and the difference in treatment that

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you get in a hospice, which is obviously all about end of life

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care, making it as good as possible in those last few days, to the care

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that you get in a hospital was very very marked, because they are

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experts in that area and they were so impressive in both treating the

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dying person but also the family, and looking after them, and I learnt

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a lot from that experience and ever since have been massively keen on

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hospice is getting more funding and more recognition for the work they

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do and I think the treatment you get when you come into the world, in

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maternity wards, and the treatment you get when you leave the world are

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so important and often don't get the funding or the attention because

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people get so worried about the idea that withdrawing treatment is

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somehow cruel and, actually, very often, it's the reverse. Time is

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tight so a brief thought from you both on the fact that Jeremy Coleman

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has made it onto the front of the observer with a microphone in his

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hands speaking to the crowds at Glastonbury. All you have to say

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about that is could you imagine any Conservative doing that? No, you

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can't. Desmond Swain in our homburg hat. That tells you all you need to

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know about what is going on in British politics. Because of his

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attraction to youth voters particularly. It just underlines it,

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Jeremy Corbyn superstar as far as Glastonbury is concerned. Yes, it

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was all Jez, we can, apparently. Time has beaten us, that is it for

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the papers, thank you to both and a reminder, we look at tomorrow's

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front pages every evening at 10:40pm on BBC News. Daisy and Peter, go off

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and do something even more important with the rest of your day. Thank you

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very much.

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