27/06/2017 The Papers


27/06/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Giles Kenningham - communications consultant and former

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Director of Communications at the Conservative Party.

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And the FT's Political Correspondent, Henry Mance.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with...

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Brussels' 2.4 billion euro fine for Google

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is the main story on the FT, which reports the decision

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could potentially have far-reaching implications for the tech sector

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and already-strained transatlantic ties.

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The Metro leads with the European Court of Human Rights

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rejecting a plea to intervene in the case of critically

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It says the decision closes off the last legal avenue of appeal

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The i looks at the Government's Brexit strategy, reporting

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on divisions within Theresa May's top team, as senior Cabinet

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ministers square up in public over competing plans for the UK's future.

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The Daily Express focuses on a report by the Office

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for National Statistics, saying about 27 million Britons may

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not have a big enough pension pot once they retire.

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The Times carries a report on a fresh cyber attack,

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similar to the one targeting the NHS, hitting a number of big

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The Telegraph leads with the Bank of England warning that lenders

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were making it too easy to borrow money, raising fears

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The Guardian says the SNP has abandoned plans to hold a second

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independence referendum before the UK leaves the EU. We have tossed

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coins, Henry, your first! Good news for you. Basically, cyber attack

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causes chaos, another one. Ransomware, they were trying to

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extort money, and this is ongoing. Yes, people watching will be

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thinking, is this going to be a facet of life? You have terrorism

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threats, climate change threats and now cyber attacks, which seemed to

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be coming up readily. Their staggering details, one is that the

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Chernobyl nuclear plant is monitoring radiation levels manually

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because the window systems have crashed. That is the kind of effect

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being felt from around the world. We don't know where it originates or

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whether it has a political intent. The companies, employees, for

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ordinary citizens, this is going to cause havoc when they start up their

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computers tomorrow morning. When we were in government, we thought this

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would become as big a threat as terrorism, George Osborne earmarked

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?1.9 billion to tackle this. It is going to become a reality for big

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business and government, how do you deal with this? It can be absolutely

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crippling, you know, over how you deal with stuff. It's part of the

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problem, Henry, the suggestion that a lot of companies in the age of

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austerity-lite looking at their bottom line, checking the ledgers,

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realising there isn't much cash after the recession, not investing

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in security was part of a way to cut costs. Companies will be looking at

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their vulnerabilities, another is that people are using their own

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devices, they want to be able to access work e-mails in all kinds of

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places with ease. Security is not often top of mind for people. I

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think you will have very worried people at the top of company saying,

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we've got to get a grip on this. Our sensitive data and customer

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information can't go, reputations are at stake if we make a mistake.

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It transcends borders, that's the real problem for people, you can't

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look at it domestically, you've got to look at it internationally. It is

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getting to be a massive problem. Staying with the times, made's top

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team splits over Brexit division between David Davis, Hammond and

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Johnson. That's not good, bearing in mind we are embarking upon the

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biggest cost and usual change in this country for 50 years. It is the

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sign of a new World order. -- the biggest constitutional change. You

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can see splits spilling out in a public way. This row over the

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transition period, should we have one, if so, for how long? David

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Davis started by saying there would not be won. Philip Allen's much more

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in favour of a soft Brexit and having one -- Philip Hammond. The

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consensus emerging out of the Conservative body is that we should

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have won. The very fact this has spilled out into the public is not

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good. What it says to the rest of the world is that we are, you know,

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a country who is basically riven by splits and divisions. We are

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essentially facing a period of chaos and division. Also what's really

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interesting is I think that Philip Hammond today mocked Boris Johnson

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over this famous Boris Johnson quote, I want to have my cake and

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eat it. When you are getting into this sort of area of satire, I think

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it's slightly problematic. What's interesting is Philip Hammond's very

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involved in post-election. Everyone said he was going to get sacked.

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Theresa May's aides were reefing that he was going to get sacked,

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ironically he is now in quite a strong position -- were briefing.

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The i continues the story, Cabinet chaos on Brexit. We might be able to

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bring up the front of the i to show that. The whole point of the

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election was to nullify this. It was to clear the decks and to allow for

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a united front. Driven by Theresa May. And potentially driven by some

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would say the hardliners within the Government. On Brexit. At the

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election result has led to, according to the i on the times and

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others, chaos. At the beginning of the campaign one of the interesting

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things was people in Brussels said, we would quite like Theresa May to

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win a big majority so we no what we're dealing with. Brussels now

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saying, who represents the British position? Is it Theresa May, he was

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not saying an awful lot today? Is it David Davis saying, I want this

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transition period all done and dusted by the next election? Is it

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Philip Hammond, who is a bit softer? Is it restores, who is not really

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part of the debate but people are making fun of anywhere? That is a

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tricky position to have if you are negotiating. Ultimately, isn't

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Theresa May, the buck stops with her, she's the Prime Minister,

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shouldn't she be saying, Mr Hammond, Mr Davies, Mr Johnson, it's my way

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or the highway, hard Brexit or soft Brexit? But you can't do that. This

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is the issue, our authority has been fatally undermined. She's still the

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Prime Minister, the leader, make a decision! Our authority has been

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undermined. The one irony is her biggest weakness is her biggest

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strength. Nobody else at this point wants to take over. It is a poisoned

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chalice. I can see the real crunch points coming for it, either at

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conference or when you have got through the divorce proceedings. At

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the moment nobody wants to touch it because it is so difficult and there

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are no easy answers. Onto the Financial Times, no easy answers for

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the Scottish as well, or at least for the SNP, Henry. Some are

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suggesting that Nicola Sturgeon's announcement today that she is not

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going to push for a second independence referendum until after

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the Brexit talks suggests that, for the first time in quite close to a

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generation, Scottish nationalism is actually on the retreat. That would

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certainly seem to be the case. Or at least a step back. Theresa May took

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a gamble in this election to try to get a big dirty, it didn't work out

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for her. One gamble she has taken that it hasn't worked out -- to try

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to get a big majority. She didn't specify when the time would be.

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Nicola Sturgeon has effectively had to back down and say, Scottish

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voters don't want it right now. The SNP lost 29 seats in the election,

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they lost Alex Salmond and the leader in Westminster, it was a

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humiliating day. They are having to dodge the mood. At the same time, if

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you go to an SNP event, it is filled with activists who want

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independence. Nicholas Dudgeon having to balance their enthusiasm,

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people who got involved in politics to get involved in the referendum --

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Nicola Sturgeon. The broader opinion has gone, let's focus on public

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services and have a bit of stability and calm down with all of this

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constitutional talk. A difficult balancing act for the SNP. Their

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whole raison d'etre or, the S, is Scottish independence. At the same

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time, Brexit has into being and that has thrown a spell in the works for

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everyone. We have seen the effect south of the border on Westminster

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politics, now it is having a similar effect over that. This is the one

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silver lining in the cloud for Theresa May. It is not happening,

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she can relax about this for a while. Having said that, Nicola

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Sturgeon is a formidable politician. And you should never discount that.

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All politicians have their shelf life. She's been around for a long

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time. You know, it may be that her time is slowly coming to an end. OK,

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Google have been naughty according to the European Commission. That's

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the front page of the frying chill times as well, Giles. Brussels ?2.4

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billion -- your row fine. They are such a massive company, between now

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and Wednesday they would make that money. It is unprecedented. It also

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underlines that they are a monopoly. Going forward they are going to face

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intense scrutiny. It also opens the door to, what else will they face in

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terms of more Legislation? They say they are reviewing it, but this is

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quite worrying for googol. -- Google. We are going to go on to the

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Daily Telegraph. A rise in easy credit. The Bank of England issued a

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warning suggesting that a lot of banks, it is as if 2008 didn't

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happen. Interest rates are low, lending is rising sharply, the car

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market has been booming thanks to personal finance. This is different

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to after the Brexit Road, when probably Leave papers were excited

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about economic prospects, saying the economy were doing much better. Here

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we have some of the problems. This is the challenge for the Bank of

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England, how do you stop the supply of credit at a time when wages are

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not doing great, the economy is slowing down? Can you put up

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interest rates? Tough decision. Read book indeed. No hope for baby

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Charlie. Charlie Gard has a rare condition. His parents want him to

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stay on a ventilator and to get treatment in the United States.

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Three British courts have said it would not be good for him. And the

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European Court of Human Rights has agreed with that. That's the story

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on the front of the Metro. Going onto the Mail. Two Remainiac crooks

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slip into Britain, remain you want them to be set back -- Romanian

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crocs. They can't be sent back because of human rights. It plays

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into the kind of Ukip Handbook about clamping down on immigrants.

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Although I don't think that even if we left the EU this would be subject

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to the judicial system. Obviously it is a big talking point, something

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that would get people excited down the pub. But there are never easy

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answers in this situation, I think. These are jail cells in Remainiac

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which are two metres by one metre square. The question is whether we

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should be sending people back to those conditions -- jail cells in

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Romania. The judge has said, the minimum is three metres. I don't get

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the headline, beyond satire. The male is saying, -- the male is

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saying committed human rights are beyond satire. Surely the limit has

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to be somewhere. There has to be something humane, and the judges are

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the people who made that decision. The European Court of Human Rights,

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which we would not be leaving anyway with Brexit. Although Theresa May

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has been criticising it in the past, she has decided we will stay. That

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is an interesting point. Finally, quickly, the back page of the

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mirror. Hair we go again. We've lost on penalties to Germany, Giles. Come

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on! We are cursed when it comes to penalties, we cannot take them.

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Somebody needs to give us some lessons! Germany are our jinx team.

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The England under 21 team were practising penalties after every

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training session, Henry, what's going wrong we can't toss a coin

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this many times and lose. I think last year we were losing to Iceland.

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In fact, it is this very day, or was it yesterday? When year ago. No

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substitute for a pressure. On that note, we going to leave, Brexit and

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the programme! Henry and Giles, thank you.

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