26/06/2017 The Papers


26/06/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 26/06/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

:00:15.:00:18.

With me are Rosamund Urwin, Columnist at The Evening Standard

:00:19.:00:22.

and Dan Bilefsky, Staff Writer at The New York Times.

:00:23.:00:28.

Welcome both of you. We will talk to them in a moment after we bring you

:00:29.:00:35.

up-to-date with the front pages for tomorrow morning. These are the

:00:36.:00:36.

first editions. 'Thanks a billion' is the headline

:00:37.:00:37.

on the front page of the i - referring to the Conservative-DUP

:00:38.:00:40.

deal with Northern Ireland getting The price of support for the

:00:41.:00:42.

minority government. The Telegraph says the agreement may

:00:43.:00:49.

come at an even greater cost with the DUP possibly coming

:00:50.:00:57.

back for more. The Mirror splashes with the deal

:00:58.:00:59.

and shows a picture of Theresa May and Arlene Foster shaking hands

:01:00.:01:02.

outside Downing Street. The Metro says the three million EU

:01:03.:01:04.

citizens living in the UK will be required to apply for ID documents

:01:05.:01:07.

to stay after Brexit. One of the stories in the Guardian

:01:08.:01:13.

is the US Supreme Court's decision to partially allow Donald Trump's

:01:14.:01:19.

travel ban on six mainly Muslim countries to take place.

:01:20.:01:21.

The Daily Express reports an operation, using a plastic liner

:01:22.:01:24.

in the gut, could cure Type two diabetes.

:01:25.:01:26.

And the Times shows a picture of HMS Queen Elizabeth,

:01:27.:01:29.

Britain's new ?3 billion aircraft carrier, which passed

:01:30.:01:31.

through the River Forth before starting trials in the North Sea.

:01:32.:01:38.

Let's get straight down to it and let's begin, I think, with the DUP

:01:39.:01:45.

deal, the front page in most of the papers. Yes. Photos, which, it's

:01:46.:01:54.

almost as if Theresa May's shaking hands with Arlene Foster and Arlene

:01:55.:01:56.

Foster is the dominant character in the picture on the front of the i.

:01:57.:02:04.

It does but Theresa May didn't sign the document herself, she didn't

:02:05.:02:09.

lower herself to that. This is what the DUP is good at. They radically

:02:10.:02:13.

underestimated them, they thought, well, they have ten MPs. A pushover.

:02:14.:02:23.

Yes. On the Friday after it turned out we had a hung parliament they

:02:24.:02:26.

thought they would get the deal quickly. I was writing about it at

:02:27.:02:31.

the time and everything was frantically changing and it has been

:02:32.:02:35.

18 days now. This is what the DUP has done for many years. They are

:02:36.:02:39.

good at letting negotiations go down to the wire because they know that

:02:40.:02:44.

squeezes out more of what they want. And actually they have an awful lot

:02:45.:02:47.

of what they want. The headline is the 1 billion figure but there is

:02:48.:02:50.

actually so much more. Various things about the triple-lock, on

:02:51.:02:54.

pensions, Theresa May already committed it wouldn't happen for the

:02:55.:02:58.

next two years but now it is pushed back. They have a veto on government

:02:59.:03:03.

legislation effectively because they will see anything before it goes to

:03:04.:03:10.

Parliament, so on legislation. They actually have a huge amount here for

:03:11.:03:16.

what seems like quite small. Yes, ten MPs, it's an extraordinary price

:03:17.:03:20.

to pay. From an outside perspective is this not classic pork barrel

:03:21.:03:24.

politics and will there be a backlash against Theresa May? Some

:03:25.:03:28.

of her critics already say she has bought each of the ten MPs for 100

:03:29.:03:34.

million apiece. She has bought her own career surviving. In the

:03:35.:03:38.

short-term but these are social Conservatives against gay rights and

:03:39.:03:41.

abortion, precisely the people Corbyn has been appealing to

:03:42.:03:44.

recently and will then not the long-term political consequences for

:03:45.:03:48.

this decision? Yes, I think so and even the DUP knows that Theresa May

:03:49.:03:55.

is toxic, so that's why they have tried to squeeze so much so it isn't

:03:56.:04:00.

so bloody body anyway. The Tory board the DUP votes with us and they

:04:01.:04:05.

expect lots of motorways and things. The Telegraph says it is just the

:04:06.:04:09.

start. In other words, they could come back for more, if there is some

:04:10.:04:13.

critical vote, they might say we are not sure we can support you on this

:04:14.:04:19.

any longer, they might be a bit of desperate... You called it pork

:04:20.:04:23.

barrel politics, the US phrase, which I think the Welsh First

:04:24.:04:30.

Minister called it a bung. We had it in the 70s when the Labour

:04:31.:04:33.

government tried to survive and it was paying for electricity cable to

:04:34.:04:37.

be run under the North Sea to connect Northern Ireland with the

:04:38.:04:42.

mainland of the rest of Britain. On that basis presumably there is a

:04:43.:04:46.

risk in the rest of the UK to say, hang on a minute, where's our money?

:04:47.:04:50.

Your broadband will get faster in Northern Ireland, you will get new

:04:51.:04:56.

motorways and better hospitals and and Wales, maybe even London

:04:57.:04:59.

complaining the money is being given away. In terms of the power-sharing,

:05:00.:05:02.

because there is so much money at stake, Sinn Fein may come back to

:05:03.:05:06.

this table, they already don't have a seat at Westminster because they

:05:07.:05:10.

choose not to take up their seats. Think what they could have extracted

:05:11.:05:14.

to get in a Labour Dermot Drummy Corbyn government if they MPs took

:05:15.:05:17.

their seats. What about the language used? I think The Daily Mirror talks

:05:18.:05:24.

about crackpots, they have their word bungs, some people call it a

:05:25.:05:27.

bribe, comfortable with the way this was written up? Some people think

:05:28.:05:33.

crackpot is offensive. I was quite surprised to see that word but there

:05:34.:05:36.

is plenty to criticise about the DUP's policies, to put it bluntly.

:05:37.:05:43.

The DUP did not turn to typical nationalist ideology in making the

:05:44.:05:46.

deal, they went away from bowler hats and parades and stuck to the

:05:47.:05:49.

nitty-gritty of economics and money so in a way they were quite astute.

:05:50.:05:54.

They played their hand well. They were not crackpots at all. Let's

:05:55.:06:00.

moved down to the Telegraph, to the column on the right hand of the

:06:01.:06:05.

front page, tower fire tests ignore combustible instillation. What do

:06:06.:06:09.

you make of this, Dan? United States builds a lot more high-rises than

:06:10.:06:15.

Britain does, bigger population and a very urbanised country, lots of

:06:16.:06:20.

big cities. How shocked were people by this fire when they saw the

:06:21.:06:23.

pictures? I noticed the New York Times has a picture of Grenfell

:06:24.:06:28.

again in the middle of it. The charred inferno of Grenfell Tower on

:06:29.:06:30.

a human level was absolutely shocking regardless of your

:06:31.:06:34.

nationality. From the American perspective what was also shocking

:06:35.:06:39.

was the laxness of the regulatory framework in this country. In the US

:06:40.:06:43.

if you have a building that is higher than a fireman's the ladder,

:06:44.:06:47.

two stories, there is mandatory testing for the cladding and no

:06:48.:06:51.

flammable padding of the type used in Grenfell has ever passed that

:06:52.:06:56.

test. People in the US context were quite surprised at the regulatory

:06:57.:07:01.

system here at and that it was so lax and the cost-cutting seems to

:07:02.:07:04.

have been prioritised over human lives and safety. What do you make

:07:05.:07:08.

of this story about the doubts of the whole testing process, whether

:07:09.:07:12.

before or now? Even the minister said today it is taken too long for

:07:13.:07:16.

the testing to go under way. They should be able to do 100 a day and

:07:17.:07:21.

so far they only have 75 and all 75 have failed the tests. They would

:07:22.:07:28.

start with the ones, it is appalling, but they start with the

:07:29.:07:31.

ones that seem most likely to fail. Yes, sure. There is also a story in

:07:32.:07:37.

the FT tomorrow saying the US engineering group which makes the

:07:38.:07:40.

cladding panels is no longer selling the flammable version for

:07:41.:07:45.

high-rises. They announced today they are halting global sales. That

:07:46.:07:48.

seems obviously a good thing but clearly too late. Better late than

:07:49.:07:57.

never, I guess. Metro, Ura must show ID papers. -- EU. I thought we had

:07:58.:08:04.

killed off the idea of identity cards in the UK but for some it

:08:05.:08:10.

might be coming back. This is a Home Office policy paper, I think. It is

:08:11.:08:14.

all very provisional. Elsewhere they are saying this might mean identity

:08:15.:08:18.

cards but it might just mean a central database and it isn't

:08:19.:08:21.

actually clear yet which of those it means. But actually there is an

:08:22.:08:28.

awful lot that this policy document suggests. EU nationals could

:08:29.:08:31.

potentially be losing. It isn't clear whether they will be allowed

:08:32.:08:35.

to vote in local elections which obviously they can at the moment,

:08:36.:08:40.

yet they would be paying tax. Sounds unlikely if the EU Court of Justice

:08:41.:08:51.

will be upholding this. When you look at this and look at the offer

:08:52.:08:56.

coming from Britain, all right, a bit late again, but people saying

:08:57.:09:01.

there is room for compromise. There is goodwill on this question. From

:09:02.:09:06.

what I hear from people in Brussels they are saying thank you so much

:09:07.:09:11.

that you will not deport us, we appreciate that, generous

:09:12.:09:14.

negotiating position. The Europeans are saying there is not enough

:09:15.:09:18.

clarity and it is too little too late. There was a tweet that said it

:09:19.:09:23.

was not ambitious enough and not enough clarity. I think we risk,

:09:24.:09:26.

with all these people who are looking at it on a purely economic

:09:27.:09:30.

basis, we are going to lose the people we want to hold onto most and

:09:31.:09:34.

that is mad. Is this not Alan Duncan because there are lots of parts of

:09:35.:09:38.

the country where there are not many EU nationals working and bringing

:09:39.:09:41.

high skilled jobs and experience to London. It is where the media is

:09:42.:09:45.

based in London. They are working in farms. Without the seasonal workers

:09:46.:09:52.

from Bulgaria and other Eastern European countries. And any rational

:09:53.:09:55.

arrangement we could continue to invite people to work for short

:09:56.:09:58.

periods of time for specific things like that. But if you don't have

:09:59.:10:02.

free movement of people then how can you have Eastern European is coming

:10:03.:10:08.

in? People who voted leave who are in the agricultural sector say they

:10:09.:10:10.

regret it because they may not have Eastern European is to employ to

:10:11.:10:15.

pick their goods. There was a man who employed 5000 EU nationals. And

:10:16.:10:23.

he voted for leave. Let's pop inside the Daily Express, nothing exciting

:10:24.:10:26.

us on the front cover but we were interested by this. Nice to see a

:10:27.:10:30.

picture of Donald Trump smiling since becoming President. He has a

:10:31.:10:34.

reason to smile today. The Supreme Court decided to hear the case of

:10:35.:10:38.

his travel ban which was a ban against people from six majority

:10:39.:10:42.

Muslim countries, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Iran etc, owing to the United

:10:43.:10:47.

States. Donald Trump declared victory because the Supreme Court

:10:48.:10:51.

has decided to hear the case and to stay part of the original order,

:10:52.:10:54.

meaning that if you try and go to the US you have to serve dumb show

:10:55.:10:58.

some kind of bona fides Link, such as a job or a parent who is there

:10:59.:11:03.

for a student visa. This will test the limits of the executive order in

:11:04.:11:07.

the United States and it remains to be seen whether he will be able to

:11:08.:11:11.

claim victory. U-turn and general described it as a triumph for the

:11:12.:11:16.

separation of powers. Since Trump entered the presidency the court

:11:17.:11:20.

system has been raining him in and there were two court decisions

:11:21.:11:24.

against the travel ban already. This is a test case and so far the

:11:25.:11:27.

American system has shown that one man cannot overcome the division

:11:28.:11:32.

between different parts of government. The constitution works.

:11:33.:11:37.

We will see, let's hope so. Let's look finally at the front of the

:11:38.:11:44.

Telegraph. I don't think we can pick this up, but I am going to put it

:11:45.:11:49.

there. That's the cartoon. I don't think we can quite so clearly see

:11:50.:11:54.

from the front of the Telegraph, there is a better picture on the

:11:55.:12:00.

front of the times, just how enormous HMS Elizabeth is. It is

:12:01.:12:05.

enormous. The cartoon is making a connection between this enormous new

:12:06.:12:09.

naval vessel and the DUP- Tory deal. Explain. His big gift is tying

:12:10.:12:15.

together two big stories of the day in a way you have not thought of and

:12:16.:12:19.

he has done it with aplomb here. It is two people standing on this

:12:20.:12:23.

enormous ship saying, this is an very impressive, thing how many DUP

:12:24.:12:29.

MPs we could have brought with the money. Because as we know 1 million

:12:30.:12:38.

gets ten of them. We can see on the front of the times, this really gets

:12:39.:12:43.

the scale of this ship. It is a big ship, wherever you look at it but it

:12:44.:12:47.

is next to the bridge there and suddenly you think that is not a

:12:48.:12:52.

ship, that is a small city afloat. It's an amazing site. There were

:12:53.:12:57.

lots of grumbles in the military thinking we are getting this big

:12:58.:13:00.

ship and there isn't much money for anyone else or any of the small

:13:01.:13:05.

boats. What a shame! For any cartoonist complaining about the

:13:06.:13:09.

fact that Matt gets on all the time it's because he's on the front of

:13:10.:13:12.

the paper, get your edited to put you on the front paper and you will

:13:13.:13:17.

make it onto tomorrow's Papers. Thank you for joining us. We have

:13:18.:13:21.

rattled through a lot. Thank you for your company.

:13:22.:13:23.

Don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online

:13:24.:13:26.

It's all there for you - seven days a week

:13:27.:13:29.

at bbc.co.uk/papers - and if you

:13:30.:13:31.

evening you can watch it later on BBC iPlayer.

:13:32.:13:34.

My thanks to Rosamond and Dan. I will be back at the top of the hour.

:13:35.:13:46.

Good evening. Sunshine for some of us today but rain is on its way. I

:13:47.:13:53.

hope you managed to make the most of it. Eastern England saw the best in

:13:54.:13:55.

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS