06/07/2017 The Papers


06/07/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Kate Proctor, Political Reporter at

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The London Evening Standard and the broadcaster,

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The Financial Times leads on the fall out from last month's

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global cyber attack - with the consumer goods group

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Reckitt Benckiser admitting the hack had caused a ?110 million

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The Express writes that Britain shouldn't be worried

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about the latest threats from Brussels over Brexit because,

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the paper says, Eurocrats are scared of a walk out

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The Telegraph says that business leaders are to demand an indefinite

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delay in Britain leaving the Single Market

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and the Customs Union from the Brexit Secretary David

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The Guardian also leads with the warnings from business

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leaders, who say they are trying to prevent a 'cliff edge' departure

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The Sun warns of a possible shortage of butter due to a lack of milk

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The Daily Mirror reports of a man accused of fraudulently adding

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30,000 kilos of horse meat into beef products sold

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The Times writes that up to a fifth of Labour MPs have reportedly

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appeared on a hit list, to be targeted by left wing

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activists following Mr Corbyn's unexpected success at the General

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And the Daily Mail headlines that plans for a statue of the late

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Margaret Thatcher to be placed outside Parliament have been

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blocked due to concerns it may be vandalised.

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We will talk in more detail about some of those. John, why do we start

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with the The FT and Donald Trump getting a warm welcome in Warsaw.

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Rapturous, a turnout, people bussed in from the countryside by the

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government because they knew they would give him a round of applause

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for stop a lot of people in Poland agree with Donald Trump on his

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thoughts about immigration, despite the fact that thousands of Polish

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Google come to this country they agree with him that it has to be

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controlled and they liked what he had to say about countries in their

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part of the world being right behind them whatever the circumstances. It

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went down very well and in stark contrast to what happened later when

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he went to Germany where there are 100,000 people on the streets,

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20,000 police out there in protest at his presence there and what he

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stands for. We have been showing pictures of the demonstrations and

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it will be an interesting G20 and meeting between Donald Trump and

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Putin tomorrow, which will be fascinating. This is a meeting where

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Donald Trump is out of his comfort zone. He is relatively safe when he

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is doing his speeches in America but here he is, over in Europe and we

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had that difficult meeting, the Nato meeting where Trump met various

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European leaders, lots of handshakes, jostling in pictures,

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move people out of the way. Trump is meeting the same group of people

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again and he has this high pressured meeting with President Putin and I

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am not entirely sure what is going to happen after this because you

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might see a quieter time from Putin or you might see more flexing of

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Putin's muscle. This is a crunch meeting very sizeable muscles, we

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have seen them many times! That will be the money shot, when they shake

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hands. So, the express, EU told you can't write in Britain. This is a

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Tory, David Campbell saying you can't frighten us. Saying that

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Eurocrats are trying to scare us because they think we might walk

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away from the negotiations, scare tactics on their part. This is after

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Michel Barnier, chief Brexit the Goucher to, as far as he concerned

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you cannot be half in and half out. -- chief Brexit negotiated. The

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possible to your being half in and half out, you can't do that. He has

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taken the opportunity since our election and since our weakened

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position, knowing that Theresa May has this minority government, he is

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using the opportunity to talk tough, being black and white about things

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and saying you cannot be in the single market, you can't be out of

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the customs union and still expect some trade eels so I think he is

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being so opportunistic. You would say, well, he would, wouldn't the?

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He need to take a hardline and negotiate from there. I think the

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tone after election is even stronger. A lot of the papers and

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the Telegraph, we're not showing it now, they have this disease is

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talking about an indefinite delay in leaving the single market and the

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customs union, really trying to push for not a cliff edge. You hear the

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different dimensions of this every single day and I think the business

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community, it's such a powerful voice and I think people need to

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listen to what they have got to say and I think they have got their

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meeting coming up tomorrow and I think that is a lobbying force you

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cannot ignore. The Sun, I feel that silly season is almost upon us!

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There is a butter crisis. The headline is I can't believe

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they're's no butter, I can't believe it either! I don't believe for a

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single second but a good talking point, I suppose. Of course,'s BBC's

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fault. It's partly because experts have allayed fears about butter but

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they say it is also because of TV's great British bake off, which used

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lots of butter, sugar and and such in cake making and so we have an

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alleged crisis. Personally I could not care less because I did use but

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anyway, I use marginally. Also a rise in wholesale butter prices of

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88% in a year. This will end up going back to the price farmers are

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paid for milk and I think if we're going to have a butter shortage

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there is going to be all kinds of problems. Was the last soldiers

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Brussels sprouts? I don't care for sprouts! , I love Brussels sprouts,

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leave them alone! Also in The FT, also news stories giving children

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post-dramatic stress disorder. We have had this run of horrific

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stories, the various terror attacks and Grenfell Tower. It is a strong

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issue and I think many parents watching, they have been really

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concerned after Manchester and the events here in London and the

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Manchester event of course involving young children. What you do when

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children are watching the six o'clock News and a story like this

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comes on? We do our best, we all do our best warn people that images may

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be distressing, we leave on the cutting floor the images that are

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too distressing but nevertheless it is an issue, it's disturbing and

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kids ask questions and sometimes they are difficult to answer. If

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they are left with those thoughts it's conceivable. And you can't get

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away from it in social media and the discussion comes back to how you can

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monitor the things online because all feeds in together. OK, that's

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move on to The Telegraph and they have a story, 1 million patients a

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week cannot see a GP, unable to get appointments with a GP, the worst

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waiting times on record according to figures. Staggering, actually. We

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were talking about this earlier, we have a great GP practice near us. I

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have not had a real problem. If you want to see a particular document

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had to wait a few days. I have never had a problem, either. Maybe we are

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lucky, maybe it is different in London but these figures are

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undeniable. 11% of people according to the survey done by the NHS don't

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see a doctor at all. A massive number not being able to see a

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doctor for a whole week and this raises fears about people suffering

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in silence and needing hospital treatment. The government... In GP

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can own it 2.4 billion. You need to see a doctor! Yes, my voice! The

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investment is there, that is what I am trying to say. But you read

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reports about not enough people coming forward to train as GPs and

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the fact of the matter people are having to wait a long time. This is

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their own survey, it's undeniable and it is an unsustainable crisis

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and unsustainable pressure. Kate, The Daily Mail have this story about

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a statue of the iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher. The plan being blocked

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because it might be eight target for vandals. They say left-wing

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activists might use this statue as a point of protest and we have seen

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before that the Winston Churchill statue there has from time to time

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ended up with a code on its head and it is the most dishes that will

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thing and I can understand the concerns about having lady that you

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-- Lady Thatcher, statue of her there and I think why should we not

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celebrate her and make sure she is there so that people can see it and

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it is also part of our political history as well. Somebody's phone is

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ringing! We will politely ignore it! Not mine! The Times have got a story

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about the hard left in a plot to oust dozens of Labour MPs. The

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section hit list as Corbyn takes an 8-point lead. Just when you think

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things might have been going the right way for Labour and that Jeremy

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Corbyn was doing really well, people were gathering around him, you now

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hear about this hard left plot and, you know, this might be the way the

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Times has decided to present it but you can't deny there has been a real

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increase this week in the talk about deselection of MPs. Was there an

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uneasy truce in the Labour Party after the election do you think

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which is now that's beginning to fall apart's you had silence from

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the moderates. There is often confusion here that people, let's

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call them the moderates, that they'd want to play any part in:'s team and

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that is untrue. What happened when Corbyn was trying to those Cabinet

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visions was they didn't ask him, he did not ask them to serve at all and

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many of them had told me they would be more than happy to take a job in

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his team but what you have now is new MPs like Chris Williamson, the

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new Derby North MP, he has been here for a matter of weeks, already

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saying we need to keep things fresh in the party. Let's talk about the

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cricket. Very important. And a cheerier note. And we are all

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rooting for Joe. First day, first Test match as captain, 26 years old

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and he has scored 184 and dragged England right back into it because

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they were 17-2 when he went in. They went to 74-4-macro and then him, and

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Stokes and Moeen Ali turned things around was captain's innings, what a

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debut and a strong position. Sometimes bats men who are captains,

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being the captain affects them and you end up getting a duck. Not Joe,

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357-5, a strong position indeed. Pats off to him. Brilliant start.

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Two three other England captains have scored a century in their first

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test but more the merrier. But still finely poised? I think so. But South

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Africa are a strong side, no doubt about it, weather is good so we look

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forward to four more days of it. Wimbledon, cricket... Thank you very

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much, John I will let you answer your telephone. It was me, guilty as

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charged! Case, thank you to you. That's it from the papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online

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It's all there for you - seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers,

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and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it

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