08/07/2017 The Papers


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08/07/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Nigel Nelson, political editor of the Sunday Mirror

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and Sunday People, and the political commentator Jo Phillips.

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Some people have more than 24 hours in their day, Nigel!

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Tomorrow's front pages starting with...

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The Observer, which tells us that German industry is warning the UK

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it cannot rely on its help in securing a good Brexit

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deal, this is a "stark" intervention, says the paper.

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The Sunday People has an exclusive - it's talked to Lord Dannatt

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about caring for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Back to Brexit and the Telegraph says Theresa May is trying

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to capitalise on Donald Trump's optimism on trade amid growing

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While the Mail On Sunday is told by Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell

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that he thinks it's time for Mrs May to step aside because she

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The Sunday Express leads with Mr Trump's comments that the UK

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will thrive outside the EU and his promise to sign a "powerful"

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And The Times - it says Mrs May claimed that Mr Trump's comments had

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put her plan for Brexit "back on track".

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We will start with the Sunday Telegraph and Brexit and Theresa May

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plays the trump card. The Prime Minister trying to head off a

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growing rebellion by playing up this strong backing from the US

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president. Has anyone used the word very as much as Donald Trump. He has

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this strange speech take where he repeats the next thing again. It is

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very nice to see you, Martin, very nice to see you. Anyway, it is very,

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very, very exciting and very powerful and it will happen very

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quickly. Which it is not. How can any trade deal ever happen quickly?

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It is a lot of warm words and Theresa May is trying to take

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something good out of the summit where she has also been busy

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chatting up various other leaders and things, but in the meantime

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Donald Trump has decided he will not sign up to the climate change

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agreement. He has isolated himself completely. We heard the click of

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her saying she is dismayed, but how dismayed do you have to be to not to

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try to persuade somebody. It all looks shambolic. I know we are

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taking the p about he says very quickly all the time. Who is?

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Martine is. I suppose it is because we do not get particularly

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descriptive words from him. But these words are wrong. Very wrong.

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He is giving us the idea we will get a trade deal in a few months down

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the road. He has not actually said that. Would you say very, very

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quickly we would get a trade deal? Anything less than ten years might

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look very quick. To look? To anybody. First we have to get a deal

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with Europe before we do a deal with the US and that is two years gone.

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We are looking at several years after that, assuming everybody

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agrees with it. Whatever the complexities of world politics they

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have to be gone into in 140 characters and if it is beyond that

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it is too much for him. That is because we expect very complex ideas

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to be explained in a 15 or 22nd sound bite. To a certain extent, but

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Nigel is right in that Donald Trump is right in that Donald Trump's way

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is that business, and do not worry, if there is a problem, I will sort

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it. Life is not like that when you are talking about complex trade

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deals. But if things are going so well for Theresa May and this is the

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leader of the free world, the other one being Angela Merkel, depending

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on your point of view, they were saying previously we would not be at

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the front of the Q and now we are doing business very quickly. He is

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signalling he wants it to be very fast. And for her there is a

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relationship that is not of the stature of the one with Ronald

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Reagan, but there seems to be a general warmth, although I don't see

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anything warm in Theresa May or Donald Trump can't do that, but you

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are right. Barack Obama said we would be at the back of the Q, but

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whether this is translated into action, and we have still got Brexit

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to deal with. We do not even have a vague outline of what kind of trade

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deal we are talking about. But the Daily Telegraph is quite optimistic

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and says because of this Theresa May will be able to stave off any

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backbench rebellion in her Cabinet that is coming her way. We will come

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to that in a moment. Meanwhile, in the Daily Telegraph, US plans for

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armed officers in UK airports which could add to the cost of fares in

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the United States. I can relax about this. Do we really want guys from

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America carrying guns and wandering around our airports? Now I think

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people have got so used to the fact we have armed police around as all

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the time. If you go to an airport armed police are normal. It seems to

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me not a bad idea because American immigration is so difficult at the

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other end. You have the screening process at this end rather than

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having difficulty when you get to your destination. It reminds me of

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the sky marshals we had on board planes after 9/11. Every now and

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again there is a report of the intervening in something. But this

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is a rather bizarre story because Gatwick has said it has got no plans

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to participate. Heathrow says it is not workable. The airports

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interested are Manchester and Edinburgh. They want more US trade.

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Yes, they might want more US trade, but who will enforce this? If the

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cost of your flight is more at Manchester or Edinburgh to pay for

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American armed police... Let's hope it would make it more difficult for

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people to come across from the channel. Yes, we hope it is more

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difficult. Once again, we want more details. They must quit now says

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chief Davis ally, this ally being Andrew Mitchell. Andrew Mitchell,

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the former International Development Secretary forced to resign as Chief

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Whip after the Plebgate affair. A very good and long-term ally of

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David Davis. Simon Walters is the political editor and it is one of

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his marvellous story. He talks about how he once got punched by him. Who

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did? Simon Walters. Are we allowed to say that? He said he gave him a

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friendly cuff around the head. So my remarks are justified. I would never

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let you down. The story is about the devastating attack and the inference

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is that David Davis, if he has not sanction it, he is aware, or would

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be aware of what Andrew Mitchell is saying, whether he is saying it on

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his behalf whether he is whipping up the frenzy of she has got to go. It

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was not exactly a secret dinner. It was a one nation dining club. You

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would not have it in the Commons. The impression I am getting from

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most MPs is the one thing they dread more than anything else is a general

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election, and that is all parties. If you look at the Tories because a

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leadership challenge might provoke a general election, they dread that

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next along the way. As they settle down, you get the impression people

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think Theresa May will stay in place for two years. Some people are

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talking about five. The leadership challengers, the likely ones, Boris

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Johnson and David Davis, I do not think we are looking at an imminent

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challenge to Theresa May at the moment. They will hold onto her for

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as long as she is useful? Even if you put a stalking horse up to get

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things moving, it still takes 48 MPs. It would be difficult to find

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48 MPs. But they love this and to be honest so do we. It is a good

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and it keeps on going and we are and it keeps on going and we are

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about to go into the summary says and then it will be conference

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season and the whole thing will be, who is going to unseat her? We might

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have a more quiet period the summer. I do not think so, I think we have

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got two years of mayhem at the very least. We have already had quite a

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few months of it. The Observer. German industry in stark warning to

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UK over Brexit, saying it will be hard to avoid hurting British

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business. This is a genuine surprise. We have always thought

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people like German car-makers are anxious to avoid any kind of tariff

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barriers which is what we would get without a deal. They seem to be

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taking the straightforward EU negotiator Michel Barnier line that

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we obey the rules or we do not. If you want to be in the single market

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and have access to it, we must also accept freedom of movement and we

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will not do that. This is quite a serious warning from them. If they

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are saying to us, if you want to be part of the club, you must obey the

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rules of the club. It does seem to show there is not that much room for

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the negotiation we keep talking about. But in stark contrast to what

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Donald Trump is saying, do not worry, it will be sorted, it is a

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direct contradiction of what David Davis, as previously mentioned, had

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said before the referendum, that German industry would put pressure

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on Angela Merkel to hand Britain a good Brexit deal. That is where the

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negotiations will end up. It is the president of the Federation of

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German industry is saying it and the president of the Confederation of

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German employers Association. They want the single market and there

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priority is to look after the 27 remaining members. Let's stay with

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the Observer. I know you will be delighted to talk about the rugby.

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Shared glory as the Lions try again. They have drawn, they did not win,

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but it felt like they had one because expectations were low.

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Fortunately she briefed me before I came on. It is a game with a funny

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ball. Did you ask me what a draw was? I would not even know what a

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draw meant. They got the same score. I went political saying what this

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particular draw turned out to be. But it is the best result they could

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have hoped for. No, it is not, the best result would have been to win.

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They have been written off by the critics. I think it is a good

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result. This is like the German referendum result. It is very Jeremy

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Corbyn. Is Sam Warburton the new Jeremy Corbyn? Do you know more than

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me? It does feel a bit like that. They have done better than we

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expected when they set out, just like Jeremy Corbyn. It was still

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only a draw. For the all Blacks that is devastating. Absolutely and the

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Lions did beat them and the all Blacks beat the Lions and the

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coaches will be deeply disappointed and they have said so. But I think

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it is not a bad result. To show off, it was a tough, ten match schedule

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next time they will reorganise the matches. It might give us a fighting

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chance. To fit in with the wider jigsaw. Nigel, I found a couple of

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facts about the story you really do not know anything about. I will give

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it a try. Can we talk about Wimbledon next? It is on the front

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pages or the back pages, so, yes. And the Independent. Brexit votes

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legacy, record rise in hate crimes. A 23% increase in racial and

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religious attacks, and exclusive. I am surprised about the figures. I

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have seen figures about this that in fact a hate crime went up after the

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referendum, but I thought it went down again. Then we had the

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terrorist atrocities that put them up again. This suggests it has been

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a continuous thing. These are different figures because they come

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from a Freedom of information requests from the paper. But they do

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make pretty grim reading. If we are talking about up to nearly 50,000

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hate crimes that took place in the 11 months after the referendum, and

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if the two things can be linked, it is troubling. It also explains why

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so many people are thinking about going home. We are not getting the

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fruit pickers in at the moment, this is the season of it, and they are

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the backbone of the agricultural workforce. And there were 41,000

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crimes before, so that is shocking. Yes, which we did not speak about.

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One of the things you can say is that perhaps people feel more

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confident about reporting it, the silver lining. There is a reporting

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spike as well. But we need more observation. And also more time.

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That would always be nice, wouldn't it? And two Mori views on Monday to

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Friday. That is not my point of view, it is your point of view.

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Thank you, Nigel Nelson and Jo Phillips, you'll both be back

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at half 11 for another look at the stories making

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