08/07/2017 The Papers


08/07/2017

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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the All Blacks in Auckland, leaving the Test series at a tie.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are Nigel Nelson, political editor of the Sunday Mirror

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and Sunday People, and the political commentator, Jo Phillips.

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Tomorrow's front pages, starting with this.

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The Observer, which tells us that German industry is warning the UK

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it cannot rely on its help in securing a good Brexit deal.

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This is a "stark" intervention, says the paper.

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It's talked to Lord Dannatt about caring for veterans

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Back to Brexit, and the Telegraph says Theresa May is trying

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to capitalise on Donald Trump's optimism on trade amid growing

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While the Mail on Sunday is told by Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell

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that he thinks it's time for Mrs May to step aside

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The Sunday Express leads with Mr Trump's comments that the UK

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will thrive outside the EU and his promise to sign a "powerful"

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It says Mrs May claimed that Mr Trump's comments had put her plan

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And that is where we will start with the Sunday Times. Donald Trump

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throws Theresa May a lifeline with a trade deal. A sabotage to the appeal

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bill. A lot to cope with. The lifeline. The promise of a trade

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deal. He says it will be very powerful, very quickly. We are not

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there yet. We are not. It is a long way off. It will take at least two

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years before we can even begin, assuming Brexit even happens in that

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time. Many think they will have to be a transitional deal that will go

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on much longer. Therefore, any trade deal will be some years in the

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future. The Sunday Times is very clever. They managed to get three

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stories in one. The trade side, with the Sunday Times suggesting Theresa

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May talked to China, Japan, and India, who are keen on trade deals.

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They say that is one for her cabinet. Then we go on to our own

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future, with an ally of David Davis saying in October she should say

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when she is going to resign. And the Great Repeal Bill, the one that will

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have a rough time in the Commons next week. This is when they talk

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about the Henry VIII powers, those not used since Henry VIII's time.

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Tell us about it? The idea about the repeal bill is when we Brexit, all

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European law will be put into British law, one deal. It is an

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interesting way to do it. We can spend years gradually picking it

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apart after doing it in one day. MPs will not get a vote on it. They are

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worried we will start repealing this, leaving that, without them

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getting a chance to consider it. They are thinking of opposing it and

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making trouble for it. If they can defeat the repeal bill, of course,

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we would have a major problem the day that Brexit came. They have

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wedged a lot in. Yes. A powerhouse! Well done, both of you. We are very

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pleased to count them as our paper review was. But there is a lot going

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on behind the scenes, which we will go on to. The facts Theresa May

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needs this lifeline from Donald Trump. Absolutely. As you said, we

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will talk soon about what the Germans said. She needs a lifeline.

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But it is not a lifeline, someone is saying it's OK, we will come back

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with a lifeline. It is not actually someone giving the rope. Keep

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treading water. That is the risk of Donald Trump. Yes. It is warm words.

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And she has come back, I don't know how important any more these summits

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are, frankly, there is a fundamental gap between the Americans on climate

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change and the Paris agreement. They are trying to appeal to many people,

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the home audience and the international audience. Compared to

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what Barack Obama said riot to the referendum, this is a useful change.

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-- prior. It is a useful change. She is already in talks with China,

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Japan, and India. She is working very hard to get some business deals

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already and interest with countries outside. At least we have an

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American president who likes Brexit, which we would not have had with

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others. Theresa May playing the Trump card,, trying to play off this

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rebellion with help from Donald Trump. But the idea she will face

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that critical of a rebellion, it would appear she will have surely

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enough friends to keep her in power for now. It does not suit the

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Conservatives to get rid of her. She is very weak and since the election.

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She is probably fatally damaged in the long-term. But we are going...

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What is it, two weeks until the summer recess? Everyone will go away

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and come back for the party conference in the autumn. These

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stories will continue to rumble on. There are obviously people making

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mischief, making stories. There is of course growing talk in the Lib

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Dems, certainly, and softer pro Brexit, sorry, pro- remain talking

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points. That is going on. But nothing new is going on in the

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Tories, they just feel weak. They don't want a new leader because they

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are terrified of opening the way for a General Election. It is difficult

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with Tory rules. You need 48 MPs to back someone to go for leadership.

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You get the kind of feeling that they have some power, because

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Theresa May is so weak, she used to be dictatorial, and now they have

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more power over her. That doesn't change the people in the background

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saying I wouldn't mind the job when it comes around. There would always

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be people like that. The Mail on Sunday says Andrew Mitchell, a chief

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David Davis ally, is saying this. Andrew Mitchell said this at a

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dinner in the Commons, a Conservative Party dining club, he

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was forced to resign. He was also the international development sector

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ally. He is a close ally of David Davis. There is no suggestion in

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this article David Davis is plotting against Theresa May, but he is being

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seen by many, and I think this is what often happens, someone saying,

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go on, Nigel, you can do it. If there was a challenge and Theresa

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May could not survive it, they would be in the position she is in. They

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would not feel they have a mandate. That is what they are terrified of.

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That is why they don't want another General Election. Andrew Mitchell

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could be the anonymous MP on the front of the Times, we don't know.

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But the message is awfully similar. The idea is that Theresa May should

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go. One hard-line Brexiteer named here says he would rather not lose

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Brexit so long as Jeremy Corbyn does not get in. That is just ridiculous.

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Of course. If there was an election tomorrow, Jeremy Corbyn would

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probably win. Exactly. It is a very febrile atmosphere, summer, everyone

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needs to go away and come down. She got through the Queen's Speech, she

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could get to the 20th of this month, Parliament breaks, they have a

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break, the comeback, and they talk about else. And in the meantime,

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political minds need to be looking at what these deals might be. The

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Sunday People. An exclusive. Britain is breaking the law over six

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soldiers. Lord Dannatt from the army is saying not enough is being done

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to support ex- service men and women who suffer from Post-Traumatic

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Stress Disorder. A serious intervention from someone who was

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head of the army at one point. The problem at the moment is that, umm,

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those who suffer Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder coming back from the

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frontline, there is very little for them. There is the NHS, superb

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charities like Combat Stress. Lord Dannatt is saying this is no way to

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treat the troops. We promised if they risked their lives, we would

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look after them when they came back. David Cameron brought in a covenant

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and Lord Dannatt is saying we are breaking that and breaking the law.

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He says it is down to the MoD to sort this out. You don't just have

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charities to rely on, you have a proper set up in the MoD which deals

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with people going through these mental difficulties. It is something

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the paper has been campaigning on for quite some time. He is certainly

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the most senior person so far to come out with something like this.

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Like so many lives of the people in the families of these sufferers.

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More than 10% of return price back -- Britain's soldiers suffer this.

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What he is saying, I think it is devastating, in 1917, they did not

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understand shellshock, but in 2017, we do understand PTSD. And

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apparently there is no MoD dedicated psychiatric hospital cap will of

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treating those with. -- capable. It is ironic, as Prince William and

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Prince Harry have of course been talking about mental health and

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mental illness. Prince Harry has been a serving soldier. It seems

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absolutely fundamentally wrong that however good a charity is, you can

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back from seeing and doing stuff civilians don't see and you are not

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given any help. Coming back into civilian life is hard enough for

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those not suffering from this stress. It is not about a lack of

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awareness, but a lack of resources, a formal framework for dealing with

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it. And also a lack of organisation. We have resources and all of that.

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But what you need to do is the MoD needs to have a cross parliamentary

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group that covers health and Work and Pensions and various departments

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getting involved. You set that up in the MoD specifically for people

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suffering from PTSD. And it would play into so many other areas of

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treating mental illness. Yes, yes. We know that veterans, former army

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personnel, they often end up on the streets, with drinking and drug

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problems, broken relationships, other problems. If there was some

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resources put into it, you could prevent that. We need the will. It

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is one of those things you put in paper. Lord Dannatt is talking about

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potentially suing the government. That is not a constructive way of

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dealing with it, it should not be necessary. The Observer. Taking us

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to the end. The Germans and the industry warning the UK about

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Brexit. We want to talk about Lions, both. But the German industry is

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warning the UK ever Brexit, saying the priority is to protect the

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single market and no favours will be done. This headline is definitely a

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stark warning, not what we expected. Our ministers have been giving the

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impression, especially David Davis, that the German industry, especially

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carmakers, are the ones who would help smooth us through a record deal

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because they don't want tariffs on the goods they sell in this country

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any more than we do over there. -- Brexit deal. What they are saying is

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these are industry organisations saying, no, no, we don't think that

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at all. If you want access to the single market, obey the rules. We

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will not help out at all because there are 27 other states. There has

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been a free trade deal struck with Japan, the EU and Japan. There is no

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freedom of movement, no single market, but a free-trade deal. We

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are looking for a similar thing. Keep in mind we are a member of the

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EU, and the smoothest transition to become out of the EU would be with

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access to the single market or the customs union. We are looking for a

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different position from Japan, but we want something similar. In years

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to come... In years to come, it won't be the same kind of smooth and

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frictionless borders we have at the moment to do the trade. The

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president of the BDI, the federation of German industries, says it is the

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responsibility of the British to limit damage for both sides. He is

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talking about imminent effects. Is it all down to political will on

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both sides? We can have a very, very nice arrangement if everyone is of a

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like mind, but they are not. We cannot. There are straightforward

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rules when the EU is set up. These are the cornerstones of keeping the

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EU as it is, which we signed up to, and also 27 other member states

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signed up to. If you want a single market, we have to accept freedom of

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movement. That is what people voted against when they voted for Brexit.

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There is no way of squaring that circle. We go with the rules or we

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don't. If you want to be in the club, those

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are the rules. And we made those rules clear to other nations who

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joined. It will be interesting to see what the negotiation is, because

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it can't be about that. And finally, shared glory as Lions win. It is a

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little bit of an anti-climax, it is like here is your Brexit cake, but I

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think in terms of the fact that the Lions were seen as the underdogs,

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they were going to take on the mighty All Blacks, they won, we won,

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a draw seems like a good deal to me. Nigel, you have been saved by the

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bell. I know you had much to add about the Lions. We will talk of

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set. How about that? Visit from the papers this power. Thank you very

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much indeed -- that is it from the papers this hour.

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Migration, human dislocation is one of the dominating political themes

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