23/07/2017 The Papers


23/07/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment -

:00:11.:00:15.

The BBC's Director General, Lord Hall says he'll go further

:00:16.:00:27.

He was responding to a letter by high-profile female personalities

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who have called on the corporation to "act now".

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A 20-year-old man has died, after being apprehended by a police

:00:37.:00:38.

He's been been named by his family as Rashan Jermaine Charles.

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Prince William and Prince Harry have spoken candidly

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about their relationship with their mother, Princess Diana,

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in a documentary marking the twentieth anniversary

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Police in the US state of Texas say the number of deaths in the human

:00:51.:01:04.

smuggling incident has risen to nine.

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20 others are thought to be in a critical condition.

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On Meet The Author this week, my guest is one of the most popular

:01:15.:01:23.

crime writers, the rather aptly named Karin Slaughter, to talk about

:01:24.:01:31.

her latest book, The Good Author. Dump -- the good daughter.

:01:32.:01:36.

Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are the Author and Broadcaster, Natalie Haynes

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and Rob Merrick, Deputy political editor at The Independent.

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Let's get straight on. Rob, perhaps you would start us off. Daily

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Telegraph front page, The Telegraph says NHS bosses

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have ordered a review , after warnings that plans to cut

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down on A numbers as we know, A departments are in

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crisis. There is a plan, they are being asked to introduce front door

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streaming. It will convert them into different arms of the NHS. There has

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been a case in Bristol, a man who was turned away from A under this

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scheme and tragically died soon afterwards. This story says they are

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being it would visibly lead to more people

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being treated in A and it shows how difficult it is for the

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government to tackle these problems without causing unintended

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consequences. Natalie, it is one terrible tragic case, but it seems a

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bit strange that the whole system has been thrown into reverse on the

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basis of that. There must be a bit more to it, would have thought? You

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would think so, we're told so many times that A departments are

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clogged, when people turning up when they shouldn't have, brutally,

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either because they have committed an incredibly minor injury to

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themselves because they should have gone to the GP and either don't have

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a GP or the GP wasn't open at that or whatever. Because they are drunk.

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It turns out if somebody turns up to an AMD department with chest pains,

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as could happen, they could be turned away without having his blood

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pressure checked. If you are turning away people, I would have thought

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chest pains but pretty much the go to for A I am obviously in no way

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in a place to qualify that. The point is it was a GP, because they

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call it the triage, I think on the way you see a nurse any way to start

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with, very often, so there is also a filter, this sounds like an even

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more Draconian one. Seems like this streaming system will be in place

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before the review has fully taken place, so there will be six months

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worth of it having happened in theory before the time the review

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comes back. Slightly worrying, but is a tragic case but on the other

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hand it is only one case. It is hard to believe they will end streaming

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altogether. As you say, it is perhaps just one terrible example.

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There must surely be some people who can so obviously be turned away from

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three macro without causing disorder problem. Things presumably they want

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people to stop turning up is with the winter vomiting virus, they are

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incredibly contagious, so the last thing you want to do is to bring

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them in the hospital is full of ill people. Drink some water, stay in

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bed. Let's quickly go onto the front page of the Telegraph, still.

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Cabinet split over imports of American chlorine chicken. That hast

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to rank as one of the most odd headlines. I wonder whether they got

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to the point where it had to arm wrestle... We think overall they

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spent very little time talking about it but they should. Quite an

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important printable behind all this. Absolutely, but as we know Liam Fox

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is in the US and about to try and start a bit of trade talk. Here's

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the trade Secretary, yes. He is hoping to persuade everyone and

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presumably the rest of his Cabinet (!) That what would be a great thing

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is if we have American meat products, this is not good for me, I

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had not eaten meat for 30 years, but I am sure it matters to many more of

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you. That would include chlorine washed chicken, which sounds

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revolting to me, but to be honest the chicken sounds worse than

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MacLaurin, I quite like swimming. Hormone -- sounds worse than the

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chlorine. But actually it is a Brexit story, isn't it? Yes, if we

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are not going to trade with Europe, we have to trade more with America,

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and there is a lot more of them and they have a lot more money than us.

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The inevitable but, in this case Michael Gove. Ceremony sentences

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begin like that! Indeed, and Angela Ballard some, -- Andrea Leadsom, we

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must keep the standards up even though not governed by the EU. They

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are on other side of the great chlorine soaked debate. Debate or

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schism? That is all I am saying. They are all arch supporters of

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Brexit. On the issue of the chicken and whether it will be allowed in

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this country, but what is new about it is the suggestion that Liam Fox

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would favour its import, and arrange to accept it. He is not quoted in

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the story, obviously just a short teaser, the story on the front page.

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If that is true, it would be nice to see when Liam Fox is in America

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tomorrow he could be interviewed on the subject when I found out. You

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remember when John Gummer was feeding beefburger to his daughter

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back in the 1990s, mad cow disease, whether Liam Fox would be asked if

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he would be happy for his own family to eat chlorine soaked chicken. OK,

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in the metro, sorry, before we do that, let's go to the eye. -- the

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Iyer. Slightly alarming, there has been

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breaches of computer systems of public bodies, hospitals, councils,

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museums, watchdogs have been breached over the last three years,

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since May 20 14. 424 successful attacks. We are not sure how many

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unsuccessful, mostly using ransomware, local authorities and

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other public bodies. The big NHS attack a couple of months ago. But

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this sounds deadly, much more serious and widespread. It is

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clearly a large and. It is one of those stories, I know cybercrime is

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really important, but my eyes tend to glaze over when I read it. When

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your credit card gets cloned... I know. There are a couple of

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interesting details in the story that struck me, one says there were

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nine health trust and several councils who confirmed they had been

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breached but had not reported it. You wonder whether they are too busy

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trying to protect their own repetition rather than being honest

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about the problem they have, which seemed alarming. They said one NHS

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Trust had been told by police that an attacker had been found to be

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outside the European Union, and therefore no further action could be

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taken. I did not understand that at all. There seem to be examples where

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even when a problem has been identified, it even wasn't being

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admitted to or wasn't being taken. They tend to be places you can't get

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at, Russia and China. Perhaps you could try. OK, the metro, I started

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to talk about it, let's get to that. Rob coming you can have a go here.

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This is Mr Corbyn being taxed by my colleague Andrew Marr on the matter

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of student debts. We never said we were going to write them off. Ever

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since the election, it has been the story of Theresa May carrying out

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U-turn after you turn, this is the press piling in on Jeremy Corbyn

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instead. When Mr Corbyn says we didn't say we would write off

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student debts, he is absolutely right and he is clearly did not say

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that, but unfortunately for him, he uttered the phrase we will deal with

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it, at least try to ameliorate the problem in some way, now he is

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running back from that. He also said he didn't realise when he said he

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would deal with it that it would be a ?100 billion bill for wiping out

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existing student debt, which clearly nobody thinks they can afford to

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pay. It is a big embarrassment for Jeremy Corbyn but to be honest,

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Jeremy Corbyn is not the Prime Minister, there was no likelihood of

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him doing that in the near future. If I was a student, or a graduate

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with a debt, what would be far more concerned about is in October the

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level of interest on that student debt is going to soar to 6.1%, even

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when interest rates are on the floor under legislation the government put

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through, and that to be honest is a much bigger issue when it comes to

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the problem of student debt, rather than what Jeremy Corbyn did or did

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not say during the election campaign. But isn't the point really

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Natalie that Jeremy Corbyn, had they had a much better successful

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campaign, said an awful things about what they would do but the actual

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total bill would be absolutely enormous. It is a bit strange she

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can say I didn't know about the figures. Straying into Diane

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territory. One could legitimately argue that the actual total bill

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whatever happens will be enormous, not least because the filthy left

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wing rag which is the Financial Times suggested that about 70% of

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students won't ever pay off their debt, which is an enormous

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percentage of ?100 billion. Not writing off all of their debt, but

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even so, a large quantity of this debt will never be paid back,

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because it is only levied once people and a certain amount and many

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people simply don't earn that much and may never. So all you are really

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giving people is a sort of horrendous stress Millstone to live

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with with no expectation really of the payment coming back. If you are

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the person who loans money to people and have been told that roughly

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seven upset of those people won't pay back and you haven't taken that

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into account in your figures, then you are an idiot, and I am sure the

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people running the student loans company are not idiots, so they are

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expecting a lot of money to be defaulted on, so why do you have to

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make 70 people's lives miserable before that money doesn't get paid

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back one way or another? I'm not sure there is a good reason. Just

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coming back to what Mr Corbyn was saying about it, the election

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campaign was very much saying don't worry, students, there will be no

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more student loans in the future. That seemed an absolute key part of

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the whole thing. Can a senior Labour politician, or whichever politician,

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say all these things and then come roaring back again? We will deal

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with it is a relatively fluid term, it could mean we will cut fees for

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the next generation, they will be much lower. Student debt used to be

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paid, in 2002 it was pretty much all paid off within something like nine

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years of graduation. We will deal with it is an extremely protean

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phrase that can be read in a bunch of ways. I think he could

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legitimately argue it is not necessarily his fault. It was not in

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the manifesto either, it was a phrase in an interview. There is

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embarrassment, but on the scale of great U-turns, not quite. Very

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quickly, to the Daily Mail. You can't get away from it, BBC pay.

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They have a picture of my colleague Emily Maitlis, who apparently earns

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less than ?150,000 a year, calling on male TV stars to publicly back

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the pay gap fight. We can't do it right now, we are on the news, so

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you are obliged to be entirely impartial but of course I am not

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surprised. She is absolutely right to suggest people need to be

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supporting her. It is of course terrific that her male colleagues

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have allowed her female colleagues 48 hours, 78 hours or so to have all

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the headlines, but now I think it is time for you to step up and join in

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and say, yes, it is lastly unfair that female colleagues are being

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paid less than we offer doing the same sorts of jobs and it is also

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unfair that women are not going to get those best paid jobs because

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they are all taken up by perfectly delightful and equally competent

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men. I see the South American correspondent with Davis, I fully

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backed calls for senior debuts to be pay the same as male counterparts.

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Quite a thing building up, but the point building up I suppose is that

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the director-general says he will act fast on this, and do something

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about this. How fast can it be, and what about the overall cost of the

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public purse in the end, if you have to raise a lot of people's salaries?

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I think he said he would act by 2020, and clearly the women who

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signed the open letter believe that is probably not achievable, not very

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far away, and they doubt that. Of course you don't have too raise the

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salaries of the women, you could cut the salaries of the men. Maybe they

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will have a word with John Humphrys etc. Wie will take some of the

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extremely high-profile men who present art strands, and let some

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less high profile women doing it, just suggesting it, I am available!

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The last one, ladies dancing, Lords are leaping, the back of the

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Telegraph front page, women cricketers, a very significant

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victory. Are you a cricket fan? I am a big one. I missed the match, as I

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was travelling in. That had it all, a full house at Lord's, which I'm

:15:15.:15:17.

not sure everyone was necessarily expecting at the start of the

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tournament. I was listening on radio five live, it was very exciting. I

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was walking past Lord's, and it was the Wimbledon grown. Did someone

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just dropped a thing. It sounded like everyone was having an absolute

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wail at the time from the outside. For once, a story about women doing

:15:36.:15:38.

extremely well and everyone is truly happy. Hole it sounds like the day

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that women's cricket arrived as a major sporting event in this

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country. Able never be the same again. That is it for the papers

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this hour. Thank you Natalie and Rob ,

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you'll both be back at half 11 for another look at the stories

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making the news tomorrow. My guest today is one of the world's

:15:54.:16:06.

most popular crime writers,

:16:07.:16:10.

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