06/09/2017 The Papers


06/09/2017

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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are Caroline Wheeler, Deputy Political Editor

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of the Sunday Times and Jason Beattie, Head of Politics

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The FT leads with a story that Downing Street has approached

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Britain's biggest businesses to publicly state their support

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for the government's approach to Brexit.

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Jacob Rees Mogg's bid to become the next leader

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of the Conservative Party has come under fire, says the Metro.

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He has drawn criticism after a TV interview in which he said he did

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not believe in abortion under any circumstances.

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The Express focuses on a new study which it says proves that statins

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can reduce the chance of an early death by 28%.

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Hurricane Irma is the lead for The i, with the warning that

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millions of people are risk in the Caribbean and US as

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The Telegraph claims that Theresa May's Brexit plans

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are in "chaos" as senior ministers distance themselves

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following the leak of radical plans for immigration.

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According to The Times, universities face being fined if they fail to

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justify paying vice chancellors more than the Prime Minister. The

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Guardian has revelations from leaked Brexit documents. And the mail says

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a survey from the British Medical Association found around half of GPs

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this book to our closing their lists to new patients. We will go straight

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to the eye of the storm, may God protect us, the front page here, I

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think that is a picture that has come from the international space

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station. It shows just how big, angry and whipped up Hurricane Irma

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is. Barrelling across the Caribbean from east to west and will probably

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hit the British Virgin Islands next ballot has caused damage to places

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like Antigua and Barbuda. And the fact that this is billed as the

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biggest storm we have ever seen is significant about just how

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devastating the impact can be and we already have the French President

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basically saying it is going to be hard and cruel. That is because we

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even see this gaining momentum as it goes across and it is only starting,

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this is the beginning. We will see this move and towards the end of the

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week it will move towards Miami and areas like that and already areas

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are on a high state of alert. People stockpiling food and getting ready

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for what looks like it is going to be the most devastating storms. And

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it comes hard on the back of Hurricane Harvey and there is

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another... Yes. Jason, lots of people's minds will turn to...

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Doesn't feel like more of this is happening? Are we just reporting

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that more? What are we reporting or not reporting? Over the past few

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months we have had floods in India and Bangladesh. 1200 people dead, 6

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million acres of crops destroyed and 14 million people affected and they

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have not seen this leading any news bulletin. We do have this almost

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West approach. That does not mitigate that the poorest people

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will most often suffer, we can remember what happened in the

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Dominican Republic. And a lot of people could lose their lives and be

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badly affected but I wonder why we focus on this and we have ignored

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completely almost what is happening in India. To be fair to the BBC, we

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have reported it quite extensively, the floods in South Asia. But I take

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your point as far as a lot of the newspapers are concerned. We had

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this horrible weather season that began with catastrophic flooding

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that caused amazing as dreadful landslides in Sierra Leone. And they

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were very underreported, those deaths. I will mention Martin

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Patience from the BBC right now. I will just throw that in. The

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Guardian. The new league of Brexit papers reveals fissures between

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Britain and the EU? We have a Brexit bonanza tomorrow, we have the bill

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having the second reading in the House of Commons, questions to David

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Davis to kick off and to make it more enjoyable we have Michel

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Barnier launching new position papers in Brussels and doing a press

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conference and the Guardian has an advance on some of those papers

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which he will put forward. David Davis has persuaded, begged Michel

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Barnier to show flexibility and imagination and he will come back

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tomorrow and say, we are not being flexible and we don't have much

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imagination. We are playing hardball. This is what the Guardian

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is saying. One suspects that a lot of people looking at these

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negotiations panning out, they might argue that the 27 through Michel

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Barnier are not saying anything that they had not telegraphed months ago?

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Equally, it does not feel like the message going the other way is

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changing either. Given the fact that all along David Davis said we're

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going to give them the mother of all frights in terms of changing the

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timetable and basically, the essence of this, they are talking about

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going in with the paper to be delivered on Northern Ireland to say

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the commission will say you sort it out, it is your problem. Whereas

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David Davis has consistently said, we cannot make progress on Northern

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Ireland if you are so focused on only talking about the divorce Bill

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and the withdrawal, we want to talk about our future relationship.

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Initially, David Davis accepted this timetable, we're just going to do

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with withdrawal and then the future relationship and towards the latter

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weeks of the summer, he then goes on this massive offensive, actually, we

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cannot solve the Northern Ireland situation unless you allow us to

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move forward and talk about other things. It is not just Northern

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Ireland, they are talking about legislating to make sure foods and

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things like Prosecco are protected so we cannot have cheap copies and

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other things. The essential message is, the commissioner is saying, you

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want to move on and talk about other things? No. We want to stick to the

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timetable, if you want to use imagination, use your own. The

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Telegraph, Theresa May's Brexit plans in disarray. I will return to

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the scene that some people are pointing to... The EU had

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telegraphed a long time ago that this was going to be their strategy

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and for some reason, it might seem that we have always believed that we

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can convince them otherwise. Why did we think that? Why did we believe

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that in the first place? That is an extraordinarily good question, why

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they were just so gung ho... It was not just the Brexiteers, some who

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wanted to remain are wondering why the EU is so steadfast in pushing

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this narrative? There are 27 of them and unless they have a clear line,

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it is easier for them to unravel. They have to act collectively and

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have one negotiator, Michel Barnier. What we're finding out is what was

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obvious in the beginning, this whole process is extraordinarily complex.

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Each question leads to another. This is why the problems are mounting for

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Theresa May. You have divisions in the Cabinet, probably in the

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country, on what sort of immigration controls we have. We have this

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constant unresolved argument, Northern Ireland cannot move forward

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on whether we should or not have a transition period and if we do, are

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we members of the single market or the Customs Union? And for how long?

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You have business saying, we want some sort of security so we can

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start investing again. And all of these issues are, because you have

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this internal conflict with the Conservative Party and in the

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Cabinet, they are mounting without any clear resolution, overseen by a

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Prime Minister whose authority has disappeared since the general

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election. This double dynamic, and the Labour Party is not immune...

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There are divisions in the Labour Party. On domestic policy... And

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then international relations, this is leading to an extraordinary lack

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of clarity. And the money issue. We are big net contributor to the EU

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budget and is a sense that if they let us off the hook in terms of

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talking about how much money we will pay them when we Brexit, that is

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somehow going to be lost in the wayside and they believe some of

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their bargaining position so we are at a massive impasse and it seems

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difficult to move beyond that. The interesting thing about this is

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actually, it is a Daily Telegraph that writing the stories, which are

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raising questions about the success of the Prime Minister and her

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ability to do with this. This is talking about the leak from

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yesterday, talking about the immigration blueprint and splits

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within the Cabinet over this, the likes of Amber Rudd and Damian Green

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being much more resistant to big curbs on immigration. Actually,

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there have been other stories today, if you wanted to do a negative

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story. We have seen a number of stories being done in The Daily

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Telegraph, probably a site from the express, the biggest flag waver for

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Brexit... They are looking at this and raising questions. The Financial

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Times, executives resist Downing Street's strong-arm bid for Brexit

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backing. This is interesting. Business leaders, perhaps not

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willing to give the kind of coverage that perhaps Number 10 would like?

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This idea of organising letters of support feels very retro, it was a

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tactic first used in the 1980s and dribbled into the 90s and we thought

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it had died. Now, it is not exactly surprising on the back of the league

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about the government's possible immigration strategy for Brexit that

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big business and small businesses, who rely massively on the flow of

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goods and people, are not exactly happy with the government's stance

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on Brexit. They made that quite clear for some time. These are

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number of leaks from within the business community and they seem to

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suggest that they are not necessarily onside and are some

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great quotes about saying, basically those who have been approached, you

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would have to be manoeuvring for a knighthood to sign this letter,

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somebody is suggesting! Another person from within the inner Downing

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Street circle says, I had no idea who in Number 10 thought this was a

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good idea. The Metro, abortion is wrong even after rape. This is Jacob

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Rees-Mogg, speaking on television today. Yes, he did an interview this

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morning he talked about his views on abortion and in some ways his

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position on this is not that surprising given he is very vocal

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about his ardent Catholic beliefs and he has voted pretty much in

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every division you can see against gay marriage. Why this becomes a

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story is that Jacob is being talked about more as a potential leadership

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candidate, when and if any vacancy arises, and how that will set him at

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odds with the modernising strand that was championed by David

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Cameron. The Daily Mirror, gender neutral role, school bands skirts

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and the head brings in a new uniform policy? This is fascinating. The

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debate about transgender, this is a very good way of illustrating this.

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It throws up so many questions, for example, they had the music awards

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last week and they did not have any male or female category. In the

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Olympics, if you transition, which category do you run in? Does this

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give you an advantage or disadvantage and should be respected

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or wish to do this? It is really quite interesting and not all these

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questions have an immediate answer. We will have to end things. Thank

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you both very much. Don't forget, you can see the front

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pages of the papers online It's all there for you, seven days

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a week, at bbc.co.uk/papers. And if you miss the programme any

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evening, you can watch it Thank you, Caroline Wheeler

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and Jason Beattie.

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