13/11/2017 The Papers


13/11/2017

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are the political

commentator Daisy McAndrew

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and the former trade

minister Lord Digby Jones.

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Welcome to you both. Thanks for

being with us.

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Tomorrow's front pages.

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The Daily Mail has a headline about

the Prime Minister's Guildhall

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speech where she accused the

Vladimir Putin regime of influencing

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the West.

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The FT says Theresa May has "bowed

to pressure" from her pro-Europe

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colleagues by offering parliament

a full vote on the final Brexit

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deal.

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The Metro reports

on another Westminster

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sexual harassment allegation.

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Daisy Goodwin, creator of ITV drama

Victoria claims that a government

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official groped her breast

when she was on a visit to No 10.

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The Express newspaper's lead

is that the cost of a care home

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place is rising at the fastest

rate on record.

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The Telegraph also has

the announcement that Parliament

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will get a binding vote on the final

EU divorce deal.

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And the i talks about the threat

from Russia, highlighted by the

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Prime Minister. The Daily Mirror

leads with Richard Ratcliffe, whose

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wife Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe is

imprisoned in Iran. He has

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reportedly told the Foreign

Secretary to fix the mess he has

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caused and bring his wife back to

the UK. The Guardian claims Tory

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rebels are not satisfied with the

announcement that they will be given

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a vote on the final Brexit deal.

Let's kick off. We're going to start

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with claims on the front pages of

quite a few of the papers. This is

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Daisy Goodwin, the TV writer who

created the kit, Victoria, saying

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she was groped at number ten Downing

St.

On the front of many papers. She

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wrote it in the radio Times but the

papers have got hold of it. She's

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alleging that she was summoned to a

meeting at Downing Street not by a

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politician but by an aide who worked

there to discuss a broadcasting idea

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that they had had and while they

were in this private meeting, he put

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his feet up on her chair, told how

great she looked and as they left,

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groped her breast. C has written

here and said that she was firstly

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shocked, but felt fully able to deal

with it and said, what do you think

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you're doing, I think you did

something inappropriate, and stormed

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out. She writes quite wittily about

it but she says it didn't occur to

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her to report it and she didn't feel

that she'd been violated or anything

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like that but she thought

afterwards, should I have said

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something, because it wasn't

acceptable. Just because it didn't

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make her burst into tears and be

very upset, is the kind of thing

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that shouldn't be allowed to be

gotten away with and I think she has

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a good point. Whether this chap

remains anonymous after this. We

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know that everybody working in

Westminster is going to be digging

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around trying to work out who it is.

I wouldn't be surprised if everyone

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doesn't know who it is now.

It is

the latest saga in the so-called

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Pestminster scandal.

It is an

allegation, it may be right or

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wrong, we should make that clear.

But on the other hand, I think this

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is right, people will say it was

ages ago, but the fact that she had

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the confidence to think that this

man was despicable, she could get

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away and get on with her life: but

there will be many young females in

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the parliamentary environment who

won't have the confidence and

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strength to walk away. If she's

doing it to ruin a career, that's

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wrong, but if she's doing it to make

sure that a female who can't cope is

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protected them I think that's spot

on. I like the quote, she says she

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has previously met the official at a

dinner and was struck by the

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atmosphere of testosterone, socks

and lust. I assume she means the

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colour of there!

One thing she says

that shocked is that he was younger

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than her. She had been used to

dealing with a generational

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difference, groping from older men,

but she was struck by the fact that

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this man was younger.

Take it or

leave it, a vote on the Brexit deal,

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the Brexit secretary giving MPs the

final say. Is this a concession by

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the government?

It's in quite a few

newspapers tonight. Is what I think

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they are trying to do, they are

trying to do two things. Firstly to

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say to the heart Tory Brexiteers,

look, we're going to engineer this

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into a position where the choice

will be, that the deal we've done,

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vote yes or no but if you vote no,

we are coming out with a hard

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Brexit. There would be no deal and

we will rely on WTO, we won't pay

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the money and we will come out.

So-called cliff edge.

On the other

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hand, if you vote yes, you will have

the deal, some kind of Single Market

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affiliation and there will be no

cliff edge, a transition. That is

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the characteristic. Where is good, I

think it's politically trying to

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sort out the hard Brexiteers. There

we are, we've looked after what you

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want, and sorting out parliament who

say that we should have the last

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say. Where I think it will unravel,

they don't have the political

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influence, the government, to see it

through. A lot of members in both

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Houses of Parliament will try and

see it down.

The Guardian front page

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is that for the rebels are not

convinced by the Brexit U-turn, if

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it has been one.

It depends on what

rebels you are talking about. If you

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talk about the Remainer rebels,

there's another way to look at this

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vote. Those who don't want Brexit to

happen could do the ultimate suicide

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vote, vote it down and call a

general election, a vote of

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no-confidence. Is basically

destroying their own government.

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There is a possibility of that.

That's interesting because how many

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people would vote to break down the

deal but then vote to have

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confidence in the government because

Jeremy Corbyn is worse? Secondly I

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think it is prime territory, which

would be good for the government,

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for at last some centre-left people

to say actually we aren't Corbyn, we

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are an alternative to your moderate

centrist person.

The Daily Express,

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I know this is music to your ears.

Booming Britain's economy.

I'm

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grateful that you are highlighting

this because what really annoys me

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is when news coverage of all sorts,

and the BBC but lots of others, they

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tend to start with the words, when

it is good economic news... In the

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Financial Times it isn't covered at

all. But in other places it is"

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despite Brexit". It says that the

economy is surging. I think that is

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an exaggeration.

It is a bit. Blue

but the economy is being robust.

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There are some default line. I know

that the biggest one is the

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productivity of the nation which is

so low that you can't afford big pay

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rises in the public sector, you

can't afford to do the things to be

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globally competitive that you need

in a post Brexit environment if you

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don't get more bang for your buck

and invest.

Something that the

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productivity argument is a red

herring because the way we measure

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it is outdated.

That's another

argument.

At least ours is true,

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compared to France.

The Daily Mirror

talking about what Theresa May was

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talking about in her Guildhall

speech, a strong attack on Russia

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and by the mere Putin.

I know we

want to get away from Brexit but you

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can't help but think that by turning

the gun is on Russia rather than the

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chaos in her own government and the

Commons, it's handy -- Russia and

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Vladimir Putin. It is true, Putin

has been running a cyber war on all

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Western democracies for a long time

and there have been some appalling

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examples. After the terror attack on

Borough Market it has been confirmed

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that the photograph of a Muslim

woman which was tweeted over and

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over saying, look at this woman

walking past dead bodies, she

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doesn't care, was done by Russia and

was an abomination of the truth.

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Call me a cynic but when I read

this, I'm glad the Prime Minister

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called it out, I'm pleased, but what

can she do about it? Putin will be

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sitting there going, oh, dear!

What

will the Iranian is be doing

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because, your mess, you fix it,

Boris, the message from the Daily

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Mirror. The continuing row over

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and how

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the government and Boris Johnson

have handled it. Her husband Richard

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Ratcliffe telling him, according to

the Daily Mirror, to fix the gas

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that may double the prison term.

Boris Johnson has made a gaffe here,

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there is no way of looking at it but

this is slightly unfair of the Daily

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Mirror. I spoke to Richard Ratcliffe

and he isn't calling for Boris's

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head because he knows it wouldn't be

in Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe's best

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interests.

They are having a meeting

this week.

This is politicising the

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issue. What he said in the meeting

was appalling and it has resulted in

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this treatment. There are so many

diplomatic issues, things going on

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that you don't know about.

When I

was a minister, one thing I learned

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in short order, it's a bit like

property developers who always say

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that they can make money, but you

can in the rising market but the

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falling market is when the skill

comes in. Ministers in big

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responsible posts like the Foreign

Secretary, and Prime Minister. You

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judge them on how they deal with

crises, not the good times. I think

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that Boris is caught up short here.

Can he cope with the big crises?

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Boris's talents, of which there are

many, are Bobby not suited to the

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stuff that goes on

behind-the-scenes, that the three of

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us will never know -- are probably

not suited. That doesn't mean he has

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suddenly got six heads, but he's not

suited for the job.

The Financial

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Times, this awful earthquake,

hundreds dead and thousands may be

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injured on the border of Iran and

Iraq.

Appalling story and telling

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that it is on the front page of only

the Financial Times and not any

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others. I understand the pressures,

foreign stories, no matter how

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awful, rarely get on the front page.

But I think it is a sorry state,

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with this death toll.

From a

financial point of view, these

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isolated states, these totalitarian

states, a lot of them are in

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earthquake zones. They can from a

financial point of view say, they

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can look after themselves but in

terms of expertise and aid, not

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financial aid, expertise and

handling it, being a member of Ennis

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National community -- of an

international community really

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helps. For the people to whom this

has happened, it is so bad that it

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has happened in a country that has

cut itself off. They have a much

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better chance of surviving if the

expertise and dealing with this is

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open to them.

The last story, I

think we've got time for the

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Guardian, Facebook personality types

revealed by one like.

Terrifying but

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not unexpected, we all know that the

most valuable commodity in the world

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now isn't gold or oil, it is data

and Facebook has as much data as

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anyone.

Data about us.

It's a story

saying that online advertising

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campaigns created by academics have

targeted people on psychological

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traits generated by a single like,

showing the effects of mass

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psychological persuasion. Similar in

politics. We talk about living in a

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silo on social media and how it

affects everything you believe in.

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On this night of news, that on the

front page of the Guardian, and the

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business section of the Times, a

headline about Google is facing an

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attack on the abusive dominance they

have. Years ago when we were in

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short trousers it used to be the big

multinational, the big oil companies

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and manufacturers and how they

bossed nations. Now it is three or

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four of these enormously socially

influential businesses and none of

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them pay enough tax.

This is

Facebook being powerful but it is

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one reason why Putin is using it.

They don't pay tax because...

We

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have one out of time! That's it.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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And if you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you, Daisy McAndrew

and Lord Digby Jones.

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Goodbye.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.