04/12/2017 The Papers


04/12/2017

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Asa Bennett,

Brexit Editor at the Telegraph,

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and Polly Curtis, editor in chief

at Huff Post UK.

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We are joined from Dublin

by Pat Leahy, political

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editor of The Irish Times.

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Tomorrow's front pages.

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The i reports that Brexit was a done

deal before the DUP said "no".

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The FT runs with a similar line,

saying the deal fell

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apart at the 11th hour,

amid DUP objections.

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The Telegraph describes Theresa

May's push as ending "in chaos".

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The Times says May is fighting

on for a Brexit deal after what it

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describes as the "DUP veto".

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The Guardian says the DUP has

"wrecked" May's Brexit plans.

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The Metro's headline suggests

the paper thinks the DUP

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is exploiting its weight

over the government.

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The Mirror puns on the DUP's name -

suggesting Mrs May has

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been "duped" by them.

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The Sun's front page focuses

on a story about Meghan Markle's

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relationship with her father.

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Let's begin with, well, it's the

headline in all the papers pretty

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much in the morning but The Mirror

with the one word headline "Duped".

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Summing up what a lot of the papers

are saying.

I think it's right. It's

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the culmination of two things. The

possible Brexit deal but also the

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minority government being propped up

by the DUP. I think that came to a

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head today in the Brexit

negotiations.

Extraordinary the way

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these events unfold and picked up in

all the papers.

It's astonishing. It

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seemed to start so well. Donald Tusk

saying this is why I like Mondays

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had a great call with the Taoiseach.

Now it is a grid Monday for the

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negotiations. The Mirror touches on

Jeremy Corbyn, highlighting the

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grubby DUP deal, and the DUP

threatening to throw their toys out

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of the pram essentially. They

pointed out that the text on offer

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would have potentially put the union

at risk. Tory backbenchers rallied

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behind the DUP and the Prime

Minister has taken flight and

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realised she needs more time to

square with the DUP. I'm surprised

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she didn't check with them first.

This is why The Daily Mirror is

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making hay with them being "duped"

because the DUP have struck again.

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Pat, your paper the Irish Times is

focusing on this story. Blows to

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hopes for Brexit deal as Tory

backbenchers support the DUP. Tell

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us a bit more about the take from

your paper on the extraordinary

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events that unfolded during the day.

Unfortunately we missed that

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important story about Meghan

Markle's dad but we are pretty much

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up to speed on the rest of the day's

happenings. It was an extraordinary

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day in Dublin. We started off with

suggestions from the Minister for

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foreign affairs on a morning news

programme that he expected a

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breakthrough over the course of the

day, and it was an early-morning

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special Cabinet meeting called by

the Taoiseach Leo Varadkar to brief

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ministers on the negotiations.

Halfway through that meeting he was

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called out to take the phone call

from John -- from Jean-Claude

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Juncker. It revealed the deal had

been agreed and the British

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negotiating team in Brussels. At

that stage we expected that the deal

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would be agreed between Theresa May

or Jean-Claude Juncker, given that

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the text had been approved by both

the British side and by the Irish

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side. That seems to have fallen

apart over lunch when Theresa May

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took a call from Arlene Foster. From

then on the deal pretty much

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unravelled. The Taoiseach was due to

call a news conference to announce

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the deal at two 30p. He took another

call from Jean-Claude Juncker saying

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hold off. We've got a problem. That

conference was called off until

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5:15pm. I attended it and it really

was one of the most extraordinary

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press conference as I have ever been

at from the point of view of British

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Irish relations. He said he was

surprised and disappointed...

Are

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lot of the other papers picking up

on that. The FT talking about the

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Brexit divorce derail that the 11th

hour after the DUP blocks the Irish

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border deal.

The timing is very

delicate for the process because

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this is how the EU like to do

things. The clock might stop at the

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last minute but the thing is Donald

Tusk is still very sanguine. She can

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take it back to the EU later in the

week and get it rubber-stamped and

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move on but she can't waste a day

now.

The word is sanguine, they are

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trying to prevent -- present a

relaxed front. I think they are

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trying to use those last days to

pull it off. But it's tough.

If we

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look at The Guardian, it is talking

about the DUP Rex May's Brexit deal.

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Talking about how Jean-Claude

Juncker when Theresa May are trying

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to put a brave face on it and saying

this needs more time, it doesn't

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seem to be the take here.

The

Guardian report gives some of the

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detail of the drama of the day.

Diplomats were waiting for two hours

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and then sent home. It was like,

guys let's go to the pub, it's all

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over. It was a dramatic change of

events.

Pat Cummins you were talking

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about that extraordinary news

conference and it seems as though

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the Irish government was pretty

angry at the way this unfolded. Do

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you think it's going to make it more

difficult for the Prime Minister to

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square the Irish government now?

I

think the difficulty is less with

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the government here in Dublin and

with the DUP. The Irish government

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has been pretty consistent in terms

of what it requires. It's quite

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transparent, it requires eight cast

iron guarantee that whatever the

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future deal between the British and

the EU, it will not entail a return

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to a hard border and they want

strong language guaranteeing that. I

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think the difficulty will probably

be at the DUP side. The British

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after all appear to have agreed the

language with the Irish government

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and with the European Commission

this morning before the DUP

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registered their objections. It

really is astonishing that no one in

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London but check with the DUP

beforehand. But that I suppose is

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the situation we find ourselves in

now. What you'll find is intensive

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discussions between Dublin, London

and Belfast. Those relationships

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have been so damaged by today's

events I think it will make it

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doubly difficult.

There is also

focus on that reaction of some

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Conservative MPs. If we look at The

Times, Brexit deal after Unionist

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veto.

It's touching on some of the

reaction, like Jacob Rees-Mogg.

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Reminding everyone the Conservatives

are meant to stand for the union. It

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would be bizarre if they had

Northern Ireland staying in the

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single market and the customs union

in all but name and act like it

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still is. Many other backbenchers

would feel the same. It is seemingly

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problematic, dangerous and risky.

What if Northern Ireland wants to

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become different from the Republic

of Ireland. When you have Scotland

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trying to claim its own right is the

dispensation and the snowball effect

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goes on.

We've already seen Scotland

and Wales saying if Ireland can get

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a special deal maybe we can to.

The

other thing to highlight in The

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Times is I think they've got the

best dab at an explanation of what

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actually happened. Ms Foster had

been told broadly what the document

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would say but not the specific

wording. I think that's probably the

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most insightful regulatory alignment

which doesn't make it into the

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headlines as a sound bite.

That was

the phrase that really angered the

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DUP.

And it didn't stand up to the

scrutiny when it was discussed in

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the court of public opinion. It was

from EU friendly sources who said it

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is a complete capitulation. The

Brexiteers have to eat humble pie.

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Is it any surprise they don't want

eat it when it tastes so awful?

They

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were so confident they would get the

deal they booked in Parliamentary

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time to debate it. It seems like a

mystery why they have that

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confidence, given the DUP position.

Your own paper talking about how the

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push the deal ends in chaos.

We are

telling it like it is. It started so

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promisingly. She wanted to do it

today, it was meant to go according

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to plan. The cat out of the bag too

early and it didn't look right and

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she failed to secure her

stakeholders. She forgot to talk to

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the DUP thoroughly enough. She's

meant to be on top of the detail but

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it escaped her this time.

A brief

final word on Pat Liam -- from Pat

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Leahy. It has highlighted how

difficult it's going to be to

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resolve this issue of the Irish

border.

I think that's true. One

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thing that is puzzling people in

Dublin, I know the DUP weren't the

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only people who raised concerns

about this. Clearly the Scots and

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the Mayor of London and the Welsh

also said if Northern Ireland is

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getting a special deal we would like

that. We hear this constant

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objection from both the DUP but also

from Tory backbenchers saying

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Northern Ireland couldn't possibly

be any different from the rest of

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the UK. The fact is Northern Ireland

is quite different from the rest of

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the UK. That is the basis that the

whole Good Friday Agreement which

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the government say they are

committed to defending. There is a

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fair bit of puzzlement in Dublin at

that. I think there is in Dublin a

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sense that this is simply the latest

example of Mrs May not being very

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good at this process. It is terribly

difficult, but at every crucial

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point she seems to have.

Thank you

for joining us, Pat Leahy. Let's

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look at a couple of the other

stories in the papers. A 10,000

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strong Google army to tackle

extremists is the other story on the

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front page of The Telegraph here.

There has been a lot of concerns

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that Google isn't doing enough to

tackle some of those who are using

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this as a platform to peddle

extremist views in your paper.

It's

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timely and good on Google and

YouTube to do this. When you have

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half a million hours of content

posted everyday, and the stats of

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this, they found 150,000 had to be

taken down. You realise the scale of

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the challenge. You have to have

human interaction and that personal

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subjective analysis on how

worthwhile this is as content when

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all sorts can get through the net.

It's good they are taking social

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responsibility for this.

If they

really significant move to Google

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and an admission they were

acknowledging the fact they are a

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publisher as well as a platform.

They have to be responsible for what

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they are printing.

It seems as

though governance here and around

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the world are really struggling to

know how to tackle this.

Absolutely.

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This is a sign they are going to

take some responsibility. For years

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Google and Facebook have been saying

it's not our responsibility, we are

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just a platform, don't shoot the

messenger. There has been a creeping

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acknowledgement on both sides that

they have to take responsibility. As

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a result of some really excellent

reporting by The Times in

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particular, the work they've done to

expose the dangerous material that

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is on those platforms.

Thank you.

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That's it for The Papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you seven days

a week at bbc.co.uk/papers -

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and if you miss the programme any

evening you can watch it

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later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you Polly and Asa.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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