06/12/2017 The Papers


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06/12/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Paul Johnson,

Deputy Editor of The Guardian,

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and Lynn Davidson,

Whitehall Correspondent at The Sun.

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Tomorrow's front pages,

starting with...

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The Guardian leads with

Donald Trump's recognition

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of Jerusalem as Israel's capital

and his plans to move the US Embassy

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there from Tel Aviv.

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The paper also looks at the growing

pressure Theresa May is facing

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to strike a deal over Brexit.

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Brexit is also on the front page

of The I which takes a look

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at the ins and outs of the talks,

from Philip Hammond and the divorce

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bill, to David Davis and his lack

of impact assessments.

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The Telegraph says Jean Claude

Juncker fears the UK

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Government might collapse next week,

if a breakthrough in

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the Brexit talks isn't found.

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The Metro leads with the story

of a man arrested after a brawl

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in a Westminster bar

on the Parliamentary estate.

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The Mirror leads

with reports of a plot

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against Prince George

with a story about a man who's

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appeared in court accused

of allegedly urging jihadis

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to attack the young

Prince at school.

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The Financial Times reports on plans

by a UK shopping centre owner

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to mitigate against a high street

slowdown, as retail

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sales shift online.

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The Times has the story of a

shortage of medicines which is

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forcing some cancer patients and

those with severe mental health

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issues to be turned away from

pharmacies and the Daily Express is

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concerned about the imminent arrival

of Storm Caroline and her 90 mph

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gusts.

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Let's start with the front page of

the Guardian, anger as Trump

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declared Jerusalem as Israel's

capital. This was a story widely

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anticipated but there has been

shocked nonetheless.

There has been

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because it is an extraordinary

story. Who on the globe could unite

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the Pope, the UN, China, Russia,

France, Germany, Britain, Egypt,

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Turkey, Iran and Saudi Arabia? Only

one person and that is what Donald

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Trump did today. One of our

commentators called it an act of

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diplomatic arson and the KSR he is

potentially going to create, he has

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fumbled his way into what is a

geopolitical hotspot -- the chaos.

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There is an agreement on one side

about this needs to be approached

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and done and he has driven a

bulldozer through it which is

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extraordinary.

Any nuance to the

story?

If there is it is hard to see

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it. We need to look at the immediate

reaction from world leaders that

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came and it did not take our own

Prime Minister long to say she

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disagreed entirely with the position

and it was really unhelpful to the

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political process and the peace

process which is very delicate out

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there.

And we have seen pictures

this evening of protests in Gaza,

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peaceful protests that there is more

to come to a general strike

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tomorrow.

Jerusalem is one of the

most sensitive spots in the world,

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the holiest site in Judaism, the

third most important mosque and a

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hugely significant place to

Christians. It was always proposed

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during the peace process that it

would be a last stage negotiation,

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direct party to party and Donald

Trump has ripped that up and walked

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straight in. In our own story, this

will destroy any hopes that the US

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has of being an honest broker and

the Palestinians have said that

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tonight, you will not be up to play

as an honest broker and you are

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throwing the whole region into

international chaos.

Moving on,

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although that is a huge story, not

many of the papers have it on their

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front page but what most of them do

have is Brexit. In the Daily

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Telegraph, Theresa May will fall

without a deal once the EU.

The

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Daily Telegraph have led with fears

of Jon Ford YouGov -- Jean-Claude

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Juncker perhaps worrying about his

own position if he does not achieve

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a deal with Britain, running up to

the December the 14th crunch summit.

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What he is speaking about is his

fears about the position of Theresa

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May in government here and the worry

is that the government could

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collapse. We saw some bookies

yesterday slashing the odds of

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another general election imminently

which I am sure will strike fear

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into the entire country more than

anything! David Davis, there have

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been rumours of him plotting to take

the top job with people giving him

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support and some of his supporters

moving around but the butt and your

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own paper has that story.

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-- moving around...

Some people fear

she is a a precarious position and

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I'm sure that the majority of Tory

MPs don't feel that as anyone else

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to steer them through these times.

Many have said that her weakness is

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a strength. The front page of The

Times, staying on Brexit, two big

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cabinet ministers making the paper

and they concentrate on comments by

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Philip Hammond.

Slightly curious in

that it is interesting that he has

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got himself in a bit more hot water

which is becoming a familiar

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scenario for him. Most of the other

attention today has been on David

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Davis. There were some good quotes

from Jacob Rees-Mogg saying he was

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worried on Monday, meltdown Monday

when we had a deal and then a leak

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and then anger and recrimination and

then chaos and farce and he said he

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was worried about Timmis a's

redlines so he got some paint out --

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Theresa May's red lines. She does

not just have problems with the

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Irish and the DUP who took 24 hours

to take a call from the Prime

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Minister. She has got the EU

apparently bewildered over this and

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real problems, mutterings from the

Cabinet, but city is trying to

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stiffen her spine and the other

group who have come out tonight, 20

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MPs saying don't walk away without a

deal -- Brexiteers trying. This is

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all tightrope stuff.

The front page

of The Times as Philip Hammond's

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comments that Britain could be

paying £40 billion even if the trade

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talks fail, and you get the inside

page and his colleague, David Davis,

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not looking too happy.

No! The

picture tells a thousand words as

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they say also to hark back to Philip

Hammond, what he is guilty of is

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being too honest. The problem for

him recently has been that he speaks

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his mind and tell it as it is and

that is difficult in politics!

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Sometimes you wonder how he has got

this far by being so honest. David

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Davis was in front of the Commons

Brexit, he first thing this morning

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and these pictures were on the

televisions from this morning. He

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had a very difficult time when he

revealed about impact assessments

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which I think a lot of people were

underway now it appears not so.

This

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is completely bewildering, a

sequence of events where the

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Secretary of State for exiting the

EU says we have done the impact

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papers in fine detail and Parliament

says, can we see them, and he says

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they are secret, and Parliament has

do see them but they relax them. He

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hands them over and Parliament looks

at them and said you have not done

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any impact assessment after all and

he says no, we haven't. The civil

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service did not do a good job and we

will do them later. It is almost

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like a scene from Yes, Minister,

apart from Brexit is the most

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fundamental economic position we

will take in our generation and the

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idea that these assessments are

drifting off and the government

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doesn't really know what the impact

of Brexit will be or has not even

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tried to find out sector by sector

is bewildering. He has been show up

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today to be at best a bluff and

certainly people in Labour think it

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is worse than that and are seeking a

condemnation within Parliament.

And

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in a sense, what he was saying was

backed up by Philip Hammond who said

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there had not been a full Cabinet

discussion of what the end Brexit

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deal should look like.

We ran a

story a few months ago with James

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Forsyth saying the same thing,

essentially that the Cabinet has not

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set out their end state position. A

few months ago they had initial

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talks and that was shelved for the

meantime and I think that is because

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it is a pretty difficult one but it

would seem quite preposterous to

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think that the Cabinet are not all

whole the United and with a vision

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for Brexit and knowing what it is on

this position 18 months on from the

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Brexit Road.

One more Brexit front

page on the Financial Times which is

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the other dimension to the Brexit

Astori -- from the Brexit vote. This

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is the Irish border with the Irish

premier raising the prospect of

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Brexit divorce talks stretching into

the New Year if there is no

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agreement next week. Some think that

means that the Irish premier is

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threatening to use his veto next

week if he is not happy with the

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plan for the border.

The phrase

regulatory alignment has been on

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everybody's lips and many people

have been getting out the thesaurus

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to see what it means but it seems

they had to persuade the DUP that

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regulatory alignment is not the same

as being in the single market and

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the customs union. Whether they can

do that or not is unclear. The DUP

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usually comes to the table but we'll

sort of spin this out. They have a

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great deal of trouble here in that

the longer you go on, it is

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significant because the longer we go

in this phase, the shorter time we

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have to do the other elements,

principally the trade deals also the

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longer time it takes to do other

trade deals and move into that other

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arena, the less confidence there is

about business and so forth and I

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think there is a Lords report

tonight saying this could cost

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75,000 jobs in the city and you have

to get on with this because

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confidence is seeping away.

It is

easy to be gloomy, I don't think it

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would be the end of the world if it

went into the New Year and I think

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the DUP are on board now and we will

hopefully see some movement.

I can't

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quite see it myself!

And the last

story in the Daily Express, the

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where the 90 mph killer storm!

Perhaps their favourite story. The

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weather! Killer storm?

Perhaps we

ought to wait for it.

This is Storm

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Caroline which is on its way towards

us.

I prefer it now that they name

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them. Scotland and northern England

will bear the brunt as always. It is

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not generally until it comes down

south that it reaches the front

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pages normally. -10 is chilly

enough...

Even for you Scots?

I

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think so!

It is a bizarre front page

to be honest.

You think so?

Yes.

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Look at the times, a terrific

picture of Judi Dench, on the

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Telegraph that is an interesting

combination of stories, we have

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Brexit, we have not seen the sun,

but I am sure two thirds of the

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front page is not taken up by

predictions of what might happen

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with a storm that might or might not

hit us in a couple of days.

People

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do love the weather stories.

They

do.

Thank you very much indeed. That

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is it for tonight, don't forget you

can see the front pages on the

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papers online on the BBC new ways

about -- at the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you seven days

a week at bbc.co.uk/papers,

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and if you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer

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Thank you to Paul Johnson

and Lynn Davidson.

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Goodbye.

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