10/12/2017 The Papers


10/12/2017

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Now on BBC News, The Papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are David Wooding, political

editor of the Sun on Sunday.

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And journalist and

broadcaster Penny Smith.

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Welcome to you both. Let's start by

showing the front pages.

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Welcome to you both. Let's start by

showing the front pages.

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The Mail on Sunday reports

that Theresa May had

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to intervene in a stand up row

between the Defence Secretary

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and the Chancellor in the House of

Commons.

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The Observer leads with a warning

that the EU is under pressure NOT

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to give the UK a better trade deal

than other non-member

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countries get after Brexit.

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The Sunday Express says leading

Brexit supporting Mps want the UK

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to make clear it will walk away

from any trade deal they don't

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think is good enough.

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The Sunday Telegraph goes

with tensions within the Cabinet

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over the meaning of the commitments

the Prime Minister made to move

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the Brexit talks on.

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And the Sunday Mirror reports that

some delivery drivers

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are working 14 hour days,

it claims they're earning less

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than the minimum wage.

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Let's kick off Brexit as so often

dominating the front pages. The

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Observer has a new blow for Theresa

May as the EU gets tough over trade

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deal. The focus moving onto phase

two now that they've won it out of

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the way.

The next thing is what we

do in terms of the future

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relationship with the EU but also

trade. That is the big one, the

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Goldman prize of getting a deal for

trade with the EU. And reaching out

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globally to other countries. The

Observer Splash is telling us the

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other countries, those we are

reaching out to two trade with, they

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are saying to the EU "If you are

going to give a special deal with

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the UK, what about us? We would

frown upon it if you give special

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trade relationship with the UK after

they leave the EU. I would argue we

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do have a special relationship with

the EU because we've been a member

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for so many years.

And all our goods

and so on are standardised to EU

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requirements.

Their regulations and

the various laws they have about the

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standards.

That should make a trade

deal on some days easier.

Whether we

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have tariffs on what is the bigger

issue. Lord Carr, the format

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diplomat who drafted Article 50 say

the chances of getting a useful deal

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of zero.

That's not good either. We

could always go down the Norway

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route. The Brexiteers do not want

that but there is a comment on the

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Observer where there is a pro-Brexit

person who says very annoyed at the

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how much has been seeded to Brussels

in the first round of the

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negotiations and one prominent Tory

saying we are worried. One large

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part says that, this is a divorce.

In a divorce there is give-and-take.

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You can't say, we put all the money

in, I put all the money and so I

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will have the house for the children

are living with you, I'm not giving

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you all the money. And the other

person says "I gave up my job for

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you, I'm looking after the children,

often the garden", it is

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give-and-take, it split.

But in a

way that is what we have seen? With

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the deal Theresa May has done?

That's what I'm saying. The

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Brexiteers saying we have ceded it,

what did you expect did you expect

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to all the staff were not give

anything about the way, you're

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having the children and taking them.

Boris Johnson was saying the

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eco-could go whistle if it wanted

tens of billions and that's been

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quietly forgetting?

Owen Paterson

the former Environment Secretary in

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our piece says if they don't give us

the deal we should say they can't

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have the money, nothing is agreed

until it's all agreed. It will be a

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long process.

You have to think

about how it is in vitro, again like

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a divorce, you have to look down the

line, the reason you're handing over

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the money is because down the line

you won't be paying anything to it.

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Or a very small amount.

The Sunday

Telegraph still on Brexit has

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Cabinet Brexit truce threatens to

unravel. Why? This is about

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language.

A lot of people think that

the riders were expressed Brexit

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breakthrough.

Congratulations for

saying that.

That was a bit of a

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fraud.

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And it had to be a bit of a bug -- a

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-- a bit of a fudge. Someone has

allegedly said that from Downing

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Street full alignment from the EU

regulations was meaningless and not

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legally binding within EU law. In

other words, this is all just words.

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Empty, meaningless word.

But

important words in the sense that

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they did secure that fudged

agreement which moves us onto the

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trade talks.

And we have to accept

that these talks about trade, there

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has a lot of all the papers today

about how it probably won't be

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sorted out, for five years that's

how much it takes. I think there

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will probably be a lot of people who

feel they are spending far too much

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time and far too many column inches

talking about Brexit have really big

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problems we need to get sorted out

in this country. We were talking

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earlier on about social mobility,

education, housing, health. So many

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other things and they are getting

pushed off the front page. Those are

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the things that affect people's

lives so much more than this.

This

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is going to be central to the

economy for decades or even

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centuries to come.

Of course. And we

know they are desperate for cash,

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clawing back taxes left right and

centre to fund all this. But other

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people's lives are going on and they

are trying to make ends meet.

It's

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not just the coverage, it's the time

all being focused on Brexit and it's

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very difficult to focus on anything

else. You would focus on Brexit as

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the PM because it's the biggest

thing to get right. There is little

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time to do those other.

In terms of

the timescale, people are saying

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it's unlikely that that agreement

can be ranged by 2019.

That's the

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other thing, the time. We said they

couldn't do it by last Friday and

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they did it.

In a sense, some

observers said it was an easy part.

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These trade talks are difficult to

work out. I don't know how we will

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cover it in the media because it is

tedious and deep in detail.

It's all

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about services as well. The service

industry, we forget how big that is.

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How difficult that is going to be.

Goods is one thing. This is another.

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We all thought she had won a big war

on Friday, but all we've done is the

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right to enter the first

battlefield.

On Theresa May, at one

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stage after the election it look

like she could even not survive a

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few more days, she still around. She

has got this success, victory if you

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want to call it, a breakthrough.

She's done quite well? A colleague

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of mine, I think this is a bit

optimistic, was liking her to Alex

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Ferguson, the first three years of

his charge of Manchester United were

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hopeless and they were nothing. He

was about to be sacked and then they

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scored this last-minute goal against

Forest in the FA Cup, and went on to

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great things. She could turn this

around and become Prime Minister

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again but that's a long shot?

There

are other people of course,

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mutterings about people who were

were a bit stronger and charismatic

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might have done it. That's the

trouble. Unless we have a parallel

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universe, how can we tell quicker

than we have an extraordinary story

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in the Mail on Sunday, claiming

there was pretty much a bust up in

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the House of Commons.

Theresa May

was almost like the referee was

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separating the two prizefighters

slugging it out.

This is Philip

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Hammond, aged 62.

In one corner.

And

then Gavin Williamson, aged 41, in

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the defence corner. And essentially,

they are just being a bit naughty.

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My mum would say, bash your heads

together, not that she ever did, but

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that is what it is.

What actually

happened? According to one MP, the

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Defence Secretary went for Philip

Hammond's throat. That sounds... Do

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you believe that?

There is a bit of

a history, he's not been Defence

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Secretary for more than a few weeks

can make you may remember that Gavin

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Williamson was the Chief Whip and

was quite an effective Chief Whip

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because there was not a single

rebellion while he was Chief Whip.

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He was made Defence Secretary and

then immediately comes up with big

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mouths of what I bolster the defence

cuts, Philip Hammond then sneeringly

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saying when he understands the

budget working.

He likened him to a

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character from Dubs Army.

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-- Dad's Army.

Not taking on foreign

trips because we need to preserve

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resources, there is a tit-for-tat

war going on between them, and the

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one thing is that Gavin Williamson

is seen as an outsider for the

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Conservative leader. He's gone into

the job and people think he may

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succeed Theresa May. Like John Major

came from nowhere to be Michael

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Heseltine some of the favourite at

the post.

And the Mail actually have

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a profile on page five, the outsider

with his sides zeroed in on number

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ten. Penny, do you think he could be

by Minister?

This thing is at the

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moment don't think most of us who

are not steeped in politics know

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enough about him to know whether or

not. You are saying there were no

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rebellion when he was too wet and at

the centre is

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That's because

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when he was Chief Whip.

He keeps a

tarantula.

But those lovely.

There's

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a bit of venom around anywhere.

Even

if some of that is true, it shows

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Theresa May does have a lot of

warring parties in her Cabinet that

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she has two, whether is literally

all physically, separate. Or bring

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together.

There's a personality

clash here.

The other side is that

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politics has become very anodyne,

the days when you actually could

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clearly tell the difference between

one and another, you could seriously

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tell someone was left-wing all

right-wing, possibly by the way they

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wore their clothes or what they

chose to drink or whether they chose

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smoke. Now it's all become a little

more woolly.

Even with Jeremy

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Corbyn?

That's what I'm saying, up

until now. I think the political

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landscape is changing.

It's more

colourful, in a sense?

In some ways

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that is no bad thing, we needed to

get people involved in politics

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because it affects us all.

He so you

quite like to see Cabinet ministers

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with their hands on other Cabinet

ministers strokes?

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-- strokes?

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We don't how close they got but it's

good that they are committed and

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passionate.

The Telegraph have fast

track degree. The idea you might be

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a two year or rather than three.

This is about making it quicker and

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cheaper for people who want to do a

degree but then won three years,

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it's to £11,000 a year for a

two-year degree, saving you five and

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a half thousand pounds because you

do two years not treat you get a job

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quicker with the average starting

salary for it to telling the latter

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is £19,000. Jo Johnson says this

will cost, save £20,000.

Good news

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for mature students, people who are

poorer and busy Christmas holidays

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and summer holidays will have to be

sure and it comes on the back of the

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National Audit Office last week

saying some degrees were not fit for

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purpose and people were going in

paying a lot of money and coming up

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with less prospect of your

prospects. -- fewer prospects.

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Sunday Times, civil partnerships to

go straight, heterosexuals in civil

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partnership.

Good idea. You don't

have to go to a church and makes out

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if you don't believe in that sort of

thing. You therefore have rights. At

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the moment were lots of people think

there is a common-law marriage,

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there isn't and you have no right.

This confers rights without having

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to go.

It makes sense?

There was

some argument when it was introduced

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for gay people that heterosexuals

should have it as well and now that

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the gay people have got married,

equal marriage, this is a level

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playing field.

It's good.

Let's get

into the Christmas, fast of spirit

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because there is our Prime Minister

and putting the decorations in the

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tree in Maidenhead, her

constituency. This is a bit of a

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difference though?

It's a stiletto

because we know she likes those

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shoes. Whatever you want to do. Why

is she wearing a proper Christmas

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jumper or something bright was

whether it's a gloomy picture. A

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nice bright jumper, a pink cardigan

like me or get really good jumpers

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with lit up bits.

Does that show

little sense of having a stiletto

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grip now, she's always talked about

shoes.

I once asked how many pairs

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of shoes she had doing an interview

and select me sternly and said not

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enough. I know she's got lots of

shoes.

I wonder if she used this

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stiletto to separate those two

Cabinet minister. It might be a

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useful weapon!

The used to talk

about Margaret Thatcher and

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handbagging, a stiletto is also a

knife.

Don't give the Prime Minister

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ideas. That's finished off with a

bracing picture on the Sunday Times

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and it is snowing across a lot of

the country, it is very chilly.

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Someone didn't check the forecast.

Or maybe they did because they swim

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in these places. He looks quite fit,

doesn't he? Helix that the sort of

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person that could dive into ice.

I

wonder if you just happen to be

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swimming and a photographer takes a

picture, and you find is plastered

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over the front pages next morning.

It must be a bit of a shock.

It

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makes me shiver just look at that

picture. Having come through this

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road this morning and then to see

that.

They are now cutting the odds

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on a white Christmas but we have

been swotting up on a white

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Christmas. A white Christmas, if a

snowflake falls on Christmas Day,

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anywhere in the UK. One snowflake.

But obviously anywhere.

You got

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about seven or eight on your jumper.

Hopefully they won't drop off in the

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machine next to my wash it. In all

areas where the Met office have a

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measuring unit. This is what we were

doing, 1138 times in the past 54

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years with one snowflake but able

but white Christmas, blankets

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snowing, has only happened four

Times in 51 years. Do you remember

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any? I do. But I'm coming up to

goodness knows how many decades on

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earth.

Does it mean a lot to have a

white Christmas's it

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for the kids --

for the kids but we

are

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for the kids --

for the kids

but we are screwed.

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-- we are Scrooge.

Bah humbug. Merry

Christmas if I don't see you, that

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is it for the papers.

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We look at the papers every evening

at 10:45pm on BBC News.

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