10/12/2017 The Papers


10/12/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello.

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This is BBC News.

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We'll be taking a look at tomorrow

mornings papers in a moment -

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first the headlines at 11:30.

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Up to 30cm of snow has fallen

in some areas of the country,

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affecting travel on the roads,

railways and at airports,

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and causing hundreds of school

closures tomorrow morning

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The Foreign Secretary has left Iran

without any agreement on the release

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of the British-Iranian woman,

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe.

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Disgraced celebrity publicist

Max Clifford has died in hospital

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at the age of 74.

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He had been serving an eight-year

sentence for historical sex

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offences.

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The Brexit Secretary, David Davis,

has warned that the UK

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This is Jake Gyllenhaal playing a

victim of the Boston bombing. Plus

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more coming up Film Review.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are the parliamentary

journalist, Tony Grew and journalist

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and broadcaster, Caroline Frost.

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Tomorrow's front pages starting with

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the Metro leads with the heavy snow

that's caused travel chaos

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in many

areas of the UK today.

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It also has news that the average

house price has dropped.

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The FT leads with Brexit -

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it says Britain's chemical

and pharmaceutical industries have

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asked the Government if they can

remain within EU rules.

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The Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

is also pictured in Iran as he tries

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to secure the release

of Britons jailed there.

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The Times focuses on Brexit

and Ireland's unhappiness

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over comments by David Davis that

a hard border on the Island

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is a statement of intent' rather

than a cast iron guarantee.

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The Daily Telegraph leads with news

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that 10-year-olds are being asked

if they feel comfortable

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with their gender in

an official NHS health study.

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And the Express warns of more cold

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weather to come - it says

we are to experience arctic

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conditions in the run

up to Christmas Day.

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Let's start with the Metro and the

front page about the biggest fall in

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house prices for five years.

Tony?

According to reports, the average

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asking prices tumbled in a month

8000 average and 23,000 in London.

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For people looking to get into

housing, this may appear to be good

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news but it is still a sellers

market as it has been for decades.

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Actually prices will continue to

rise next year but may rise less

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slowly. All in all, it's marginally

good news for people looking to get

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on the housing ladder. . It's

certainly not, as I say, break out

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the bunting

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certainly not, as I say, break out

the bunting.

It's the trend people

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look out for and it is mixed.

Different price pressures. That is a

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deliberately vague term. As Tony

says, it's good news for aspiring

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first-time buyers coupled with

Philip Hammond's gift of stamp duty

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exemption. I'm not sure how far

£300,000 goes in the capital.

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Extraordinary. It's all about trends

in this comes against the context of

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ever inflating prices over the last

crash which was the late 90s. Watch

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this space. Another demonstration of

deep Brexit uncertainty.

Which

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brings us to the front page of the

Guardian. Resch doubts over the

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Brexit deal.

-- fresh doubts. Phase

one, money, the Irish border and the

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rights of EU citizens in the UK but

it appears from this morning's

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interviews, David Davis is putting

out a different narrative, saying

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it's not a deal, it's an aspiration.

It that it's technically correct but

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the age -- the arrangements, the

assurances they have given over the

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Irish border would appear to

preclude the idea of no deal being

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on the table and also David Davis's

own idea of a hard Brexit appear to

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be off the table. He doesn't want to

tell that to the right wing of his

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own party and MPs to support Brexit

because he could possibly still be a

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leadership contender. This has upset

people in Dublin. They thought the

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deal was done and the DUP appeared

to scupper that deal. They then it

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appeared to have done a late-night

deal that Ireland thought was not

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progress to be made. It's important

to out -- it's important to point

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out that the two countries are co-

guarantors for the Good Friday

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Agreement and it's hard to see how

this could work. It's like watching

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a silent disco. David Davis is

listening to his own headphones,

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everyone is dancing to a different

tune.

You say that that the Guardian

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says it has gotten hold of a letter

or seen a letter the Prime Minister

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has written to all Tory MPs about

Friday's agreement. Promising

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nothing is agreed until everything

is agreed.

Even just the top of the

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Guardian headlines, David Davis in

his clash with Ireland. I've never

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seen such an elegant understatement.

Northern Ireland peace agreement,

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everything that was agreed against

everything that's now been put on

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table to appease the EU and create

this strong position over Brexit.

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Theresa May declares a new sense of

optimism. I don't know what tea

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leaves she has been reading. I think

Theresa May urged from last week's

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debacle with dignity. She was placed

in an impossible position because of

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these opposing demands.

This proves

how weak shears. She doesn't just

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right, the deal that has been

reached must be approved by European

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leaders. I question whether this

Sunday was a good time to be

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stomping around television studios.

This is all about political

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manoeuvring, not national interest.

Much more to come later in the week

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on that. Let's stick with the

Guardian. The other story is the

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death of Max Clifford, the disgraced

celebrity publicist. Why are we so

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interested?

He is a man who defined

in the era of tabloid journalism.

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When you think of the headline

"Freddie Starr ate my hamster", that

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was Max Clifford's doing. He

mastered the art of the kiss and

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tell. When you think of those great

headlines, the Parliamentary

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standards. So many hands in so many

pies. It becomes a very dubious

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legacy. The support came after.

The

publicist behind all these lewd

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stories became himself the centre of

a very deluded and eventually

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criminal story.

His legacy, we have

to question whether that has been

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helpful. The sort of Gotch culture

that they surround themselves with.

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And the fact they dealt with him,

very quick turnaround and attacked

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him. He says that she has

fundamentally changed our political

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media approach and reporting but I'm

not sure it was for the better.

The

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front page of the Telegraph, the

optimistic sound of these

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transactions at tills. What is it

mean?

These have done huge amounts

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of laboratory testing and they

realised it all it's a bit

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monotonous, perhaps not inspiring

and aspirational in shops survey

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have come up with this thing called

sensory branding which is twofold.

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One, to create a new sound which is

meant to be optimistic, energetic,

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all of those things which will

accompany a Visa transaction and

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also they've come up with a very

personalised app on your phone. I

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don't know this will be the latest

thing, you have to be seen having

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heard having but they are convinced

this is going to add an extra

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element to very mundane, normal

affairs. One is that make -- is it

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meant to make you better about

spending your money?

Months of

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neurological research and the

company claims users are left

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feeling happy and excited. They are

putting a serious amount of money

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into this. This is from the

marketing manager. He says we are

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all becoming very responsive to the

use of sound. Thanks to that, good

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to know. Sensory branding is on its

way to you.

Let's go to the front

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page of the Financial Times. An

interesting story about the Labour

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policy.

Labour have been looking

into what they might do should they

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become the next government. They

have a plan to set up Birmingham as

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an alternative centre for the

finances and regulation. As part of

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that, they think about moving some

of the functions of the Bank of

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England. They want to base

themselves in Birmingham. I'm fully

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in support of this. I think far too

many of these institutions,

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particularly with the modern

technology we have these days. There

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is no reason to people not to be

able to work together so the

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constant argument that you have to

be in London. Whenever and had this

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idea that we would move the civil

service to York or Manchester, the

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senior ones did not leave London and

55,000 other staff went up the road

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but that has proven that it is

possible for you to have a small

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base in London. And the bulk of your

operation ever else.

It would be

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symbolically important but also

economically important.

We have seen

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this when there have been other big

institutional shifts. It's so much

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of a chance in such a precedence. We

assume these big levers of

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government and finance have to stay

rooted in the city and once you take

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that purport and say what does work?

Mr McDonald has come up with some

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very convincing statistics.

Let's go

to the front page of the Times and

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be British and talk about the

weather. Here is a novel way of

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getting to work tomorrow morning, on

your skis.

We will be talking about

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London again. It's a perennial

obsession for this country.

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Something that anyone can talk

about. A judge can talk to a dust

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and about the weather.

It's not

about whether, it's about

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communication.

There is a great

school of thought that says because

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this country has been so creative is

because of the unpredictable

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weather. That means the likes of the

Beatles will have to go inside. That

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is thought about why this country

punched so far above its weight in

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centuries go by. We will talk about

the weather forever.

Excellent. Very

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good to talk to you. That is it that

the papers tonight. Coming up next,

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the Film Review.

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