21/01/2018 The Papers


21/01/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Fourteen foreigners are among 18

people killed in the attack

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on a Kabul hotel.

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They're thought to have been

deliberately targeted.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Ben Chu,

the Economics Editor

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at The Independent and Ruth Lea,

who's an Economics Adviser

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for the Arbuthnot Banking Group.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The FT leads with news

that the German government has

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taken a step towards breaking

a four-month deadlock,

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as Angela Merkel's Social Democratic

party voted in favour

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of formal coalition talks.

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The front page of The Express

features the BBC's interview

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with French President Emmanuel

Macron and his comments that French

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people would also vote to leave

the EU if they had the chance.

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The I says wildlife conservationists

have issued a warning that the UK

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is aiding sales of ivory,

because there is no outright ban

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on sales on the illegal goods.

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The Telegraph leads with a story

about the British Army,

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the paper says that a lack

of resources means our troops

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are struggling to keep up

with military advances in other

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countries like Russia.

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this

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So it's a mixed bag of stories

from those papers there,

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this with lots to discuss and more

front pages still to come in.

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Ben and Ruth, let's start things off

with our first story.

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is the children's. The story of a

local, -- pendulum. With the

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government in the peripheral and

time nobody looks like former

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coalition talks might be able to

start, achieves success? -- Angela

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Merkel.

This is good news for her,

it has been for months now since the

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inconclusive results of the Federal

elections which everybody expected

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her to do well in and not have these

difficulties. Failed attempt to form

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a coalition with the Liberals and

the Greens and now she has had to go

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back to her old partners, the Social

Democrats, they voted today to open

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talks for a new grand coalition.

Good news in the short term but

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really a reminder of how quickly

political fortunes can change.

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Angela Merkel was talked about last

summer of the strongest leader in

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the EU and now she is really

hobbled, it initiates this together

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she will not be in the driving seat.

Presumably have to make a lot of

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concessions to Martin Schultz and

the general consensus is that she

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will not be leading her party into

the next set of federal elections in

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2020.

We have got so used to her

being the leader of Europe, haven't

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we? It is quite incredible to see

her here really struggling to hold

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onto power.

Germany was the leader

in Europe, unquestionably. It is

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interesting about Martin Short, in

September the SPD did very badly.

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They suffered having been in the

party and Martin Schultz said I am

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not going into any more coalition

's. However it seems as though he

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has soft and that view -- softened

that view and they will talk about

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the detailed coalition arrangement

where there will be a lot of

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concessions from Angela Merkel to

keep him on side. Then the detailed

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agreement has to go to the SPD

membership, six months after the

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election, the membership may throw

it out. She has gone almost

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certainly from hero to zero. There

has really been a vacuum, who has

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stepped in to its? Emmanuel Macron.

BSP to very many places. He has even

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hosted President Trump in the Eiffel

Tower. Lots of people said they

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handled him very well. Let's have a

look at expressed. -- of the

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express. What he said about the

French if they ever had a chance to

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have a referendum on the EU, he

thought they might vote for Frexit,

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as it is known. Will that happen?

Hasn't given them a choice any time

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soon. The point was he gives it will

a binary choice in the referendum

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and people don't understand the

implications. He is making the point

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that if you want people to to vote,

you have to give something concrete

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to vote for which is also addressing

the reasons why they are feeling

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that things are not the way they

should be. He has told Andrew Marr

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that he didn't think the UK

referendum gave this opportunity. He

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has been getting rave reviews from

UK political analysts and pundits it

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is a straightforward way he has

approached all of these questions

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thrown at him and I think that comes

over in this. Would friends vote for

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Frexit? Quite possibly. -- France.

A

bit of fresh air. We are so

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surprised when a politician answers

a question.

I think he has had a

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good visit and the truth is he won't

let the French people have a vote on

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this at all.

No.

And what became the

Lisbon Treaty in 2005, French voted

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against the initial constitution and

it was ignored. That is called

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democracy by the way. He had a good

meeting and also I assured his

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relationship with Theresa May it was

good. Them agreed on the bilateral

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agreement on security and talked

about Britain getting a bespoke

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trade deal with the EU. There was a

lot of other stuff which was noise

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but on the whole it was

satisfactory.

He will have a pivotal

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role, assumedly. He said I am not

doing the negotiating, it is up to

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Michel Barnier, but he is clearly

going to be a figure in this.

He and

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Angela Merkel are absolutely pivotal

is that this is where the language

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of the Brexit debate gets confusing,

he says bespoke deal but it doesn't

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mean this bespoke deal that a lot of

people who support Brexit are hoping

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for which is a very, a lot of

services involved and special

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carveouts for the U.K.'s. It could

mean anything from what I have

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described to a very limited deal

which is what Canada has, certainly

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far below what Brexiteers and Brexit

ministers are roping. In -- are

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hoping for. He has been very clear

about this, which again is

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refreshing. If you are not the EU

you cannot be in the single market

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in the way that you previously were.

You don't get the benefits of the

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single market unless you are in the

single market. That is a pretty

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sobering message for people hoping

for a very good deal of getting the

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same benefits.

All down to

negotiation. As far as I am

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concerned, a bespoke deal doesn't

need to cover very much a. A

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continuation of tariff free trade

and something with financial

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services. This is saying that we

have a deal where both parties

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benefit.

Let's move on to UKIP. The

Guardian, UKIP in crisis after

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leader loses vote of confidence.

Henry Bolte and's reskill friend,

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with her for three weeks, sent text

which were deemed to be offensive

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and racist and he has seemingly

ditched her. Can he survive this?

I

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don't think so silly didn't he go

for a meal after having broken up?

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Yes, apparently she restrain to get

help.

I don't see how he can

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survive, the national executive

committee has the confidence but the

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bigger question is will UKIP

survive? I think this will become a

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rump party. Nigel Farage is in the

wings with his friend Aaron Banks

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and they will put some sort of

movement together no doubt after the

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loot, leave movements are already

there and to keep the reason they's

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feet to the fire, what ever Glory...

It all sounds violent. Nigel Farage

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did say that there is a role for a

party like UKIP, if it can pull

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itself together because there are

people who feel that the government

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might the backsliding on Brexit, a

soft Brexit, you may not notice we

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have left, maybe there is a role but

at the moment it is not working out

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for them.

The thing about UKIP is,

they have always had the stories of

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sort of, loose cannons around them,

this is not a new phenomenon, it has

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been going back for years with some

of the slightly bigoted people

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attracted to it. It did seem to be a

big hindrance in the past, support

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going up and did very well in the

European elections, came top.

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Despite stories, the trouble is that

since and the election, it has no

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traction at all it seems, it seems

to have collapsed in support. Most

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leaders, if you're executive

committee says they have no

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confidence, there is no chance he

would carry on but such is the

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state, Henry Bolte and obviously

thinks he has earned chance of the

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membership backing him speaks to the

dysfunction in the movement.

Do you

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think they can survive without a

character like Nigel Farage? It

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seems without him, they cannot.

I

think they are employed in, quite

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frankly. I think Nigel Farage will

be back on our screens because he

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does not like to spell away.

Did he

ever leave?

There is an organisation

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called leave means leave, I suspect

that he will take that over.

Now,

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the Times. Trust in social media

hits record low amid fears over fake

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news. It is interesting that

mainstream media, a bump in people

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's trust of mainstream media, TV,

radio and newspapers. This talks to

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all sorts of things about Twitter

and other social media, people don't

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necessarily trust it.

You could

argue it is an encouraging story

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because people are waking up to the

fact that fake news exist and one of

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the main platforms for it is

Facebook. The trouble is, you are

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comparing mainstream newspapers and

television is with Facebook is not

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comparing like with like as a

source, a lot of people don't know

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it. Betting if you open up Facebook,

it is not a producer of news it is a

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platform for all sorts of content

coming onto it from all sources. So

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one quarter of people trust the tech

publishing giants, that is

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encouraging people seem to be waking

up to reality that they are not

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reading some in from the content

producer just a random string of

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stuff. Newspapers and TV actually

take responsibility for what goes on

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this topic you could argue about its

politically -- validity, but someone

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has taken charge of it.

I assume for

a lot of young people getting their

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news from Facebook and Twitter, it

is completely different, getting and

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digestive and news very differently

from an older generation.

I think

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that is where the Tory party fell

down so badly during the last

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election. In this particular article

there is another important point

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made that people are concerned about

how extremism is portrayed on the

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social media and the cyber bullying.

Patrols and all of that. We have

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heard a lot about this recently, so

not merely do they think it is fake

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news but they also think it needs

more regulation. There is a freedom

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on social media that a lot of people

like but it is abused. Something has

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to be done.

Can you regulate

Facebook Tom Twitter in the same

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way?

Markers after Burke is actually

taking some serious action in recent

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weeks to actually move a lot of

journalism off of the feeds,

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downgrading it in response to these

concerns that it is feeding social

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media bubbles and all of this fake

news getting pushed into people 's

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lives through the platform.

Actually, maybe we will see how it

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goes but that's it is neglecting its

off to some extent a bit there is

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the point that a lot of social media

is self-selecting.

You choose the

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ones you want to hear and they are

often people who agree with you and

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there is a lot of talk about this

discussion that people disagree with

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each other is disappearing.

It could

be true, but was it so different in

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the past? You bought the paper that

reflected your, I was going to see

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prejudices, or opinion. -- says.

People are selective in what they

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read, they are and they have to be.

Let's move on, finally, to the

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Telegraph. It has got a little piece

here. There has been a lot of people

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in Westminster very upset about big

then, the fact it is being

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refurbished and not act to its

former glory for many years. Covered

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in scaffolding, it is resurrected

now and then and some saying that

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when we leave the EU it should be

bonging.

Passports and again seemed

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to be the big symbols of Brexit.

I

am all in favour.

These totemic

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images of Britain, as you were

saying, David Liddington, the

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cabinet minister is not saying it

won't happen, he is saying there are

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presently no arrangements for it. It

seems to be a way of the Telegraph

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bouncing the government into saying

that it definitely will bong.

I

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shall raise a glass to you.

I think

what we are seeing here is the start

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of a campaign, maybe.

Will you

launch a petition to get this going?

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I must tweet for this, Big Ben bongs

for Brexit. And stamps. We had

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stamps when we joined in 1974 and as

I said earlier, I possess a set of

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these stamps, a first day cover. I

think we should have stamps. I am

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using this opportunity to say to the

Royal Mail, get your stamps out.

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Stamps and Big Ben.

Stamps and

bongs.

Thank you so much. That is it

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for the papers tonight. You can see

the front pages online and on the

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BBC website.

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If you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you Ben and Ruth.

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Goodbye.

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