05/02/2018 The Papers


05/02/2018

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Coming up in a moment, The Papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Joe Watts,

political editor of the Independent

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and Lucy Fisher, Senior political

correspondent at The Times.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The FT says the financial

problems facing Stagecoach -

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the company that runs the East Coast

rail line - means the government may

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have to renationalise the line.

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The Guardian has that story

too, along with news

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that the High Court has blocked

the extradition of Lauri Love,

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accused of hacking several US

government bodies including Nasa

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and the FBI.

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The Metro says both

the Conservatives and Labour have

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hit back at President Trump

he claimed the NHS is

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broke and not working.

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The Mirror's take on that same story

is summed up in its headline:

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"You're Sick Mr President"

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A century after women

won the right to vote,

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campaigners are calling for jailed

suffragettes to be pardoned,

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according to the Daily Telegraph.

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The I reports that arch-Brexiteer

Jacob Rees-Mogg has

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launched an inflammatory attack both

on the Chancellor and Theresa May.

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And finally, The Express says

Britain is on a big freeze alert,

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warning that Tuesday night will be

the coldest for six years.

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So Brexit - probably

unsurprisingly - makes several

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of the front pages tomorrow,

as does the East Coast rail

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line franchise collapse.

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That is where we are starting. On

the front of the Financial Times,

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the Transport Secretary, Christopher

Grayling, lines up state takeover as

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the East Coast franchise nears

collapse, is that the only option on

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the table?

No, but this is the most

likely given the heavy losses that

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this is -- that this is -- that

Stagecoach have incurred. I think

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this will annoy many people and this

will play into the Labour narrative

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that with private companies, profits

can be privatised but losses tend to

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be gnashed Aliza and it will be

interesting how this plays out --

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tend to be nationalised.

Especially

after Carillion.

Yes, you can see

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Jeremy Corbyn leaping on this this

week, he has been pushing the

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agenda, he will be talking about far

from virgin are being punished for

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this franchise not working out, it

looks as though they will have their

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franchise extended or not one of the

other lines around the UK --

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extended on one of their other

lines. There is a feeling that

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despite things that keep going

wrong, these companies come back for

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more and tender win contracts and

take more money from the public

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purse -- tend to win contracts. It

links into the issue of Carillion

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outsourcing, and there's a big theme

growing up around this comment

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Jeremy Corbyn is in the place to

take advantage. -- around this, and

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Jeremy Corbyn.

Europe and Asia catch

Wall Street Journal, this is about

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equity markets falling sharply, why

is that, Lucy?

The Dow Jones has

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taken his biggest hits since 2008

and this comes off the back of

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strong wage growth data which has

raised the prospect of Excel rated

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interest rate rises which will have

an impact on borrowing --

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accelerated. And so the question is

whether this will force the US

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Federal Reserve and the European

Central Bank to cut their crisis in

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Iraq stimulus. -- crisis era

stimulus.

It feels like a pivotal

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moment, the cheap money is going and

that is what is freaking the market

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is out.

Another one, I don't think

we have seen the end of this, but

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now to Brexit. We did not start with

it, so maybe that was a novelty,

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time to make a choice on trade,

Barnier tells Britain. This is

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Michel Barnier who had a meeting

with both David Davis and a brief

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meeting with Theresa May. Time to

make a choice, surely no surprise

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but this is about the transition

period

and what we're going to have

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afterwards, UK is trying to ditch

the old format of talks which took

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place last year where David Davis

would go over to Brussels and then

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they would have a week of talks and

then a press conference in which

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Michel Barnier would say disparaging

things about the British approach to

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Brexit, so they are trying to change

that, and instead they had Michel

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Barnier over to Downing Street and

then a tiny press conference, but

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Barnier still managed to say

something disparaging. Basically, he

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is trying to tell the British

government that it is time to make a

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decision about whether they want to

be inside or outside the single

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market and the customs union and

Theresa May can't tell him to Mac

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the EU what that decision is yet

because frankly her Cabinet is not

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agreed on it -- can't tell him or

the EU what the decision is yet.

We

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are getting the pressure from

Brussels to make up our mind on what

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we are offering, there is also

pressure from within the Cabinet and

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on her backbenchers, and also the

need for more clarity, but she

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can't. The only thing keeping her

Cabinet together is the vagueness

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that is allowing people on both

sides to still think they have got

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something in the game and there is

everything to play for but I think

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this'll be a very difficult and

period ahead.

And now Jacob Rees

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Mogg is emerging as rebel in cheek,

but we knew that already. Could he'd

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be a Prime Minister in waiting? --

could he be.

He is emerging as a

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serious Prime Minister candidate,

people are starting to say that he

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is one of the few people on the Tory

side around Brexit who is saying

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what they think and it harks back to

the leadership contest regarding

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Labour and Jeremy Corbyn, where it

did matter what he said, because he

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said what he thought, and Jacob

agrees Mogg has got the same thing

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regarding the Conservatives, so

maybe people should not think of him

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as a jokey character. People are

starting to listen to him in terms

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of him saying just what he thinks

and that is hitting home with the

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Tory grassroots membership. He came

on top of a poll recently shown he

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was more popular than Boris Johnson

amongst Tory members and so that was

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a movement that is building.

He has

launched an attack on Theresa May

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and Philip Hammond?

He's usually

very polite so it is more shocking

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when he launches an attack, he says

it doesn't look as though the Prime

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Minister is having much fun, but the

Prime Minister's spokesperson has

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said that she enjoys her job

enormously, actually. He has also

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launched a campaign against Philip

Hammond, the Chancellor, who has

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been calling for a soft Brexit.

Either like to inject more

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scepticism about Jake agrees Mogg's

leadership just as -- I would like

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to inject more scepticism about Jake

agrees Mogg's -- Jacob Rees Mogg's

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leadership prospects, he has never

held a Cabinet position, and some of

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his conservative views would not be

that palatable to the wider public,

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I would imagine, like his views on

abortion.

Yes, that is true. And on

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the Tory side the MPs have got to

vote you into the final two to face

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a vote of the membership and he

would first have to gain enough

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support amongst the Conservative

Parliamentary party and it is by no

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means clear he could do that.

Would

he like to be leader?

Yes.

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Definitely.

And now to the

Telegraph, this is their spin on

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Brexit, the EU could force steady

seven new laws on the UK. -- 37 foot

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-- 37 new laws. Including having

four Vince for recycling.

This is a

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interesting story. There has been

talk that financial transaction

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taxes and things which could damage

the City of London and our economy

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but the thing they focus on here is

the thing that affects everyone on

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the streets that is how it goes to

the heart of what Brexit is about,

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it is about the small infringements

are not the big issues. -- and not

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the big issues for the EI permit is

whether we would have to accept --

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the argument is whether we would

have to accept these laws in the

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transition period. They are

determined to make us take these new

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laws in the spirit, it is reported.

-- in the report.

This goes to the

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heart of what the Grenfell campaign

was

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-- this goes to the heart of what

the campaign was all about in terms

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of Leave, so there will be an outcry

if this is pushed.

We have a good

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picture here, regarding the

suffragettes, and the story is that

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they should be pardoned, were many

women jailed when they were fighting

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for the vote?

Tomorrow is the 100th

anniversary of some women, not all

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women, getting the vote, and in that

suffragette campaign around 1000

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women were arrested and many were

imprisoned. This is an interesting

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campaign and I have written a book

about Emily Davidson, the only

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suffragette to die, and many of them

wanted to get arrested because it

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would help the publicity of their

cause. The first act of militancy

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was in 1905 when one of the

Pankhursts spat at a policeman to

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hopefully get imprisoned, and the

idea of whitewashing that and asking

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for the record to be scrubbed is may

be misguided. It was a key part of

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what they were trying to achieve to

get publicity.

That is interesting.

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Have you written a book about this

as well?

I'm afraid not.

LAUGHTER

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Last year we had the so-called

Turing law in which gay men who had

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been prosecuted would be pardoned,

and so Eusebius as the government

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doing this -- and so you can see

this as the government doing this to

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mark a big event like a centenary,

but whether this is the right thing

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to do, and Lucy makes a good case

that those convictions were badges

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of honour and it allowed them to

campaign and get the vote.

And now

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The Guardian. We have a picture of a

very elated Lauri Love, the British

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student accused of hacking who has

won his appeal against his

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extradition. I suppose the big

question, what happens to him now?

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There is the possibility that the

CPS might appeal this decision, but

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they have 14 days to decide whether

they do that or not. Even if they

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don't, he will likely or possibly be

prosecuted in the UK for his crimes,

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as well. This sets a precedent for

this to happen in the future, and

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you might see the US tried to

extradite people who do these kind

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of crimes in the future, but there

will always be this case now, the

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case law, where lawyers can draw

upon this and say, this person

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should be tried for their crimes in

the UK and not the US.

It raises

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interesting questions about the US

prison service and the fact he was

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going to be potentially put in

solitary confinement with a 99 year

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sentence and I'm not clear if they

are the right safeguarding aspects

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in the US prison service and so I'm

not surprised there are civil

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liberty groups welcoming this

decision.

Thanks for joining us.

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That's it for The Papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you -

seven days a week at

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bbc.co.uk/papers - and if you miss

the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer

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Thank you Joe Watts and Lucy Fisher.

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Goodbye.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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