06/02/2018 The Papers


06/02/2018

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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immortal. The Red Devils's spirit

will never die.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Stephen Bush,

Special Correspondent

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for the New Statesman,

and the Deputy Political Editor

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at The Sun, Steve Hawkes.

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Welcome to you both.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The FT's leaders of volatility of

world stock markets complete with a

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picture of frayed nerves on Wall

Street. The Guardian reports that

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Tesco may face a £4 million bill for

back pay in what could become the

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UK's largest ever equal pay claim.

It also has an image of so-called

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Cheddar man, dating back 10,000

years. A planned reform of the gig

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economy could lead to millions of

new work is getting better rights,

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according to the i newspaper. The

top story in the Metro is the

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jailing of a stalk of 26 years after

he murdered his former partner. The

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Mirror features a pledge from the

mother of brain-damaged Alvi Evans

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to never stop fighting to save his

life. The Daily Express claims

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Britain could be forced to accept

new EU regulations after Brexit.

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That's according to a new report. In

the Times has a picture of the

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Falcon Heavy rocket taking off in

Florida. A mixed bag of front-page

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stories. Thank you both, Stephen and

Steve, for being here. Must begin

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with the FT, Europe and Asia bearing

the brunt as stocks reel from

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volatilities. All day I have been

hearing it as a correction and not a

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crash but wide range of

repercussions for this.

The Dow

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Jones index was up 567 points so

this huge sell-off has already run

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its course. My view is that we are

bound to see things like this

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because the stock market has been on

such a boom, it's gone up 20 points

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so that will always be a correction

if people get worried, is this note

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the peak, do we stop selling, and if

someone does, it highlights a me two

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things. An interesting paragraph

anywhere when a trader says this is

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about the economy moving off life

support. People think interest rates

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will go up a lot this year. In a way

that is a sign of good things

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because we are coming off life

support from the credit crisis

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almost a decade ago and returning to

normality. We should see it as a

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good thing that the economy is

moving back into that normal cycle.

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Would you agree, Stephen?

Yes, they

have predicted nine out of the five

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last recessions and we know for the

last decade central banks have

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created this parallel universe of

big businesses. The economy appears

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to be recovering, still very low

wage growth and a slight worry about

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what that means. The interesting

question is, it looks as if the Dow

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Jones has recovered most of its

losses. I wouldn't be surprised if

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on Friday Europe and Asia have

recovered most of theirs as well.

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Interesting. Notice, we didn't start

with Brexit! But we need to go to it

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now. The EU six to limit UK's access

if Brexit terms are broken. We

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likely to get any more clarity on

the direction we are going in?

It

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seems unlikely. According to this

story the EU wants a transition

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period while it negotiates the trade

deals are effectively we would still

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be members of the EU although

without a say. The EU is worried

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that we will start to leave without

having properly left. What kind of

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think the British government has

spent too much time worrying about

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the transition. A bit like, if we

were a hermit crab, we would not sit

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there going, this shell is not good

that Shell is not God, we would put

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on a shell and look for the next.

The EU needs to stop fussing and

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think about what had once the UK to

look like in 2030, 20 40. A

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long-term vision as opposed to this

short-term one that we've got.

Is

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this not another example of the EU

flexing its muscles?

It's another

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well timed leak ahead of this

subcommittee meeting of the Cabinet

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tomorrow when hopefully they will

spell out what kind of Brexit they

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want which is taken far too long,

almost a year now, we still haven't

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set out what we want to achieve. I

disagree in a way, the transition is

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important to the government because

it helps them work out what they

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want to do, it gives them more time.

Viewers will be happy because we are

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into the endgame in a way so

hopefully in the next month in

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Brussels and London will flesh out

where we are, there will be all

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manner of arguments, stories about

who will do what still but I think

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we are getting there!

The front page

of the Daily Express claims the EU

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is still trying to rule Britain.

This story was in the Telegraph last

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night, new laws that may come into

force, we may have to have full

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recycling bill steering this

transition period. Was it only

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yesterday, now confirmed?

It was a

leak obtained by the Telegraph,

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saying the EU might do this, and now

they said they would.

Except that we

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know that this is what transition

looks like, the EU will continue to

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evolve and change and do what it

once and after we leave will do what

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we want but they will be a period

transition when we will still follow

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the rules. It's a bit like if you

move out of a flat your flatmates

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can repaint the walls while you are

still there and you don't get to

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vote on it because everyone knows

that you are leaving and you won't

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be paying the rent animal. This is a

product of the governments failure

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to sit down and explain what Brexit

means to voters beyond saying, we

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can't talk to you about that, Brexit

means Brexit, we haven't negotiated

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the end state. This stuff about the

EU wanting to rule us is just not.

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There's the fear among hard-core

Tory Brexiteers but they were told,

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the consequence of Theresa May

dithering as such, they were told,

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2019, we will take back control.

Money, law and Borders, no it will

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be 2021 because of this transition

phase, we have to accept everything.

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They have no say over what puzzles

does because we moving out.

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Brexiteers are worried that Brussels

could force the laws that we need to

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accept that might be to our

disadvantage, will have no say in

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it.

Ireland pushing for border deal

threatens to hit Brexit talks, says

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this headline. Steve?

If we have

said we are coming out of the

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customs union it brings up the

question of what will happen on the

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border between the North of Ireland

and the South. A massive issue,

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Ireland squad we will say about it,

they want reassurance that button

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won't have this hard border coming

back. It keeps coming back, this

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argument. This will all hopefully be

resolved soon and we can move on.

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You look at it and think, I went to

the Brexit negotiations last year

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and the civil servants, in a room

could sort this out easily and all

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the politicians are all arguing they

feel like this.

Any word to add on

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that, Stephen, or would you like to

move on to the suffragettes?

Ireland

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is the big unsolvable issue for

Brexit. If you diverge from the EU

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you'll have a hard border. If you

don't what is the point of Brexit?

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The sensible solution is that

Ireland does not leave. The whole

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Ireland does not leave. Sadly

Theresa May has lost a majority and

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has to deal with the DUP and they

will never accept it. The only

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sensible solution is either, we

don't leave order hard border. --

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either we don't leave or we have a

hard border.

Theresa May has been

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asked to consider posthumously

pardoning those suffragettes who

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committed crimes in pursuit of the

vote. I wonder if this is right.

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Perhaps the suffragettes wanted to

get arrested to draw attention to

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their cause. They may not want to be

pardoned.

I will plug my magazine

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and said there was a great these by

Caroline creat or Peres about this.

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-- is a great piece in our magazine.

She says the government was wrong to

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imprison them. The government did do

something wrong. Maybe a formal

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apology but this idea that you

pardon somebody. I think if I was

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descended from a suffragette I would

be quite proud to be descended from

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someone who had been imprisoned for

breaking an unjust law. I think a

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pardon is quite the wrong course of

action.

It's one of those things

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that happening now, like with Alan

Turing, people asked if he would get

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a medal, would he be pardoned. What

was great today and what we should

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focus on more is the enjoyment of

that centenary celebration and how

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far have moved. One line in the

speech by Theresa May was the line

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about moving on and talking about

online abuse. Nowhere near that

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historic battle but another big

battle we have to win. Katie Price

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was in the Commons today talking

about the violence directed at her

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son Harvey. Abuse suffered by a lot

of female MPs on Twitter for

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example.

Let's move on to the i

newspaper.

It's a policy from the

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government, surprise surprise that

could do some good. Matthew Taylor

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was sent to look at the gig economy.

You don't really have sick pay and

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holiday day with these firms, it's a

massive review of what can be done

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to help people in that gig economy.

The government may look at getting

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these guys sick pay and holiday pay

and the chance to ask for a normal

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contract which make them than with a

higher minimum wage. Great news for

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the 5 million people in that. I

wonder if the sting in the tail will

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be how the Treasury treats them tax

rise. Last year Philip Hammond

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talked about raising national

insurance for self-employed workers.

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That might be the sting in the tail.

Stephen, does this link with the

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story on the front page of the

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Guardian, Tesco may face a £4

billion bill of equal pay claim,

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would that be the biggest of equal

pay claim in the country?

The

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largest clawing back of money that

should have been paid. It turns out,

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thanks to this law firms that Tesco

has been paying more to men who have

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been working in its warehouse than

women in the same jobs and more to

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men who have been working on tills.

People who work in Tesco's are not

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self-employed, they have a

contractual relationship with Tesco.

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It's part of the same pattern of big

firms are effectively saying, now

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you work for us, the rights you had

in a small sum, you don't get those

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any more.

Interesting. Steve?

Tuscan

needs this like a hole in the head,

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the ex-directors are going through

the courts of the profit warning

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from a couple of years back and now

business isn't food in the best of

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light today what with the Carillion

story and Tesco on the front of a

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national paper being told that they

pay women £3 an hour less, that's

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not good for them.

This striking

picture. We don't have much time.

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Cheddar man, facial reconstruction

of Britain's oldest skeleton. How

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does he look.

Kind of how you would

expect! We know humanity began in

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Africa. People arrived, fresh from

the boat as my grandfather was, you

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intermarry and get a bit paler and

it appears this is what has happened

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with Cheddar Man. Each generation

has become more accustomed to living

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here, doesn't have to worry so much

about the sun, it's a reminder we

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are all from the same place

originally.

That's a wonderful way

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to end, we've run out of time. Thank

you both so much.

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That's it for The Papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you -

7 days a week at bbc dot co uk/

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papers - and if you miss

the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you Stephen and Steve.

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