18/02/2018 The Papers


18/02/2018

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 18/02/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Now on BBC News, The Papers.

0:00:000:00:05

Hello, and welcome to our look

at what the papers say this morning.

0:00:150:00:19

With me are City AM's Rachel

Cuncliffe and the Financial Times'

0:00:190:00:23

political correspondent Henry Mance.

0:00:230:00:28

Let's take a look

at those front pages.

0:00:280:00:32

The Observer investigates

Britain's prison system,

0:00:320:00:35

claiming two-thirds of prisons

are providing inadequate

0:00:350:00:38

conditions or unacceptable

treatment for inmates.

0:00:380:00:43

The Sunday Express says Theresa May

has declared there will be "no

0:00:430:00:46

going back" on Brexit.

0:00:460:00:51

The Telegraph leads

on claims prominent members

0:00:510:00:55

of the Labour Party met Eastern Bloc

agents during the Cold War.

0:00:550:00:57

The Mail on Sunday has

an interview with Brendan Cox -

0:00:570:01:01

the widower of murdered MP Jo Cox -

who has stepped down from his role

0:01:010:01:05

in two charities after admitting

inappropriate behaviour

0:01:050:01:06

with a colleague.

0:01:060:01:08

The Sunday Times says

the Education Secretary is looking

0:01:080:01:10

at a number of university reforms,

including cheaper tuition

0:01:100:01:13

fees for some courses.

0:01:130:01:19

And the Sun on Sunday reports

on alleged marriage difficulties

0:01:190:01:22

between pop stars Cheryl and Liam

Payne.

0:01:220:01:25

So a variety of stories

on the front pages.

0:01:250:01:30

Lets kick-off and start with The

Mail on Sunday. The Brendan Cox

0:01:300:01:40

story is dominant, The Mail on

Sunday have made the running on this

0:01:400:01:42

story.

Yes, he has given an

extraordinary person an in-depth

0:01:420:01:47

interviews with them. Obviously this

is the husband of Jo Cox. She was

0:01:470:01:53

murdered very shockingly, and has

been a hero for the charity sector

0:01:530:02:00

and also talking about free speech

on migration and making MPs feel

0:02:000:02:06

safe. It is a real fall from grace,

these allegations from various

0:02:060:02:12

charities that he made women feel

uncomfortable and behaved in an

0:02:120:02:16

inappropriate way. It's quite

interesting because obviously you've

0:02:160:02:19

got that incredible headline which

is a bit misleading and then a

0:02:190:02:24

couple of pages detailing the

allegations in quite a lot of

0:02:240:02:27

detail.

The front-page headline

which says yes, I was a sex pest

0:02:270:02:33

confesses Jo Cox's Husband.

He

doesn't use those exact words. In

0:02:330:02:38

the interview lots of apologies,

lots of soul-searching, and he's one

0:02:380:02:44

of the few that have actually been

accused and come forward and said

0:02:440:02:49

I'm really, really sorry, I've let

myself down. It's an interesting

0:02:490:02:55

juxtaposition.

What did you make of

that?

It primarily seems to relate

0:02:550:02:59

to two complaints made in relation

to Brendan Cox, one when he was a

0:02:590:03:05

senior figure at Save the Children

and another when he was on a

0:03:050:03:10

university course at Harvard

University. He says he doesn't

0:03:100:03:12

accept the precise details of the

complaint at Harvard but he

0:03:120:03:17

understands that his behaviour might

have made people feel uncomfortable,

0:03:170:03:20

might have been inappropriate, that

he could be seen as overstepping the

0:03:200:03:25

mark. This comes down to power. He

was a very senior figure in the

0:03:250:03:30

charity. The Mail on Sunday links to

the former chief executive Justin

0:03:300:03:34

Forsyth. It's trying to save where

these figures untouchable, that you

0:03:340:03:38

couldn't make a complaint knowing it

wouldn't affect your career. A lot

0:03:380:03:45

of people will find this very sad,

given how much Brendan Cox has

0:03:450:03:50

suffered and how much dignity he's

had in the aftermath of his wife's

0:03:500:03:55

murder.

The paper says it is a

remarkable fall from grace, that's

0:03:550:04:00

their words.

Yes, and I think you're

right about the power dynamic. Later

0:04:000:04:05

in the interview he links it to the

wider More in Common movement. We've

0:04:050:04:11

allegations like this in Hollywood,

Westminster, the city, now the

0:04:110:04:15

charity sector. -- the Me Too

movement. He makes a point which is

0:04:150:04:23

sometimes intentions don't matter,

if there is such a gaping power

0:04:230:04:28

imbalance and such a lack of

oversight, you can make women feel

0:04:280:04:35

very uncomfortable and unsafe

perhaps without realising. That is a

0:04:350:04:39

culture change that needs to happen

across industries.

Oxfam, who has

0:04:390:04:46

been so much in the spotlight over

the last few days, on the front page

0:04:460:04:50

again of The Sunday Telegraph. This

is saying Oxfam new ten years ago of

0:04:500:04:56

a "Urgent sex abuse problem".

This

is a report in 2008 by Save the

0:04:560:05:06

Children, a report about Haiti

saying that people were being forced

0:05:060:05:12

to sell sex in exchange for aid.

That was circulated to various

0:05:120:05:17

charities. Oxfam say one of their

representatives went to Haiti and

0:05:170:05:21

put some processes in place.

However, Oxfam admit the measures

0:05:210:05:26

they put in place will probably

insufficient and also that the

0:05:260:05:29

people in charge of those policies,

the country director in Haiti for

0:05:290:05:36

example, they couldn't be trusted to

do that and may have compromised the

0:05:360:05:41

measures. You have a real question

about what happens when complaints

0:05:410:05:45

are raised and why it takes so long

to go from evidence of wrongdoing to

0:05:450:05:51

proper procedures in place, and who

is ultimately responsible. If there

0:05:510:05:55

are going to be bad eggs in the

system, who is in charge of routing

0:05:550:05:58

them out and in searing desperately

poor people in places like Haiti are

0:05:580:06:04

protected? -- ensuring desperately

poor people in places like Haiti are

0:06:040:06:11

protected.

This started with Harvey

Weinstein, Hollywood, now the

0:06:110:06:16

spotlight very much on the charity

sector and aid agencies.

I think

0:06:160:06:20

ultimately that's a good thing, that

we are talking about this and

0:06:200:06:24

allegations are coming to like and

we are having a conversation. I

0:06:240:06:28

think what you get particularly with

the charity sector stories is people

0:06:280:06:31

like to think that harassment and

sexual abuse is done by bad people.

0:06:310:06:39

What you're getting with the Brendan

Cox story and also with aid workers

0:06:390:06:42

in the charity sector is these can

be good people doing good work who

0:06:420:06:47

have families, who have friends who

are not what you would consider a

0:06:470:06:53

sexual predator, but who can also do

terrible things and use prostitutes.

0:06:530:07:00

This story claims some children as

young as six were forced to sell

0:07:000:07:04

sex. The reason it's perhaps taken

longer to get the charity sector is

0:07:040:07:08

we have this idea of everyone

working in the charity sector is

0:07:080:07:14

doing good work, that doesn't mean

you don't need oversight and

0:07:140:07:17

structure and a process for

accusations, evidence, policies. I

0:07:170:07:21

think perhaps the charity sector is

a bit complacent because we think

0:07:210:07:26

about it in a positive, rosy light.

There are repercussions financially

0:07:260:07:32

for people like Oxfam losing money

as a result of the publicity.

Oxfam

0:07:320:07:41

has told government, but you think

ministers might have said the same

0:07:410:07:43

thing anyway, that it won't bid for

new contracts. Last year they won 60

0:07:430:07:49

million in contracts to do work in

Yemen and South Sudan. Over the

0:07:490:07:54

medium-term, the threat is greater.

We know how much Oxfam depends on

0:07:540:08:02

goodwill, how much the government

spend on aid. People have the sense

0:08:020:08:06

that that is good work being done by

good people and is making Britain's

0:08:060:08:11

name more popular and seen in a good

light around the world. Haiti has

0:08:110:08:18

strong words to say about charities

so it's not the soft power we

0:08:180:08:21

imagined.

Let's move onto happier

news which is Queen Lizzy as The

0:08:210:08:28

Sunday Telegraph calls her. Lizzy

Yarnold with gold again, waving the

0:08:280:08:32

union flag, a great moment.

We

weren't doing so well in the Winter

0:08:320:08:40

Olympics up until this point. We got

four medals in 48 hours. I watch

0:08:400:08:49

what they do and it's absolutely

terrifying. How quickly can you

0:08:490:08:53

throw yourself down a chute of ice?

It's a real success story, she is

0:08:530:08:59

the first Brit to have defended her

title in two Olympics in a row.

Are

0:08:590:09:04

you a fan of the Winter Olympics?

It's exciting, it's just terrifying.

0:09:040:09:09

You watch with your heart in your

mouth.

Are you watching it?

I am.

0:09:090:09:15

You need a moment like this to get

people interested. You don't want to

0:09:150:09:18

see Brits losing. There was another

sad except for Elise Christie. It

0:09:180:09:25

wasn't all good news. Once you see

it's not just the Germans and the

0:09:250:09:29

Dutch who are going to win

everything, you get involved. We are

0:09:290:09:33

just behind Belarus in the medals

table.

The Winter Olympics are not

0:09:330:09:38

our strongest sporting event, we are

good at cycling, running, those sort

0:09:380:09:46

of things.

The thing everyone says

about the summer Olympics is we are

0:09:460:09:50

good at the sitting down sports.

Rowing, horse riding, cycling and

0:09:500:09:54

now this as well.

And running with

Mo Farah.

She's using the technology

0:09:540:09:59

that these British spy -- that the

British cyclists use for their

0:09:590:10:08

suits.

Prisons in The Observer

0:10:080:10:19

British cyclists use for their

suits.

Prisons in The Observer.

0:10:190:10:20

Another depressing report.

We have a

new prisons minister, Rory Stewart.

0:10:200:10:26

He's come out and said that the

state of some jails is deeply

0:10:260:10:30

disturbing. This is fairly amazing.

You see various people in charge of

0:10:300:10:35

prisons in the government come out

and almost trash the government's

0:10:350:10:40

record and admit things haven't been

at all good.

It's not just this

0:10:400:10:44

government, this is a problem that's

been going on for decades.

That is

0:10:440:10:49

the case. The type of language being

used is really strong. In terms of

0:10:490:10:55

figures we are talking about self

harm going up over 10% in the past

0:10:550:11:01

year, assaults going up 10%, a lot

of those on staff. Fewer than 10% of

0:11:010:11:08

prisons are seen as good. If you're

thinking about rehabilitation, in

0:11:080:11:12

the earlier years of the Cameron

government there was this idea that

0:11:120:11:16

people should be spending less time

in prison, get them out,

0:11:160:11:20

rehabilitate them. Michael Gove have

the same idea. The facilities

0:11:200:11:24

themselves are not living up to

that.

There are people who will say

0:11:240:11:29

actually prisons aren't meant to be

nice, who cares if they are awful

0:11:290:11:34

because they're awful people

prisons.

They are meant to be safe

0:11:340:11:40

for both the prisoners and the staff

who work there. The government has a

0:11:400:11:44

duty of care, which is clearly

failing. One of the statistics is

0:11:440:11:50

44% of prisons are unsafe. The

second one is an economic argument

0:11:500:11:54

which is it costs a lot of money to

keep people in prison and you should

0:11:540:11:58

want people leaving and trying to

rebuild their lives afterwards.

0:11:580:12:05

There's an interesting quote from

the Conservative chair of the

0:12:050:12:08

Justice select committee Bob Neill

who says we need to have a

0:12:080:12:11

discussion about what is the point

of prisons. If they are just for

0:12:110:12:15

punishment, then your argument is OK

but if we actually want people

0:12:150:12:22

engaged with society when they leave

and we want to stop them going back

0:12:220:12:26

and save money, we need to be

focusing on education and

0:12:260:12:30

rehabilitation. So many people, like

you say, don't want to spend money

0:12:300:12:34

on prisons, because it seems like a

waste. It's an easy way to cut the

0:12:340:12:39

budget and looks like there are no

consequences but clearly they are.

0:12:390:12:43

The Sunday Times with a focus today

on the cost of going to university.

0:12:430:12:50

University fees which has been a big

political headache for Labour, the

0:12:500:12:56

lbw Democrats and conservatives. A

lot of older people who know their

0:12:560:13:02

children might incur these costs are

concerned about it as well. The new

0:13:020:13:08

Education Secretary Damian Hinds is

launching a consultation which could

0:13:080:13:12

see the Fifa certain subjects

dropped. If you've got subjects

0:13:120:13:14

which are less expensive to teach

compared to medicine or physics, the

0:13:140:13:24

arts degrees and social science

degrees would be cheaper. Also the

0:13:240:13:27

interest rate at which students paid

back would be cut.

It is currently

0:13:270:13:35

6.1%, which seems...

You can accrue

£5,000 worth of interest before you

0:13:350:13:39

finish your course. Is linked to

RPI. Basically no one is going to

0:13:390:13:45

pay back their student loan. I did

classics, another useless degree.

0:13:450:13:49

They say the ones that are cheaper

to teach should be cheaper to

0:13:490:13:53

students. I've heard the alternate

which is the one is more useful to

0:13:530:14:00

society, I mean I think Classics is

useful but medicine and engineering,

0:14:000:14:04

we talk a lot about the skills gap.

If you're doing something to fill

0:14:040:14:09

the skills gap you should be

subsidised more. There are different

0:14:090:14:13

arguments. I think that politically

the Conservatives are never going to

0:14:130:14:17

win over a majority of students.

They will never beat Labour which is

0:14:170:14:23

the policy of scrapping tuition

fees. The Conservatives have a youth

0:14:230:14:28

problem, its defining youth. Really

it's anyone under 40. If they want

0:14:280:14:31

to increase their voucher rather

than going after students they

0:14:310:14:36

should go after people in their late

20s and 30s and talking about

0:14:360:14:41

housing and policies to do with

building on the green belt or

0:14:410:14:47

liberalising planning laws. That

would be better for them politically

0:14:470:14:50

than trying to win over students

which they are never going to do.

0:14:500:14:54

We're going to end up with The

Sunday Times again and an

0:14:540:14:59

interesting new rule about how to

film sex in the movies. I suppose

0:14:590:15:08

it. As with the Harvey Weinstein and

the idea that you wouldn't have any

0:15:080:15:16

nudity in auditions, very strict

rules on how they filmed. What did

0:15:160:15:20

you make of this?

This is something

coming out of Equity. We've been

0:15:200:15:29

told by actors that sex scenes are

very unsexy, but it's not a nice

0:15:290:15:34

thing to film. There are some issues

such as do you kiss with tongues

0:15:340:15:38

when filming these themes. -- these

scenes. The problem again is power.

0:15:380:15:47

Male writers, male directors, male

actors being paid more and female

0:15:470:15:51

actors may be feeling cajoled. Maybe

these restrictions would balance

0:15:510:15:58

things a bit.

Is this a reform we

need?

These are professionals. One

0:15:580:16:09

of the examples in the story is an

actress at 19 filming a sex scene

0:16:090:16:14

where there was quite explicit

content but the director

0:16:140:16:17

deliberately didn't tell her about

it because he wanted her to "React

0:16:170:16:21

as a girl not have an actress". That

is very sinister and not treating

0:16:210:16:27

her as a professional. I think it is

about giving them respect. Clearly

0:16:270:16:32

they can film realistic sex scenes

in a professional and safe way and

0:16:320:16:35

they should be doing that.

Thank you

for coming in to review the papers

0:16:350:16:41

today.

0:16:410:16:43

That's it for The Papers

this morning.

0:16:430:16:45

Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

0:16:450:16:48

on the BBC News website.

0:16:480:16:49

It's all there for you - seven days

a week at bbc.co.uk/papers -

0:16:490:16:52

and if you miss the programme

you can watch it

0:16:520:16:54

later on BBC iPlayer.

0:16:540:16:55

Thank you Rachel and Henry.

0:16:550:16:56

Goodbye.

0:16:560:17:03

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS