18/02/2018 The Papers


18/02/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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LineFromTo

On meet the author, my guest is the

bestselling thriller writer Mick

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Heron.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are the former

Conservative Adviser,

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Giles Kenningham and Torcuil

Crichton, political editor

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at The Daily Record.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The Financial Times is leading

with a story about Donald Trump

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lashing out at the FBI

and his national security advisors

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over the Russia investigation.

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A Pensions boost for millions -

the Daily Express says pensions

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experts are hailing a "perfect

cocktail" of conditions that have

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boosted many company schemes.

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The 'I' focusses on the new review

of university tuition fees saying

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the reforms will be divisive.

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Power dressing at the Baftas -

the Telegraph pictures British

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actress Florence Pugh who joined

other celebrities dressing

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in all black at tonight's

Bafta awards.

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The Metro also leads on tuition fees

with a quote from the Prime Minister

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saying "uni fees unfair

and poor value."

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The Mirror shows a picture

of Keira Ball, who died in a car

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crash, whose heart helped

save the life of a ten-year-old boy.

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The Guardian also focusses

on tuition fees saying that

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proposals to reduce charges

for cheaper courses is deemed

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'unworkable' by critics.

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I am speaking a bit slowly it's

because I can hear myself coming

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back and its most discombobulated.

Happy if you could do something

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about that, that would be

marvellous... VI is where we will

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begin. Tuition fees, I feel like we

have been pre-empting this for days,

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maybe I have just been a work quite

a lot. Tuition fee reforms would be

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divisive.

It is not days or days,

it's just the government learning

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how to manage news. In the old days

before Brexit the government would

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make an announcement on Sunday, when

the speech on Monday and we would be

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talking about it till Tuesday. Since

Brexit, we have talked about nothing

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except Brexit will stop the most

stunning thing on this story is that

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the issue has been around enough

since as long as University fees

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came in, it's that it's a domestic

story running on a domestic agenda

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on the front pages of Monday morning

News. Theresa May looks like she

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will make a market intervention

here. She looks like she will force

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universities to reduce fees for some

people and significantly she will

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also start looking at bringing back

maintenance grants for poorer

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students which is a key point.

She

has been saying it's making our

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system of the most expensive in the

world for tuition, that Labour would

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go further, they would get rid of

Jewish and fees altogether.

They

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would but they have not been able to

cost it at all.

-- they would get

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rid of tuition fees altogether.

There are some sensible things in

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here. A bigger push towards two year

degrees with a stint in business. I

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did a four year degree and could

have done other than too. I did

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politics, sadly. I did a diploma in

nine months afterwards which I could

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have done in three months easily.

Quite a lot of sense of kindness.

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You pay according to market values,

a good sentiment but how do you

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measure that will be a lot more

difficult in practice. You have

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already had Justine Greening today

criticising that.

The Tories are

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floundering when it comes to young

people and middle-aged people,

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Corbyn is meant to be boosted in the

20 17th election with the youth

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quake but it did not really happen.

But the under 25 and 45 state.

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People are looking for the parties

to provide solutions. Massive

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student debt everyone is carrying

around.

I have to say I was the last

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year which did not pay tuition fees

and if I was going to uni now I

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would think twice about doing it.

Fees are the one end of the horse,

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it's about access. Why won't they

just put the money into getting more

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kids from working class areas into

uni in the first place.

The former

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universities minister says this is

irrelevant because you don't stop

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paying upfront, you only pay after

the fact once you have earned a

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certain amount of money.

It will

deter people because it is an eye

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watering amount of money when you

are 18, racking up £20,000 in debt.

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27 Justin fees. Then living costs...

Lichaj something like 6% so you

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could be paying something like

£5,000 in interest on your debt. By

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the time you leave uni. Thousands

more by the time you have paid it

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off.

They took about a big push

towards vocational courses which I

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think is great. University does not

suit everyone. Hopefully these

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vocational courses will equip people

with skills which mean they can get

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jobs quite quickly.

We are talking

about English universities, a

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different thing in Scotland.

Tuition

fees don't exist in Scotland, that

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doesn't mean accesses any better.

Scotland's medical schools take

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fewer kids from working-class

backgrounds than England and Wales

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medical schools. Something is wrong

with the system, it's not to do with

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these, it's about getting kids from

working class areas into university

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in the first place and that's the

other end of the horse, that early

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intervention in primary school.

Hammond to drop all props for budget

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light. We are not going to get all

of the usual accoutrements we're

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used to seeing.

Hammond here, not

the most charismatic or eye-catching

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of charts this, ditching the red box

for his so-called mini budget. He

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has ditched the two budgets every

year. Apparent pain this year, the

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so-called mini budget will be 15 to

20 minutes. There has been this

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longer held view that you should

only have one budget a year. We are

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the only country with an advanced

economy that has this.

It is Gordon

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Brown's fault. Used to be the Autumn

Statement in December, then another

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rabbit out of a hat in March at

budget time. The surprise and thing

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is its Philip Hammond delivering the

budget. He seems in such disarray

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around the Cabinet table that he was

in danger if few weeks ago of not

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being.

At the time of Brexit when

you need to convey a climate of

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certainty, give a vision for the

country, maybe there should be a

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longer budgets are people actually

understand the economic road map.

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Clearly they are going for short but

sweet.

People underestimate the

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importance of symbolism and the

power of totems like that, that red

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box, it means something.

Introduced

in 1860 by William Gladstone. Not

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just no red box but no official

document or spending increases or

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tax changes.

We will take the day

off.

Speculation anyway. We will

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just have more time to fill. Let's

look at the Daily Express. Pensions

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boost for millions, relief as

deficits in final salary schemes

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halved in a month. How has that

happens, it's been causing lots of

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concern on the sheer scale of

deficits?

Causing concern in some

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places, not in my house.

Because you

don't have one, is that the case?

I

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fail to see how this is news that

affects us the days. -- that affects

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us today.

The pensions deficit has gone from

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something like hundred and 40

billion hundred and 50 billion. Good

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news for millions of employees who

are approaching retirement. That may

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be an apt description of Daily

Express readers, but I just don't

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see how this is a large story.

And

the stock market is quite volatile.

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The problem is, when pension schemes

fail and there is not the money to

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bail them out. We have seen out with

big companies recently with that

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£900 million deficit. This will be

pleasing to some people in

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particular, Ros Altmann who we are

used to seeing on paper review, she

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has been talking about this for a

long time.

Confidence breeds

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confidence. From that perspective

it's a good thing to see.

I am in

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that section of the Daily Express

readership that switches off when I

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see the word pension, I don't even

have to think about a pension, so.

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We have not done very well with that

story. Where shall we move to? Let's

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go to the Telegraph. The BAFTAs. We

have a picture here of Florence

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Pugh, British actress, power

dressing and the BAFTAs with at

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times bring on her finger. One of

many who turned up dressed in black

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in support of not just the time is

up campaign against sexual

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harassment but the Me Too campaign

as well which we have seen all over

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social media. You were the odd one

out if you didn't wear black

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tonight.

It feels like this campaign

is getting a lot of momentum, it

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still has some way to go. At the

Golden Globes last month you had

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Nicole Kidman and Meryl Streep who

came out and were pretty vocal on

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this issue. Obviously this whole

issue continues to rumble in the

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press in many different sectors. It

feels like it's a story which has

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some way to run.

It does keep it in

the public eye when you have this

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public display of solidarity and

unity, at an awards ceremony. These

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only have at certain times of the

year, it requires that cultural

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change, day in day out, not just

amongst those who are on screen, on

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stage, but those in the industry

behind it.

It is symbolic. The

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message is getting through loud and

clear, Time's Up, that campaign

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wants to change the culture that is

around that. As Sherborne said

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earlier talking to you, the

decisions that are taken far earlier

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in the storyboard when people sit

down to discuss character, narrative

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and who will be in the movie, that's

when, who's going to direct movies

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even, on who will buy them, that is

when we will see real change. -- or

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who will write them.

The cultural bias is what's so

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difficult to change, and you can't

legislate for.

The story is Three

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Billboards, five BAFTAs, big British

success because it's a Channel 4

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film.

Even though, to look at it, it

is totally American.

Completely

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American. But there is Channel 4

money in that, it has taken 100

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million, it will take a lot more

now. Another feather in the cap for

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Channel 4. Something like 32 Oscars

since they started making movies? I

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don't think they have reception on

the way in, that will feed into

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that.

A lot of the films we have not

had a chance to see yet have all

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picked up awards, that will really

boost box office.

Gary Oldman has

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won for Darkest Hour.

And the ship

of water as well. Let's finish with

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hidden calories fuelling obesity,

the average person eating too much.

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How is it, portion control?

The

obesity crisis is being fuelled by

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the average person eating 50% more

calories than they realise. They put

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this down to two things, won his

portion control and second is people

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eating more meals outside their

home.

A good old statistic. What's

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happened is that the office for

National statistics asked people to

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estimate how many calories they were

eating over a certain number of

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days. Many estimated they were

eating 2000, in fact there were

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eating well over 3000. -- men

estimated they were eating 2000.

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Basically the story is that men are

kidding themselves. You kid

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yourselves.

Men are worse than women

on this.

We kid ourselves we are

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eating far less than actually are.

You have a sugar tax coming in,

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long-awaited, in April. Which the

government estimates will get the

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Treasury 520 million which will then

be invested in primary schools and

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sport. That has been trialled for a

long time, it's been off and on. Add

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to see if that changes behaviour.

It's on in Ireland, Ireland has

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introduced one. Mexico has a sugar

tax, it has seen sales of soft

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drinks full. The Scottish Government

has the same kind of thing, talking

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about forcing restaurants and clubs

to control their portion size.

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Smaller portions.

Smaller plates,

they reckon.

Not like in America

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where you can get a second portion,

fourth portion, full three.

We all

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know what we have to do, it's that

cultural, habitual thing of doing it

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day in day out. That's it for the

papers this hour. We will be back at

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11:30pm.

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Next on BBC News - Meet the Author.

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