03/03/2018 The Papers


03/03/2018

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

in Russia after football's lawmakers

voted to approve the technology.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are journalist

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown

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and Penny Smith, who is

a journalist and broadcaster.

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Nice to have you both here.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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At this time of the night, you would

hope so, hey?

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While the Beast from the East

subsides and the snow melts,

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The Observer takes stock

of the financial cost the wintry

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weather has taken on the country,

suggesting it's cost us one billion

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pounds per day.

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The Sunday Times leads

on an investigation in to how

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internet giants may be

implicated in the trafficking

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of vulnerable women.

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The paper also looks ahead

to tomorrow night's Oscars

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with a picture of Gary Oldman,

who has the Best Actor nod

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for playing the part

of Winston Churchill.

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The actor also takes centrestage

on the front of The Telegraph,

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alongside the paper's top story

which looks at the way BBC

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presenters' salaries are taxed.

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The top story for the Mail

is the latest gossip

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from within Theresa May's cabinet.

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So, no clear consensus on a top

story for the Sunday papers,

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but a couple are looking ahead

to tomorrow night's Oscars ceremony.

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Let's start with the Observer,

adding up how much this it freeze

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has cost us, apparently £1 billion a

day as fears mounted GDP growth.

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Things like insurance costs,

disruptions, you know.

As the snow

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melts you can see the waiters

ravaged many of the Main Roads.

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Potholes.

Freeze thaw action. That

is the geography speaking.

The

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built-up areas is 5.9%, I checked.

How much of Britain's land...

It is

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still tiny.

Best from the East

hitting construction, schools,

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transport, construction...

Accidents, people have fallen, the

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emergency department have had

immense pressure, due no, I also

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think about all of those people who

have not been able to heat their

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homes, who will be, no money cases

have gone up, so it is a huge thing.

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Well, that'll comes into costs

because if you have no money

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obviously you cannot work and you

cannot be productive but they are

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saying construction could lose up to

£2 billion over the three worst days

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because of course nobody could do

any work. And there may have

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transport and retail of course also

suffering, which you think about the

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obviously no one was going into

shops because it was too cold and

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most people were told to stay at

home.

The clever voice in my ear,

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rock, reliably tells me, I'm not

sure where from, please give me a

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source if you can, GDP is from the

office of National statistics. --

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Rob. Thank you, very reliable. One

fifth we are losing. It is a lot of

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money.

When you look at that, and I

thought the figure was staggering,

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it is the most costly weather event

since 2010 when we have that

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freezing week before Christmas. That

is only eight years ago so it is

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obviously not that unusual to

have...

I don't ever remember it

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being like this. I just don't ever

remember it.

Really?

I just don't. I

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remember the very hot summers of the

'70s and so on.

You ignore the cold

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areas?

Perhaps I feel the cold more.

Cars freezing in five or ten

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minutes, I went out to get something

from the local shops and I couldn't

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open the door, I have never known it

like that and I think those poor

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people on the street! O! They could

not have survived.

Sunday Times.

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Crackdown on councils, they are not

building enough houses, the

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government is liking.

To the

government's liking. What they are

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saying is that if he refuses the

council to build these homes, you

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will be stripped of your right to

decide where they are construct did

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and this is a revolution in planning

laws to be unveiled tomorrow, this

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is an interview with the Sunday

Times, the Housing Secretary, saying

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councils will be given higher

targets for homes to be built and

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those who fail will have the

planning powers removed. They are

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planning on building two towns

between Oxford and...

The thing is

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until how long? Until recently the

pressure on councils not to spend on

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infrastructure, you know, the

government, on the coalition

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onwards, they were not allowed to,

and now they can do that, and they

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are so cash strapped at the moment,

councils.

They are being asked to

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build the houses, are they?

Just

approved them? Oh, is that it?

Yes,

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yes, they are not funding council

houses all of a sudden full top of

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his private construction firms being

encouraged.

Or that I have another

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objection!

Of course you do!

This

deregulation bunk this is dangerous

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because the planning a purpose.

Yes

it does.

It is not all about

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authoritarianism and whatever. I

think if we give up on planning

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permission of course all of us have

been through a bit with the council

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because you cannot get the tree you

want to cut down or whatever but

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they are right and actually, there

is a move now and it links to the

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one of the other stories we will do,

but we can do what we want, we did

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the regulations. I think it would be

a terrible thing.

And here is that

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Lourey. It is a bit like we thought

this through. Hang on, Penny,

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please. I know you are TV presenter

but come on! It is my show! The

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Sunday Telegraph, to abolish 50 EU

rules, please explain.

First you

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have to remember this is Sunday

Telegraph the obviously it is coming

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from the viewpoint of being pro-

Brexit. And although it is saying

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that both leaders and Remainers are

saying that after we have an picked

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ourselves from Europe, all of a

sudden everything is going to be so

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much easier -- Leavers. We will not

have red tape. Utterly without

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cucumbers be allowed to be as curly

as they darned well like...

And

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unable to build higgledy-piggledy of

things! It will look horrible!

Oh my

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god! Planning has nothing to do with

the EU though.

Of course not! That

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was going to be my point! The

planning permission is...

I will

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stop interrupting.

Yes, please!

Almost all of the local and National

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our government.

This is about taking

back control and releasing ourselves

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from regulations and direct gives...

I like the bondage.

They are saying

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at the moment that builders for

example construction council homes

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and putting, the dictats from Europe

are telling us what to do, they are

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not saying he was doing this or

anything else, it is all about

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signing off a new major trade on

much-needed infrastructure related

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to railway systems or else it would

be tangled in red tape and covered

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in red tape.

Hold on. I sat and

listened to all of Theresa May's

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speech yesterday and she was saying

a lot of the records realignment

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will need to be kept if we want to

do trade with Europe, as we

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certainly do, but not under the same

terms. The regulations which are

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necessary for that would be part of

this 50.

No.

Yes.

And there we have

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Steve Bannon, and hope we know who

Steve Bailey news, this man who is

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very...

It has got nothing to do

with this.

He has written in the

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Telegraph said that Brussels has

been viciously dismissive!

I

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shouldn't say that at...

I do think

he has much to do with the price of

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fish but there you go.

The Telegraph

love that, it is on the front page!

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That we find this out. Shadow

Secretary of State for housing has

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said that this year policy shows

that policies -- they have no plans

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to fix the housing policy. It is a

fault of Whitehall not town halls.

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Since 2010 Ross Lee ping has more

than doubles, the number of new

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homes being built still has not

recovered to prerecession levels.

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Well, the Independent. The headline.

Goodness me. So rude tonight. The

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Tories quietly shelved benefit

sanctions reform, yellow card plan

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prevent poorest being unfair, Doctor

says a positively by Rob are pleased

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to see around his desk some nights.

What are the reforms?

This is being

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going on for a long time. It is like

a Catch-22, people do need this

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university credits and other

benefits have been caught in this

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vicious, vicious trap, actually,

they have to pass all these tests

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and then suddenly they fail one bit

of them and there are these dreadful

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stories about somebody in hospital,

somebody not being able to attend an

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interview, and then they are denied

their basic living money. And you

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know, it was never fiction, I think,

we know it is happening.

It was

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meant to be in October 15 Ian Botham

Speight introduced the idea of the

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yellow card, in other words, really

to say can I just raise the yellow

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card, I think I have been wrongly

given the wrong amount, the wrong

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decision on this sort of thing, and

he said that there was going to be,

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and then, they have quietly shelved

this reform, the yellow card plan,

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and...

The evaluation proved to be

too complex.

Can you imagine that?

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How could they possibly mean that?

People 's lives are dependent on

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this!

It was supposed to be a

universal benefit and was meant to

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sort it out.

Exactly!

It was the

president all these disparate

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elements and sort it out but Frank

Field for example the chairman of

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the Commons Work and Pensions...

He

is very good on this.

It has

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highlighted the appalling distress

that some people are in anti- talks

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about one place where somebody was

having an operation at the time when

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he was given this decision and came

out, appealed the decision,

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obviously it was upheld, and by that

time he had already been evicted and

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somebody else was in emergency going

in for a major surgery and was

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shouting at everybody please, find

Work and Pensions, I need to get

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this sorted before I go in and

again, serious problem.

It is

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orphaned -- awful and Iain Duncan

Smith created this policy and he now

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says it cannot be evaluated, then

actually, he has got to be pulled

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before some committee to answer

questions about what he did!

He

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isn't overseeing it any more, is he?

But he created it and is still

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defending its!

Moving on to

something different, the Mail on

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Sunday has a picture of the very

lovely Susan constant time on the

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front page formerly of the Susannah

and Trini. I am now as skinny as

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Trini.

Yes, well, Yasmin, if you

would like to... You said is this

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news? It is a front-page story. Is

it really?

We are encouraged to look

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on pages 20 and 21 to find out how

she did it.

I don't have to know. I

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probably have some kind of idea.

Go

on.

Moved a bit more. That is how I

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did it. It is magic, the only way.

So we should have you on the front

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page!

Shouldn't we just?

In my

handmade frock? Home-made frock was

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to mark that tape is nice to a final

item on the Observer, talking about

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Paris fashion week.

Penny, Penny...

What she is wearing... This is a

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concoction by Vivienne Westwood.

By

her husband apparently. It is a

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Marsh to his wife.

Sorry! -- homage.

It is lovely! If I was younger, I

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would. I think it is great!

Penny

would make that to you.

My immediate

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thought was you rip up a whole lot

of stuff and tack it on and...

It is

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a bit like a curtain. But unlike

its!

Also, you slash up to him

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around the top and do a bit of

cutting and...

You make it sound

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very simple, this is haute couture!

It is like a housecoat, you just

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wrap it around, curtains are very

nice. I do like it.

The thing I like

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is the upsidedown yellow legs.

I

have no idea. Growing up in a family

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of hose re- manufacturers, it

reminds me of the model averagely

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that were used to have in the

factory that you could put a pair of

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stockings on or of Python and they

would, you check they fit --

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hosiery.

Why do they have an average

lake?

One leg sticking up off the

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leg desk.

Did I have a foot? Is

there such a thing as an average

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leg?

By parents may still have that

tucked away at home. Painted yellow.

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That is all from us.

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Don't forget, you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you -

seven days a week at

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BBC.co.uk/papers

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and if you miss the programme any

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evening, you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you and goodbye.

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