08/02/2018 The View


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08/02/2018

Mark Carruthers and guests review the week's political events from Stormont and Westminster and follow the highs and lows of the political week.


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Are we at a critical stage

tonight in the negotiations

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to get Stormont back?

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There's speculation there could be

signs of movement on the hill.

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We'll be trying to piece

the jigsaw together.

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Welcome to The View.

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Also tonight:

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Brexit is back

on the agenda big time

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and the border issue is once again

one of the major sticking points.

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The DUP's Ian Paisley has called

for a "no surrender" approach

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to the UK's neotiations with the EU,

but is it really that simple?

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The North Antrim MP is with me,

and in our Foyle studio

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is the former SDLP

leader, Mark Durkan.

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Plus 60 years on, a row over who

inspired the civil rights campaign.

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-- 50 years on.

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I think that the article that Declan

Kearney Road is delusional. When I

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say that, I say it is very little

basis in reality, in fact. Or into

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humans.

The reality is that Republican

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activists were involved directly

with many others in the formation of

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the civil rights movement.

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And taking ownership

of Commentators' Corner this week -

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Fionnuala O Connor and Alex Kane.

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But first tonight, the two

main parties have been

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involved in talks this evening

at Stormont, with the prospect

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of a second five-party

round-table session tomorrow.

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But are we any closer

to a deal being done?

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There have been some optimistic

noises from the Secretary of State,

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Karen Bradley, and the Tanaiste,

Simon Coveney, and talk

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of an agreement "within days".

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So what are the chances?

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With me now is our political

correspondent Enda McClafferty.

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Well, Enda, speculation

that a deal could be

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-- speculation that Theresa May like

the positioning herself to get

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involved.

She has been criticised in

the past for having a hands-off

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approach to the talks in Northern

Ireland. Response, Downing Street

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have insisted that she was fully

briefed by the Secretary of State

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for Northern Ireland and there was

money for calm. She has now put this

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out as an option. -- there was no

need for her to come. If it is felt

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that she is going to be able to

nudge DUP and Sinn Fein closer

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together, she might come. There is

no sense outside the circle that we

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are close to this point, or any kind

of intervention from Downing Street,

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or doctrine, wiping the bodies -- or

Dublin might bring the parties to a

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point unless the two parties agree

to hammer this out.

We had a guess

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clusters denied that called for

Theresa May to be involved. To be

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clear, we are saying she's willing

to get involved if that is going to

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help the process forward. We are not

saying she's about to get involved.

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We need to be clear about that. Leo

Varadkar has set in the past 30 and

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the Prime Minister promoted with a

shoulder to the wheel if they felt

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that would help the process. We are

not at this point yet. -- the Prime

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Minister would put their shoulders

to the real. It is being talked

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about in Downing Street, though.

Before it from both the DUP and Sinn

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Fein today. The positions seem to be

that progress has been made but

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significant gaps remain. Before it

is virtually every day now for

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weeks.

That has been the position

all along because this process has

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dragged on for more than a year. We

are in the place now where we were

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last November when we were getting

positive sounds from the edges of

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the talks process. Central to this,

at the heart of this, is a

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stand-alone Irish language act. Sinn

Fein says there will be no deal

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unless there is a stand-alone

Irishman would act and we know that

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the DUP's position says Dimbleby no

deal if it involves a stand-alone

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Irishman language act. -- says there

will be no deal. They keep leaving

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the elephant out of any talks, and

this is when things fall apart, when

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they talk about the Irish language

act. We haven't reached this crucial

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stage yet.

We were supposed to have

five party talks today. Karen

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Bradley push the to tomorrow. We

think this will happen tomorrow, not

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exactly sure. -- pushed them back to

tomorrow. The three smaller parties

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are pretty cheesed off with the way

they've been treated recently.

They

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are being treated like political

cheerleaders. They are not going to

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have any impact on the final result

of this political gain. It is

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frustrating and heard that echoed

this week by Colum Eastwood from the

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still be that he wasn't interested

in getting involved in some kind of

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pretend process. -- Colum Eastwood

who said this week that he wasn't

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interested.

We've missed another

milestone because David Stirling,

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the head of the civil service that

he needed clarity on a budget by

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today.

Sterling. Nigel Dodds has

said that on the other side of the

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Westminster recessed, we are talking

up to a fortnight away. He thinks

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that the Secretary of State, Karen

Bradley, should press ahead with his

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budget plans. Great pressure behind

the scenes felt like all sin. Civil

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servants. -- felt by all civil

servants.

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Enda, thank you.

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It's time for the Government

at Westminster to get tougher

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with the European Union and adopt

a "no surrender" policy.

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That's the view of the DUP's

Ian Paisley, at least.

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Accusing Brussels of blackmail

and bullying, an impassioned

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Mr Paisley invoked the spirit

of unionism to drive his point home

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during Northern Ireland Questions

at Westminster yesterday.

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And while it wasn't perhaps

the milestone that Karen Bradley had

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originally predicted,

it did have its moments

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of rhetorical flourish.

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Now that the new team has had a

chance to find a way around,

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particularly the border, and they

study the issue of the electronic

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border, do they believe that such a

furniture is feasible or is it just

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a fantasy?

The honourable gentleman refers to

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the matter of the border. We are

determined they will be no new

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physical infrastructure at the

border and we will maintain things

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like the Common Travel Area, which

has been in existence since well

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before the EU.

Is he not concerned

about the friction in relationships

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between the UK Government and the

Irish Republic and what comment as

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he got to make about the threat

issued by the Foreign Minister

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yesterday that he will block

negotiations if it does not get

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legislation to force the Northern

Ireland Assembly to introduce EU

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regulations?

As far as our

relationship with rather long, it

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goes back to entries. Trade,

geography, history, and so on. We

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have an excellent working

relationship with Northern Ireland.

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Does he agree that it's about time

that the Government chemistry did no

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surrender attitude to the EU talks?

-- demonstrated a no surrender.

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Fights, passion to register,

everything. Stand up to them, man,

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stand up to the EU. Let's get on

with leaving the EU.

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Ian Paisley in full flow there,

and he's with me in studio now.

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And joining us from our Foyle studio

is the former leader

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of the SDLP, Mark Durkan.

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Ian Paisley, tell me more about this

"no surrender" attitude

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you were calling for there.

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How's that going to work exactly?

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I think most people are sick, sore

and tired by the Government being

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sold, if you like, pushed around

during the Brexit negotiations.

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Which is people have decided that we

will leave the EU, all of the assets

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we control, from fisheries, waters,

trading benefit, that all of that

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should be turned to our advantage.

If we leave on the basis of a bad

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deal and they cannot -- and I have

not advocating one, if we leave on

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the basis that it is not a deal in

place, the EU loses just as much as

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ours and the Republic of Ireland

loses the most. The British

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Government at positive about this

and say they will get the best deal

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possible.

That is what the British

Government has been sent. Theresa

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May clarified today that the UK is

leading the single market and the

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customs union.

What more do you

want? I have no objection to what

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you said. We had Mr Barnier earlier

this week. The fight is a good

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start, the pressure that was going

to be applied and that UK had taken

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the wrong position. They are trying

to chastise the UK for treating a

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determined position to leave the EU.

It is not Michel Barnier's job to

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sit quietly because of what you

think.

It is perfectly valid for him

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to make the argument that he wishes

that the UK would not leave.

He is

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not entitled.

He has no

responsibility to make it easy for

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the UK to leave.

He has the right to

make sure that the rest of the

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missions are argued for. But he has

no right to saying that he objects

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to the British taking a particular

decision. That has been the attitude

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of the EU towards Britain. They look

at other countries might decide to

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leave after the UK lease. That's

what frightens them the most. I

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think they are trying to put the

frighteners on other countries to

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the east, that they should not leave

the earful.

Does Michel Barnier have

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the right to express his

disappointment in colourful terms of

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the UK has decided to leave?

He does

have the right to talk straight and

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frank terms. He also has to listen

to an awful lot of crude language

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and all sorts of discussions and

exaggerations representing a

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supposedly UK position. Describing

the UN all sorts of terms and

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himself personally and also to

terms. -- the EU in all sort of

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terms. It clear that the

negotiations that he and David Davis

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have treated quite a number of

issues. Few of the ideas seem to be

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coming from the EU Government side.

Ian is calling for a no surrender

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approach. At the moment, there is a

no plan, no arguments and approach

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from the UK. That creates a huge

problem for people like Michel

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Barnier that attracted negotiate a

deal with UK to make sense of Brexit

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and, so far as anybody can, in

everybody's interests. That creates

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problems for the Irish Government.

They need to defend their own

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interests, they wanted different --

they want to defend the whole

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interests -- they want to defend the

interests of the whole island.

Isn't

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it the case, Mark Durkan, that the

Irish Government is to be careful

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how places because it's being

charged with interfering in the

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internal affairs, the sovereign

affairs of the UK? Maybe it was too

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much to say for itself.

I don't

think it has too much to say for

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itself. The Irish fragment is in a

particular position with a land

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border, -- the Irish Government is

any particular position with a land

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border with the UK, Oracle

guarantors with the UK of the Good

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Friday Agreement. After all, the

Brexit -- the Brexiteers are saying

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that the Good Friday Agreement will

not be touched by Brexit. Then

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whenever people try to use the

architecture of the Good Friday

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Agreement, they are accused of

interference and upsetting the

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constitutional integrity of the UK.

There is a democratic constitutional

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integrity of the Good Friday

Agreement that has to be upheld and

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the Irish Government should continue

to do that.

The Irish Times puts

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today that it is hard to negotiate

with the British Government because

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the British Government is still

negotiating with itself.

There is a

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deliberate attempt... There is

issues within the Conservative

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Party. But there is eight deliberate

attempt -- a deliberate attempt to

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make the British Government reveal

its hand.

But it doesn't have a hand

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at the moment, isn't that the

problem.

We have a strong hand as a

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nation, I don't agree with that. We

are leaving the EU, the customs

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union and the single market. Today

the Labour Party spokesman on trade

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media group that if we were to stay

in the customs union we would not be

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able to make the free trade

agreement with other countries

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around the world. It's imperative

that we get on with this, all of the

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issues that Mark campaigned for when

he was member of Parliament and

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issues that I've campaigned for,

reducing VAT on fuel, tampon tax,

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issues like that, all of those taxes

were kept in place by the EU.

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Leaving the EU allows us to remove

things that create poverty in our

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nation.

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When you look at the Treasury

figures released this week, leaked

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this week, they point to a big

slowdown in economic growth over the

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next 15 years. Are you not concerned

about that?

A 15 year forecast is

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astrology! The Bank of England made

a forecast this time last year, and

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it has changed and four times in 12

months. You are expecting me to

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believe a forecast for 15 years?

What if it is true?

It is not.

Four

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parts of the EU would see a

double-digit slowdown in GDP.

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Northern Ireland sells £78 billion

worth of goods, £48 billion with

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sold in turn lead within Northern

Ireland.

Why would you leave the

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biggest trading bloc in the world?

The remainder goes to the United

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Kingdom. How on earth could we lose

out on internal trade when most of

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our sales are internal to our

market? The United Kingdom is the

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biggest market for Northern Ireland,

so that forecast is nonsense,

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astrology.

Astrology, Mark Durkan?

That is what Ian wants to say to

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dismiss these forecasts, because he

does not like them. We are in a

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situation where the UK's trading

arrangements with Europe are going

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to be up in the air. Ian says there

will be other trade deals, but it is

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not clear where we will get them,

offsetting the loss of value in

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terms of European trade. We have

more and more sectors waking up to

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the dangers of Brexit for them - the

haulage sector most recently

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realising that the legislation that

the British and are bringing forward

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will place huge restrictions on

them. The British Government are

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bringing forward. It could impose

restrictions on the industry

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locally.

On a sector that you

campaign for, fuel poverty, whenever

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you voted in 2009 to try and reduce

VAT on fuel, you were not allowed,

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it was brought down to 5%, you will

not allowed to take it to zero

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because of the EU. Whenever we leave

the EU, we can scrap VAT in total

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for all of our people. And you are

stopped from doing that.

Frankly,

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the UK Government are saying they

will not do that. The fact is that

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we have governments to have at times

protected that they did not have

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discretion in relation to be 80

whenever they had a lot more

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discretion that they did. -- in

relation to VAT.

No.

In relation to

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hospitality, fuel, UK minister

saying they could not reduce it.

Air

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passenger duty, we couldn't reduce

that because of the UK.

The point is

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that there are wider economic issues

at stake in relation to this, and of

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course the implications here locally

not just in terms of the border,

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customs and trade terms, it is also

the dangers of borderism, more and

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more different terms over the years,

going against the grain and the

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direction of travel under the

agreement.

Let's look forward and

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say that in a year's time, just over

a year, the UK leaves the EU - what

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will the border look like? We are

hearing from Karen Bradley and

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others that there will be no new

infrastructure on the border, Jacob

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Rees-Mogg says a border will be put

in place by the Republic of Ireland

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if anyone. How will your border work

if tariffs are not the same north

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and south of the border? About the

obvious reality is that probably the

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EU will instruct one of its member

states to put infrastructure on the

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border.

United Kingdom Government

has made it clear that we would use

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technology on the border, number

plate recognition, and in terms of

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trusted traders to service goods. If

you travel to the Swiss border, the

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Swiss border as five borders with

five other nations, and it is not as

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complex.

You are saying there will

be new infrastructure on the border?

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Numberplate recognition?

We already

have that.

So exactly as it is,

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then?

We already have precise

numberplate recognition systems, but

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more importantly the Irish

government will be forced, as a

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member state of the EU, to a wrecked

stuff on the border.

What about

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hauliers who are concerned about

this?

There will be an order coming

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through which will address haulage

and licenses, coming up in

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Parliament very soon.

Mark Durkan

has nothing to be concerned about?

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In terms of haulage, no.

Are you

reassured by that?

The border is

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very significant, and it has been

talked up by people who are engaged

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in stirring party politics in the

south of Ireland.

You don't think

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you have a slightly simplistic view

of what it is going to be like? That

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is what your critics say.

I do not

believe it will be simple, but at

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the same time I do not believe it

will be a great difficulty that

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people want to portray.

Mark Durkan

is shaking his head, are you

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persuaded by any... Ian Paisley has

conceded it will not be simple.

This

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somewhere over the rainbow nonsense

about how perfect Brexit will be is

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just nonsense. The fact is, Ian is

returning to his selection box of

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bogus and the silly claims that were

given during the referendum

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campaign, and we are getting them

reheated now. The fact is that most

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people realise that Brexit is more

complicated than they thought, even

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supporters of Brexit are realising

that. If we are going to get

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answers, we have to get real answers

to real questions. Ian dismisses

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every question, he also dismisses

every positive proposal and

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dismisses it as interference in the

UK's position. It is clear the

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December deal said it is up to the

British Government to come forward

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with key proposals in a number of

areas, including in relation to

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Ireland. I don't see them coming

forward with those proposals, and

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there is an onus on democratic

Ireland to come forward with clear

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proposals and show how the Good

Friday agreement can be used to

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answer a lot of the Brexit

challenges, how we can boost the

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economy into the future, not just in

the areas of existing co-operation,

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but in all other areas in future.

Final quick question, would you like

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to see the UK leave on WTO

arrangements, without a formal deal?

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It is an option, but I would prefer

a bespoke deal, and it is better for

0:20:430:20:47

the EU to get that, and that is what

we are working towards. The old

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point of this, I have a positive

attitude to what the United Kingdom

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people have come to, we are better

doing these things outside of the

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EU, rather than being tied by their

internal restrictions. Mark wants to

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be part of a club because he is not

convinced the United Kingdom can cut

0:21:040:21:08

its own club outside of the EU.

Look, let's park that one for a

0:21:080:21:14

second, I want to ask you very

quickly about speculation that

0:21:140:21:19

Theresa May may be thinking about

involving herself in the process,

0:21:190:21:23

perhaps as soon as next week. What

are you hearing?

This has been the

0:21:230:21:30

Prime Minister's position for quite

some time, she is ready to come over

0:21:300:21:33

when it is necessary, and that is

just speculation.

Are we approaching

0:21:330:21:38

that stage?

No idea.

Gosh, you

should have a word with some of the

0:21:380:21:42

people in your party, then, there is

a lot of speculation...

I am sure

0:21:420:21:47

there is, I read it in the

newspapers. I will wait and see what

0:21:470:21:51

happens. We have a negotiating team,

let them do their job.

0:21:510:21:54

Thank you both.

0:21:540:21:57

Sinn Fein's national chairperson,

Declan Kearney, has been accused

0:21:570:21:59

of being delusional by claiming

republicans inspired

0:21:590:22:00

the civil rights campaign here.

0:22:000:22:02

Mr Kearney has said that the civil

rights movement was heavily

0:22:020:22:04

influenced 50 years ago

by the IRA

0:22:040:22:06

and Sinn Fein leaderships.

0:22:060:22:07

But Bernadette McAliskey,

who was herself a key player

0:22:070:22:09

in the civil rights campaign,

has told this programme that

0:22:090:22:12

Mr Kearney is wrong -

and guilty of "silly ramblings".

0:22:120:22:15

So who's right and who's wrong?

0:22:150:22:17

Our political correspondent

Stephen Walker

0:22:170:22:18

has been investigating.

0:22:180:22:26

There is battle lines being drawn...

# Nobody is right if everybody is

0:22:260:22:34

wrong

# Young people... #

0:22:340:22:37

The late 1960s were a key time,

protests on the streets, demands for

0:22:370:22:41

votes, jobs and houses, and change

was in the air.

0:22:410:22:50

was in the air. The civil rights

movement was formed, and it was a

0:22:500:22:53

turning point in history. 50 years

on, opinion is divided on what

0:22:530:22:58

exactly happened and who was

involved. Writing on a website,

0:22:580:23:03

Declan Kidney argued it was the

strategic decision of the IRA and

0:23:030:23:08

Sinn Fein leaderships that helped to

form the civil rights movement.

0:23:080:23:13

Republicans were involved, the IRA

and Sinn Fein leadership is

0:23:130:23:17

encouraged their activists to

organise and to campaign under the

0:23:170:23:20

umbrella of the civil rights

movement, alongside other Democrats,

0:23:200:23:25

other political activists, human

right activists, Communists and

0:23:250:23:28

trade unionists. So the role of

republicanism was central to the

0:23:280:23:33

emergence of the civil rights

movement, along with others.

So our

0:23:330:23:37

Sinn Fein trying to claim a place in

history? Bernadette Devlin, as you

0:23:370:23:41

was then, was a leading figure in

the civil rights movement, later

0:23:410:23:45

becoming the youngest woman to

become elected to Westminster.

I

0:23:450:23:50

really don't have the political

space in my head, and I don't think

0:23:500:23:56

anybody should, to engage in the

delusional silliness of individual

0:23:560:24:04

ramblings that people have about the

past.

So do you really think Declan

0:24:040:24:11

Kidney is delusional?

Yes,

undoubtedly, with respect I think

0:24:110:24:17

the article that he wrote is

delusional, you know, and I say that

0:24:170:24:26

it has very little basis in reality.

We represent a stand for basic human

0:24:260:24:35

rights...

Eamon McCann was in the

civil rights campaign. Today he

0:24:350:24:40

questions Sinn Fein's recollection

of the time.

They are trying to

0:24:400:24:44

colonise history, claim every

advance, every bit of militancy over

0:24:440:24:48

the years, as their own, and of

course this isn't true, Sinn Fein

0:24:480:24:55

was attempting to portray

themselves, and, more importantly,

0:24:550:24:58

to portray the IRA as a natural

outgrowth of the civil rights

0:24:580:25:03

movement, which is certainly not

true. They are also trying to

0:25:030:25:08

pretend that they instigated the

civil rights movement.

Others insist

0:25:080:25:12

that Sinn Fein are using the history

of the civil rights campaign to

0:25:120:25:16

justify the subsequent actions of

the IRA.

The civil rights movement

0:25:160:25:24

was about equality. The republican

movement commission pain and the IRA

0:25:240:25:28

were about Brits out and Irish unity

by force. So, you know, it is a

0:25:280:25:33

rewriting of history to pretend that

the republican movement fought a war

0:25:330:25:39

to get equality, they did not. They

fought a war to get the breads and

0:25:390:25:44

to unite Ireland, neither of which

they succeeded in doing.

So our Sinn

0:25:440:25:49

Fein laying claim to something they

have no right to buy suggesting the

0:25:490:25:52

party and the IRA were influential?

I haven't said that leading members

0:25:520:25:58

of the civil rights movement at that

point in time were exclusively IRA

0:25:580:26:02

or Sinn Fein activists. What I have

said is that the reality is that

0:26:020:26:08

Republican activists were involved

directly, with many others, in the

0:26:080:26:12

formation of the civil rights

movement.

The danger is people say

0:26:120:26:16

you are trying to claim ownership of

something that was not there at the

0:26:160:26:20

time.

That is not the case, the

civil rights movement, through the

0:26:200:26:24

lens of historical objectivity, and

multiple parents and gave birth to

0:26:240:26:29

many children.

This week, Sinn Fein

continued to make remarks about the

0:26:290:26:34

civil rights campaign. This time, it

was Alex Maskey who tweeted,

0:26:340:26:39

unfortunately it took more than the

civil rights association to secure

0:26:390:26:43

rights in the putrid

0:26:430:26:50

rights in the putrid little statelet

Northern Ireland. It did not make an

0:26:500:26:54

impression with Bernadette

McAliskey.

Whatever it is that he is

0:26:540:26:57

trying to say, he would want to say

that in a way that reflects some,

0:26:570:27:08

any depth of political thought or

understanding, rather than an

0:27:080:27:15

enveloped culture of opening your

mouth without any prior thought and

0:27:150:27:20

allowing abuse to fallout of it.

Aside from the arguments over what

0:27:200:27:31

happened 50 years ago, is there a

broader lesson to be learned? As

0:27:310:27:35

politicians grapple with what needs

to happen in the future, what can

0:27:350:27:39

they learn from the past?

50 years

on, the work of the civil rights

0:27:390:27:46

movement remains unfinished.

I do

think that what the civil rights

0:27:460:27:50

movement taught me is that when

people of integrity, with the right

0:27:500:27:58

aims and with justice as their aim,

come together to achieve something,

0:27:580:28:04

the sky is the limit.

The lesson I

take from the civil rights movement

0:28:040:28:08

is that the major things we achieved

towards democracy in the North were

0:28:080:28:12

achieved by people power on the

streets.

I rarely look back, unless

0:28:120:28:17

I want to learn something from the

past. In order to do something

0:28:170:28:22

better for the future. If we look at

the work that has to be done in

0:28:220:28:29

Northern Ireland, it ill befits

anyone in this place to claim

0:28:290:28:32

bragging rights.

Five decades on,

the history of the civil rights

0:28:320:28:40

movement still divides opinion. Much

has changed, but an agreed narrative

0:28:400:28:45

remains elusive.

0:28:450:28:47

Stephen Walker reporting.

0:28:470:28:48

Plenty to discuss with our

commentators tonight,

0:28:480:28:50

and it's a warm welcome back

to Fionnuala O'Connor

0:28:500:28:52

and Alex Kane.

0:28:520:28:57

Welcome to you both. First of all,

let's have a word about the talks

0:28:570:29:01

that Brenda McCafferty was playing

us up your speakers. The suggestion

0:29:010:29:05

that Theresa May could be about to

come over here if the situation

0:29:050:29:09

presented itself for her presence

might make a difference. -- Enda.

0:29:090:29:14

What should be read into that if

anything at all?

We should think

0:29:140:29:19

about it and the idea that that that

might help as just so plainly daft.

0:29:190:29:26

If she has no authority

understanding in her own Government

0:29:260:29:29

and Cabinet, the ideas you could

come over here and have any

0:29:290:29:32

beneficial effect on to parties,

neither of whom have any time for.

0:29:320:29:37

The DUP protective because --

pretend to because they have this

0:29:370:29:43

deal with the Conservative Party but

I can believe that they are any more

0:29:430:29:49

impressed with her as a politician

and as a person with an authority

0:29:490:29:53

than her own Cabinet.

Do you get any

sense that the two main parties are

0:29:530:29:57

inching towards some kind of common

ground?

No, I do. They might well

0:29:570:30:02

be. They've made it hard for

themselves. -- no, I don't. They

0:30:020:30:07

both have set up things that look

impossible for them to overcome. It

0:30:070:30:12

could well happen. They could

produce something. It will be pretty

0:30:120:30:16

if they do.

That's right. The

problem with Theresa May, given the

0:30:160:30:22

nature of the relationship she has

with the GP I can't conceive of a

0:30:220:30:26

situation where she can turn up and

sell some industry and friend. The

0:30:260:30:32

relationship she has with DUP. The

issue with the language act, they

0:30:320:30:43

would both have been given so much.

Within unionism, there is no way on

0:30:430:30:48

God 's earth that DUP could sell a

stand-alone Irish language act.

It's

0:30:480:30:55

not possible. Leo Varadkar would be

there as well if Theresa May was.

He

0:30:550:31:00

would have to. I remember when David

Cameron came over and had been

0:31:000:31:07

told... Then he realised. Absolutely

nothing, I can't conceive of

0:31:070:31:13

anything that they could come up

with at this stage and say, I'll

0:31:130:31:18

come on, Prime Minister, come and

have your input.

What did you make

0:31:180:31:25

about Ian Paisley's comments on a no

surrender approach?

That was not

0:31:250:31:30

very intelligent. When you think

about how upset many unionists were

0:31:300:31:34

well beyond the DUP about the

mockery of the DUP fall the

0:31:340:31:38

Conservatives, much of which was

couched in mockery of shouting terms

0:31:380:31:46

like, no surrender, of red-faced

Orangemen marching and bolder hats,

0:31:460:31:49

somebody gets up in the House of

Commons and waves his order paper

0:31:490:31:54

and yells, no surrender. What I

think we saw there was somebody

0:31:540:32:01

reacting to the

0:32:010:32:08

reacting to the tweet that morning.

That tweet about burgers and Irish

0:32:080:32:14

opportunist. I think these are two

of the biggest exhibitionist in the

0:32:140:32:18

DUP. Off the pitch, not involved in

the talks, they are striving for

0:32:180:32:23

attention.

I think it was nonsense.

I think that he is right in terms of

0:32:230:32:28

the fact that the rib problem is

with Theresa May and the

0:32:280:32:32

Conservative Government. -- the real

problem is with. He forgets that the

0:32:320:32:37

idea of hardbody, hard Brexit, there

is a clash of identities. --

0:32:370:32:42

hardboard. The DUP cannot ignore

this, they cannot come out with this

0:32:420:32:50

idea of the worst office, man. --

the idea of toughness.

It was a daft

0:32:500:33:02

article, as well as a big whopper.

This is the Declan Kearney article?

0:33:020:33:11

Yes, it was scratched -- the

Republicans were involved but it

0:33:110:33:16

wasn't hers Sinn Fein, the leaders

said about the civil rights movement

0:33:160:33:24

as individuals, attempting to

influence, as when a debt -- as

0:33:240:33:32

Bernadette and Eamon, they were very

involved. Republicans were involved,

0:33:320:33:40

but not these Republicans. He is

guilty by omission of reframing

0:33:400:33:47

history.

She nailed it, when she

said that Sinn Fein were trying to

0:33:470:33:52

colonise history. They are making it

up as they go along.

It is

0:33:520:33:56

offensive. One of the leaders

afterwards said that he was sorry

0:33:560:34:02

afterwards that he did not shoot

Gerry Adams and call.

0:34:020:34:10

That's it from The View

for this week.

0:34:100:34:12

Join me for Sunday Politics

at 11:35am here on BBC One.

0:34:120:34:14

For now, though, we'll sign

off on a tranquil note

0:34:140:34:17

with some thoughtful,

reflective debate from

0:34:170:34:18

yesterday's session in the Dail.

0:34:180:34:20

It all began when the new system

of numbered cards for TDs hoping

0:34:200:34:22

to put questions to the Taoiseach

began to unravel -

0:34:220:34:25

and the Healey-Rae brothers

were in the middle of it.

0:34:250:34:27

Goodnight!

0:34:270:34:28

Have you got a card?

Of course I

have, the same as you.

Hang on

0:34:280:34:32

one-minute kicks!

0:34:320:34:42

one-minute That's... That's

outrageous!

That other directors! We

0:34:420:34:51

were elected...

0:34:510:34:56

were elected...

Stop shouting.

It's

not... It's a disgrace!

Are

0:34:580:35:07

suspended house. -- Isis Bentley

house. Deputy, you will not speak to

0:35:070:35:14

the chair like

0:35:140:35:15

Join Mark Carruthers and guests on Thursdays for The View - the week's political news, comments and expert analysis. The View reports events at Stormont and Westminster and how they are affecting issues such as health and the economy. It follows the ups and downs of the political parties and debates the highs and lows of the political week. It also has an alternative view on the week's political headlines.