10/12/2015 Victoria Derbyshire


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


10/12/2015

Joanna Gosling presents the BBC's daily news and current affairs programme. Ashley John-Baptiste looks at a project in London helping young adult offenders.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 10/12/2015. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello it's Thursday, it's 9.15, I'm Joanna Gosling in for Victoria,

:00:00.:00:07.

The debate continues on where to build a new airport runway.

:00:08.:00:15.

Ministers were due to decide before Christmas.

:00:16.:00:18.

But it could be delayed for another 6 months.

:00:19.:00:21.

David Cameron's expected to make an announcement this evening.

:00:22.:00:24.

We have exclusive access to a programme to stop reoffending

:00:25.:00:29.

It targets young adults above the age of 17,

:00:30.:00:36.

who don't qualify for the support given to youth offenders

:00:37.:00:39.

in the hope of turning their lives around.

:00:40.:00:43.

If they do let me out, I've got someone to help to help me into

:00:44.:00:50.

work. Do you think this could be the end of your life of crime? Yes.

:00:51.:00:53.

More exam papers than ever are being remarked; that's

:00:54.:00:55.

what the regulator in England OFQUAL is expected to confirm later today.

:00:56.:00:58.

Teachers and students have criticised the standard of marking

:00:59.:01:01.

after several years in which increasing numbers

:01:02.:01:04.

of papers have had to be re-graded on appeal.

:01:05.:01:14.

Hello, welcome to the programme, we're on BBC 2 and the BBC

:01:15.:01:18.

Throughout the programme we will bring you up to date

:01:19.:01:23.

with the latest stories including the news that French prosecutors

:01:24.:01:26.

are investigating the decision to award the 2021 World Athletics

:01:27.:01:30.

Championships to Eugene in the United States.

:01:31.:01:33.

Plus, we'll talk later about the growing number of people

:01:34.:01:39.

signing a petition to have Donald Trump -

:01:40.:01:41.

the American billionaire who wants to be President -

:01:42.:01:44.

As always we're keen to hear from you on all the subjects we're

:01:45.:01:49.

talking about this morning - do get in touch - texts will be

:01:50.:01:52.

charged at the standard messaging rate.

:01:53.:01:54.

And of course you can watch the programme online wherever

:01:55.:01:58.

you are - via the BBC News app or our website bbc.co.uk/victoria

:01:59.:02:01.

and you can also subscribe to all our features on the news app,

:02:02.:02:04.

by going to add topics and searching Victoria Derbyshire.

:02:05.:02:07.

The debate over airport expansion rages on;

:02:08.:02:10.

The Government was due to make a decision on whether to build

:02:11.:02:15.

a new runway at Heathrow as recommended by the Airports

:02:16.:02:18.

Commission before Christmas, but this week it emerged that this

:02:19.:02:22.

could get delayed by another six months.

:02:23.:02:24.

We're expecting an announcement from the Prime Minister this evening.

:02:25.:02:26.

Businesses are warning that pushing the decision back could cost

:02:27.:02:30.

We'll discuss that in a moment, but first let's look at how

:02:31.:02:34.

Why does the UK need another runway in the South East?

:02:35.:02:39.

60 million Brits travel abroad each year by air

:02:40.:02:42.

and that figure is steadily increasing.

:02:43.:02:44.

According to the Airports Commission, which has been looking

:02:45.:02:49.

into airport capacity, all major south east airports,

:02:50.:02:52.

such as Heathrow, Gatwick, Luton and Stansted will run out

:02:53.:02:55.

If that happens it's estimated it could cost the economy

:02:56.:03:01.

So, the government needs to decide whether to build an extra runway

:03:02.:03:07.

After three years of deliberation, the Airports Commission said

:03:08.:03:13.

this summer that Heathrow was the "clear and

:03:14.:03:15.

Here's what the head of the Commission Sir Howard Davies

:03:16.:03:20.

The economic benefits of expanding Heathrow are much greater than any

:03:21.:03:31.

other option. You get additional trade benefits, connectivity

:03:32.:03:33.

benefits, additional long haul routes to important cities in

:03:34.:03:36.

emerging markets which will be crucial for our economy in the 21st

:03:37.:03:38.

century. It was due to make the call before

:03:39.:03:40.

Christmas, but it's rumoured that's Politically this decision

:03:41.:03:45.

is a tricky one for David Cameron. He's previously said

:03:46.:03:50.

he won't support expansion A number of high profile Tories

:03:51.:03:52.

are also against Heathrow expansion the London Mayor Boris Johnson,

:03:53.:03:57.

and the man they hope will be the next mayor

:03:58.:04:00.

Tory MP Zac Goldsmith. This was Boris Johnson at

:04:01.:04:02.

the party's conference this Autumn. If we are going to build new airport

:04:03.:04:18.

capacity, let's not bodge it with one runway in the wrong place in a

:04:19.:04:28.

short-termist old, failed, tired and environmentally disastrous solution.

:04:29.:04:33.

One of the many things that you and I Zac are right on.

:04:34.:04:34.

David Cameron may decide later to order another review looking

:04:35.:04:40.

at the environmental impact of expanding both options.

:04:41.:04:43.

Another delay will not go down well with businesses.

:04:44.:04:48.

We can speak now to two business leaders about this potential delay.

:04:49.:04:51.

Iain Anderson runs the international communications company Cicero

:04:52.:04:53.

and Baroness Valentine speaks on behalf of London Businesses.

:04:54.:04:56.

Also James Thornton from environmental group Client

:04:57.:04:58.

Baroness Valentine, what do you think of the delay? I think it's

:04:59.:05:08.

completely and utterly pathetic. We have been waiting 50 years, we keep

:05:09.:05:13.

doing consultations, keep coming up with recommendations, they need to

:05:14.:05:17.

take a decision. Why do you think the decision is not being made? Do

:05:18.:05:21.

you think politics is coming into it? Yes, we have spent three years

:05:22.:05:24.

with an Independent Commission and landed back in the political soup.

:05:25.:05:27.

The whole point of the Independent Commission was to avoid the

:05:28.:05:32.

political soup. Iain, what is the impact on business? I think it's

:05:33.:05:36.

really significant. We have been waiting for a decision for a long

:05:37.:05:40.

time. I work a lot with inward investors so I spend a lot of time

:05:41.:05:45.

in the States, Asia and circling over Heathrow, and people are really

:05:46.:05:53.

asking the question, is the UK serious about ensuring that business

:05:54.:05:56.

can have open access to British markets? That is a real concern.

:05:57.:06:04.

James, as you are concerned about the airport expansion, presumably

:06:05.:06:07.

you welcome another delay, even though it's only six months? Any

:06:08.:06:11.

decision that gets made and a decision will be made, needs to take

:06:12.:06:14.

into account the environmental consequences of building extra

:06:15.:06:18.

capacity. Now, in the UK, we are violating the relevant air pollution

:06:19.:06:22.

laws. We had to take UK Government to court and we won a judgment in

:06:23.:06:26.

the UK Supreme Court. The Supreme Court ordered the Government to come

:06:27.:06:30.

into compliance with air pollution laws "as soon as possible". Now, the

:06:31.:06:35.

Government is saying that as soon as possible means at least 2025 and the

:06:36.:06:40.

problem is, expanding he's row would increase the air pollution and they

:06:41.:06:43.

haven't suggested a way to get around this problem. What do you say

:06:44.:06:48.

to that? What I would say is that, Davis spent a lot of time looking at

:06:49.:06:53.

the questions. Heathrow is coming up with answers to this question. Most

:06:54.:06:57.

of the environmental issues that are going on are about

:06:58.:06:59.

of the environmental issues that are the airport, rather than the planes

:07:00.:07:03.

in the sky. This has been looked at, we don't need to look at it again.

:07:04.:07:14.

Just to Just to add, circling planes at Heathrow, very bad for emissions.

:07:15.:07:18.

The Government's known it's had to hit the targets for 15 years, what

:07:19.:07:24.

have they been doing? ! Well, they seem to have been doing nothing.

:07:25.:07:26.

They stood up in the Supreme Court and said, we had no intention of

:07:27.:07:31.

coming into compliance. They knew they had to come in at 2000. The

:07:32.:07:36.

Government's potentially delaying the decision because of their own

:07:37.:07:41.

inability to act on our pollution. It's pathetic. I think the

:07:42.:07:45.

Government is delaying the decision for party political reasons. This is

:07:46.:07:49.

about a problem within the Conservative Party and the

:07:50.:07:53.

about a problem within the election next year. If you asked,

:07:54.:07:58.

and the numbers have been done on this, 70% on MPs across Britain

:07:59.:08:02.

would actually vote for the Davis decision.

:08:03.:08:07.

That is clear already. It's also clear that the meeting air

:08:08.:08:14.

pollution targets or legal requirements in Heathrow or in the

:08:15.:08:17.

rest of the UK is not difficult. Absolutely right. So with those

:08:18.:08:22.

targets those still outstanding, where would you say that does leave

:08:23.:08:26.

the airport expansion, is six months even going to be enough? It depends

:08:27.:08:34.

what they come up with. They have to comply with a plan of air quality

:08:35.:08:37.

laws as soon as possible. They haven't done that yet. Do you think

:08:38.:08:41.

Heathrow is the better option, bearing in mind what the others have

:08:42.:08:45.

been saying about the concerns for the environment with traffic on the

:08:46.:08:50.

ground? Heathrow appears to have worse air pollution problems than

:08:51.:08:54.

alternative options, it really does, but any of these situations can be

:08:55.:08:59.

addressed. Can I just say, it will take ten years once we even make the

:09:00.:09:02.

decision so we can sort out the air pollution in the ten years before we

:09:03.:09:06.

actually get a plane off the ground. You can also make it a condition of

:09:07.:09:10.

the planes taking off. I mean, when this was last decided with Andrew

:09:11.:09:15.

Adonis in the early 2000s, he said we won't put in any extra capacity

:09:16.:09:19.

unless we are sure we are complying with the environmental stuff so we

:09:20.:09:24.

can make it a condition. 40% of our exports travel out of the country by

:09:25.:09:29.

air. Over half of those exports travel out through Heathrow. You

:09:30.:09:32.

know, something needs to happen here and quickly.

:09:33.:09:37.

So put it in figures, the impact of the delay on the economy? So Davis

:09:38.:09:43.

has already said a further impact of the delay could cost, you know, over

:09:44.:09:47.

?30 billion for the economy. Actually, getting on with it

:09:48.:09:51.

could... How is that figure reachd? OK, so they are looking at a figure

:09:52.:09:56.

around the gross value. Basically what happens in terms of the

:09:57.:10:00.

opportunities that are being lost, because we are not actually getting

:10:01.:10:05.

on with this. If we got on with, again according to Davis, we'd also

:10:06.:10:09.

create 190,000 jobs in terms of construction, but also in terms of

:10:10.:10:14.

the opportunities across Britain. Which is why the unions have come

:10:15.:10:19.

out strongly in favour saying please take a decision. Some other numbers

:10:20.:10:26.

were relevant and meaningful. Air pollution deaths in the UK. This

:10:27.:10:33.

isn't a hyperthey wantical thing. The Government's own numbers which

:10:34.:10:36.

are probably conservative, say there are 40,000 people a year die from

:10:37.:10:43.

air pollution. Very important stuff -- hypothetical.

:10:44.:10:46.

We are expecting to hear from the Prime Minister later. Thank you all

:10:47.:10:49.

very much. Do let us know your thoughts on that. We'll hear some of

:10:50.:10:52.

your thoughts later. French prosecutors have opened

:10:53.:10:54.

an investigation into the awarding of the 2021 World Athletics

:10:55.:10:57.

championships to the American The city, in Oregon,

:10:58.:10:59.

is closely associated Until recently, the new president

:11:00.:11:04.

of athletics' world governing body, the IAAF Lord Coe was a paid

:11:05.:11:08.

ambassador for the company. He's denied lobbying

:11:09.:11:11.

anyone about the bid. Our correspondent Mark Daly has been

:11:12.:11:14.

following this story. Tell us a bit more about the

:11:15.:11:24.

decision to award it to Eugene in the first place because that was

:11:25.:11:29.

controversial from the start? Yes, this story is essentially about the

:11:30.:11:34.

embattled IAAF's decision to award what's the premier event in the

:11:35.:11:39.

world, athletics calendar, the World Championships, to Eugene in 2021.

:11:40.:11:43.

This was controversial because it was done without by pass, the usual

:11:44.:11:50.

bidding process, much to the annoyance of the Swedish city of

:11:51.:11:53.

Gothenburg which was planning a rival bid. French prosecutors who've

:11:54.:11:58.

been investigating allegations of corruption and bribery within the

:11:59.:12:02.

IAAF, have now turned their attention to this decision. The

:12:03.:12:08.

French national financial prosecution service have launched a

:12:09.:12:13.

new investigation into the reasons behind the awarding of the 2021

:12:14.:12:19.

Championships to Eugene, that is a city closely associated with Nike,

:12:20.:12:23.

known as the birthplace of Nike. This comes a couple of weeks after

:12:24.:12:29.

the BBC revealed that Lord Sebastien Coe who is now President, but whilst

:12:30.:12:34.

Vice-President of the IAAF in January this year, appeared to have

:12:35.:12:43.

been in discussions with the Nike senior executive, as well as the

:12:44.:12:49.

then President of the IAAF about his support for the World Championships

:12:50.:12:52.

coming to Eugene. Why was this an issue? Well, at the time, Lord Coe

:12:53.:12:58.

was a paid ambassador for Nike, and he was apparently discussing IAAF

:12:59.:13:03.

business with Nike about an event that they could be seen to

:13:04.:13:09.

financially benefit from. Now, under mounting pressure, Lord

:13:10.:13:12.

Coe resigned from his position at Nike two weeks ago. In this

:13:13.:13:18.

morning's Today programme on Radio Four, Lord Coe was specifically

:13:19.:13:23.

asked about this and the Eugene bid. We have selected cities before not

:13:24.:13:27.

within a bidding cycle. There was at that point no bidding cycle and

:13:28.:13:32.

Eugene was not put forward by the IAAF, it was put forward by the

:13:33.:13:41.

United States Track Field and by 23-25 votes, my council decided this

:13:42.:13:44.

was for the foreseeable future the best opportunity to get the world

:13:45.:13:47.

athletics Championships into the United States. Every sport is

:13:48.:13:52.

falling over itself to get into the largest sports market in the world.

:13:53.:14:00.

So this was not, the A-list was not -- A, this was not without precedent

:14:01.:14:05.

and B, the council made a judgment that for the foreseeable, they were

:14:06.:14:09.

not. It aggrieves me to say this, but the powerhouse of the United

:14:10.:14:12.

States track and field that we see at the Olympic Games is not

:14:13.:14:15.

replicated across the country. They did not have cities like Miami, Los

:14:16.:14:20.

Angeles, Chicago falling over themselves and this was a city put

:14:21.:14:27.

forward, not by the IAAF, but by United States Track Field. Mark,

:14:28.:14:30.

in terms of the French investigation, are there my

:14:31.:14:35.

implications for Lord Coe? He's already been voluntarily interviewed

:14:36.:14:40.

by the French police. Not about Eugene specifically, but about the

:14:41.:14:44.

wider allegations surrounding his predecessor. Now, he stands accused,

:14:45.:14:51.

he and three others, of pocketing around a million dollars in bribes

:14:52.:14:58.

where he's been accused of effectively extorting money from

:14:59.:15:03.

mainly Russian athletes in order to cover up positive doping tests.

:15:04.:15:08.

There is no suggestion that Lord Coe is at all involved in any of this

:15:09.:15:14.

and Lord Coe himself has strenuously denied he's ever lobbied Mr Diak.

:15:15.:15:20.

His support for Eugene was primarily based on fact in his opinion it was

:15:21.:15:25.

the best city for it. Now that French prosecutors have launched an

:15:26.:15:28.

investigation, it's likely they'll want to ask Lord Coe what, if

:15:29.:15:36.

anything, he knows about the reasons behind Mr Diak deciding to opt to

:15:37.:15:44.

call the surprise vote. That is what I understand of this part of the

:15:45.:15:48.

investigation. He's got a lot on his plate right now, hasn't he? Nobody

:15:49.:15:53.

should underestimate the task ahead of Lord Coe. This has been the most

:15:54.:15:59.

tumultuous 12 months in the sport of athletics history, perhaps more so

:16:00.:16:04.

than the scandal of 1988 when Ben Johnson tested positive in the final

:16:05.:16:09.

of the 100 metres in Seoul. Last December we first heard about the

:16:10.:16:14.

allegations of systematic doping in Russia, in June there was a Panorama

:16:15.:16:20.

programme about allegations concerning Mo Farah's coach Alberto

:16:21.:16:24.

Salazar at the Nike Oregon project, shortly after that we heard about

:16:25.:16:28.

the allegations of systematic blood doping amongst thousands of athletes

:16:29.:16:32.

and then perhaps most significantly, just a few weeks ago, the World

:16:33.:16:38.

Anti-Doping Agency produced what can only be described as a davming

:16:39.:16:42.

indictment of the state of doping within athletic.

:16:43.:16:48.

The second part of the report, focusing on corruption in the IAAF,

:16:49.:16:55.

is yet to land. We expect that to be published in the middle of January.

:16:56.:17:00.

Lord Coe certainly does not have his problems to seek. Thanks very much.

:17:01.:17:02.

Still to come: A mother and her seven children,

:17:03.:17:05.

including a baby of just three weeks old, have drowned while trying

:17:06.:17:08.

to cross the Aegean Sea from Turkey into Greece.

:17:09.:17:11.

A total of 13 children have been washed up on Turkey's beaches

:17:12.:17:13.

We'll be speaking to our correspondent there.

:17:14.:17:21.

Plus, we have exclusive access to a programme to help stop young adults

:17:22.:17:26.

who have been in prison from reoffending. Often they do not

:17:27.:17:29.

qualify for the support given to youth offenders. We will find out

:17:30.:17:30.

why. The Prime Minister, who's in Poland

:17:31.:17:34.

for talks on European Union reform, says 'meaningful change'

:17:35.:17:40.

has already begun. Mr Cameron said there was goodwill

:17:41.:17:41.

and engagement to keep the UK He also said Poland had agreed

:17:42.:17:44.

to work with Britain There's been more floods misery

:17:45.:17:49.

for parts of Cumbria and Lancashire. In one village, Glenridding,

:17:50.:17:56.

the river overtopped its banks People have been moved

:17:57.:17:58.

to safety overnight. The Army, fire crews and mountain

:17:59.:18:05.

rescue teams have all been called Our news correspondent Fiona Trott

:18:06.:18:08.

is in Appleby in Cumbria. Just what they don't need?

:18:09.:18:20.

Exactly. People all the time keeping an eye on those river levels. Taken

:18:21.:18:25.

care in Appleby, a flood warning is in place, you can understand why.

:18:26.:18:30.

The level rising sharply over the last few hours. St Michael's village

:18:31.:18:34.

in Lancashire, evacuation taking place there at the moment, a lot of

:18:35.:18:38.

rain water overnight, a lot of flooded homes this morning. A severe

:18:39.:18:43.

flood warnings in place, which means danger to life. Let me take you now

:18:44.:18:48.

to lend wedding and show you footage taken by a local shopkeeper. Look

:18:49.:18:52.

how fast that was going past his shop door last night. That is why

:18:53.:18:56.

for the second time the military work brought back help fire crews,

:18:57.:19:01.

help the police to get people out of their homes. They had to use rope to

:19:02.:19:06.

get people out of one building. That was the situation in Glenridding.

:19:07.:19:11.

Here in Appleby, people trying to clear up but still worried about the

:19:12.:19:15.

rain and the river levels. You can see this local shop here, all of the

:19:16.:19:20.

furniture and stock abandoned on the pavement, and look at the river

:19:21.:19:23.

level, underneath the bridge. You can see it is still closed, some of

:19:24.:19:27.

this local shop here, all of the furniture and stock abandoned on the

:19:28.:19:29.

pavement, and look at the river level, underneath the bridge. You

:19:30.:19:31.

can see it is still stopping people from going over, one of many bridges

:19:32.:19:36.

due to be inspected by the military in Cumbria to make sure they are

:19:37.:19:40.

safe. So, 13 flood warnings in place across England and Wales, one severe

:19:41.:19:44.

flood warning for Saint Michael's in Lancashire and where the evacuation

:19:45.:19:48.

is taking place at the moment. Thank you.

:19:49.:19:51.

French prosecutors are investigating the decision to award the 2021

:19:52.:19:54.

World Athletics Championships to Eugene in the US state of Oregon.

:19:55.:20:03.

The city is closely linked to the American sportswear giant, 90. Lord

:20:04.:20:11.

Coe, until recently an ambassador for the company, has denied lobbying

:20:12.:20:12.

the bid. The Nuffield Trust says the NHS

:20:13.:20:13.

will struggle to cope this winter, unless more beds are made

:20:14.:20:16.

available in care homes. It says more than a third

:20:17.:20:18.

of hospital beds are taken up by a small group of patients,

:20:19.:20:21.

mainly fragile and elderly people, and it suggests targeting

:20:22.:20:24.

more help towards them. The Government says it will robustly

:20:25.:20:32.

defend a compensation claim being made by one of the killers of

:20:33.:20:37.

Fusilier Lee Rigby. Michael Adebolajo says he was assaulted two

:20:38.:20:41.

years ago by officers at Belmarsh prison whilst being restrained.

:20:42.:20:44.

A surrogate dog in the US has given birth to the world's first

:20:45.:20:47.

All seven pups, who have three sets of biological parents,

:20:48.:20:50.

are said to be healthy and doing well at Cornell University

:20:51.:20:53.

They were born after 19 embryos were transferred to the host

:20:54.:20:56.

Let's catch up with all the sport now.

:20:57.:21:04.

After Manchester United went crashing out of the Champions League

:21:05.:21:06.

on Tuesday night, all eyes turned to Arsenal and Chelsea,

:21:07.:21:10.

with worries all three could have been playing in the Europa League.

:21:11.:21:13.

Arsenal needed a two-goal win against Olympiakos in Greece -

:21:14.:21:17.

Olivier Giroud the hero with a hat-trick in their 3-0 win.

:21:18.:21:22.

For Chelsea, a point would have been enough at home to Porto -

:21:23.:21:25.

they won 2-0 to top Group G and ease the pressure on manager Jose

:21:26.:21:29.

Things looking brighter in elite football,

:21:30.:21:33.

but what about at the grassroots level?

:21:34.:21:35.

I'll be talking to Kelly Simmons, FA's Director of Development

:21:36.:21:38.

and Participation, about the huge investment -

:21:39.:21:41.

?260 million - pledged over the next four years,

:21:42.:21:45.

asking how and where the money will be spent.

:21:46.:21:47.

Many suggesting the cash needed to improve the game should be more,

:21:48.:21:52.

especially given the huge finances in football.

:21:53.:21:54.

We'll also talk athletics and Greg Rutherford,

:21:55.:21:57.

the Olympic gold medallist, still part of the Sports Personality

:21:58.:22:03.

Of The Year shortlist after previously withdrawing

:22:04.:22:05.

his nomination.

:22:06.:22:06.

I'll be back with those stories in more detail in around

:22:07.:22:08.

Thank you. Lots of you getting in touch about the expected delay to

:22:09.:22:20.

the decision on airport expansion. We are expecting David Cameron

:22:21.:22:23.

potentially to delay a decision on Heathrow or Gatwick for another six

:22:24.:22:27.

months when he talks about it later. Gary says, meanwhile, who is paying

:22:28.:22:31.

the bill for the earth work currently taking place and work

:22:32.:22:34.

carried out like to be stationed and wrote in? And other says, there will

:22:35.:22:38.

be no second or third runway decision the Gatwick or Heathrow

:22:39.:22:45.

until after the May 2016 London may boat. On Twitter, are there plans to

:22:46.:22:54.

make North hold the short-haul hub? On Twitter, no decision has been

:22:55.:22:58.

made for 50 years, which would indicate the extra runway is not

:22:59.:23:02.

needed, we are fine without it. Another on Twitter, David Cameron

:23:03.:23:05.

just cannot make difficult decisions.

:23:06.:23:08.

Do keep getting in touch, not just on that but all of the stories we

:23:09.:23:09.

are covering today. A mother and her seven children,

:23:10.:23:11.

the youngest a baby of just three weeks old, have drowned while trying

:23:12.:23:14.

to cross the Aegean Sea The family were fleeing

:23:15.:23:17.

the Syrian civil war. In the last ten days,

:23:18.:23:20.

13 children have been washed up on Turkey's beaches -

:23:21.:23:30.

their families all trying to make Our reporter Mark Lowen

:23:31.:23:33.

is following the story from Cesme in Western Turkey and

:23:34.:23:37.

joins us live now. Tell us what has happened here.

:23:38.:23:43.

It is a heartbreaking story, the story of a man who came with his

:23:44.:23:49.

family from Syria, and Islamic State held area, and he, his sister, his

:23:50.:23:55.

wife and seven children tried to make a short crossing across the

:23:56.:24:00.

Aegean Sea to a Greek island, tantalisingly close. They paid 7000

:24:01.:24:06.

US dollars, about ?4000, for what they hoped would be a sturdy boat,

:24:07.:24:09.

more so than the rubber dinghies that have capsized all too often.

:24:10.:24:15.

But the engine failed, the boat flooded with water and capsized, and

:24:16.:24:19.

he lost his wife and seven children. The eldest was nine years old, the

:24:20.:24:24.

youngest just 20 days old. Sitting on the beach-front here in Cesme,

:24:25.:24:28.

you told me about the family that he had lost.

:24:29.:24:31.

TRANSLATION: I had the most affectionate wife.

:24:32.:24:36.

I took my family out of Syria to escape the killing.

:24:37.:24:38.

My children could have had a future in Europe.

:24:39.:24:42.

What is your message to other Syrians who want to make

:24:43.:24:46.

They said we would reach Greece within 15 minutes.

:24:47.:25:02.

I advise everyone, don't come, stay in Syria, however

:25:03.:25:04.

You said this is not an isolated case, and tragically it is not, 13

:25:05.:25:20.

children have died in the last ten days here. Another bout of six

:25:21.:25:23.

Afghan children drowned in the last few days as well. Turkey is under

:25:24.:25:27.

pressure to stem the flow of migrants and refugees, they are

:25:28.:25:36.

signing a deal with the EU in the next two years to patrol the border,

:25:37.:25:46.

but with just a fraction of the Syrians here in Turkey living in the

:25:47.:25:54.

cities and towns, hard to control, and the dream of Europe burning

:25:55.:25:58.

bright, it will be difficult to restrain those seeking sanctuary

:25:59.:26:02.

from the Turkish civil war. Let's bring you breaking news about the

:26:03.:26:07.

number of terror arrests in September. We are hearing from the

:26:08.:26:12.

Home Office that 315 terror suspects were arrested in the year to

:26:13.:26:16.

September, a record number. They say that is partly down to a major

:26:17.:26:20.

increase in the number of females detained. Looking at a breakdown of

:26:21.:26:25.

the figures, the number of women and girls detained more than doubled

:26:26.:26:31.

from 21 to 50. The number of under 18-year-olds arrested for terrorism

:26:32.:26:34.

related offences almost doubled from eight in the year ending September

:26:35.:26:39.

20 14th to 15th in the year ending this September -- the year ending

:26:40.:26:49.

September 2014. A record number, we will bring you more on that if we

:26:50.:26:51.

get it. Coming up: Why the education

:26:52.:26:55.

regulator is expected to say that more exam papers than ever

:26:56.:26:57.

were remarked this summer. If you commit a crime

:26:58.:27:00.

after the age of 17, you're treated as an adult

:27:01.:27:02.

by the authorities. There's little or none

:27:03.:27:04.

of the support that's given A committee of MPs is now looking

:27:05.:27:06.

at whether that should be the case, or if young adults need

:27:07.:27:11.

special treatment. We've been given exclusive access

:27:12.:27:12.

to an innovative project in south London which is already trying

:27:13.:27:15.

to help these offenders. Set up by police officers

:27:16.:27:19.

at Brixton police station, its aim is to stop them

:27:20.:27:22.

committing further crimes. This report is from

:27:23.:27:26.

Ashley John-Baptiste. Literally it was a couple

:27:27.:27:30.

of weeks after my birthday. I was having a drink,

:27:31.:27:38.

I threw a plastic bottle out I looked out of the window

:27:39.:27:40.

and I realised the man I could not speak a word in English

:27:41.:27:47.

but I understood he was upset. I was under the influence of alcohol

:27:48.:27:53.

so I went to the kitchen, Got into his car, and he was trying

:27:54.:27:56.

to call the police so I smashed I tried to stab him a few times,

:27:57.:28:10.

when he was sitting in his car. I can't really say, I don't

:28:11.:28:16.

remember how I did it, but I just know he suffered

:28:17.:28:22.

an injury in his shoulder. I was given a custodial

:28:23.:28:37.

sentence of four years. Prison for me at the age

:28:38.:28:40.

of 18 was really hard. The separation from my family,

:28:41.:29:02.

from my parents, it was hard to understand that now I am

:29:03.:29:06.

wasting my life in here sitting in a cell when I could have been

:29:07.:29:09.

studying, trying to get a job. Trying to do things that

:29:10.:29:13.

are positive to my life. But clearly, because of the choice

:29:14.:29:16.

that I made, now I am sitting Young adults are treated much

:29:17.:29:19.

like adult offenders but the evidence shows

:29:20.:29:26.

they are different. Recent research has found

:29:27.:29:28.

that they are still maturing, more challenging to manage,

:29:29.:29:32.

and crucially, more I went back to prison for the simple

:29:33.:29:34.

reasons that there was no support. I wanted to get a house,

:29:35.:29:49.

I wanted to get a job, I wanted to get an apprenticeship,

:29:50.:29:56.

I wanted to do something positive. But the reality is that there

:29:57.:29:59.

was nothing there and on top of it So if you turn up to a job interview

:30:00.:30:02.

the first thing they will look at is, do you have

:30:03.:30:07.

a criminal record? OK, well, let me give it to somebody

:30:08.:30:09.

else who has those things. People made the assumption

:30:10.:30:29.

because I am now older I should know And the reality is, that I wasn't

:30:30.:30:32.

aware of what I am doing, fully. So I needed support,

:30:33.:30:38.

I needed support in the sense of show me what's

:30:39.:30:41.

right, what's wrong. Or maybe not necessarily what's

:30:42.:30:42.

right and what's wrong, but how do I overcome the wrong

:30:43.:30:45.

to turn it into a right thing? This is often the first part

:30:46.:30:57.

of the journey for young adult offenders - an overnight

:30:58.:31:01.

stay in a police cell. A group of police officers

:31:02.:31:04.

here in Brixton, south London, have decided this is

:31:05.:31:07.

the crucial time to intervene. They have set up a radical

:31:08.:31:10.

new project to try and stop young We will go and speak to him,

:31:11.:31:13.

see if he wants to engage with us. If we can sit down with him we can

:31:14.:31:34.

find out what the story is. If he wants the help I am sure

:31:35.:31:37.

we can give it to him. This is a unique new scheme, to try

:31:38.:31:41.

and stop young adults reoffending. It targets anyone who is brought

:31:42.:31:44.

into custody here under the age of 25 and tries to get them a job

:31:45.:31:48.

when they are released. To help them find work

:31:49.:31:51.

when they are released We are just going to make our way

:31:52.:31:54.

down to cell seven. A young man called Abdi

:31:55.:31:58.

was brought in last night I understand you don't

:31:59.:32:00.

want to be on the camera However, not everyone

:32:01.:32:05.

wants their help. That's fine, I won't take up

:32:06.:32:09.

any more of your time, Do you remember my name's Anne-Marie

:32:10.:32:14.

and I am coordinating Are you still happy

:32:15.:32:40.

to talk? Do you remember when

:32:41.:32:43.

you was first arrested? But when he got arrested he pointed

:32:44.:32:55.

out, saying it was me. I'm just gonna you ask you a few

:32:56.:33:07.

questions about you and your interests, what sort

:33:08.:33:20.

of things you like doing, Are you into football,

:33:21.:33:23.

anything like that? OK, what sort of art and design,

:33:24.:33:30.

what do you like doing? Design peoples tattoos,

:33:31.:33:42.

design graphics, stuff like that. So why didn't you

:33:43.:33:50.

become a tattooist? So is that something that

:33:51.:33:52.

you would be interested in as well? You just had the consultation

:33:53.:34:01.

with Marcus, how did it go? It went really well,

:34:02.:34:09.

Marcus really opened up. Lots of potential, lots of interests

:34:10.:34:12.

I was tapping into and that I am going to develop and explore

:34:13.:34:17.

with Marcus later on. At this stage how hopeful

:34:18.:34:19.

are you that you can get him a job? I am 100% positive about that

:34:20.:34:24.

and I am very hopeful. Where do you think you would be

:34:25.:34:29.

without the lifeline It's the best thing I've

:34:30.:34:33.

heard since I've been To hear they will come and do that,

:34:34.:34:51.

it made me feel good. Now I feel like, if they do let me

:34:52.:34:58.

out I have someone I can speak Do you think this could be the end

:34:59.:35:02.

of your life of crime? These young adults that

:35:03.:35:09.

want to engage with us, when they engage with us and say

:35:10.:35:21.

they want to change, they have every chance

:35:22.:35:25.

of anybody else. We have young people

:35:26.:35:27.

that we arrest that can be brought If they want to engage

:35:28.:35:30.

with us they have got a lot Drug dealers know risk,

:35:31.:35:35.

they know business strategy When you tell them that,

:35:36.:35:39.

when you say that the line you are going down is wrong

:35:40.:35:45.

but the skills you have are right to be used in business and be used

:35:46.:35:48.

in other elements, they start There currently aren't any national

:35:49.:35:51.

programmes to deal with young adult offenders, meaning it's up to local

:35:52.:36:01.

services to take initiative. When you turn 18,

:36:02.:36:05.

that is pretty much it. Unless you are a serial offender

:36:06.:36:11.

there is not much else there for young people

:36:12.:36:14.

that make those mistakes Although we have only been

:36:15.:36:17.

going for six months what it has really proved is that this works

:36:18.:36:26.

and can fit anywhere else I've been arrested

:36:27.:36:29.

more than 50 times. Why have you been arrested

:36:30.:36:48.

so many times? Because crime is all

:36:49.:37:02.

I've known for a good - I have had jobs but they've never

:37:03.:37:06.

lasted. I've worked up to a month and lost

:37:07.:37:13.

jobs through drug abuse, Yeah, I don't know, I haven't got

:37:14.:37:16.

an exact answer Why do you think you're

:37:17.:37:24.

still getting arrested? Because I feel once you're

:37:25.:37:30.

in the system you're stuck. I feel like, once you've -

:37:31.:37:32.

maybe once or twice as a kid could have been swept away

:37:33.:37:37.

but when I got arrested so many times and was in and out of court

:37:38.:37:40.

so much, now if I got arrested for spitting on the floor I reckon

:37:41.:37:44.

I would be straight in court. Whereas if you or someone else that

:37:45.:37:47.

hasn't been arrested so much done it I just feel like it doesn't matter

:37:48.:37:50.

what I do, I'm stuck in that life. It's like a circle I can't

:37:51.:37:55.

get out of. Within two days of being out

:37:56.:38:02.

they have constantly been ringing my phone and try to get me

:38:03.:38:06.

to come and see them and that, so it does seem like they are trying

:38:07.:38:09.

to help me if I'm honest. Has that ever happened

:38:10.:38:13.

to you before? I've had help offered to me most

:38:14.:38:14.

of the times but it has always been And I have always said

:38:15.:38:20.

no, to be honest. But for some reason,

:38:21.:38:28.

something about these lot made me They've got me a job interview

:38:29.:38:31.

for a demolition job. And they are saying that if it goes

:38:32.:38:37.

through, like, well, it could take me around the world

:38:38.:38:40.

and that sort of stuff. How do you respond to the prospect

:38:41.:38:43.

of getting a job that could take Makes me feel happy,

:38:44.:38:48.

to be honest with you. Marcus, who was featured

:38:49.:39:17.

in our film, pleaded guilty He is now free to take

:39:18.:39:21.

up his offer from the magazine. The stakes are high for getting

:39:22.:39:31.

the right exam grades. For pupils it can mean

:39:32.:39:34.

the difference between gaining or missing out

:39:35.:39:36.

on a university place. For a school it can mean

:39:37.:39:38.

changes in league tables. But what happens if there are doubts

:39:39.:39:41.

over the accuracy of the marking? This morning we found out there's

:39:42.:40:01.

been an increase of 22 % which has led to 90,000 grades being changed.

:40:02.:40:03.

Let's talk now to Sam Wright, she had her English AS Level

:40:04.:40:07.

remarked from U to C this year, Steve Taylor, Chief Executive

:40:08.:40:11.

of the Cabot Learning Federation and Martin Lavelle, Headteacher

:40:12.:40:15.

Sam, you first of all, U to C, that must have been stressful while you

:40:16.:40:26.

were waiting for that to happen. Tell us about it? I didn't expect to

:40:27.:40:30.

it be regraded so when I was told it was being regraded I was happy about

:40:31.:40:34.

it because I was very upset to get the U at first and it was quite a

:40:35.:40:38.

shock. What were you expecting to get? I didn't think that the exam

:40:39.:40:42.

had gone amazing so I expected to get like at least a D but when it

:40:43.:40:46.

came back a U I was really upset about it. So what impact did it have

:40:47.:40:53.

on you in any potential choices? It meant that my university choices I

:40:54.:40:56.

had to lower them down because of that U, I couldn't apply to the ones

:40:57.:41:02.

that I wanted to. So I had to fine lower offering universities and

:41:03.:41:05.

things like that. Steve Taylor, Chief Executive of a group that runs

:41:06.:41:10.

14 academies. How can this be happening? First of all,

:41:11.:41:17.

congratulations to Sam on ending up with a grade she no doubt absolutely

:41:18.:41:22.

deserves. We look at the data and figures and we can be concerned

:41:23.:41:26.

about possible uncertainties in if system, but fundamentally on the

:41:27.:41:30.

other end, there are young people who've worked extremely hard over a

:41:31.:41:33.

period of time and it's absolutely right that there's an opportunity

:41:34.:41:37.

for schools to challenge where there may be a remark that could make a

:41:38.:41:42.

difference to someone's future. The number of challenges being made is

:41:43.:41:48.

increasing based on the new figures. Across your academies, what are you

:41:49.:41:51.

seeing? Are schools putting in more challenges with the schools you are

:41:52.:41:55.

working with? No, actually, ours have remained pretty consistent. The

:41:56.:41:58.

way it works is that we see that there are some pupils that have

:41:59.:42:03.

narrowly missed out on a grade that's either the one that'll get

:42:04.:42:06.

them on to their next course or the one we expected them to get and our

:42:07.:42:10.

perspective is, if you are the parent of that child, you are

:42:11.:42:14.

looking for someone to help you out, and if there's a chance to check,

:42:15.:42:17.

you would expect a school to do that and to help you do that. It's not

:42:18.:42:22.

something we plan for, we don't have an idea in advance of how many

:42:23.:42:27.

remarks there'll be, we want to make sure, especially after all of the

:42:28.:42:32.

work that's gone into supporting young people up to their exams that,

:42:33.:42:36.

they have the best possible chance of getting the right grade. Martin,

:42:37.:42:39.

do you have faith in the exam boards? I recognise what Steve's

:42:40.:42:44.

been saying and I am glad you have Sam here as well because as you have

:42:45.:42:52.

heard, at its heart of all this is a young person who's worked damn hard.

:42:53.:42:56.

I find it a bit of a situation at the moment, I don't have absolute

:42:57.:42:59.

faith in the exam system, no. There are pressures they are under, about

:43:00.:43:03.

the quality assurance of the marking which is done in the first place.

:43:04.:43:08.

There are concerns around the grading and the grade boundaries

:43:09.:43:11.

which seem to change after the exams have been sat by students. I think

:43:12.:43:17.

there are real issues. But equally, I think people just bat on and we

:43:18.:43:21.

don't panic, we do what Steve said, look at the students who are within

:43:22.:43:28.

a mark or two and worth checking but it's a concern. Are you putting many

:43:29.:43:32.

pupils forward and, I guess if they are not being put forward, they'll

:43:33.:43:36.

be maybe thinking, hang on, when you hear about a U to a C, even a U to

:43:37.:43:42.

an A we have heard about, a loot of people might be thinking, maybe

:43:43.:43:46.

these things should be put in as a matter of routine? I don't think we

:43:47.:43:52.

are rushing to put people in because at the end of the day it costs money

:43:53.:43:56.

and if you are not successful you can end up with a big bill, we are

:43:57.:44:00.

talking tens of thousands of pounds. It's a big industry. Tell us more

:44:01.:44:06.

about what you mean by that? Well, I think what you will find at this

:44:07.:44:10.

time of year, head teachers across the country looking at the grades

:44:11.:44:14.

will have real concerns. I've been at a meeting with Enfield's head

:44:15.:44:18.

teachers where concerns have been raised about the quality of marking,

:44:19.:44:22.

about the incredible changes in some subjects which just weren't

:44:23.:44:26.

expected, you have experienced teachers who've done nothing

:44:27.:44:28.

different and certain think grades have plummeted but it's a case of

:44:29.:44:34.

looking at that. We are in a bit of a - sorry I'm digressing - but we

:44:35.:44:40.

are in a perfect storm. Schools are under pressure, with massive changes

:44:41.:44:43.

to the curriculum. We are having to look at how we cope with budget cuts

:44:44.:44:48.

in real terms of maybe 7% because we are having a stand still budget, but

:44:49.:44:54.

we have got to find money to pay for national insurance et cetera. There

:44:55.:44:58.

are sort of cold-hearted decisions which have to be made about what the

:44:59.:45:02.

priorities are. The priorities are always going to be the students,

:45:03.:45:06.

it's got to be the outcomes, they get one chance at a decent life and

:45:07.:45:11.

education, and we just have to make sure that somehow we are bouncing

:45:12.:45:17.

all these things and ensuring that the young people come out with their

:45:18.:45:23.

deserved results at the end -- balancing all those things.

:45:24.:45:29.

Let's catch up with the very latest weather update with Carol.

:45:30.:45:32.

Good morning. We have seen a huge amount of rain

:45:33.:45:46.

in the last 24 hours. Quite a difference in the amount of rain we

:45:47.:45:50.

have had on the coastline compared to inland. 12 millimetres there in

:45:51.:46:00.

the last 24 hours. Much more than that, 42 millimetres and 68

:46:01.:46:04.

millimetres, inland. A lot of rain in a short amount of time,

:46:05.:46:09.

especially when the ground is saturated.

:46:10.:46:12.

Today, we are looking at further rain showers moving south. But it is

:46:13.:46:16.

winter and we are seeing snow as well. One of our weather watchers

:46:17.:46:20.

sent in this picture from the Highlands this morning. We had a

:46:21.:46:25.

line of showers going through, we should not be surprised to see snow,

:46:26.:46:30.

it is winter! The temperature was one Celsius. In stark contrast as we

:46:31.:46:34.

can further south, and even now further south, temperatures in

:46:35.:46:36.

double figures. The weather is all over the place.

:46:37.:46:41.

So it will not be a white Christmas? If I knew that I would be straight

:46:42.:46:48.

to the bookies! Today, we have got rain, the rain

:46:49.:46:52.

that affected parts of England this morning is continuing its descent

:46:53.:46:55.

south eastwards and you can see what has been happening in the last six

:46:56.:47:00.

hours or. Behind it, and line of showers there, that what produces

:47:01.:47:04.

the snow across Carrbridge and Aviemore, for example. As we go

:47:05.:47:09.

through the course of the day, the rain comes out and you can see the

:47:10.:47:12.

line of demarcation between the mild area in the south and the cold as

:47:13.:47:17.

flooding in behind it. Temperatures roughly around five Celsius behind

:47:18.:47:21.

the band of rain. Locally lower than that and ahead of it's still in

:47:22.:47:26.

double figures. ", We have got the rain is slowly making its journey

:47:27.:47:30.

south eastwards, still windy ahead of it, a lot of cloud and drizzle.

:47:31.:47:35.

Behind it, I returned to sunshine and showers. Some of the showers

:47:36.:47:38.

will be happy and thundery with Hale, someone merge, giving heavier

:47:39.:47:42.

downpours, and some of the downpours across Scotland will the wing

:47:43.:47:46.

trimmer is even at lower levels but most will tend to be in the hills

:47:47.:47:51.

and mountains -- across Scotland will be wintry. Equally, a lot of

:47:52.:48:00.

dry weather around and some sunshine. Here is the line of rain

:48:01.:48:04.

from the south-west, through the Midlands, into East Anglia. The far

:48:05.:48:08.

south-eastern corner hangs to the dry conditions. By the time we get

:48:09.:48:12.

to 3pm, the rain should have cleared Wales and it will be colder but also

:48:13.:48:16.

brighter. Through the evening and overnight, the rain makes it down to

:48:17.:48:20.

the south, for a time it will dry in the south-west apart from a few

:48:21.:48:23.

showers but by the end of the night more rain coming back in from the

:48:24.:48:26.

south-west across the southern counties. Back into the cold air,

:48:27.:48:31.

there will be some clear skies and some frost around tonight, and still

:48:32.:48:36.

those showers. Once again on higher ground they are likely to fall

:48:37.:48:39.

asleep or snow but the heavier showers they have some of that at

:48:40.:48:45.

lower levels. Tomorrow, the weather front will be in the south but you

:48:46.:48:49.

can see how it is starting to turn around and Saturday will come back

:48:50.:48:54.

in our direction. On Friday, while we have another weather front in the

:48:55.:48:57.

north, we will see rain at both ends of the country. Here is the cloud

:48:58.:49:03.

and rain, breezy conditions across southern counties for a time, that

:49:04.:49:07.

will move away leaving showers. North, another weather front

:49:08.:49:12.

producing outbreaks of rain and some of that being wintry, more

:49:13.:49:17.

especially on higher ground. In between, some sunshine. Not a bad

:49:18.:49:20.

day although it will feel cold anywhere from East Anglia, through

:49:21.:49:24.

the Midlands and into Wales. Temperature levels only four in

:49:25.:49:29.

Aberdeen to highs of around 13 as we pushed down to the Channel Islands.

:49:30.:49:36.

Welcome to the programme if you've just joined us.

:49:37.:49:40.

The debate continues on where to build a new airport

:49:41.:49:45.

runway but the Government's decision could be delayed for another six

:49:46.:49:48.

months, a move businesses claim could cost billions.

:49:49.:49:50.

David Cameron's expected to make an announcement this evening.

:49:51.:49:52.

Some of the world's biggest tobacco businesses are taking

:49:53.:49:54.

It's over new rules which will mean all branding, logos and trademarks

:49:55.:49:59.

Health officials want plain packaging to be used instead.

:50:00.:50:06.

We have exclusive access to a programme to help stop young

:50:07.:50:09.

adults who have been in prison from reoffending.

:50:10.:50:11.

Often they don't qualify for the support given to youth

:50:12.:50:14.

offenders - we'll be finding out why.

:50:15.:50:22.

If they do let me on, I have got someone I can speak to, try to get

:50:23.:50:29.

me into it. Do you think this could be the end to the life of crime?

:50:30.:50:32.

Yes. The Polish Prime Minister has told

:50:33.:50:45.

David Cameron she does not CIA to eye with him on curbing benefits for

:50:46.:50:51.

migrants from the European Union. Mr Cameron is in Warsaw to try to win

:50:52.:50:54.

backing for the reforms he wants before a promised referendum on

:50:55.:50:56.

Britain's's membership of the EU. A Syrian woman and all seven

:50:57.:51:05.

of her children have drowned as they attempted to cross

:51:06.:51:07.

the Aegean Sea, from Turkey They had been fleeing

:51:08.:51:10.

Islamic State militants. The only member of the family

:51:11.:51:12.

to survive was the children's father, who has warned other Syrians

:51:13.:51:15.

not to make leave the country. TRANSLATION: I had the most

:51:16.:51:24.

affectionate wife, I took my family out of Syria to escape the killing.

:51:25.:51:29.

My children could have had a future in Europe. Now I have lost my

:51:30.:51:35.

family, my world. What is your message to other Syrians who want to

:51:36.:51:40.

make the same journey? I would say, don't take this risk. Don't go by

:51:41.:51:46.

sea. You will lose your children. The smugglers are traitors, they

:51:47.:51:50.

said we would reach Greece within 15 minutes. I advise everyone, don't

:51:51.:51:55.

come, stay in Syria, however difficult it is.

:51:56.:51:58.

There's been more floods misery for parts of Cumbria and Lancashire.

:51:59.:52:01.

In one village, Glenridding, the river overtopped its banks

:52:02.:52:03.

People have been moved to safety overnight.

:52:04.:52:06.

The Army, fire crews and mountain rescue teams have all been called

:52:07.:52:09.

There has been a big increase in the number of requests to remaster GCSE

:52:10.:52:22.

and A-level according to the exam regulator. The proportion of results

:52:23.:52:24.

that were changed has actually dropped slightly.

:52:25.:52:26.

French prosecutors open an investigation into the decision

:52:27.:52:33.

over who'll host the 2021 World Athletics championship.

:52:34.:52:35.

It's gone to the US city of Eugene, which is closely linked

:52:36.:52:38.

The new president of athletics' governing body, Lord Coe,

:52:39.:52:44.

who was until recently a Nike paid ambassador, has denied

:52:45.:52:47.

NHS England has published performance data for England,

:52:48.:52:55.

showing key target for ambulance response times, A waiting, cancer

:52:56.:52:59.

care and diagnostic tests are still being missed. On many measures the

:53:00.:53:02.

figures are worse this year than this time last year and show a

:53:03.:53:08.

deterioration since September. The Government says it will robustly

:53:09.:53:11.

defend a compensation claim being made by one of the killers of

:53:12.:53:13.

Fusilier Lee Rigby. Michael Adebolajo alleges

:53:14.:53:15.

he was assaulted two years ago by officers at Belmarsh Prison

:53:16.:53:17.

while being restrained. A surrogate dog in the US has given

:53:18.:53:19.

birth to the world's first All seven pups, who have three sets

:53:20.:53:22.

of biological parents, are said to be healthy and doing

:53:23.:53:26.

well at Cornell University They were born after 19 embryos

:53:27.:53:29.

were transferred to the host Hello, thank you for

:53:30.:53:34.

joining us this morning. Welcome to the programme

:53:35.:53:39.

if you've just joined us. We're on BBC Two and the BBC News

:53:40.:53:44.

Channel until 11am this morning. Your contributions to this programme

:53:45.:53:48.

and your expertise really is key. Texts will be charged

:53:49.:53:51.

at the standard network rate. And of course you can watch

:53:52.:53:53.

the programme online wherever you are via the BBC News app

:53:54.:53:55.

or our website, bbc.co.uk/victoria. And you can also subscribe

:53:56.:53:58.

to all our features on the news app by going to 'add topics'

:53:59.:54:02.

and searching 'Victoria Derbyshire'. We will be hearing some of your

:54:03.:54:11.

comments on the stories we have covered in a few moments. First, the

:54:12.:54:15.

latest on the news we broke a little while ago that a record number of

:54:16.:54:19.

terror suspects were arrested in the year to September according to the

:54:20.:54:21.

latest Home Office figures. Our home affairs correspondent

:54:22.:54:23.

Danny Shaw is here. These are figures for England, Wales

:54:24.:54:31.

and Scotland in the year to be in the September. What they show is

:54:32.:54:36.

there were 315 terrorism related arrests, up by more than a third on

:54:37.:54:40.

the previous year. What is interesting about these figures is

:54:41.:54:44.

there has been a big increase in the number of girls and women who have

:54:45.:54:49.

been detained, that has gone up from 21 to 50. Still a small proportion

:54:50.:54:54.

of the total but increasing. The number of under 18s who have been

:54:55.:54:58.

arrested has gone up from eight to 15, almost doubled. In some ways

:54:59.:55:04.

this comes as no surprise, we know that the terrorism threat level is

:55:05.:55:07.

stuck at Sabia, which means an attack is highly likely. We know

:55:08.:55:10.

there has been a huge amount of activity by police following events

:55:11.:55:17.

abroad and concern here about people travelling to Syria to fight and so

:55:18.:55:22.

on. In someways this isn't a surprise, but it does show the scale

:55:23.:55:26.

of the police activity and the threat they face. What happens to

:55:27.:55:30.

those people once they are arrested, the figures provide some indication.

:55:31.:55:35.

39% were charged with an offence, usually a terrorism related offence.

:55:36.:55:41.

22% released on police bail, 37% released without any charges. A

:55:42.:55:47.

significant proportion of those arrested do not face any action at

:55:48.:55:50.

all from the police. Is it possible to read much behind

:55:51.:55:54.

these figures in terms of other more people are being radicalised or

:55:55.:55:58.

whether it is that the security services are getting a better grip

:55:59.:56:02.

on being able to monitor what is going on?

:56:03.:56:05.

It is probably a bit of both. We have heard from counterterrorism

:56:06.:56:09.

officials that there is increasing concern about radicalisation, but it

:56:10.:56:13.

also may be that the police counterterrorism agencies do have a

:56:14.:56:16.

stronger grip on what is going on out there. We know that seven plots

:56:17.:56:26.

have been boiled over the last year, there were arrests last week,

:56:27.:56:28.

charges this week. This is something going on every day, every week. The

:56:29.:56:31.

resources for counterterrorism are protected by the Government, so

:56:32.:56:34.

there will be more officers recruited by the police, certainly

:56:35.:56:37.

by the security agencies as well, to deal with the threat.

:56:38.:56:38.

Thank you. Let's catch up with all

:56:39.:56:41.

the sport now and join Hugh. Olivier Giroud scored a hat-trick

:56:42.:56:47.

to complete Arsenal's great escape and take them through to the last 16

:56:48.:56:54.

of the Champions League. After losing their opening two group

:56:55.:56:58.

games, they needed to beat Olympiakos by two clear goals

:56:59.:57:01.

in Athens, or they would fail to reach the knock-out

:57:02.:57:03.

stage for the first time. But Giroud's first hat-trick

:57:04.:57:06.

for Arsenal made sure they'll be Chelsea finished top of their group

:57:07.:57:09.

with a 2-0 victory over So all smiles at the top

:57:10.:57:21.

of the game, but what about amateur players and the kids

:57:22.:57:31.

just starting out? Are the costs involved too much

:57:32.:57:33.

for families at a time Well, they are putting ?260 million

:57:34.:57:38.

into coaching and pitches Their director of development

:57:39.:57:46.

and participation, Kellie Simmons, It is an ambitious plan to change

:57:47.:58:02.

pictures like this all over the country. Since the football

:58:03.:58:06.

foundation started, there has been nearly three quarters of ?1 billion

:58:07.:58:10.

invested into facilities, there are some fantastic ones across the

:58:11.:58:13.

country but still some like this, we need to turn that around. We are

:58:14.:58:18.

arresting in 3G pitches so that children can play-on high-quality

:58:19.:58:23.

services, train and high-quality surfaces, and that suits adults who

:58:24.:58:26.

want to play midweek and after work, so it is important to get that

:58:27.:58:30.

across the country. But there are those who say the extra costs, there

:58:31.:58:34.

are teams folding up and down the country because of the running costs

:58:35.:58:38.

of clubs like this. Is there a support network for the clubs and

:58:39.:58:42.

families to keep kids participating in sport? Children's football is

:58:43.:58:47.

flourishing, we have had 5000 additional children's teams across

:58:48.:58:56.

the country in the last four years alone, mini soccer is thriving.

:58:57.:58:58.

There is support, what I would say to parents is to look on the website

:58:59.:59:01.

to find their local clubs, high-quality, free coaching

:59:02.:59:03.

available for young children, and we support clubs to get the costs down

:59:04.:59:08.

through free kit, grunts, education, there is a range of support. That is

:59:09.:59:17.

as well as the big facility grants. What about those who drop out of the

:59:18.:59:20.

game, children and apples, is there a support network aside from the

:59:21.:59:25.

money for coaching and pitches to make sure they stay in the game?

:59:26.:59:30.

There is a range of support. Through the clubs, we know children tend to

:59:31.:59:34.

drop out at 14, 15, 16, not just from football but team sport

:59:35.:59:39.

generally. A range of programmes in schools, colleges, further education

:59:40.:59:42.

to keep them involved in the game whilst they might be studying and

:59:43.:59:45.

have other pressures. A different problem just the 11 aside game for

:59:46.:59:50.

those who cannot commit to the nine-month season, midweek leagues,

:59:51.:59:58.

walking football for old people, there is a range of options

:59:59.:00:02.

available. Have a look on the website, talk to the county football

:00:03.:00:05.

Association, there are ways for everybody to get involved. Thank you

:00:06.:00:08.

for joining us, it will be good to see how the plan is delivered over

:00:09.:00:09.

the next four years. The Olympic long jump champion

:00:10.:00:17.

Greg Rutherford says he did pull out of the BBC Sports Personality

:00:18.:00:20.

of the Year awards show in the wake of comments from fellow

:00:21.:00:23.

nominee Tyson Fury, Rutherford, who's also the world,

:00:24.:00:25.

Commonwealth and European champion, took exception to controversial

:00:26.:00:28.

comments made by the world heavyweight champion

:00:29.:00:30.

on a range of topics. But he said he decided to attend

:00:31.:00:35.

the show on December 20th to make his family proud and thank

:00:36.:00:38.

them for their support. That is all the sport by now, I will

:00:39.:00:40.

have the headlines at 10:30am. Should we expand Heathrow airport,

:00:41.:00:45.

or is Gatwick the better option? The Government was due to make that

:00:46.:00:48.

decision before Christmas, but this week it emerged

:00:49.:00:51.

that this could get delayed We're expecting a decision from

:00:52.:00:55.

the Prime Minister this evening. The potential delay has been

:00:56.:01:00.

criticised by his political opponents, who feel he's manouvering

:01:01.:01:04.

himself out of a tricky situation. We can go now to our

:01:05.:01:07.

Political Guru Norman Smith Let's be honest, this is longest

:01:08.:01:26.

running saga in British politics. It's been dragging on since the

:01:27.:01:30.

1960s, since we last won the World Cup, since Harold Wilson was Prime

:01:31.:01:34.

Minister when he set up a commission just like David Cameron to look at

:01:35.:01:37.

where to build another runway or another airport in the south-east of

:01:38.:01:42.

England. What happened? Well, the Commission reported and the report

:01:43.:01:45.

got chucked in the bin and nothing happened and here we are years later

:01:46.:01:52.

after innumerable investigations, inquiries and commissions and

:01:53.:01:55.

nothing's happened. So will today be the day when David Cameron finally

:01:56.:02:01.

decides? Well, making the case for Heathrow leading the charge is the

:02:02.:02:08.

Chancellor. Now, Mr Osborne is backed by big business, he's backed

:02:09.:02:11.

by the Scottish Government, he's backed by many of the smaller

:02:12.:02:16.

airports in Birmingham and elsewhere which have hub connections with

:02:17.:02:20.

Heathrow, but basically, the Chancellor's argument is that it

:02:21.:02:24.

would be a huge boost to the British economy. There have been estimates

:02:25.:02:29.

that over the next 50 years it could create something like 70,000 jobs,

:02:30.:02:32.

boost the economy by around ?200 billion. Against him, is the man who

:02:33.:02:39.

could be his rival for the Tory leadership once Mr Cameron goes.

:02:40.:02:45.

Boris Johnson. He is leading the charge against Heathrow. Now, the

:02:46.:02:50.

Mayor of London argues that Heathrow is just in the wrong place because

:02:51.:02:57.

it means more flights going over poor old Londoners to reach

:02:58.:03:02.

Heathrow, and that, he says, will mean more pollution, more noise,

:03:03.:03:09.

more houses blighted. So he has said that if Mr Cameron gives the

:03:10.:03:13.

go-ahead to a third runway, he'd lie down in front of the bulldozers to

:03:14.:03:18.

stop it. So what does Mr Cameron do? Well, would he say yes? Well, he

:03:19.:03:21.

might do, because there's a lot of big beast in the Tory party, people

:03:22.:03:28.

like William Hague saying for heavens sake, just agree to give

:03:29.:03:31.

Heathrow the go ahead. He might do because if he doesn't there are

:03:32.:03:35.

concerns that international airports will overtake Heathrow as the major

:03:36.:03:46.

hub airport. PROBLEM WITH SOUND

:03:47.:03:50.

Might he say no? Well, Mr Cameron might say no, because if he does

:03:51.:03:55.

give it the go-ahead, he risks potential Civil War in the Tory

:03:56.:04:01.

party. Not just Boris Johnson, but the current Tory candidate for

:04:02.:04:07.

Mayor, Zach Goldsmith's threatened to force a by-election if Mr Cameron

:04:08.:04:13.

gave the go ahead to a third runway. There's the possibility of

:04:14.:04:16.

resignations from the Cabinet too, from people like Justine Greening,

:04:17.:04:20.

so he might not want a Civil War. But there's a personal reason why I

:04:21.:04:25.

think Mr Cameron might be very, very cautious. Have a look at this. This

:04:26.:04:32.

is an election leaflet from the last election and look at Mr Cameron's

:04:33.:04:38.

pledge on that when he said, "no ifs, no buts, no third runway" at

:04:39.:04:46.

Heathrow. So what is going to happen today when ministers meet? David

:04:47.:04:50.

Cameron will be sitting in the chair to decide what to do. My guess is it

:04:51.:04:56.

could be our old friend Fudgurama. In other words, Mr Cameron may sell,

:04:57.:05:01.

well we think Heathrow's got an awfully good case but perhaps they

:05:02.:05:05.

need a bit more time to make sure they've taken account of all the

:05:06.:05:09.

environmental concerns so tell you what, why don't we put it off for

:05:10.:05:13.

another six months before we reach another final decision and by the

:05:14.:05:18.

way, after the Mayoral elections after London and therefore hopefully

:05:19.:05:22.

in Mr Cameron's view avoiding a Civil War. Do you think that we'd

:05:23.:05:27.

definitely get a decision in six months if that's what happened? No

:05:28.:05:31.

is the truth. There is a view that Mr Cameron might not want to take

:05:32.:05:35.

this decision at all during this Parliament. When you talk to some

:05:36.:05:40.

people around Boris Johnson, they say, well, we think what is going to

:05:41.:05:44.

happen is Mr Cameron will put it off for six months saying there are

:05:45.:05:50.

issues around noise pollution, night flights, transport, and that

:05:51.:05:52.

Heathrow simply won't be able to come up with an answer to all those

:05:53.:05:56.

problems in six months. In fact, it will take more like two years and

:05:57.:06:00.

then they'll have had to redraw and redraft their plans so much they'll

:06:01.:06:04.

pretty much have to go back to square one and there'll have to be a

:06:05.:06:12.

whole new planling process in two years and guess what, Mr Cameron is

:06:13.:06:18.

not even Prime Minister then. So we are in for fudgurama or long grass!

:06:19.:06:23.

We'll talk about it in a moment with our guests. A quick word for you on

:06:24.:06:28.

an urgent question in the Commons later on unexpected hospital deaths.

:06:29.:06:32.

What are you expecting? Yes, we have been covering that this morning

:06:33.:06:37.

which is indications that the southern Health Authority which

:06:38.:06:40.

basically covers Hampshire, one of the largest Mental Health Trusts in

:06:41.:06:47.

the UK, has basically presided over a catalogue of failures in terms of

:06:48.:06:52.

investigating the deaths of patients and reports suggest over the past

:06:53.:06:56.

four years or so, there may have been more than 1,000 deaths which

:06:57.:07:01.

have not been properly investigated. Now, obviously, if that is true,

:07:02.:07:04.

that would be a major scandal. Labour have now secured an urgent

:07:05.:07:09.

statement in the Commons in the next half hour when they are going to be

:07:10.:07:13.

pressing, not just over what has happened, but how much confidence

:07:14.:07:18.

patients using the southern Health Authority can have now that things

:07:19.:07:23.

are being done properly. Also question marks about the board,

:07:24.:07:28.

about whether they should stay in place and also what sort of measures

:07:29.:07:31.

are going to be put in place to make sure this can't happen again. One

:07:32.:07:35.

interesting thing, I was just listening to the Care Minister in

:07:36.:07:38.

the last Government, Norman lamb, who was saying this morning he was

:07:39.:07:43.

completelyoblivious, didn't know, he wasn't told what was happening in

:07:44.:07:46.

this Health Trust. Thank you, Norman. I said we'd talk

:07:47.:07:53.

to a Tory MP and London's candidate former, they are joining me in the

:07:54.:07:57.

studio now, Bob Stuart and Sadiq Khan, thank you very much for coming

:07:58.:08:02.

in both of you. Sadiq Khan, Heathrow, Gatwick, do you think this

:08:03.:08:06.

is being kicked into the long grass potentially because of Zac Goldsmith

:08:07.:08:10.

and the political headache? Any decision to delay whether he

:08:11.:08:13.

increase airport capacity may be good for the internal politics of

:08:14.:08:16.

the Conservative Party, but it's bad news for London, the south-east and

:08:17.:08:20.

our country. The Government's got to decide. I'm in favour of a new

:08:21.:08:24.

runway at Gatwick Airport. You are now? The case has been made for the

:08:25.:08:31.

increased flight capacity. The reason why Heathrow is a bad idea

:08:32.:08:37.

is, last year alone, almost 10,000 Londoners died because of air

:08:38.:08:41.

quality. There are children in parts of London whose lungs are

:08:42.:08:45.

under-developed. Early this year, the UK Supreme Court held that our

:08:46.:08:48.

air was in breach of the air quality directive. So the air in London is a

:08:49.:08:53.

killer, it makes you sick and it's illegal. Those circumstances are not

:08:54.:08:56.

in favour of Heathrow, but I do think the case has been made for a

:08:57.:09:01.

new runway at Gatwick. It will be cheaper, lead to jobs and growth but

:09:02.:09:05.

it will provide competition for Heathrow to be better rather than

:09:06.:09:09.

bigger. You had a conversion this year didn't you, you used to be

:09:10.:09:14.

supporting Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith said it's about as authentic as

:09:15.:09:18.

Donald Trump's hair? He should check his facts. In 2009 I was in favour

:09:19.:09:23.

of increased flight capacity as I am now. The facts have changed and I'm

:09:24.:09:28.

not scared to change my mind if the facts change. Last year 10,000 died,

:09:29.:09:33.

children's lungs underdeveloped and the Supreme Court this April said

:09:34.:09:36.

the air was unlawful. Experts say if we stay as we are, we can't meet our

:09:37.:09:42.

air quality obligations, that's before the runway at Heathrow

:09:43.:09:46.

Airport. Cameron should say yes to Gatwick, no to Heathrow and let's

:09:47.:09:52.

get on with it. Why isn't he making a decision Bob Stuart? Probably for

:09:53.:09:57.

the run we have just rehearsed, that it's politically difficult at the

:09:58.:10:01.

moment. When won't it be? It's always going to be politically

:10:02.:10:05.

difficult and right now we have got the Mayoral election. I think

:10:06.:10:10.

Sadiq's right, it's very political now. The reporter suggested

:10:11.:10:17.

Heathrow, the Davies Report has suggested Heathrow, but a lot of

:10:18.:10:20.

people think that's wrong and a lot of people matter and we live in a

:10:21.:10:26.

democracy. If a lot of people feel, regardless of the report, I don't

:10:27.:10:30.

want these aeroplanes coming over my house, I think it's dangerous and

:10:31.:10:36.

there's air quality stuff, therefore I object, and frankly, politicians

:10:37.:10:41.

have got to listen to that. Under the circumstances, if we have really

:10:42.:10:45.

got to make a decision now, there'll be far less objection if it was in

:10:46.:10:50.

favour of Gatwick. Does it come down to nimbyism a lot

:10:51.:10:56.

of the time? Well, the numbers of people affected by noise under

:10:57.:10:59.

Heathrow is more than the numbers of people affected by the noise in

:11:00.:11:03.

Paris Amsterdam, Brussels and Madrid added together. So if Cameron and

:11:04.:11:08.

the Government say yes to Heathrow, there'll be legal challenges taking

:11:09.:11:12.

many, many, many years, yes to jobs, yes to growth, yes to increased

:11:13.:11:16.

flight capacity and you can do it by expanding Gatwick. The numbers

:11:17.:11:22.

affected by noise is a fraction, 30,000 versus 800,000, the air

:11:23.:11:25.

quality issues aren't there, they are not breaching the directives. We

:11:26.:11:29.

create jobs in that part of the country, it's a win-win and I would

:11:30.:11:33.

say to David Cameron and to George Osborne, internal Party Politics all

:11:34.:11:36.

well and good, think about the well-being of London, the south-east

:11:37.:11:39.

and our country. Is he damned if he does, damned if

:11:40.:11:44.

he doesn't and therefore goes back to what Norman was saying, it's most

:11:45.:11:48.

likely in the end potentially to keep getting kicked further into the

:11:49.:11:53.

long grass? I think that is a perfect description, damned if he

:11:54.:11:56.

does, damned if he doesn't and could well be put into the long grass. I

:11:57.:12:01.

think I agree with Sadiq that decisions should be made and, under

:12:02.:12:04.

the circumstances, with all the objections, with all the reports and

:12:05.:12:10.

with all the pressure to try and get London a really good airport system

:12:11.:12:15.

it's probably going to have to be Gatwick, let's get on with it and do

:12:16.:12:20.

it. Bear in mind that probably we'll need more capacity in that in the

:12:21.:12:23.

lifetime, well perhaps in your lifetime, maybe not in mine. We'll

:12:24.:12:30.

need more capacity if we are to be continuing to be such a

:12:31.:12:33.

world-leading city and, at the moment, we are at Bushing point and

:12:34.:12:34.

we've got to do something about moment, we are at Bushing point and

:12:35.:12:38.

The buck has been passed over so many years. What would you say if a

:12:39.:12:48.

decision isn't taken in six months. Norman was kind and diplomatic in

:12:49.:12:54.

his language. I'm persuaded there is an argument for increased capacity,

:12:55.:12:58.

Mr Goldsmith isn't. We should bite the bullet and go with Gatwick. I'm

:12:59.:13:02.

in favour of reconsidering expanding city airport, Boris Johnson ruled

:13:03.:13:06.

that out, but we have got to invest in high speed. High speed II is

:13:07.:13:09.

important, we have got to think about III. I'm if favour of a cross

:13:10.:13:14.

rail II. I was the minister in charge of cross rail I. We need to

:13:15.:13:19.

think about cross rail III. Think about the trams, improving the

:13:20.:13:24.

trains, a generation of new buses, hybrid and electric. We have to

:13:25.:13:27.

think about being green but also having jobs, growth and being

:13:28.:13:32.

sustainable. There is a huge runway in the south-east that could be used

:13:33.:13:35.

but the fact of the matter is, if we are really going to sort out our

:13:36.:13:40.

airport capacity, a decision does have to be made and, if people

:13:41.:13:46.

really object to Heathrow, beyond the fact of the report, including

:13:47.:13:49.

the fact of air quality, we have actually got to make a decision. It

:13:50.:13:54.

seems to me, based on those factors, that Gatwick is probably an option

:13:55.:13:58.

that we could actually accept all round. Equally, I think that at some

:13:59.:14:03.

stage we are going to have to come back to the table and think how we

:14:04.:14:07.

get even more capacity for airports around London. Before I let you go,

:14:08.:14:12.

Donald Trump's hair was mentioned earlier in the discussion. Sadiq

:14:13.:14:16.

Khan, I want to get your views on him, whether you think he should be

:14:17.:14:22.

allowed into Britain, there is a petition with 350,000 people saying

:14:23.:14:26.

he shouldn't. I want to go to the Mayor of New York and talk about the

:14:27.:14:31.

housing crisis, I'll be stopped, I want to talk about creating jobs and

:14:32.:14:34.

entrepreneurship, I'm be stopped from doing so because I happen to be

:14:35.:14:38.

a Muslim. There are many Muslims from around the world who love

:14:39.:14:43.

America like I do but who will be stopped from going there to visit

:14:44.:14:49.

families and on holiday. His views are outrageous and divisive and I

:14:50.:14:53.

hope he loses badly. Are the views enough to get him banned from

:14:54.:14:56.

Britain? I would like him to come here so I can introduce him to

:14:57.:15:01.

Muslims like myself who 're tolerant and respectable. There are no no-go

:15:02.:15:06.

areas in London. I'm in favour of debating him, showing him how wrong

:15:07.:15:11.

he is, proving what a bafoon he is. He's got to recognise his views lead

:15:12.:15:16.

to people thinking all Muslims may be terrorist, thinking Muslims are

:15:17.:15:21.

like that, and that is why his views are divisive. I want to educate him,

:15:22.:15:24.

I want him to realise the follies of his ways so when he loses the

:15:25.:15:29.

Republican race and hopefully loses the presidential race, I'm looking

:15:30.:15:33.

forward to educating him and giving him a tutorage in being able to be a

:15:34.:15:38.

good citizen. What if he keeps going, is he fit to be President?

:15:39.:15:41.

That's for the American people to decide. I have huge respect for the

:15:42.:15:47.

Americans. Democracy, we'll have to see which way the cards fall,

:15:48.:15:55.

obviously my personal views are, if people vote for this guy, that's the

:15:56.:16:01.

choice they have made. I want them to recognise that proud Muslims have

:16:02.:16:07.

died serving our countries. We have multiple identitied, British,

:16:08.:16:09.

Muslim, South Londoner, a husband and a father, you know, you are not

:16:10.:16:14.

recognised and defined simply by your faith and his comments have

:16:15.:16:18.

caused huge offence to non-Muslims as well. Would the passports have

:16:19.:16:23.

"Muslim written on them? ! Them?!". Still to come before

:16:24.:16:28.

11am: Staying put - Donald Trump insists he'll never

:16:29.:16:32.

pull out of the US Presidential race, despite an avalanche

:16:33.:16:34.

of criticism from politicians and the media after he called

:16:35.:16:36.

for a temporary ban Some of the world's biggest tobacco

:16:37.:16:39.

businesses are taking It's over new rules which will mean

:16:40.:16:44.

all branding, logos and trademarks Health officials want plain

:16:45.:16:48.

packaging to be used instead. The Polish Prime Minister has told

:16:49.:17:02.

David Cameron that she does not see eye to eye with him on curbing

:17:03.:17:07.

benefits for migrants Mr Cameron is in Warsaw

:17:08.:17:10.

to try to win backing for the reforms he wants before

:17:11.:17:15.

a promised referendum NHS England has published

:17:16.:17:17.

performance data for the health It shows key targets

:17:18.:17:25.

for ambulance response times, A waiting, cancer care

:17:26.:17:28.

and diagnostic tests On many measures the figures

:17:29.:17:29.

are worse than this time last year and show a deterioration

:17:30.:17:33.

since September. A record 315 terror suspects

:17:34.:17:40.

were arrested in the year to September, driven in part

:17:41.:17:42.

by a major increase in the number of females detained,

:17:43.:17:45.

Home Office figures show. They accounted for around one in six

:17:46.:17:47.

of the total counter-terrorism arrests, a rise of 7%

:17:48.:17:50.

on the previous year. There's been a big increase

:17:51.:17:57.

in the number of requests to re-mark GCSEs and A-levels, says

:17:58.:18:00.

the exams watchdog Ofqual. There's also been a rise

:18:01.:18:05.

in the number of re-grades awarded. But the proportion of exam results

:18:06.:18:08.

that were changed has A Syrian woman and all seven

:18:09.:18:10.

of her children have drowned as they attempted to cross

:18:11.:18:14.

the Aegean Sea, from Turkey They had been fleeing

:18:15.:18:17.

Islamic State militants. The only member of the family

:18:18.:18:20.

to survive was the children's father, who has warned other Syrians

:18:21.:18:23.

not to make leave the country. TRANSLATION: I had the most

:18:24.:18:32.

affectionate wife. I took my family

:18:33.:18:36.

out of Syria to escape the killing. My children could have had

:18:37.:18:39.

a future in Europe. What is your message to other

:18:40.:18:42.

Syrians who want to make I would say, don't take this risk.

:18:43.:18:48.

Don't go by sea. The smugglers are traitors,

:18:49.:18:55.

they said we would reach I advise everyone, don't come -

:18:56.:19:00.

stay in Syria, however French prosecutors open

:19:01.:19:07.

an investigation into the decision over who'll host the 2021

:19:08.:19:19.

World Athletics championship. It's gone to the US city

:19:20.:19:22.

of Eugene, closely linked The new president of athletics'

:19:23.:19:25.

governing body, Lord Coe, who was until recently

:19:26.:19:34.

a Nike paid ambassador, has denied

:19:35.:19:36.

lobbying for the city. The Government says it

:19:37.:19:39.

will "robustly defend" a compensation claim being made

:19:40.:19:41.

by one of the killers Michael Adebolajo alleges

:19:42.:19:43.

he was assaulted by officers at Belmarsh Prison

:19:44.:19:46.

while being restrained. Let's catch up with

:19:47.:19:48.

all the sport now. The main headlines in sport this

:19:49.:19:50.

morning concern the Champions And thankfully the procession

:19:51.:19:52.

of two British clubs. Olivier Giroud was Arsenal's hero,

:19:53.:20:01.

with a hat-trick in their 3-0 win Chelsea finished top of their group

:20:02.:20:04.

with a 2-0 win over Porto at Stamford Bridge,to

:20:05.:20:09.

help ease the pressure Olympic long jump champion

:20:10.:20:10.

Greg Rutherford says he will stay as part of the Sports Personality

:20:11.:20:15.

of the Year shortlist because of it's importance

:20:16.:20:18.

to his family. He had wanted to be removed,

:20:19.:20:22.

after controversial comments I'll have more on BBC

:20:23.:20:25.

News throughout the day. Earlier in the programme,

:20:26.:20:36.

we showed you a film about an innovative new project

:20:37.:20:40.

developed by police in South London, to try to stop young adults

:20:41.:20:42.

who commit crimes from reoffending. It's run by officers

:20:43.:20:45.

and a group of volunteers, who try to find work for those

:20:46.:20:47.

who end up in custody. Here's our reporter

:20:48.:20:50.

Ashley John-Baptiste. We will go and speak to him,

:20:51.:20:51.

see if he wants to engage with us. If we can sit down with him we can

:20:52.:21:08.

find out what the story is. If he wants the help I am sure

:21:09.:21:12.

we can give it to him. This is a unique new scheme, to try

:21:13.:21:16.

and stop young adults reoffending. It targets anyone who is brought

:21:17.:21:22.

into custody here under the age of 25, and tries to get them a job

:21:23.:21:28.

when they are released. Are you still happy to talk?

:21:29.:21:31.

Yeah? I'm just gonna you ask you a few

:21:32.:21:35.

questions about you and your interests, what sort of things

:21:36.:21:56.

you like doing, what sort Are you into football,

:21:57.:21:59.

anything like that? OK, what sort of art and design,

:22:00.:22:05.

what do you like doing? There currently aren't any national

:22:06.:22:15.

programmes to deal with offenders So it's up to local services

:22:16.:22:36.

like this to take initiative. When you turn 18, that is

:22:37.:22:45.

pretty much it. Unless you are a serial offender

:22:46.:22:48.

there is not much else there for young people that make

:22:49.:22:50.

those mistakes the Though we have only been

:22:51.:22:53.

going for six months what it has really proved is that this works

:22:54.:23:03.

and can fit anywhere else Where do you think you would be

:23:04.:23:06.

without the lifeline of this It's the best thing I've

:23:07.:23:10.

heard since I've been To hear they will come and do that,

:23:11.:23:23.

it made me feel good. Do you think this could be the end

:23:24.:23:29.

of your life of crime? So how should 18 to 25-year-old

:23:30.:24:09.

offenders be dealt with in the criminal justice system?

:24:10.:24:12.

Here to discuss this further is the founder of the Divert scheme,

:24:13.:24:14.

And Steve Gillan, the general secretary of Prison Officer's

:24:15.:24:18.

We also have here two former offenders, Dario and Chelsea.

:24:19.:24:24.

Thank you all very much for coming in to talk to us. Dario, tell us

:24:25.:24:30.

about your experiences in the prison system. My first experience was a

:24:31.:24:36.

young offenders Institute at the age of 16, I was sentenced to 12 months,

:24:37.:24:45.

of which I served six. I came out of prison, reoffended, and re-entered

:24:46.:24:50.

the prison system for an offence of aggravated burglary, which I served

:24:51.:24:54.

nine years, that was my custodial term of which I served five. The

:24:55.:24:58.

aggravated burglary for which you were sentenced involved what? Taking

:24:59.:25:05.

a family hostage? We took the family hostage, we demanded large amounts

:25:06.:25:11.

of money, and we were later arrested within the vicinity of where the

:25:12.:25:14.

offence took place. At the time you were in the age group being

:25:15.:25:19.

discussed today. Would you say you should take adult responsibility for

:25:20.:25:23.

what you did? Definitely, I believe so, because we thought about it, we

:25:24.:25:28.

have to take responsibility for our actions. Yes, I think we should be

:25:29.:25:34.

treated as adults. Chelsea, you went to prison at 18. Tell us what that

:25:35.:25:37.

was for and what your experience was. That was during the riots, 2011

:25:38.:25:47.

riots. I was published all over the newspapers and the media are a lot

:25:48.:25:51.

and was portrayed in a way that I wasn't. In what way, how did you see

:25:52.:25:57.

yourself and how did you think people saw you? There was a story

:25:58.:26:02.

about me being an Olympic ambassador, but that was when I was

:26:03.:26:05.

in school, but it was released as if I was an ambassador at the time I

:26:06.:26:09.

committed the offence, and it got published in the newspapers, I was

:26:10.:26:14.

on ITV, BBC News, front pages, everywhere. The thing about that is

:26:15.:26:18.

that I was a young female, 18 years old, and what I committed was

:26:19.:26:25.

throwing missiles at a police car, with police officers inside will

:26:26.:26:29.

stop I was seen at the forefront of a large group of people, so I was

:26:30.:26:37.

seen as the leader of the pack. And that made it very public and a lot

:26:38.:26:40.

of people popped onto that because I was a female, I was young, and I was

:26:41.:26:45.

all over the newspapers. I felt like I was made an example of, and my

:26:46.:26:53.

offences, there were eight in the end, violent disorder, two counts,

:26:54.:26:58.

burglary, common assault, criminal damage, loads, and eventually I got

:26:59.:27:02.

sentenced to a two years two months in prison because I was also wearing

:27:03.:27:07.

a tag. You were in the age group the report is talking about, saying the

:27:08.:27:12.

tend to be people like you should be treated differently. What do you

:27:13.:27:14.

think about the way you were treated? Because I was put over the

:27:15.:27:20.

newspapers, I felt it had already given the judge... He would have

:27:21.:27:24.

made up his mind already before he even looked at me and had a

:27:25.:27:29.

chance... Obviously judges have to be open-minded, but your experience

:27:30.:27:32.

once you were behind bars, how did you see that? There are newspapers

:27:33.:27:38.

in presence and a lot of people did see it. First of all, officers felt

:27:39.:27:43.

they needed to talk to me about it because they felt people would come

:27:44.:27:47.

up to me and said things or attack me or whatever, but no one did

:27:48.:27:51.

because of the nature of my offence, it was against police officers, but

:27:52.:27:54.

the prison of this is did not take a liking to me because of the offence.

:27:55.:28:00.

Steve, you are general secretary of the prison Officers' Association. Do

:28:01.:28:04.

you have any sympathy over the weight 18 to 25-year-olds are

:28:05.:28:07.

treated in prison? Know, on the whole I think they are treated very

:28:08.:28:13.

well in prison. I thank Dario for his view in saying he should have

:28:14.:28:21.

been treated as an adult for the offence he did and he took

:28:22.:28:23.

responsibility for that, and that is what I am here to betray, that there

:28:24.:28:28.

was a problem within our prison system, 86,000 prisoners now, we saw

:28:29.:28:36.

the statistics from your earlier film about 14, 15,000 of them are 18

:28:37.:28:44.

to 25-year-olds. Once people are in the criminal justice system it is

:28:45.:28:50.

very difficult to turn them around, and where I believe that we need to

:28:51.:28:54.

intervene much earlier, before people get into that criminal

:28:55.:28:59.

justice system. Jack, you set up the scheme we featured in our report. Do

:29:00.:29:04.

you think that 18 to 25-year-old should be treated differently?

:29:05.:29:09.

Without a doubt. As soon as you turn 18, the system lets you go a bit.

:29:10.:29:15.

Between those ages, you haven't developed the majority to take on

:29:16.:29:21.

the risks that come into life and making those decisions. Dario said

:29:22.:29:25.

he felt at 18 he knew what he was doing, you did something violent, he

:29:26.:29:29.

was punished, he said he should have taken responsibility. Definitely,

:29:30.:29:33.

but your rain is not developed enough to take on risk, you need the

:29:34.:29:38.

added support. The first time Dario comes into police custody, he needs

:29:39.:29:43.

that one-to-one help to get him onto the right path to stop the tailspin

:29:44.:29:49.

from happening. Sometimes, when you are 18, you turn an adult, society

:29:50.:29:56.

expects you to completely take responsibility for what you are

:29:57.:29:59.

doing. Sometimes you need that extra help. Steve? I slightly disagree, I

:30:00.:30:05.

think 18 to 25-year-olds are adults. People make choices in life, some

:30:06.:30:10.

choose the wrong path. What I'm not failing is that you abandon people,

:30:11.:30:14.

because quite clearly Dario and Chelsea have turned their lives

:30:15.:30:18.

around, they have done that themselves. Others, they may want to

:30:19.:30:27.

go and assist others. But we have to look at the victims of crime as

:30:28.:30:31.

well, they are just as important as those that perpetrate crime, and I

:30:32.:30:37.

think we have got to have a root and branch review of how we deal with

:30:38.:30:41.

these issues in England and Wales, because we cannot continue doing

:30:42.:30:47.

what we're doing, because it is not working. The key is to start as

:30:48.:30:54.

early as possible. If you start at 80 you get the foundations right,

:30:55.:30:57.

fewer victims, fewer people coming into police custody, going to

:30:58.:31:02.

prison, less mental health, so there is no argument for how early you

:31:03.:31:05.

should start, the earlier the better, because if you stop the

:31:06.:31:09.

issues emerging then we don't get people coming into the system.

:31:10.:31:14.

Do you think there is a danger of them being treated differently.

:31:15.:31:27.

In each situation we have to treat everybody individually. Mario said,

:31:28.:31:31.

although I was an adult, I still needed some form of direction. I

:31:32.:31:35.

needed someone to guide my foot steps in. That circumstance,

:31:36.:31:37.

everybody is an individual. What I am if fave of is what the officer

:31:38.:31:44.

said. Prevention for me is better than the cure so we

:31:45.:31:46.

said. Prevention for me is better while we are at the police stations,

:31:47.:31:50.

Probation Services, we need to work a as a whole in order to just

:31:51.:31:54.

communicate with the young people and address the issues going on in

:31:55.:31:57.

their mind to see how we can move forward.

:31:58.:32:03.

Chelsea, you have southernth turned your life around -- you have turned

:32:04.:32:10.

your life around, but we were hearing for kids coming out of

:32:11.:32:15.

prison with a criminal record, it inevitably taints them. Have you

:32:16.:32:19.

found you have to fight to be able to progress? Initially yes, I felt

:32:20.:32:24.

like I had to fight because everyone remembered my face and stuff. It's

:32:25.:32:27.

about yourself as an individual. People can say stuff and put

:32:28.:32:32.

barriers up against you but if you have changed within your mindset and

:32:33.:32:37.

how you do things, you should be able to progress forward. For me

:32:38.:32:43.

having a criminal record hasn't stopped me getting jobs. I have a

:32:44.:32:48.

job and I do youth work which is really rewarding. There are

:32:49.:32:51.

obstacles but it's up to the individual to move forward and leave

:32:52.:32:57.

that behind. People might say, you are an ex-offender, but I'm just

:32:58.:33:00.

Chelsea now and ex-offenders in the past have moved forward and everyone

:33:01.:33:05.

that can see that I've moved forward and believed in my change have stuck

:33:06.:33:10.

to Chelsea as well but in order for someone to progress and progress

:33:11.:33:15.

against the obstacles, they need to move forward, forget the negatives,

:33:16.:33:19.

move forward with the positives, onwards and upwards. If you can do

:33:20.:33:22.

that within yourself, you have the ability to push all the negatives

:33:23.:33:26.

and the people and progress and you will get a job.

:33:27.:33:30.

Ava on Facebook, moaning about lack of support in prison, don't commit

:33:31.:33:37.

the crime then. Tweet from T 2 A alliance, commendable intervention

:33:38.:33:40.

by the Met police highlighted but system needs to support youngsters

:33:41.:33:44.

who're not motivated too. That's the issue isn't it, I guess,

:33:45.:33:49.

Jack, these two are sorted themselves out, but there'll be

:33:50.:33:52.

people who feel they can't for whatever reason? Without a doubt,

:33:53.:33:56.

definitely. Divert helps with that because we understand people aren't

:33:57.:33:59.

on that level of being employable yet so we have a range of really

:34:00.:34:04.

good partners, St Matthew's partnership in Brixton, Spear,

:34:05.:34:07.

Jack's foundation, to get people up to that level and to sort of get

:34:08.:34:12.

them from feeling there is no hope to actually being Dario and Chelsea

:34:13.:34:17.

and being in their position saying, I can do this. That can take a lot

:34:18.:34:22.

of time. I do recognise that and that's what Divert offers.

:34:23.:34:28.

Another text, it's clear reoffenders are not well educated and lack of

:34:29.:34:33.

education is the problem, more needs to be done, not more jail.

:34:34.:34:36.

Politicians should make their minds up. At which age a person is old

:34:37.:34:44.

enough to take action for their actions and they get no vote and no

:34:45.:34:51.

support. We shouldn't lower the voting age from a texter. Lot of

:34:52.:34:55.

texters bringing voting age into this debate. Chelsea, you are

:34:56.:34:59.

nodding, what were you thinking about in particular there? Just

:35:00.:35:02.

thinking some of the comments people are saying, there are some good ones

:35:03.:35:05.

and some that are just like, "really? " So what are the ones you

:35:06.:35:12.

would say "really? " You need to say it again because it's gone in my ear

:35:13.:35:16.

and I've thought, it's so pants I don't even want to listen to it. The

:35:17.:35:21.

ones that have said people aren't taking responsibility for

:35:22.:35:27.

themselves? Yes, I just think, 18-25, for me, when you go into

:35:28.:35:31.

prison, they class young offenders from 18-21, so you are a young

:35:32.:35:38.

offender, so although you may be 18-21 or 25, doesn't necessarily

:35:39.:35:43.

mean that you've committed an offence and should be punished in

:35:44.:35:46.

this way and that way because you are really bad, because people don't

:35:47.:35:51.

have the support on the outside to even realise they have made

:35:52.:35:53.

mistakes. For somebody to take responsibility is a big step if

:35:54.:35:56.

their life, if they can't take responsibility because they don't

:35:57.:35:58.

understand what they have done wrong, you can't knock for them for

:35:59.:36:02.

that really. People, in order to learn, I believe you make mistakes.

:36:03.:36:06.

Some mistakes are too bad that you can't change them as quick as you

:36:07.:36:12.

want to, but when you are young, 18-25, even younger, you shouldn't

:36:13.:36:16.

be expected to do big, big, big things if you haven't been exposed

:36:17.:36:19.

to things that can help you and enable you to do those things. Some

:36:20.:36:25.

people need the tools and skills to develop self-awareness and if you

:36:26.:36:27.

are not aware how can you take responsibility, you shouldn't knock

:36:28.:36:32.

it. Just to support that... Sorry, we are out of time, but thank you

:36:33.:36:38.

all very much for talking so frankly about this.

:36:39.:36:40.

Despite tobacco companies being banned from advertising

:36:41.:36:43.

on television and sponsoring sporting events, most of us,

:36:44.:36:45.

whether we smoke or not, will know they belong

:36:46.:36:48.

Today, some of the world's biggest tobacco businesses

:36:49.:36:52.

are taking the Government to court over new rules which will mean

:36:53.:36:54.

all branding, logos and trademarks are banned from fag packets

:36:55.:36:57.

and instead they will be forced to use plain packaging.

:36:58.:36:59.

The Government hopes the measures will discourage people from smoking.

:37:00.:37:02.

Companies argue it will hit their business.

:37:03.:37:03.

Our legal eagle Clive Coleman is outside the High Court

:37:04.:37:06.

Talk us through the arguments this case centres on, Clive?

:37:07.:37:23.

This case is This case is not about whether smoking is bad for you, it's

:37:24.:37:29.

about whether the regulations on plain packaging are lawful. As you

:37:30.:37:33.

say, the effect they'll have, and they come in in May of next year, is

:37:34.:37:37.

that anything other than the health warning on the packet, the packet

:37:38.:37:42.

has to be brown or green in colour, they can't use logos or trademarks.

:37:43.:37:51.

For example the Marlborough Roof which is estimated at around $1

:37:52.:37:55.

billion, companies won't be able to use those marks or logos and even

:37:56.:38:02.

their names will have to be in modest type face and non-descript

:38:03.:38:06.

type-face if you like. They are bringing this challenge and saying,

:38:07.:38:10.

look, it's unlawful on a number of grounds. The Government can't simply

:38:11.:38:14.

ride rush or do away with our valuable property rights in those

:38:15.:38:18.

trademarks and logos, it's being said. Also they are saying, it's

:38:19.:38:22.

disproportionate. The Government are basing this on evidence from

:38:23.:38:26.

Australia which brought this in in 2012 and the evidence-based just

:38:27.:38:31.

isn't there. In Australia, people downtraded to cheaper brands and in

:38:32.:38:34.

fact that could have had the effect of increasing smoking. Those

:38:35.:38:37.

arguments are taking place in court as we speak.

:38:38.:38:42.

The US Presidential hopeful Donald Trump remains defiant -

:38:43.:38:44.

he says he'll never pull out of the race,

:38:45.:38:47.

despite an avalanche of criticism from the media and politicians

:38:48.:38:50.

of his call for a temporary ban on Muslims entering America.

:38:51.:38:53.

A UK petition calling for the poll frontrunner

:38:54.:38:57.

and billionaire businessman to be banned from coming here has

:38:58.:39:00.

got more than 400,000 signatures and could be

:39:01.:39:03.

Last night, Mr Trump told CNN that his Muslim friends

:39:04.:39:08.

"I'm doing good for the Muslims," he said.

:39:09.:39:13.

"Many Muslim friends of mine are in agreement with me.

:39:14.:39:16.

They say, 'Donald, you brought something up to the fore

:39:17.:39:19.

that is so brilliant and so fantastic.'"

:39:20.:39:23.

So we asked some American Muslims to explain in five words how

:39:24.:39:26.

American politics causes brain damage.

:39:27.:39:52.

I feel unapologetically Muslim American.

:39:53.:40:23.

I'm joined now by Zainab Chaudry, a Muslim political activist

:40:24.:40:53.

and poet, who is based in Maryland in the US.

:40:54.:40:59.

Thank you for joining us, Zeinab, Donald Trump is absolutely standing

:41:00.:41:10.

by what he said. How do you see it? It's unbelievable that a candidate

:41:11.:41:13.

running for the highest office in the land would not only make these

:41:14.:41:18.

kind of bigoted remarks that he has gone on record not once but numerous

:41:19.:41:23.

times as making, but would double down and continue to defend these

:41:24.:41:28.

kind of remarks, even in light of the significant backlash that he's

:41:29.:41:32.

received. Not only from members of the opposing parties, but also

:41:33.:41:36.

members, higher ranking members, of his own party. There's been strong

:41:37.:41:41.

criticism of him in the United States and elsewhere. What impact do

:41:42.:41:45.

you think his comments potentially could have?

:41:46.:41:50.

Initially we were extremely concerned about the backlash towards

:41:51.:41:54.

the Muslim community and that is something that we are seeing rite

:41:55.:42:00.

now. We are seeing a spike in hate crimes and anti-Muslim bigotry in

:42:01.:42:05.

attacks on houses of worship. We have been seeing an unprecedented

:42:06.:42:08.

level of the attacks over the course of the few weeks since the horrific

:42:09.:42:12.

Paris terror attacks. But recently... Sorry, you are linking

:42:13.:42:16.

that to Donald Trump's comments, it's too soon to see any impact from

:42:17.:42:23.

those presumably directly? Well, we know that bigoted remarks from

:42:24.:42:27.

polices and elected leaders and public officials have an impact on

:42:28.:42:34.

shaping the public psyche. They tend to help create this fear and anxiety

:42:35.:42:39.

within Americans towards Islam and Muslims and we are seeing this

:42:40.:42:45.

phenomenon during elections for the past several years. Unfortunately,

:42:46.:42:51.

whenever we have, since Mr Trump announced intentions to run for

:42:52.:42:56.

presidency, the remarks he's made in terms of advocating for special IDs

:42:57.:43:03.

for Muslims, Muslim refugees, for promoting surveillance of Muslim

:43:04.:43:06.

communities, these kind of statements, they really alienate the

:43:07.:43:10.

Muslim community in their eyes and help to create the sense of

:43:11.:43:15.

tolerance for this kind of bigotry which we are not of course directing

:43:16.:43:20.

all of the blame for the kind of anti-Muslim and sentiment that we

:43:21.:43:24.

have seen on his shoulders. But he's had a significant role to play in

:43:25.:43:31.

helping to start animosity towards Muslims -- stir animosity. His

:43:32.:43:34.

latest remarks have helped underscore that sentiment. We are

:43:35.:43:38.

now seeing American Muslims who're stepping forward and saying that we

:43:39.:43:44.

reject this kind of bigotry. Zeinab, thank you very much. Thank you very

:43:45.:43:47.

much for your company today and all of your messages, it's always great

:43:48.:43:50.

to have your company, I'll see you same time tomorrow. Have a good

:43:51.:43:52.

afternoon. Bye.

:43:53.:43:55.