30/09/2016 Victoria Derbyshire


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30/09/2016

Joanna Gosling speaks to the scientists behind the Rosetta probe project. Plus tributes to Shimon Peres and the former heroin addict who has been saved three times.


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Good morning, welcome to the programme, I'm Joanna Gosling.

:00:13.:00:14.

The funeral is taking place of Israel's former

:00:15.:00:16.

Prince Charles and Boris Johnson are amongst the hundreds of people

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His critics often claimed he was a naive, overly

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They were only wrong about the naive part.

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We will join the service, throughout the morning.

:00:33.:00:42.

President Obama is due to speak in the next half an hour.

:00:43.:00:48.

The end is nigh for the spacecraft Rosetta -

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as it prepares to crash-land into the comet it's been studying

:00:53.:00:54.

We are live at the European Space Agency.

:00:55.:00:58.

And later, a drug charity says it's saved hundreds of lives

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It's a year since a change in the law made it possible

:01:02.:01:05.

for an heroin antidote to be given out to friends and relatives to use

:01:06.:01:08.

on addicts who are in danger of overdosing.

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Welcome to the programme, we're live until 11am.

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Do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning,

:01:26.:01:28.

And if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.

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Leaders from around the world are gathered in Jerusalem this

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morning to pay their final respects to the former Israeli President

:01:36.:01:38.

The 93-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner suffered a stroke two

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weeks ago and passed away earlier this week.

:01:43.:01:46.

President Barack Obama and Prince Charles are amongst those

:01:47.:01:49.

Speaking at the ceremony a short while ago, Israeli Prime Minister

:01:50.:01:55.

Benjamin Netanyahu paid tribute to Peres as a man of vision.

:01:56.:01:59.

That so many leaders came from around the world to bid

:02:00.:02:01.

farewell to Shimon is a testament to his optimism, his quest

:02:02.:02:04.

The people of Israel deeply appreciate the honour

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And the State to which he dedicated his life.

:02:20.:02:29.

He swept so many with his vision and his hope.

:02:30.:02:40.

But we find hope in his legacy, as does the world.

:02:41.:03:04.

With us now is our Middle East correspondent Yolande

:03:05.:03:06.

Tell us more about the tributes that have been heard at the funeral so

:03:07.:03:14.

far. It's a really impressive

:03:15.:03:20.

international line-up, first of all, something quite incredible. To see

:03:21.:03:26.

the National cemetery filled with dozens of world leaders are

:03:27.:03:31.

assembling to remember the life of Shimon Peres. They come from 70

:03:32.:03:35.

different countries, some of them came from the other side of the

:03:36.:03:40.

world. This is a man, as Israeli politicians have been pointing out,

:03:41.:03:43.

his life really mirrored that of Israel itself. Which was created in

:03:44.:03:48.

just 1948. He was somebody who served as an aid to the country's

:03:49.:03:53.

founding fathers. He was a defence official early on and somebody who

:03:54.:03:59.

was very hawkish. Widely credited with many of the achievements making

:04:00.:04:04.

Israel a nuclear power. Also, early on, he supported the creation of

:04:05.:04:10.

Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank, on occupied Palestinian

:04:11.:04:15.

land. But then, he went through his big turnaround. He was the hawk that

:04:16.:04:21.

became a dove. In 1993, he oversaw the peace deal, the first peace deal

:04:22.:04:26.

with the Palestinians. That was what won him a Nobel Peace Prize. That is

:04:27.:04:31.

why, really, the Palestinian president, Matt Millar bass, has

:04:32.:04:35.

made just a short visit here but an extremely rare one to Jerusalem.

:04:36.:04:41.

Withstanding a lot of criticism about the mixed legacy of Mr Peres

:04:42.:04:50.

so he could be had. His vision and optimism Barack Obama will focus on,

:04:51.:04:54.

when he gives his eulogy very shortly. What happens, from here?

:04:55.:05:00.

At the moment, we are just hearing from the children of Mr Peretz,

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their personal recollections of him and then he will be laid to rest

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alongside the Prime Minister of Israel who was assassinated back in

:05:13.:05:17.

1995. A joint winner of the Nobel Peace Prize with Mr Peretz and the

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Palestinian president at the time, Yasir Arafat. He will then take his

:05:23.:05:31.

place in the history of Israel. So people can continue to pay their

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respects. 50,000 members of the Israeli public, most of them went to

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visit the coffin of Mr Peres, when he was lying in state at the Israeli

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parliament yesterday. Thank you. This is the scene live in and. We

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will go back and continue with further coverage. We are expecting

:05:53.:05:56.

to hear from President Barack Obama and we will bring you his tribute

:05:57.:05:58.

when that happens. Annita is in the BBC

:05:59.:06:00.

Newsroom, with a summary It's one of the most complicated

:06:01.:06:02.

and difficult missions ever undertaken by a spacecraft,

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but the 12-year journey by the Rosetta probe

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is about to come to an end. Dramatically. The probe, Rosetta,

:06:11.:06:21.

has been in close orbit around the comet 67P will crash landing to the

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comet in a couple of hours' time. Rosetta is so far out in space

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that its solar powered instruments are failing, but before impact,

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it's expected to send back some more Our global science correspondent

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Rebecca Morelle has more. A final farewell to Comet 67P

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and a trailblazing mission that's The Rosetta spacecraft's been

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orbiting this alien world, Now, though, its power is fading,

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and a crash-landing will bring It's sad that, on the one

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hand, this is over, but we've achieved

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something fantastic. There's the excitement

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of what we have achieved already by doing this mission,

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and the huge amount of science we have that we've only

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just started to scrape So, the operations end now,

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but the science continues. The Rosetta mission blasted off

:07:10.:07:15.

in 2004 and, after a 10-year journey, and it made history when it

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dropped a small robot After a bumpy touchdown,

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the robot stopped working But the next landing,

:07:22.:07:30.

of its mothership, will The Rosetta spacecraft was designed

:07:31.:07:33.

to fly to the comet, around the comet,

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but not to land on it. There's no doubt that

:07:39.:07:41.

as soon as it touches down But it gives scientists

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the chance to squeeze every last drop of science

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of this mission, and all the way down,

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it's going to be taking close-up Rosetta's transformed our

:07:51.:07:53.

understanding of comets. But it's also a mission that has

:07:54.:08:03.

captured the public's imagination. The most senior lawyer working

:08:04.:08:11.

for the independent inquiry into historical allegations of child

:08:12.:08:13.

sex abuse has resigned. Ben Emmerson, who was suspended

:08:14.:08:18.

from the inquiry yesterday after what were said to be questions

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about his leadership, has denied falling out

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with the chairwoman, Alexis Jay. The investigation was

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set up 18 months ago to look at failures by institutions,

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such as schools and hospitals, to protect children

:08:32.:08:34.

in England and Wales. Questions have been raised

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about the inquiry's future, but the Prime Minister Theresa May

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has defended its work. We should always remember why

:08:40.:08:44.

it is that the inquiry was set up And when those terms

:08:45.:08:47.

of reference were set, they were agreed with

:08:48.:08:51.

victims and survivors. And it's victims and survivors

:08:52.:08:53.

who are at the heart For too many years, too many people

:08:54.:08:55.

have been raising their voice, saying what has happened to them,

:08:56.:08:59.

and people have not been listening. We need to learn the

:09:00.:09:02.

lessons from the past. If we don't do that, we can't

:09:03.:09:10.

guarantee that we're going to be able to stop such abuse

:09:11.:09:13.

from happening in the future. The assistant manager

:09:14.:09:15.

of Southampton Football Club has become the latest figure implicated

:09:16.:09:24.

in the Daily Telegraph's investigation into football

:09:25.:09:27.

corruption. The paper says Eric Black has been

:09:28.:09:28.

secretly filmed allegedly advising undercover reporters how to bribe

:09:29.:09:30.

staff at lower league clubs. A spokesperson for

:09:31.:09:34.

Southampton said the club The Chief Constable

:09:35.:09:36.

of South Yorkshire Police has said he'll take legal action

:09:37.:09:45.

after the region's Police and Crime Commissioner

:09:46.:09:47.

asked him to resign. David Crompton was suspended

:09:48.:09:53.

from his role, following the Hillsborough inquest

:09:54.:09:55.

verdicts in April. The PCC Alan Billings says he should

:09:56.:09:57.

quit because he had led a force that put its own reputation before

:09:58.:10:07.

the welfare of victims. Mr Crompton says he'll challenge

:10:08.:10:09.

that in the high court. The Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt

:10:10.:10:11.

is threatening to 'name and shame' restaurants,

:10:12.:10:14.

cafes and pubs that do not reduce In private meeting

:10:15.:10:16.

Mr Hunt and the head of Public Health England,

:10:17.:10:19.

Duncan Selbie, met more They discussed the implementation

:10:20.:10:21.

of the government's obesity strategy, which includes

:10:22.:10:24.

a commitment to cut sugar Shares the troubled in Deutsche Bank

:10:25.:10:26.

- Europe's second largest lender - have fallen sharply amid reports

:10:27.:10:41.

that some hedge funds There have been questions

:10:42.:10:43.

about the bank's stability since news emerged that it is facing

:10:44.:10:51.

a penalty of up to $14 billion in the US for mis-selling

:10:52.:10:54.

mortgage-backed securities. Investigations are continuing

:10:55.:10:56.

in America into what caused a train to crash into a station

:10:57.:10:58.

in New Jersey yesterday. A 34-year-old woman died and more

:10:59.:11:00.

than 100 other people were injured. The packed commuter service failed

:11:01.:11:03.

to slow down and then The packed commuter service failed

:11:04.:11:06.

to slow down and then The train driver has been released

:11:07.:11:09.

from hospital and is expected to be If you're in your 30s,

:11:10.:11:13.

you're probably only half as wealthy as someone who is now in their 40s

:11:14.:11:18.

was at the same age. That's one of the findings of some

:11:19.:11:21.

research looking at differences in wealth between people born

:11:22.:11:23.

in the 1970s and 1980s. The property boom and generous

:11:24.:11:26.

pensions are the big Our personal finance correspondent

:11:27.:11:28.

Simon Gompertz explains. Making the best of it,

:11:29.:11:34.

but this is the generation Early-30s, struggling to get

:11:35.:11:37.

on the housing ladder, shelling out for rent,

:11:38.:11:40.

instead of a pension. It was very much everyone

:11:41.:11:45.

was spending on credit cards that were limitless, and people could get

:11:46.:11:48.

another one and another one. And I think people didn't think

:11:49.:11:50.

they needed a plan, really. And I grew up in that

:11:51.:11:53.

scenario, as a little boy. It is hard to try and get a place

:11:54.:11:59.

of my own, as well, as it is. I'd like to get to maybe

:12:00.:12:08.

house-sharing stage, or renting, but I think that

:12:09.:12:10.

what is the norm now is renting. It's getting a lot more

:12:11.:12:13.

like Europe, I think. I think it's becoming a bit

:12:14.:12:15.

of a daydream that people can The stark numbers are

:12:16.:12:18.

that the average wealth of this group, born in the early 1980s,

:12:19.:12:22.

is ?27,000 each, including home and savings, while those only ten

:12:23.:12:25.

years old had wealth by the same stage in their lives of ?53,000,

:12:26.:12:28.

helped by house prices and the value If we look across the country

:12:29.:12:31.

as a whole, on average, those born in the '80s have half

:12:32.:12:40.

the wealth of those born ten years earlier

:12:41.:12:42.

did at the same age. And when we look at their incomes,

:12:43.:12:44.

they look about the same. But renters are spending a bigger

:12:45.:12:47.

share of their income That bigger share,

:12:48.:12:50.

who don't own a home. That's crucial, because young adults

:12:51.:12:53.

now paying high rents are watching older generations

:12:54.:12:58.

pull far ahead, as far And, when they're older,

:12:59.:13:00.

they are likely to have stingier That's a summary of the latest BBC

:13:01.:13:07.

News, more at 9:30am. Thank you, let's go back to

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Jerusalem where the funeral service is underway for the former Prime

:13:27.:13:30.

Minister and President Shimon Peres, being laid to rest in a ceremony

:13:31.:13:34.

being attended by leaders from around the world, the largest

:13:35.:13:38.

gathering of world leaders injuries and for years. The children of

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Shimon Peres have just paid tribute. They have just followed on from

:13:47.:13:52.

eulogies that have been delivered, paid tribute to the life of a man

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who has been described as a man of peace. The Prime Minister, Benjamin

:13:57.:14:07.

-- Benjamin Netanyahu said he sought to incredible heights, great man of

:14:08.:14:12.

Israel, great man of the world. This is his funeral service. He will soon

:14:13.:14:21.

be laid to rest, alongside other former leaders and President Obama

:14:22.:14:26.

is about to deliver his eulogy to Shimon Peres.

:14:27.:14:44.

To the generations of the Peres family. To the president, Prime

:14:45.:14:56.

Minister, Netanyahu, members of the Israeli government, heads of state,

:14:57.:15:02.

and government and guests from around the world, including

:15:03.:15:11.

President Mahmoud Abbas, whose presence here is a gesture and a

:15:12.:15:14.

reminder of the unfinished business of peace. To the people of Israel, I

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could not be more honoured to be in Jerusalem, to say farewell to my

:15:24.:15:27.

friend, Shimon Peres. Who showed us that justice and hope

:15:28.:15:43.

are at the heart of the Zionist idea. A free life in a homeland

:15:44.:15:57.

regained. A secure life in a nation that can defend itself by itself. A

:15:58.:16:07.

full life in friendship with nations that can be counted on as allies.

:16:08.:16:12.

Always. A bountiful life, driven by the

:16:13.:16:22.

simple pleasures of family and by big dreams. This was Shimon Peres'

:16:23.:16:33.

life. This is the state of Israel. This is the story of the Jewish

:16:34.:16:41.

people over the last century. It was made possible by a founding

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generation that accounts Shimon as one of its own. Shimon once said

:16:48.:16:56.

that the message of the Jewish people to mankind is that faith and

:16:57.:17:05.

moral vision can triumph over all adversity. For Shimon, that moral

:17:06.:17:13.

vision was rooted in an honest reckoning of the world as it is. He

:17:14.:17:24.

said he felt surrounded by a sea of sick and threatening forests when he

:17:25.:17:29.

was born. When his family got the chance to go to Palestine, his

:17:30.:17:32.

beloved grandfather's parting words were simple. Shimon, stay Jew.

:17:33.:17:46.

Propelled with fat face, he found his home, he found his purpose. He

:17:47.:17:53.

found his life's work. -- propelled with that faith. But he was still a

:17:54.:17:57.

teenager when his grandfather was burned alive by the Nazis in the

:17:58.:18:02.

town where Shimon was born. The synagogue in which he prayed became

:18:03.:18:08.

an inferno. The railroad tracks which carried him towards the

:18:09.:18:13.

promised land also delivered so many of his people to death camps. And

:18:14.:18:23.

so, from an early age, Shimon bore witness to the cruelty that human

:18:24.:18:28.

beings could inflict on each other. The ways that one group of people

:18:29.:18:35.

could dehumanise another. The particular madness of anti-Semitism,

:18:36.:18:45.

which has run like a stain through history. That understanding of man's

:18:46.:18:49.

ever present sinfulness would steal him against hardship and make him

:18:50.:18:57.

the jewel and against threats to Jewry around the world. But that

:18:58.:19:04.

understanding would never harden his heart. It would never extinguish his

:19:05.:19:20.

face. -- his faith. It broadened his moral imagination instead, and gave

:19:21.:19:24.

him the capacity to see all people as deserving of dignity and respect.

:19:25.:19:33.

It helped him see not just the world as it is but the world as it should

:19:34.:19:41.

be. What Shimon did to shape the story

:19:42.:19:47.

of Israel is well chronicled. Starting in the kibbutz that he

:19:48.:19:55.

founded with his wife, he began the work of building a moral community.

:19:56.:20:03.

Begu Rhian called him to serve at their headquarters to make sure that

:20:04.:20:07.

the British people have the armaments and organisation to secure

:20:08.:20:12.

their freedom. After independence, surrounded by enemies who denied

:20:13.:20:16.

Israel's existence and sought to drive it into the sea, the child who

:20:17.:20:24.

had wanted to be a poet of the stars became a man who built Israel's

:20:25.:20:31.

defence industry, who laid the foundation for the formidable Armed

:20:32.:20:40.

Forces that won Israel's wars. His skills secured Israel's strategic

:20:41.:20:45.

position, his boldness sent Israeli commandos to rescue Jews from

:20:46.:20:53.

Ethiopia. His statesmanship built an unbreakable bond with United States

:20:54.:21:02.

of the America -- United States of America and so many other countries.

:21:03.:21:09.

His contributions did not end there. Shimon showed what people can do

:21:10.:21:15.

when they harness reason and science to a common cause. He understood

:21:16.:21:19.

that a country without many natural resources could more than make up

:21:20.:21:22.

for it with the talents of its people. He made hard choices to roll

:21:23.:21:32.

back inflation and climb back from a terrible economic crisis. He

:21:33.:21:36.

champions the promise of science and technology to make the desert bloom

:21:37.:21:44.

and turned this tiny country into a central hub of the digital age,

:21:45.:21:48.

making life better not just for people here but people around the

:21:49.:21:57.

world. In deed, Shimon's contribution to this nation is so

:21:58.:22:06.

fundamental, so pervasive that perhaps sometimes they can be

:22:07.:22:11.

overlooked. For younger generation, Shimon was

:22:12.:22:19.

probably remembered more for a peace process that never reached its end

:22:20.:22:27.

point. They would listen to critics on the left who might argue that

:22:28.:22:33.

Shimon did not fully acknowledge the failings of his nation, or perhaps

:22:34.:22:40.

more numerous critics on the right who argue that he refused to see the

:22:41.:22:44.

true wickedness of the world and called him naive.

:22:45.:23:02.

But whatever he shared with his family or his closest friends, to

:23:03.:23:08.

the world he brushed off the critics. And I know from my

:23:09.:23:15.

conversations with him that his pursuit of peace was never naive.

:23:16.:23:26.

On one special occasion, each time, he would read the names of the

:23:27.:23:31.

family that he lost. As a young man he fed his village by working in the

:23:32.:23:35.

fields during the day, but then defending its by carrying a rifle at

:23:36.:23:40.

night. He understood, in this war-torn region, where too often

:23:41.:23:47.

Arab youths are taught to hate Israel from an early age, he

:23:48.:23:52.

understood just how hard peace would be. I'm sure he was alternatively

:23:53.:24:04.

angry and used to hear the same critics who called him hopelessly

:24:05.:24:07.

naive depend on the defence architecture that he himself had

:24:08.:24:17.

helped to build. I don't believe he was naive. He understood from

:24:18.:24:24.

hardened experience that true security comes to making peace with

:24:25.:24:31.

your neighbours. We won them all, he said of Israel's wars, but we did

:24:32.:24:37.

not win the greatest victory that we aspire to, release from the need to

:24:38.:24:48.

win victories. And just as he understood the practical necessity

:24:49.:24:56.

of peace, Shimon believe that Israel's exceptionalism was rooted

:24:57.:24:59.

not only infidelity to the Jewish people, -- was rooted not only in

:25:00.:25:09.

fidelity to the Jewish people but in the moral precepts of his Jewish

:25:10.:25:15.

faith. The Jewish people were not born to rule another people, he

:25:16.:25:21.

said. From the very first day, we are a guest, slaves and masters. Out

:25:22.:25:35.

of the hardships of the diaspora he found room in his heart for others

:25:36.:25:43.

who suffered. He came to hate prejudice with the passion of one

:25:44.:25:48.

who knows how it feels to be its targets. Even in the face of

:25:49.:25:56.

terrorist attacks, even after repeated disappointments at the

:25:57.:26:04.

negotiation table, he insisted that, as human beings, Palestinians must

:26:05.:26:11.

be seen as equal in dignity to Jews and must therefore be equal in

:26:12.:26:15.

self-determination. Because of his sense of justice, his analysis of

:26:16.:26:24.

Israel's security, his understanding of Israel's meaning, he believes

:26:25.:26:30.

that the Zionist idea would be best protected when Palestinians too had

:26:31.:26:39.

a state of their own. Of course, we gather here in the knowledge that

:26:40.:26:47.

Shimon never saw his dream of peace achieved. The region is going

:26:48.:26:59.

through a chaotic time. Threats are ever present. And yet he did not

:27:00.:27:11.

stop dreaming, and he did not stop working. By the time that I came to

:27:12.:27:17.

work with Shimon he was in the twilight of his years, although he

:27:18.:27:24.

might not admit it. I would be the tenth US president since John F.

:27:25.:27:29.

Kennedy to sit down with Shimon. The tenth to fall prey to his charms. I

:27:30.:27:37.

think of him sitting in the Oval Office, this final member of

:27:38.:27:41.

Israel's founding generation, under the portrait of George Washington,

:27:42.:27:48.

telling me stories from the past but, more often, talking with and

:27:49.:27:52.

he's Yaz of the present. His most recent lecture, his next project.

:27:53.:28:04.

His plans for the future. The wonders of his grandchildren. In

:28:05.:28:12.

many ways, he reminded me of some of the giants of the 20th-century that

:28:13.:28:20.

I've had the honour to meet. -- some other giants. Men like Nelson

:28:21.:28:26.

Mandela, women like Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth. Leaders who have

:28:27.:28:30.

seen so much, whose lives span such momentous ethics that they find no

:28:31.:28:39.

needs to posture or traffic in what is popular in the moment. People who

:28:40.:28:53.

speak with the depth and knowledge, not in sound bites. They find no

:28:54.:29:05.

interest in polls or fads, and like these leaders, Shimon could be true

:29:06.:29:08.

to his convictions even if they cut against the grain of current

:29:09.:29:17.

opinion. He knew better than the cynic that if you look out over the

:29:18.:29:23.

arc of history, human beings should be filled not with fear but with

:29:24.:29:32.

hope. I'm sure that is why he was so excited about technology because,

:29:33.:29:37.

for him, it symbolised the march of human progress. And it is why he

:29:38.:29:42.

loved so much to talk about young people. Because he saw young people

:29:43.:29:47.

unburdened by the prejudices of the past. It's why he believed in

:29:48.:29:57.

miracles, because, in Israel, he saw a miracle come true. As Americans

:29:58.:30:07.

and Israelis, we often talk about the unbreakable bond between our

:30:08.:30:12.

nations and, yes, these bonds and compass common interests. Vital

:30:13.:30:19.

cooperation that makes both our nations more secure. But, today, we

:30:20.:30:28.

are reminded that the bonds that matter most... Anchored in a

:30:29.:30:36.

Judaeo-Christian tradition we believe an irreducible value of

:30:37.:30:42.

every human being. I nations were built on that idea -- our nations

:30:43.:30:50.

were built. They were built in large part by stubborn idealists and

:30:51.:30:54.

striping immigrants, including those who had fled war and oppression. --

:30:55.:31:01.

striving immigrants. Both our nations had flaws that were not

:31:02.:31:09.

always fixed. Parts of our history that dates back to our founding that

:31:10.:31:14.

we do not always squarely address. But because our founders planted not

:31:15.:31:25.

just flags in the eternal soil, but also planted the seeds of democracy,

:31:26.:31:32.

we have the ability to always pursue a better world. We have the capacity

:31:33.:31:43.

to do what is right. As an American, as a Christian, a person partly of

:31:44.:31:51.

African descent, born in Hawaii, a place that could not be further than

:31:52.:32:00.

where Shimon spent his youth, I took great pleasure in my friendship with

:32:01.:32:11.

his older, wiser man. We shared a love of words and books and history.

:32:12.:32:17.

And, perhaps, like most politicians we shared too much great joy in

:32:18.:32:26.

hearing ourselves talk. But beyond that, I think, our friendship was

:32:27.:32:30.

rooted in the fact that I could somehow see myself in his story and

:32:31.:32:35.

maybe he could see himself in line. Because, for all of our differences,

:32:36.:32:43.

both of us had lived such unlikely lives.

:32:44.:32:51.

It was so surprising to see the two of us,

:32:52.:32:54.

where we had started. Talking together in the White House, meeting

:32:55.:33:03.

here, in Israel. Both of us understood we were here

:33:04.:33:16.

only because, in some way, we reflected the magnificent story of

:33:17.:33:25.

our nations. Shimon 's story, the story of Israel. The experience of

:33:26.:33:31.

the Jewish people. I believe it is universal. It's the story of a

:33:32.:33:37.

people who come over so many centuries in the wilderness, never

:33:38.:33:41.

gave up on that basic human longing to return home. It's a story of a

:33:42.:33:49.

people who suffered the boot of oppression and the shutting of the

:33:50.:33:54.

gas chamber's door. And, yet, never gave up on a belief in goodness.

:33:55.:33:59.

And it's the story of a man who was counted on and off and counted out,

:34:00.:34:10.

again and again, and who never lost hope.

:34:11.:34:15.

Shimon Peres reminds us that the state of Israel, like the United

:34:16.:34:21.

States of America, was not built by cynics. We exist, because people

:34:22.:34:29.

before us refused to be constrained by the past or the difficulties of

:34:30.:34:34.

the present. And Shimon Peres was never cynical.

:34:35.:34:38.

It is that faith, that optimism, that belief, even when all the

:34:39.:34:47.

evidence is to the contrary, that tomorrow can be better. That makes

:34:48.:34:55.

us not just on Shimon Peres, but love him. -- just honour. The last

:34:56.:35:03.

of the founding generation has gone and Shimon accomplish enough things

:35:04.:35:07.

in his life for 1000 members he understood it is better to live to

:35:08.:35:11.

the very end of his time on earth with a longing not for the past, but

:35:12.:35:15.

for the dreams that have not yet come true. Then Israel that is

:35:16.:35:23.

secure with a just and lasting peace with its neighbours. Now this work

:35:24.:35:27.

is in the hands of Israel's next generation. In the hands of Israel

:35:28.:35:40.

's next generation and friends. Like Joshua, we feel the weight of

:35:41.:35:45.

responsibility that Shimon seemed to wear so lightly. We draw strength

:35:46.:35:48.

from his example and the fact that he believed in us. Even when we

:35:49.:35:58.

doubted ourselves. Scripture tells us that before his death, Moses

:35:59.:36:03.

said, "I call upon heaven and earth to bear witness this day that I have

:36:04.:36:11.

set before you life and death, blessing and curse. Therefore,

:36:12.:36:17.

choose life. That you and your offspring may live.

:36:18.:36:30.

Choose life. Fort Shimon chose life. Let us make his work our own. May

:36:31.:36:39.

God bless his memory, may God bless this country and this world that he

:36:40.:36:41.

loved so dearly. Shimon : President Barack Obama paying

:36:42.:37:19.

tribute to Shimon Peres, now being embraced by members of his family.

:37:20.:37:24.

He said he had the capacity to see all people as deserving of dignity

:37:25.:37:29.

and respect. He understood true security comes from making peace

:37:30.:37:33.

with your neighbours. He hated prejudice, he said. He said that he

:37:34.:37:37.

seemed to wear the weight of responsibility lightly. Some of what

:37:38.:37:43.

he said echoed Bill Clinton, who spoke a little earlier. You can see

:37:44.:37:48.

him there, now. He spoke earlier at this service. And said how Israel

:37:49.:37:55.

had watched Shimon Peres grow into a wise statesman. I think this is now

:37:56.:38:01.

in the morning prayer. At the service.

:38:02.:38:07.

In our Tel Aviv studio this morning is the Former Israeli Justice

:38:08.:38:09.

Minister Dr Yossi Beilin who served under Shimon Peres as his cabinet

:38:10.:38:12.

Secretary and was instrumental in initiating the Oslo Accords.

:38:13.:38:14.

From Jerusalem, is the Editor in Chief of the Jerusalem Post,

:38:15.:38:18.

Yaakov Katz, who met the former Israeli Prime Minister several times

:38:19.:38:21.

as a reporter and travelled with him on official trips.

:38:22.:38:25.

Joining me now is Professor Yossi Mekleberg an associate fellow

:38:26.:38:27.

for the Middle East and North Africa at the think tank Chatham House.

:38:28.:38:30.

He's an expert in the politics and history of Israel.

:38:31.:38:37.

Thank you all for joining us. , first of all, Yossi you worked with

:38:38.:38:49.

him for many years, tell us what he was like.

:38:50.:38:54.

First of all, I loved him, I loved this man. I was very close to him,

:38:55.:39:02.

for many, many years. It was never boring to be with him. He was

:39:03.:39:08.

unusually interesting. He always could tell you things that you never

:39:09.:39:15.

knew about. He didn't like to waste time, which was our common

:39:16.:39:22.

denominator. So, he liked to work, I liked to work. . We could do many

:39:23.:39:30.

things together. What I can say about him is that he was curious in

:39:31.:39:37.

an unusual way. I mean, it was not that he was only cure is in some

:39:38.:39:40.

political issues, wanted to know about politics of other nations and

:39:41.:39:45.

whatever -- only curious. He was curious about everything. Which was

:39:46.:39:53.

difficult, for me. I was interested in many things, but not in

:39:54.:39:58.

everything! But, sometimes he was like a child, wanting to know more

:39:59.:40:02.

about everything. The last thing was his interest in the human brains.

:40:03.:40:08.

And another thing, he knew he was a very important person. He had his

:40:09.:40:15.

ego, no doubt. He had his self-confidence, no doubt. But he

:40:16.:40:22.

was never ever smug. In the highest point of his career, when it felt

:40:23.:40:29.

like he was exactly where he wanted to be, you could think that maybe

:40:30.:40:35.

this is a moment in which he will allow himself to be a little bit

:40:36.:40:40.

smug or cynical about others, to dismiss others it's never happened

:40:41.:40:46.

to him. He was a politician who knew what he wanted, which is quite rare.

:40:47.:40:54.

He had a very, very clear agenda. As an executive, he knew more than many

:40:55.:41:00.

others how to get there. Both President Barack Obama and Bill

:41:01.:41:05.

Clinton felt the need to address what some have described as naivete

:41:06.:41:09.

in Shimon Peres, because of his desire for peace. They said he

:41:10.:41:14.

absolutely was not naive, but he had that vision. How would you describe

:41:15.:41:15.

him? First of all, there was naivete in

:41:16.:41:24.

him. It is never, you know, black and white. That people are totally

:41:25.:41:29.

cynical or totally naive. He was old enough and experienced enough not to

:41:30.:41:33.

be a naive person, a dreamer, who is not connected to reality. But there

:41:34.:41:40.

were points of naivete. Mainly about trust in people. Sometimes, I said

:41:41.:41:46.

to him, Shimon, how can you trust this person? You know who he is. He

:41:47.:41:53.

said, no, no, no, in everybody there is positive things. I believe he

:41:54.:41:56.

said to me something like that, he will fulfil it. Sometimes he was

:41:57.:42:03.

right. Sometimes he was wrong. But, there is no doubt that he was very

:42:04.:42:11.

optimistic. Now, most of the wise people are pessimistic, in my view.

:42:12.:42:15.

But, without optimism, you cannot achieve anything. Even if he knew

:42:16.:42:22.

that in many cases he will not be able to implement what he wanted, he

:42:23.:42:29.

understood that, as an optimist, you can believe that if you are doing

:42:30.:42:33.

the right things, in your view, you can achieve your target. Or at least

:42:34.:42:41.

get close to it. But if you are pessimistic, wise as much as you can

:42:42.:42:45.

be wise, and you do not do things because you believe the chance is

:42:46.:42:49.

not big, then, for sure, nothing will happen. As the years... That

:42:50.:42:55.

was, perhaps, close to naivete. As the years went on and as he realised

:42:56.:43:00.

what might hope happen after the Oslo accords might not happen, did

:43:01.:43:05.

he grow close to disillusioned at all? No. On the one hand, we all

:43:06.:43:11.

hoped that in five years, we could get to the permanent agreement. The

:43:12.:43:17.

deadline was made 1999. Nothing happened under Netanyahu. Of course,

:43:18.:43:23.

it created frustration. But, he did not give up.

:43:24.:43:29.

He convinced us, the people who were his colleagues then, in the party or

:43:30.:43:39.

others that you have to wait longer. Apparently. The fact that we did not

:43:40.:43:44.

meet the deadline didn't mean that we are doomed and only we, Israelis,

:43:45.:43:50.

will never have peace with our neighbours. He understood that

:43:51.:43:56.

eventually it will happen because it is a mutual interest of the

:43:57.:44:01.

Palestinians and of the Israelis. Because of the extremists on both

:44:02.:44:04.

sides, it might take longer. But he never gave up. It was not because of

:44:05.:44:13.

unusual strength or whatever, he just couldn't. He couldn't. Because

:44:14.:44:17.

of being, if you wish, selfish, he could not give up on it and we could

:44:18.:44:25.

not give up on it. Yaakov Katz editor in chief of the Jerusalem

:44:26.:44:30.

Post, obviously, he had his ideals, optimism about peace, but it was

:44:31.:44:34.

founded in a pragmatism for the protection of Israel. And he made

:44:35.:44:39.

sure that Israel's defence industry was strong. No question about it.

:44:40.:44:46.

Shimon Peres, I think is beyond just being about a founding father and

:44:47.:44:49.

one of the members of the founding generation of the state of Israel in

:44:50.:44:54.

having a hand in building the state. Mostly known for building the

:44:55.:44:58.

military as we know today. He was the one who crafted the deal in the

:44:59.:45:01.

midnight and 50s for Israel to obtain a nuclear reactor from the

:45:02.:45:06.

French around the Suez crisis -- mid-19 50s. He opened the doors to

:45:07.:45:11.

France to get France as Israel's main strategic partner and combat

:45:12.:45:16.

air -- aircraft. Over the years, that was what he was known for, he

:45:17.:45:20.

built up the Israel air space industries which is an international

:45:21.:45:21.

conglomerate today. He is possibly the world leader when

:45:22.:45:32.

it comes to drones, electronic warfare and other systems. You can

:45:33.:45:36.

attribute those things to Shimon Peres. But, I think, at the same

:45:37.:45:40.

time, you genuinely believe that a peace deal with the Palestinians and

:45:41.:45:45.

the separation from them, the establishment of a Palestinian state

:45:46.:45:50.

no doubt including the removal of many Israeli settlements in the West

:45:51.:45:54.

back was part of the Israeli interest, part of a vision in

:45:55.:46:00.

keeping Israel strong, ensuring its strength and survival in the face of

:46:01.:46:04.

the multitude of threats and challenges it faces in the region.

:46:05.:46:07.

That is what made him unique. On the one hand he was a hawk when it came

:46:08.:46:12.

to Israeli security and military, but when you look at his vision of

:46:13.:46:17.

the new Middle East, how Israel should separate from the

:46:18.:46:20.

Palestinians and give them a state which is something that, let's say,

:46:21.:46:23.

people on the right and even some members of the current Israeli

:46:24.:46:27.

government believe is wrong and too dangerous, Peres would have argued

:46:28.:46:34.

that this is part of the way of keeping Israel strong. It is part of

:46:35.:46:37.

one overarching vision. Yaakov Katz, thank you for joining us. Dr Yossi

:46:38.:46:44.

Beilin, I hope you can remain with us for a few minutes longer. With me

:46:45.:46:51.

in the studio I have Professor Yossi Mekleberg from Regents University,

:46:52.:46:57.

the director of social sciences. How did you see the legacy of Shimon

:46:58.:47:02.

Peres? Gulp it is so difficult to talk about the legacy of someone who

:47:03.:47:06.

was active politically in Israeli life for seven decades, just to sum

:47:07.:47:13.

it up in a sentence. I think Dr Yossi Beilin express the complexity

:47:14.:47:16.

of the man and the revolution of his thinking. He is the product of the

:47:17.:47:23.

history that he lived, from the Holocaust and post-Holocaust and

:47:24.:47:29.

independence, the Cold War, to globalisation. In many ways, he

:47:30.:47:34.

evolved with the world and saw the changes. He had this intellectual

:47:35.:47:38.

capacity that many politicians don't have, to change his mind and to

:47:39.:47:43.

understand that it was right at a certain point but not necessarily

:47:44.:47:48.

right at another point. So at one point it was red phase rail to be a

:47:49.:47:56.

strong military power, -- it was right for Israel to be a strong

:47:57.:48:00.

military power, but also to understand that this -- that of

:48:01.:48:08.

Israel wants to stay... They need to extend the hand of peace towards the

:48:09.:48:13.

Palestinians and acceptability within the region. I obviously did

:48:14.:48:21.

not know Shimon Peres as well as Dr Yossi Beilin, but in the meeting of

:48:22.:48:27.

a small British delegation you could see some of the dreams, but not a

:48:28.:48:33.

daydreamer. It is a vision. When he talks... Why are you talking to me

:48:34.:48:37.

about boulders, talk to me about the digital age. We need to talk about a

:48:38.:48:43.

Middle East that is not a low-wage economy, people involved in hi-tech.

:48:44.:48:47.

So it is this capacity of renewal that I have not seen in any other

:48:48.:48:53.

politician. Dr Yossi Beilin, a man with the huge legacy, a man with the

:48:54.:48:56.

enormous ability, as you have described. Why did he never win a

:48:57.:49:05.

popular mandate at an election? Well, he won once in 84, he became

:49:06.:49:22.

the Prime Minister. Then he got the real popular support. Otherwise, you

:49:23.:49:27.

got 50% in 96, which was a tragedy. I believe that had he then be the

:49:28.:49:31.

Prime Minister of Israel, we could have achieved peace with the

:49:32.:49:37.

Palestinians by 1999. I think that what happened to him, if we talk

:49:38.:49:41.

about popularity, is that he was very popular when he was a hawkish

:49:42.:49:49.

leader in the Labour Party, because then he could get the support of one

:49:50.:49:58.

of its leaders, and on the other hand the support of the

:49:59.:50:03.

centre-right. When he moved in the 70s, 80s and, of course, the 90s,

:50:04.:50:13.

them all dovish part of the political arena in Israel, he lost

:50:14.:50:18.

the centre-right, and he was left with the centre-left and the left,

:50:19.:50:22.

which made it very very difficult for him to win again. When he was

:50:23.:50:31.

nominated as the leader of his party after the resignation of Yitzhak

:50:32.:50:35.

Rabin and 77, he was nominated because he was the most popular

:50:36.:50:42.

leader in that party, as a minister of defence who was considered a real

:50:43.:50:47.

hawk. When he became dovish, at least in the perception of the

:50:48.:50:52.

people, rightly so, I believe, you lost part of the support and

:50:53.:50:58.

regained it only when he became president. And, in a way, he gave up

:50:59.:51:04.

on actually speaking his mind loudly enough. Professor Yossi Mekleberg,

:51:05.:51:15.

is that the eternal conundrum, effectively, in Israel, trying to

:51:16.:51:19.

get the right balance between hawkish and being a dove, the need

:51:20.:51:22.

for popular support and the desire for peace? You need to won an

:51:23.:51:29.

election on a platform that you need to change completely your glove for

:51:30.:51:35.

the sake of the country. But I think there is a way to combine, and

:51:36.:51:41.

Shimon Peres managed to combine it for many years. It was not as

:51:42.:51:45.

popular when he was a politician, then he became a father figure as a

:51:46.:51:52.

president. But there is a real conundrum. I think it is wrong in

:51:53.:51:57.

Israeli politics that you had to be very strong in negotiation. You have

:51:58.:52:01.

to be strong negotiation but you need to have a strategy and a

:52:02.:52:05.

long-term vision about peace, which the current Government 's not have.

:52:06.:52:12.

I think Shimon Perez is the only politician in Israeli history that

:52:13.:52:17.

has had both at the same time, the village -- the vision of strength,

:52:18.:52:23.

but with the need to be generous in negotiations. I think at the end of

:52:24.:52:30.

the day, more than it was Shimon Peres loss for not serving as Prime

:52:31.:52:36.

Minister, it was the loss of the country. Thank you very much, Dr

:52:37.:52:42.

Yossi Beilin. The body of Shimon Peres will be laid to rest in a

:52:43.:52:45.

burial plots between Yitzhak Rabin and another former Prime Minister.

:52:46.:52:52.

That'll be happening shortly. For now, we will leave injuries. -- will

:52:53.:53:05.

leave events injuries. -- in Gerry Solano.

:53:06.:53:08.

In around about two and a half hours, the Rosetta spacecraft

:53:09.:53:12.

will crash land on a comet it has been orbiting for two years.

:53:13.:53:15.

It'll bring to an end a twelve year mission by the European Space Agency

:53:16.:53:18.

to try to gather data, which could eventually tell us how

:53:19.:53:21.

It's pretty big stuff and since being launched into space,

:53:22.:53:24.

Rosetta has travelled billions of miles.

:53:25.:53:26.

It is sent back thousands of images and even landed a Robert onto the

:53:27.:53:30.

surface of the comet. Now there is just the small matter of crushing

:53:31.:53:32.

itself into a frozen peas of cosmic debris travelling through space at

:53:33.:53:33.

around 30,000 miles an hour. Oh, I'm just so happy,

:53:34.:53:38.

it's just wonderful! We've waited so long

:53:39.:54:22.

and now it's happening! Let's talk now to Sarah

:54:23.:54:56.

Cruddas, who's a space And Paul McMahon, he works

:54:57.:54:58.

for Airbus which built the Rosetta spacecraft - he's responsible

:54:59.:55:01.

for the 'reaction wheels' which basically control the movement

:55:02.:55:03.

of it, and he had to fix them when they failed

:55:04.:55:06.

on the other side of Jupiter. We will get you to explain how you

:55:07.:55:15.

did that. Sarah, it has been described as you's moon landing

:55:16.:55:20.

moment. Really? I think we take for granted how much we have done in

:55:21.:55:25.

space, but we had an very little. We have not sent humans back to the

:55:26.:55:29.

Moon" years, we have never landed on a comet until this mission happened.

:55:30.:55:34.

It had an epic journey across the solar system. The technical

:55:35.:55:40.

equivalent of this was landing a fly on a speeding bullet. At the moment,

:55:41.:55:46.

the comet is moving at around 14 kilometres a second. We have managed

:55:47.:55:49.

to send a spacecraft from Earth, which was dreams up in the

:55:50.:55:54.

mid-1980s, send it to this comet, chase it across the solar system,

:55:55.:55:58.

study how life might have come to be. Comets were around at the early

:55:59.:56:03.

solar system we think they might have ceded a very young earth with

:56:04.:56:07.

the potential ingredients for life. We are updating the jigsaw pieces

:56:08.:56:10.

together and we have never done something like this before, it is an

:56:11.:56:14.

Apollo moment in terms of exploration. It is great for Europe,

:56:15.:56:19.

it is just huge ad incredible. Lots of people have worked very hard. It

:56:20.:56:23.

was an expensive mission, but you get a lot of innovation and

:56:24.:56:27.

technology back from. It is a game changeable to stop it is the next

:56:28.:56:31.

piece in the jigsaw of asking the fundamental questions of who we are,

:56:32.:56:37.

where we came from, why we exist, is there life beyond the solar system

:56:38.:56:41.

and in the solar system? All these questions, extraordinary claims

:56:42.:56:44.

require extraordinary evidence, as a MIDI wants that. We are piecing

:56:45.:56:48.

together evidence to answer fundamental questions about our

:56:49.:56:52.

existence. Paul, I said you are effectively responsible for the

:56:53.:56:57.

wheels? There four reaction wheels on board Rosetta, used to point the

:56:58.:57:00.

spacecraft whenever they want to image something or reorient the

:57:01.:57:05.

spacecraft. There was a problem with them, and it is quite a long way

:57:06.:57:12.

away?! After Rosetta flew past a comet in 2008, we noticed that the

:57:13.:57:16.

friction that one of the wheels was increasing, so we had to work on it,

:57:17.:57:20.

change the parameters, managed to really book eight it when it was

:57:21.:57:25.

orbiting Jupiter, so that when it came out of hibernation in January

:57:26.:57:29.

2014, it started at the wheels again, things were running much

:57:30.:57:33.

better. If that had not been fixed, it would have been kaput? It would

:57:34.:57:39.

not have been a kaput mission, but it would have been a degraded

:57:40.:57:42.

mission. They could not have used the reaction wheels as they wanted,

:57:43.:57:47.

they would have had to rely more on thrusters. Looking at the orbit of

:57:48.:57:51.

Rosetta, it is a triangular shaped orbit. Every time the spacecraft

:57:52.:57:59.

goes round one of the corners of the triangle, the reaction wheels rotate

:58:00.:58:02.

the spacecraft and pointed in a new direction. They were working very,

:58:03.:58:06.

very hard. Sarah, you have described what was

:58:07.:58:10.

done as like landing a fly on a moving bullet, that brings it home

:58:11.:58:14.

when you talk about that. In terms of what is being done today, why is

:58:15.:58:20.

it being crashed into the comet? Its panels will not get enough energy or

:58:21.:58:24.

heat from the sun to keep it away, because it is going so far away. It

:58:25.:58:30.

could be sent to sleep. The comet orbits around the earth, it takes

:58:31.:58:34.

about six years to orbit around the sun. We could put was that it sleep

:58:35.:58:39.

and maybe wake it up, it probably would not wake up and it could just

:58:40.:58:44.

end up as space junk, space debris. As humans we have always generated

:58:45.:58:49.

waste. I am talking about colliding with a comet, it is the final piece

:58:50.:58:54.

of science in the mission, I really interesting area where they will try

:58:55.:58:57.

to land Rosetta. As soon as it collides we will not get further

:58:58.:59:02.

communication, but we will get lots of closer pictures. This but they

:59:03.:59:06.

have picked is rather flat, it is almost like goose bumps, embryos of

:59:07.:59:13.

comments. It will help us understand more about how comets form. You hear

:59:14.:59:17.

about words like solar systems, comets etc, but we don't know the

:59:18.:59:22.

exact and says about many things, so it is helping along the way in terms

:59:23.:59:27.

of science and potential. The amount of research and data and information

:59:28.:59:32.

means that kids at school now who might be interested in space, if

:59:33.:59:36.

they become a scientist in 20 or 30 years, they will be studying data

:59:37.:59:45.

from this mission, so it is not over in terms of research and exciting

:59:46.:59:46.

developments. Very cool, thank you. Get in touch

:59:47.:59:51.

if you have any thoughts on that, now mat has the weather.

:59:52.:59:57.

A cool breeze will bring in showers. They have been most frequent across

:59:58.:00:03.

western area so far. If you will make towards the east in the

:00:04.:00:08.

afternoon. Big gaps between some of the showers, many staying completely

:00:09.:00:13.

dry through the day. Not far off yesterday's values, 12 to 19

:00:14.:00:18.

degrees. As showers go through you will notice a chill in the wind.

:00:19.:00:22.

Showers continuing this evening, fading away from northern and

:00:23.:00:26.

western parts, by and large. They get close to Wales and the later,

:00:27.:00:33.

more showers pushing in and longer spells of rain. Into the start of

:00:34.:00:36.

the weekend, eastern England, northern Scotland, Northern Ireland,

:00:37.:00:40.

temperatures could be cold enough for frost in sunspots.

:00:41.:00:46.

Saturday is a story of two Hobbs, Scotland, Northern Ireland and

:00:47.:00:50.

northern England, not many showers. Wales Midlands, East Anglia and

:00:51.:00:54.

seven counties, generally cloudy with outbreaks of rain. Temperatures

:00:55.:00:59.

around 11 or 12 Celsius. A few brighter spells between the showers

:01:00.:01:04.

later, generally a cool day. Shallots fade away through Saturday,

:01:05.:01:08.

lasting longer into the night through East Anglia and the

:01:09.:01:12.

south-east. -- showers fade away through Saturday. Frost around

:01:13.:01:17.

Scotland, Northern Ireland, parts of north-west England, a lovely,

:01:18.:01:19.

autumnal day nonetheless. I'm back at 11am.

:01:20.:01:23.

Good morning, I'm Joanna Gosling, it's 10am.

:01:24.:01:25.

World leaders have been paying tribute to Israel's former

:01:26.:01:27.

Prince Charles and Boris Johnson are amongst the hundreds of people

:01:28.:01:30.

US President Barack Obama gave a 20 minute eulogy.

:01:31.:01:36.

Shimon accomplished enough things in his life for a 1000 men.

:01:37.:01:43.

But he understood that it's better to live to the very end

:01:44.:01:46.

of his time on Earth, not with a longing for the past,

:01:47.:01:49.

but for the dreams that have not yet come true.

:01:50.:01:51.

The end is nigh for the spacecraft Rosetta,

:01:52.:01:55.

as it prepares to crash-land into the comet it's been studying

:01:56.:01:57.

We are live at the European Space Agency.

:01:58.:02:02.

And later, a drug charity says it's saved hundreds of lives

:02:03.:02:04.

It's a year since a change in the law made it possible

:02:05.:02:08.

for an heroin antidote to be given out to friends and relatives to use

:02:09.:02:12.

on addicts who are in danger of overdosing.

:02:13.:02:23.

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:02:24.:02:28.

Leaders from around the world are gathered in Jerusalem this

:02:29.:02:33.

morning to pay their final respects to Israel's former President

:02:34.:02:36.

The 93-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner suffered a stroke, two weeks

:02:37.:02:40.

Prince Charles and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson are among those

:02:41.:02:54.

attending the funeral in Jerusalem. The American President, Barack Obama

:02:55.:03:00.

paid tribute to Peres as a man of conviction and faith.

:03:01.:03:02.

Shimon could be true to his convictions, even if they cut

:03:03.:03:05.

against the grain of current opinion.

:03:06.:03:09.

He knew better than the cynic that if you look out

:03:10.:03:12.

over the arc of history, human beings should be filled not

:03:13.:03:15.

I'm sure that's why he was so excited about technology,

:03:16.:03:26.

because, for him, it symbolised the march of human progress.

:03:27.:03:29.

And it's why he loved, so much, to talk about young people.

:03:30.:03:34.

Because he saw young people unburdened by

:03:35.:03:36.

Because, in Israel, he saw a miracle come true.

:03:37.:03:55.

It's one of the most daring missions ever undertaken by a spacecraft,

:03:56.:03:58.

but the 12-year journey by the Rosetta probe

:03:59.:04:00.

In a few hours, it will be deliberately crashed into the comet

:04:01.:04:04.

67P, which it has been tracking for the past two years.

:04:05.:04:07.

Rosetta is so far out in space that its solar powered

:04:08.:04:10.

instruments are failing, but scientists say its findings will

:04:11.:04:12.

The most senior lawyer working for the independent inquiry

:04:13.:04:18.

into historical allegations of child sex abuse has resigned.

:04:19.:04:21.

Ben Emmerson, who was suspended from the inquiry yesterday

:04:22.:04:23.

after what were said to be questions about his leadership,

:04:24.:04:25.

has denied falling out with the chairwoman,

:04:26.:04:27.

The investigation was formally set up 18 months ago

:04:28.:04:33.

to look at failures by institutions, such as schools and hospitals,

:04:34.:04:35.

to protect children in England and Wales.

:04:36.:04:37.

Questions have been raised about the inquiry's future,

:04:38.:04:39.

but the Prime Minister Theresa May has defended its work.

:04:40.:04:47.

The assistant manager of Southampton Football Club has

:04:48.:04:49.

become the latest figure implicated in the Daily Telegraph's

:04:50.:04:51.

investigation into football corruption.

:04:52.:04:53.

The paper says Eric Black has been secretly filmed allegedly advising

:04:54.:04:55.

undercover reporters how to bribe staff at lower league clubs.

:04:56.:04:57.

A spokesperson for Southampton said the club was investigating

:04:58.:05:00.

The Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police has said

:05:01.:05:09.

he'll take legal action after the region's Police

:05:10.:05:11.

and Crime Commissioner asked him to resign.

:05:12.:05:14.

David Crompton was suspended from his role following

:05:15.:05:16.

the Hillsborough inquest verdicts in April.

:05:17.:05:18.

The PCC Alan Billings says he should quit because he had led a force that

:05:19.:05:21.

put its own reputation first before considering victims.

:05:22.:05:23.

Mr Crompton says he'll challenge that in the high court.

:05:24.:05:26.

Mr Crompton says he'll challenge that in the High Court.

:05:27.:05:35.

Shares in Deutsche Bank, Europe's second-largest lender,

:05:36.:05:37.

have fallen sharply amid reports that some hedge funds

:05:38.:05:39.

There have been questions about the bank's stability,

:05:40.:05:44.

since news emerged that it is facing a penalty of up to $14 billion

:05:45.:05:47.

in the US for mis-selling mortgage-backed securities.

:05:48.:05:55.

Police searching for the missing toddler Ben Needham on the Greek

:05:56.:06:00.

island of Kos have been asked to call off their work,

:06:01.:06:04.

by the owner of the land they are digging up.

:06:05.:06:07.

It follows the announcement yesterday that a number of graves

:06:08.:06:12.

dating back 1,500 years had been found on the site

:06:13.:06:14.

where it is believed Ben Needham went missing more

:06:15.:06:17.

Our correspondent, Danny Savage, is in Kos with the latest.

:06:18.:06:20.

Well, this is the search site in Kos for the investigation into the

:06:21.:06:23.

For the time being, work is continuing as normal.

:06:24.:06:31.

We have a digger outlying strips of dirt, which has been dug

:06:32.:06:34.

up from a neighbouring olive grove and once they are out, searchers

:06:35.:06:37.

will come through them with rakes, to see if they can find anything of

:06:38.:06:40.

How long work will continue here, like this, is a bit

:06:41.:06:44.

Because, you can see them continuing to dig over here, where the cesspit

:06:45.:06:50.

They're continuing to dig there, to see if they can find any evidence.

:06:51.:06:59.

But, beyond there, yesterday, a number of graves were found.

:07:00.:07:02.

Four or five adults, dating back some 1,500 years.

:07:03.:07:04.

The landowner, we understand, has approached South Yorkshire Police

:07:05.:07:11.

and asked them to stop work in that olive grove, which is the focus

:07:12.:07:15.

All the earth being searched through here is coming from that field

:07:16.:07:20.

beyond this house, which is where Ben Needham was last seen alive.

:07:21.:07:23.

If the work stops there, that will cause serious issues

:07:24.:07:25.

for the British police, here, because this is day

:07:26.:07:28.

They found nothing of significance, so far and

:07:29.:07:35.

if they have to stop, it could jeopardise

:07:36.:07:37.

So, in the last few minutes, Jon Cousins, the senior

:07:38.:07:40.

investigating officer from South Yorkshire Police has headed off down

:07:41.:07:43.

to the local magistrates to see if he can clarify the

:07:44.:07:45.

He says this work is too important to have to stop now.

:07:46.:07:51.

It's important to Ben Needham's family,

:07:52.:07:52.

Determination from South Yorkshire Police to continue this

:07:53.:07:57.

investigation on this Greek island but will it fall victim to the legal

:07:58.:08:00.

process here and the very strict rules regarding the discovery of

:08:01.:08:02.

archaeological remains, which have been found, here?

:08:03.:08:16.

If you're in your 30s, you're probably only half as wealthy

:08:17.:08:19.

as someone who is now in their 40s was, at the same age.

:08:20.:08:22.

That's according to research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies

:08:23.:08:25.

that found people in their early 30s now have an average net household

:08:26.:08:29.

wealth of ?27,000 per adult compared to ?53,000 for those born

:08:30.:08:32.

in the 1970s when they were at the same stage.

:08:33.:08:34.

The study found the property boom and generous pensions

:08:35.:08:35.

Making the best of it, but this is the generation

:08:36.:08:37.

Early-30s, struggling to get on the housing ladder,

:08:38.:08:42.

shelling out for rent, instead of a pension.

:08:43.:08:47.

It was very much everyone was spending on credit cards that

:08:48.:08:50.

were limitless, and people could get another one and another one.

:08:51.:08:53.

And I think people didn't think they needed a plan, really.

:08:54.:08:55.

And I grew up in that scenario, as a little boy.

:08:56.:09:00.

It is hard to try and get a place of my own, as well, as it is.

:09:01.:09:06.

I'd like to get to maybe house-sharing stage,

:09:07.:09:08.

or renting, but I think that what is the norm now is renting.

:09:09.:09:11.

It's getting a lot more like Europe, I think.

:09:12.:09:13.

I think it's becoming a bit of a daydream,

:09:14.:09:15.

The stark numbers are that the average wealth of this

:09:16.:09:21.

group, born in the early 1980s, is ?27,000 each, including home

:09:22.:09:24.

and savings, while those only ten years old had wealth by the same

:09:25.:09:27.

stage in their lives of ?53,000, helped by house prices and the value

:09:28.:09:30.

If we look across the country as a whole, on average, those born

:09:31.:09:40.

in the '80s have half the wealth of those

:09:41.:09:42.

born ten years earlier did, at the same age.

:09:43.:09:45.

And when we look at their incomes, they look about the same.

:09:46.:09:48.

But renters are spending a bigger share of their

:09:49.:09:50.

That bigger share, who don't own a home.

:09:51.:09:56.

That's crucial, because young adults now paying high rents

:09:57.:10:00.

are watching older generations pull far ahead, as far

:10:01.:10:02.

And, when they're older, they're likely to have stingier

:10:03.:10:05.

A 28-year-old man has appeared in court

:10:06.:10:26.

charged with the murders of two shopworkers in Cardiff

:10:27.:10:28.

Andrew Patrick Saunders spoke to confirm his name,

:10:29.:10:31.

He was remanded in custody and will appear before crown court

:10:32.:10:35.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte were the star guests at a children's

:10:36.:10:44.

tea party in Canada on the latest leg of the Royal

:10:45.:10:47.

The grounds of Government House, the home of the Lieutenant Governor

:10:48.:10:50.

of British Columbia, was the venue for the event,

:10:51.:10:52.

which featured balloons, a petting zoo, and miniature ponies.

:10:53.:10:55.

Our Royal Correspondent Peter Hunt reports.

:10:56.:10:58.

A lifetime of waving and welcoming awaits 16-month-old

:10:59.:11:04.

Princess Charlotte, but for now, fun, not formality, is the focus.

:11:05.:11:13.

Pop, she says, as she tries her hardest to do just that.

:11:14.:11:17.

For the Prince, another attraction is here.

:11:18.:11:30.

It will gladden his great grandmother, though

:11:31.:11:42.

the Queen may wish he stayed astride for longer.

:11:43.:11:45.

It's much more fun as a toddler squirting bubbles at your dad.

:11:46.:11:48.

Even if he is the future king of Canada and the UK.

:11:49.:11:52.

A children's party can be a mesmerising affair.

:11:53.:11:54.

For Charlotte, though, there's one part of it

:11:55.:11:56.

Balloons are the way to this Princess's heart,

:11:57.:12:03.

and an entertainer was here to indulge her in the grounds

:12:04.:12:06.

of Government House, where the other guests

:12:07.:12:15.

Royal sibling rivalry is alive and well.

:12:16.:12:20.

It's rare to see Prince George and Princess Charlotte.

:12:21.:12:22.

William and Kate are determined their children grow up in private

:12:23.:12:27.

Peter Hunt, BBC News, Victoria, British Columbia.

:12:28.:12:35.

Italian police have recovered two Van Gogh paintings that

:12:36.:12:37.

They are the 1882 work Seascape at Scheveningen and a later work,

:12:38.:12:43.

Congregation leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen.

:12:44.:12:45.

Police in Naples discovered the paintings during

:12:46.:12:47.

Pandas are notoriously reluctant to reproduce but one breeding centre

:12:48.:12:55.

in South West China is having a bumper year.

:12:56.:12:58.

23 baby pandas have made their public debut in Cheng-du.

:12:59.:13:01.

Since it was set up nearly 30 years ago, the centre has

:13:02.:13:04.

bred 176 giant pandas, the world's largest

:13:05.:13:06.

artificially-bred giant panda population.

:13:07.:13:18.

I don't know how much they've bumped up the world panda population but by

:13:19.:13:22.

quite a lot, I think. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:13:23.:13:24.

News, more at 10:30am. Thank you, certainly scoring very

:13:25.:13:29.

high on the cuteness factor. So sure was Darren Clarke

:13:30.:13:37.

about his opening pairing for the Ryder Cup that he had

:13:38.:13:40.

decided on them even before He's chosen two golfers who had

:13:41.:13:43.

a 100% record two years ago They are Justin Rose,

:13:44.:13:47.

the Olympic champion being introduced to the crowd

:13:48.:13:50.

at the opening ceremony last night, and Henrik Stenson,

:13:51.:13:52.

the Open champion. They'll take on Jordan Spieth

:13:53.:13:57.

and Patrick Reed at just One player that has to wait

:13:58.:13:59.

until later is Danny Willett. The Masters champion isn't part

:14:00.:14:07.

of the foursomes, but, according to his captain,

:14:08.:14:09.

not because of what his brother said in his recent magazine column

:14:10.:14:12.

when he described the American fans When I had to explain to the guys,

:14:13.:14:25.

tell the guys who are not playing tomorrow morning, they are all

:14:26.:14:27.

playing well and are disappointed they are not playing but there is a

:14:28.:14:31.

reason behind it. I have a plan, what I will try to execute, this

:14:32.:14:36.

week. Danny is fine, he's ready to go, he wants to play. He's like all

:14:37.:14:40.

the guys, he's disappointed he's not playing in the morning but he

:14:41.:14:44.

understands what I am trying to do is for the team. There is no

:14:45.:14:49.

individual in our 12. It's about the team.

:14:50.:14:51.

Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger has said it is possible he could one day

:14:52.:14:55.

manage England if he had no club commitments.

:14:56.:14:56.

His contract at the Emirates runs out at the end of the season,

:14:57.:15:00.

and England are looking for a new manager after

:15:01.:15:02.

Gareth Southgate will see them through the next four matches.

:15:03.:15:09.

After a week of three defeats in a row, Manchester United have

:15:10.:15:12.

now won three in a row, and they're off the bottom

:15:13.:15:14.

of their Europa League group thanks to a 1-0 win over the Ukrainian side

:15:15.:15:18.

United had 70% of the ball but it took until the 70th

:15:19.:15:21.

minute to have their first effort on target.

:15:22.:15:24.

And Zlatan Ibrahimovic tucked it away after

:15:25.:15:26.

It's been confirmed Rooney will stay on as England captain,

:15:27.:15:33.

but Jose Mourinho decided to leave him on the bench again

:15:34.:15:35.

for the club's first European win of the season.

:15:36.:15:45.

Southampton are top of their Europa League group

:15:46.:15:47.

after picking up a point against Israeli champions

:15:48.:15:49.

Virgil Van Dyke had a great early chance for Saints but his header

:15:50.:15:55.

almost resulted in a throw in, somewhat summing up a terrible game.

:15:56.:16:00.

It finished goalless, and both sides have four points in Group K.

:16:01.:16:05.

Lewis Hamilton says he needs to drive better in Malaysia this

:16:06.:16:08.

weekend to get his world title campaign back on track.

:16:09.:16:10.

And he did just that, clocking the quickest time

:16:11.:16:12.

of the day in second practice at Sepang.

:16:13.:16:14.

He was almost a quarter of a second ahead of his Mercedes

:16:15.:16:17.

team mate Nico Rosberg, who leads the drivers' championship

:16:18.:16:19.

But the most dramatic moment of the day involved Kevin Magnussen.

:16:20.:16:32.

The Dane was fortunate to escape unharmed when his Renault caught

:16:33.:16:34.

It took several attempts by his mechanics to put it out

:16:35.:16:38.

Back at the Ryder Cup there is always a lot

:16:39.:16:41.

of passion shown by the fans, who often think

:16:42.:16:43.

Well, there's one who actually could.

:16:44.:16:47.

Rory McIlroy and Andy Sullivan had a few attempts at a 12-foot

:16:48.:16:50.

putt on the 8th hole and missed every time.

:16:51.:16:52.

There came a heckle from the crowd and Henrik Stenson told fan

:16:53.:16:56.

David Johnson, "Come on, then, you have a go!"

:16:57.:17:00.

Justin Rose made it interesting, putting $100 dollars next

:17:01.:17:04.

to the ball, and Johnson drilled it into the hole.

:17:05.:17:13.

He celebrated in just the way you would expect an American fan to

:17:14.:17:27.

celebrate at the Ryder Cup. Back to you, Joanna

:17:28.:17:29.

That is great, thank you. In around about two and a half

:17:30.:17:31.

hours, the Rosetta spacecraft will crash land on the comet it has

:17:32.:17:35.

been orbiting and studying It'll bring an end to

:17:36.:17:37.

an amazing 12-year mission by the European Space Agency

:17:38.:17:41.

to try to gather data from the comet data, which could help us discover

:17:42.:17:44.

how our solar system was created. Since being launched into space,

:17:45.:17:47.

Rosetta has travelled billions of miles, sent back thousands

:17:48.:17:49.

of images and even landed a robot Now there's just the small matter

:17:50.:17:52.

of crashing itself, at something approaching walking pace speed,

:17:53.:17:56.

into a frozen piece of cosmic debris travelling through space

:17:57.:17:59.

at about 30,000 miles an hour. We can speak to Rebecca Morelle, our

:18:00.:18:15.

correspondent at mission control in Germany. It is almost over for

:18:16.:18:21.

Rosetta, tell us about how they are feeling? Not too long to go. The

:18:22.:18:26.

Rosetta spacecraft is currently in freefall, heading for a gentle

:18:27.:18:32.

collision. It will not be an explosive impact with the surface of

:18:33.:18:36.

the comet, but it will finish the spacecraft. There is a mix of

:18:37.:18:40.

emotions from the team. There is the pride in what the mission has

:18:41.:18:44.

achieved, it was conceived in the 1980s, the idea to do this. It is

:18:45.:18:51.

one of the most bold and, in some ways, bonkers space missions ever

:18:52.:18:56.

attempted. The idea of hunting a comet down that speeding through the

:18:57.:19:00.

solar system, take ten years to get there, put a spacecraft in orbit

:19:01.:19:04.

around it, land something on that. But all things had to come to an

:19:05.:19:09.

end, so pride and then sadness. But rather than letting the spacecraft

:19:10.:19:12.

fade into oblivion, because the problem is that the comet is moving

:19:13.:19:17.

away from the sun at the moment and resented his solar powered, it will

:19:18.:19:21.

run out of power a eventually. -- and Rosetta is solar powered. So

:19:22.:19:30.

they are dumping it on the surface of the comet, where it will remain

:19:31.:19:33.

for a very long time to come. There is real sadness from the team, one

:19:34.:19:36.

of the scientists I spoke to had a pack of tissues, he said he has

:19:37.:19:40.

cried at every stage so will be crying at the end of the mission. A

:19:41.:19:46.

real mix at Mission HQ. It has cost a huge amount, troubled

:19:47.:19:51.

a huge distance, what has been achieved? What is known now that was

:19:52.:19:59.

not known before Rosetta's mission? The mission has totally transformed

:20:00.:20:04.

our understanding of comets. We knew that comets were balls of ice and

:20:05.:20:09.

dust whizzing around the solar system. But when you look at the

:20:10.:20:13.

first images that came back, the shape and the geological complexity,

:20:14.:20:18.

the mountains on the surface, the cracks, the boulders the size of

:20:19.:20:22.

houses, it is a really interesting place just to look at, for starters.

:20:23.:20:28.

Comets are really imparted to study, they are relics from the dawn of the

:20:29.:20:32.

solar system -- really important to study. They are practically

:20:33.:20:37.

unchanged for 4.6 billion years. If you can get onto the surface of a

:20:38.:20:43.

comet and study it in detail, like the Philae robot did, it is like a

:20:44.:20:50.

time capsule. We found out that the comet has chemicals on their recent

:20:51.:20:54.

to life, so there is an idea that a crash landing from a comet into the

:20:55.:20:59.

earth delivered to these chemicals here and kick-started life here. If

:21:00.:21:04.

you find these things, you can find about the origins of planets,

:21:05.:21:08.

origins of the Earth and our origin, too. The observations will stop, but

:21:09.:21:13.

scientists recommend have enough to keep them busy for decades to come.

:21:14.:21:19.

Joining the dots from what you describe as a relic from the dawn of

:21:20.:21:26.

the solar system to how planets became, there is a huge amount of

:21:27.:21:31.

distance between those two. How on earth do you join those dots? What

:21:32.:21:40.

happens now? Basically, the idea is that you just have a bucket load of

:21:41.:21:45.

data. The two years that the Rosetta spacecraft has been orbiting the

:21:46.:21:49.

comet, there are 11 instruments are. It has recorded the gases coming

:21:50.:21:54.

off, the chemical make-up, the temperature. The magnetic field

:21:55.:21:59.

around it. That sort of thing. And also the data that came back from

:22:00.:22:04.

Philae. But then you had to take it back and study, it will take time.

:22:05.:22:09.

You need to find out what is there and how it fits together. We have

:22:10.:22:13.

models of what happened at the very start up the solar system. If you

:22:14.:22:18.

have the raw material, you can chuck that information into those models

:22:19.:22:21.

and that will give you a better idea of what happened. The science is one

:22:22.:22:27.

legacy of this. One thing is how it has captured the public's

:22:28.:22:31.

imagination. This is a robotic mission. People have an affinity

:22:32.:22:35.

with the spacecraft that went down two years ago. There must have been

:22:36.:22:38.

kids there watching their coverage couple of years ago of the Philae

:22:39.:22:44.

landing thinking that being a scientist sounds really quite fun

:22:45.:22:50.

and interesting as a job, so there is also that and the ambition of

:22:51.:22:53.

this. The mission goes to show that you can have really bold ideas,

:22:54.:22:58.

hunting down a comet, getting to orbit around it, landing on it costs

:22:59.:23:02.

a lot of money. It takes a lot of guts to do it. It might have gone

:23:03.:23:06.

horribly wrong. If you have these big ideas and you can achieve them,

:23:07.:23:12.

that is also fantastic. That will be important for the space missions to

:23:13.:23:18.

come into in the future. The Rosetta mission has held up exactly what you

:23:19.:23:21.

can do in terms of space science, that will be a real legacy. Thank

:23:22.:23:24.

you, Rebecca. A short time ago I spoke to Paul

:23:25.:23:42.

McMahon, who built the wheels on the Rosetta.

:23:43.:23:44.

There are four reaction wheels which are used

:23:45.:23:45.

to point the spacecraft where they want to image something

:23:46.:23:48.

or re-orientate the spacecraft on a new trajectory.

:23:49.:23:50.

There was a problem with them, wasn't there?

:23:51.:23:52.

What a long way away, explain what happened.

:23:53.:23:54.

After Rosetta flew past, comet is in 2008, we noticed

:23:55.:23:56.

that the friction on one of the wheels was increasing,

:23:57.:23:58.

We changed some of the parameters and we managed to read lubricated

:23:59.:24:01.

-- really lubricate it while it was out by Jupiter.

:24:02.:24:11.

So that when it came out of hibernation, in January, 2014,

:24:12.:24:13.

they started up the wheels again and things were running much better.

:24:14.:24:16.

So, presumably, that was fundamental.

:24:17.:24:18.

If that hadn't have been fixed that would have been kaput?

:24:19.:24:20.

No, it would not have been kaput to the mission,

:24:21.:24:23.

but it would it would have been a degraded mission

:24:24.:24:25.

because they would not have been able to use the reaction wheels

:24:26.:24:28.

They would have had to rely more on the thrusters.

:24:29.:24:31.

If you look at the orbit of Rosetta round the comment,

:24:32.:24:34.

basically a triangular-shaped orbit, every time the spacecraft goes

:24:35.:24:36.

round one of the corners of the triangle, the reaction wheels

:24:37.:24:39.

and rotate the space craft and point it in a new direction,

:24:40.:24:42.

Let's talk to Monica Grady, who joins us from Darmstadt.

:24:43.:24:49.

She's a Professor of Planetary and Space Science at

:24:50.:24:51.

the Open University, based at the European Space Agency.

:24:52.:24:56.

Thank you very much for joining us. Before I ask how you are feeling, I

:24:57.:25:03.

want to just show everyone how you are feeling and reacting two years

:25:04.:25:07.

ago when the Rosetta dropped the Philae lander on the comet.

:25:08.:25:10.

I think you were quite excited. I was mildly pleased, yes. What has

:25:11.:25:44.

got you so excited about this mission? I have been involved with

:25:45.:25:49.

it for a long time. I was looking to day as a picture that was drawn of

:25:50.:25:56.

the instrument that I have been associated with, it was run in 1993.

:25:57.:26:02.

This is the first schematic diagram. I have been looking into the science

:26:03.:26:05.

of comets since well before then. To go through the journey of Rosetta

:26:06.:26:12.

and the Philae, of course, and come to the end, it has been huge part of

:26:13.:26:17.

my scientific career. Our science correspondent Rebecca said it was a

:26:18.:26:21.

bold and bonkers project. Did you ever think it would be possible to

:26:22.:26:25.

achieve what has been achieved, landing a probe on a comet?

:26:26.:26:31.

I take issue with the bonkers. It was certainly bold. You don't start

:26:32.:26:37.

out a mission thinking that you will not be able to achieve it, you

:26:38.:26:42.

started thinking, yes, actually, it is really well planned, the

:26:43.:26:46.

engineers know what they are doing. Then something goes wrong like, oh,

:26:47.:26:51.

crikey, the launch was postponed for a year. And you have to look for

:26:52.:26:54.

another commentary target, which is what happened. And you think, OK, we

:26:55.:27:01.

have not had quite the information that we need. But it has been

:27:02.:27:06.

fantastic to trouble for 8 billion kilometres or whatever it is, a huge

:27:07.:27:10.

number of kilometres, and do the things that the Rosetta spacecraft

:27:11.:27:16.

has done, it is an enormous project and has been a huge success.

:27:17.:27:21.

With something that is so outside of the thinking of most of us, it has

:27:22.:27:26.

been hard to grapple with how significant this is and what has

:27:27.:27:32.

been achieved in terms of technically and everything else.

:27:33.:27:37.

Just try to encapsulate that for us? Technically, the landing of Philae

:27:38.:27:43.

on the comet was almost successful. It landed on its side instead of its

:27:44.:27:48.

legs. It achieved most of its objective. You had to think about

:27:49.:27:55.

the communications. I'm talking to you from Darmstadt in Germany, I can

:27:56.:27:59.

hear a tiny delay on the line. Imagine trying to talk to me if the

:28:00.:28:03.

delay was 20 minutes, which is what it is between here and Rosetta. You

:28:04.:28:08.

can't have a proper conversation, so you have to send a packet of

:28:09.:28:12.

instructions and wait for something to happen. All that programming has

:28:13.:28:17.

to be done in advance. The fact that the instruments worked as well as

:28:18.:28:22.

they did with each other on very, very low amounts of power, it has

:28:23.:28:26.

been a wonderfully cooperative venture with all these scientists

:28:27.:28:32.

throughout Europe. And to come together and then get different data

:28:33.:28:37.

from the different instruments and then talk about the data together

:28:38.:28:41.

and collaborate, to build up a much more complete picture of a comet,

:28:42.:28:46.

which is overturning the other models we have had in the past of a

:28:47.:28:52.

comet, it has just been wonderful. What have you learned, then? We have

:28:53.:29:01.

learned about what the comet is made from, we have seen the composition

:29:02.:29:05.

is perhaps slightly different from what we thought in terms of the

:29:06.:29:09.

minerals. Certainly with the water and the ice, the hydrogen in the

:29:10.:29:15.

water is different from how we would have predicted it to be, knowing

:29:16.:29:19.

what we do about the hydrogen in the sun and on the earth. So we had to

:29:20.:29:24.

think a lot about what happened to the water when the solar system was

:29:25.:29:29.

forming. Of course, we have found all these building blocks, the

:29:30.:29:33.

glycine, the sugars, these really important molecules essential for

:29:34.:29:37.

life. We have found those. I think the most fascinating thing is the

:29:38.:29:41.

images. When you look at these images, as Rebecca said a minute

:29:42.:29:49.

ago, the chasms, they appear to be strata, they look like riverbeds and

:29:50.:29:53.

grey seal valleys. They are not. You try to interpret them in terms of

:29:54.:29:57.

terrestrial processes, and you can't. It has built a new science

:29:58.:30:04.

of, tree morphology, which is interpreting these landforms. That

:30:05.:30:08.

is so important and so interesting -- a new science of comet

:30:09.:30:12.

morphology. They will apply to all sorts of bodies in the solar

:30:13.:30:18.

systems, moons around other planets, Pluto, asteroids. It is the

:30:19.:30:25.

beginning. The mission, the data collection part of the mission is

:30:26.:30:31.

over, but the data reduction and interpretation and understanding and

:30:32.:30:35.

application has only just started. Thank you very much, Monica.

:30:36.:30:39.

As Italian police recover two stolen Van Goghs,

:30:40.:30:42.

during an anti-mafia raid, we will get the latest on what happened

:30:43.:30:45.

Stolen from an Amsterdam museum in 2002.

:30:46.:30:52.

And research suggests if you're in your thirties you're probably

:30:53.:30:54.

only half as wealthy as someone who is now in their 40s

:30:55.:30:57.

We'll talk to the lead researcher about why this is the case.

:30:58.:31:10.

Let's catch up with all the news with Anita.

:31:11.:31:14.

Leaders from around the world are gathered in Jerusalem this

:31:15.:31:16.

morning to pay their final respects to Israel's former President

:31:17.:31:19.

The 93-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner suffered a stroke, two weeks

:31:20.:31:22.

President Obama and Prince Charles were among those attending the

:31:23.:31:35.

funeral. Former American President Bill Clinton paid tribute as a man

:31:36.:31:38.

who dared to dream. His critics often claimed

:31:39.:31:43.

he was a naive, overly They were only wrong

:31:44.:31:45.

about the naive part. He knew exactly what he was doing,

:31:46.:31:50.

in being overly optimistic. He knew exactly what he was

:31:51.:31:55.

doing, with his dreams. A 23-year-old man has

:31:56.:32:02.

admitted causing the deaths of a boy and his aunt,

:32:03.:32:05.

who were hit by a car being chased by police

:32:06.:32:07.

in south-east London in August. Makayah McDermott and Rosie Cooper

:32:08.:32:11.

were walking along a road Joshua Dobby, of no fixed abode,

:32:12.:32:13.

acknowledged the "pain and suffering" he caused,

:32:14.:32:18.

but has denied manslaughter charges It's one of the most daring missions

:32:19.:32:21.

ever undertaken by a spacecraft, but the 12-year journey

:32:22.:32:30.

by the Rosetta probe In a few hours, it will be

:32:31.:32:32.

deliberately crashed into the comet 67P, which it has been tracking

:32:33.:32:37.

for the past two years. Rosetta is so far out in space

:32:38.:32:40.

that its solar-powered instruments are failing,

:32:41.:32:43.

but scientists say its findings will The most senior lawyer working

:32:44.:32:45.

for the independent inquiry into historical allegations of child

:32:46.:32:53.

sex abuse has resigned. Ben Emmerson, who was suspended

:32:54.:33:01.

from the inquiry yesterday after what were said to be questions

:33:02.:33:08.

about his leadership, has denied falling out

:33:09.:33:11.

with the chairwoman, The investigation was formally

:33:12.:33:12.

set up 18 months ago to look at failures by institutions,

:33:13.:33:15.

such as schools and hospitals, to protect children

:33:16.:33:18.

in England and Wales. The assistant manager

:33:19.:33:20.

of Southampton Football Club has become the latest figure implicated

:33:21.:33:22.

in the Daily Telegraph's investigation into

:33:23.:33:24.

football corruption. The paper says Eric Black has been

:33:25.:33:27.

secretly filmed allegedly advising undercover reporters how to bribe

:33:28.:33:30.

staff at lower-league clubs. A spokesperson for Southampton said

:33:31.:33:34.

the club was investigating The Chief Constable

:33:35.:33:36.

of South Yorkshire Police has said he'll take legal action

:33:37.:33:46.

after the region's Police and Crime Commissioner

:33:47.:33:48.

asked him to resign. David Crompton was suspended

:33:49.:33:50.

from his role following the Hillsborough inquest

:33:51.:33:52.

verdicts in April. The PCC Alan Billings says he should

:33:53.:33:56.

quit because he had led a force that put its own reputation first

:33:57.:33:59.

before considering victims. Mr Crompton says he'll challenge

:34:00.:34:01.

that in the High Court. Shares in Deutsche Bank,

:34:02.:34:09.

Europe's second-largest lender, have fallen sharply amid reports

:34:10.:34:11.

that some hedge funds There have been questions

:34:12.:34:13.

about the bank's stability, since news emerged that it is facing

:34:14.:34:21.

a penalty of up to $14 billion in the US for mis-selling

:34:22.:34:24.

mortgage-backed securities. If you're in your 30s,

:34:25.:34:32.

you're probably only half as wealthy as someone who is now in their 40s

:34:33.:34:34.

was, at the same age. That's according to research from

:34:35.:34:37.

the Institute for Fiscal Studies that found people in their early 30s

:34:38.:34:40.

now have an average net household wealth of ?27,000 per adult compared

:34:41.:34:43.

to ?53,000 for those born in the 1970s when they

:34:44.:34:46.

were at the same stage. The study found the property boom

:34:47.:34:48.

and generous pensions It's emerged that the BBC's

:34:49.:34:50.

governors intervened in the 1960s when it was proposed

:34:51.:35:02.

that the glove puppet, Sooty, A new documentary about its creator

:35:03.:35:04.

Harry Corbett reveals he wanted He was initially overruled,

:35:05.:35:11.

because the BBC thought it was inappropriate for two puppets

:35:12.:35:21.

to be romantically linked. That's a summary of the latest

:35:22.:35:24.

news, join me for BBC More allegations of corruption in

:35:25.:35:47.

English football starting with Sam Allardyce, England manager, this

:35:48.:35:52.

week. What is the latest? Early on in the week, the beginning of what

:35:53.:35:57.

we understand will be a whole range of allegations that are made over a

:35:58.:36:04.

series of days in the newspaper. Continued this week. Ten month

:36:05.:36:08.

investigation. The results of which they are revealing and have been

:36:09.:36:14.

doing so. Sam Allardyce was revealed to be, by undercover reporters,

:36:15.:36:20.

talking to them about potentially getting around third-party ownership

:36:21.:36:24.

rules. Suggesting he knew a way how to do that. He was the negotiating

:36:25.:36:29.

an appearance fee of ?400,000. It was within 24 hours, almost, there's

:36:30.:36:35.

newspaper allegations coming out, in the Daily Telegraph, that he lost

:36:36.:36:40.

his job. Tommy Wright in the day subsequent was one of those named,

:36:41.:36:44.

Barnsley Assistant Manager placed under investigation. You can see him

:36:45.:36:48.

here. Sacked yesterday as a result of the allegations in the Daily

:36:49.:36:52.

Telegraph. Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink, QPR manager, never Championship

:36:53.:36:55.

club, allegations made against him. QPR were investigating those

:36:56.:36:59.

investigations but they have said in the last half an hour they are

:37:00.:37:03.

unable to proceed -- another Championship club. Because they have

:37:04.:37:06.

not yet received all the details on the Daily Telegraph. Massimo

:37:07.:37:11.

Cellino, Leeds owner was also named in that piece by the Daily

:37:12.:37:18.

Telegraph. It has been a sinew of, including today of allegations that

:37:19.:37:24.

Southampton manager Eric Black gave undercover reporter 's advice on how

:37:25.:37:29.

to bribe officials at other clubs. Here he is, having taken over at

:37:30.:37:33.

Southampton. Assistant Manager Southampton. Claude Poole sitting

:37:34.:37:39.

next to him in the summer. He was filmed apparently doing that. He

:37:40.:37:43.

denies the claims. Southampton have said they will investigate those

:37:44.:37:47.

claims, including, you can understand that as these claims and

:37:48.:37:51.

all the investigations, the details of that are revealed, day by day,

:37:52.:37:55.

there are more investigations that have to be done by clubs. They are

:37:56.:37:59.

seeking all the information from the Daily Telegraph. Police are getting

:38:00.:38:04.

involved as well. We don't know how long it will go on for. A suggestion

:38:05.:38:09.

that ten months of work will be relayed in the newspaper over the

:38:10.:38:12.

next few days. Interesting to see who else they are able to name and

:38:13.:38:16.

what effect it has on some of those people's careers.

:38:17.:38:21.

It's a year since a change in the law made it possible

:38:22.:38:28.

for people who might have to deal with overdosing heroin users to be

:38:29.:38:31.

The injection, Naloxone can be carried

:38:32.:38:35.

by lifeguards, toilet attendants, carers, and also friends,

:38:36.:38:37.

family and even children of drug users.

:38:38.:38:39.

Charity Change Grow Live says the antidote has saved

:38:40.:38:41.

But figures show more people than ever in England and wales

:38:42.:38:45.

are dying from heroin and other opiate drugs.

:38:46.:38:51.

With me now is Karl Price a former drug user who has been saved

:38:52.:38:54.

from dying of an overdose by naloxone on three occasions.

:38:55.:38:56.

And Stacey Smith from the charity Change Grow Live, which has trained

:38:57.:38:59.

more than 6,000 people to be able to administer naloxone.

:39:00.:39:02.

Thank you both for coming in. Stacey, tell us how it works. It

:39:03.:39:11.

sounds like a miracle if somebody has overdosed, but this injection

:39:12.:39:15.

can reverse that? What naloxone does, it reverses the effect of the

:39:16.:39:20.

opiate overdose. The main killer from an acute overdose is not being

:39:21.:39:25.

able to breathe. What naloxone does, it boots out the opiate and allows

:39:26.:39:29.

the person to breathe again. It is as simple as that. How many people

:39:30.:39:35.

has your charity actually trained? We've trained round about... Mostly

:39:36.:39:40.

all of our staff teams, we've already saved 241 lives. It has been

:39:41.:39:45.

a real driver for us, when the regulations changed in October, we

:39:46.:39:48.

were really driving this training for people. Stacey says you can't

:39:49.:39:55.

breathe when you overdose with an opiate. You have been there, three

:39:56.:40:02.

times, describe what it is like. You kind of, you know, becomes

:40:03.:40:06.

semi-unconscious. Your breathing drops, your heart rate drops. You

:40:07.:40:11.

can, kind of, you are where little bit of what is going on around you

:40:12.:40:14.

but you can't speak, you can't move, stuff like that. -- you are aware.

:40:15.:40:20.

It's not a nice place to go to. And you feel you are dying? That there's

:40:21.:40:28.

no way back? No... You kind of... You're not really sure what's going

:40:29.:40:32.

on. You feel like you're kind of slipping into a deep sleep type of

:40:33.:40:39.

thing. You will feel really drowsy. And you are, pretty much,

:40:40.:40:43.

unconscious. As I mentioned, you have overdosed three times and on

:40:44.:40:47.

those three occasions, your life has been saved with this injection.

:40:48.:40:52.

Yeah. When you are injected, what happens, then? What it does, it

:40:53.:40:56.

actually removed the morphine from your receptors in your brain. It

:40:57.:41:00.

will give you a massive adrenaline rush. -- it actually removes. You go

:41:01.:41:05.

from being unconscious, unresponsive, and you will wake up

:41:06.:41:10.

really quickly. It will put you into a withdrawal. Describe how all of

:41:11.:41:14.

that feels, in the moment. The first time I had it, obviously,

:41:15.:41:23.

it was quite surprising because I never had it before. The second and

:41:24.:41:27.

third time I had it, I obviously knew what was happening. I was more

:41:28.:41:32.

aware. I was just pretty relieved to be alive, if I'm honest. Once the

:41:33.:41:36.

doctors and nurses had explained to me what had happened, I was just

:41:37.:41:44.

relieved that it was there. I wouldn't be sitting here today if it

:41:45.:41:48.

wasn't for naloxone. I am one of the success stories because I had it on

:41:49.:41:53.

three occasions. On one of those occasions, I had overdosed and 20

:41:54.:41:58.

minutes later, when the naloxone wore off, I overdosed again. It kind

:41:59.:42:02.

of saved my life twice in one sitting. Having gone through that

:42:03.:42:08.

experience once and knowing that you would have died, if you hadn't of

:42:09.:42:13.

had the naloxone, you might think that would be a wake-up call. How

:42:14.:42:19.

did you react to that? I guess, when you're addicted to, you know, class

:42:20.:42:24.

a drugs, every time you use, you're risking life, really. You don't

:42:25.:42:30.

really look at it like that. The power of addiction and the way that

:42:31.:42:34.

you think, even though you know you are taking a risk, you, kind of,

:42:35.:42:41.

don't think about that stuff. Your main priority is using drugs. Did

:42:42.:42:48.

naloxone take away your fear of overdosing? To be fair, kind of

:42:49.:42:54.

before I'd had the naloxone, I didn't really have a fear of

:42:55.:42:58.

overdosing. It's not something that you think about. When I was using, I

:42:59.:43:04.

would kind of use as much as I could, every single day, if I could

:43:05.:43:09.

get hold of it. I didn't, kind of, think well, there's a risk I might

:43:10.:43:15.

overdose. My overdoses and a lot of ones I have heard of and I have had

:43:16.:43:19.

friends and a partner who died, they are accidental overdoses because

:43:20.:43:23.

they are not thinking they are using too much. Or that they are at risk

:43:24.:43:30.

of overdose. Stacey, could the knowledge that there is an injection

:43:31.:43:35.

that can effectively bring you back to life after an overdose take away

:43:36.:43:41.

a fear of overdosing, for some? I think as Karl has explained, people

:43:42.:43:46.

are not in that state of mind at that moment. We know that most

:43:47.:43:49.

overdoses are accidental overdoses, these people don't necessarily want

:43:50.:43:53.

to die but they are caught up in their habit. I think when we give

:43:54.:43:57.

naloxone, there is a lot more training that goes with it around

:43:58.:44:01.

basic life support, how to put people in the recovery position,

:44:02.:44:06.

make sure you ring 999 and it is an opportunity for drugs workers to

:44:07.:44:09.

bring people into treatment. The most dangerous is when you use on

:44:10.:44:13.

your own in an unsafe place because there is nobody there to help you.

:44:14.:44:17.

One of our drivers at the moment is trying to get naloxone out to as

:44:18.:44:20.

many people as possible through drug workers, pharmacists, through

:44:21.:44:24.

lifeguards, the police. There are all of these people that may come

:44:25.:44:28.

across those people. What message is that sending? A message that an

:44:29.:44:32.

overdose isn't the worst thing to fear because there is the antidote?

:44:33.:44:38.

Everybody deserves a second chance. If Karl hadn't received naloxone, he

:44:39.:44:43.

would not be here today. That is the message. People go through stages

:44:44.:44:47.

and they deserve a chance to get their lives on track and it brings

:44:48.:44:50.

people into services and allows us to work with people. It is very

:44:51.:44:53.

difficult to work with someone when they are dead. This is a drug that

:44:54.:44:57.

is completely simple. It is given and it reverses the effects. Andrew

:44:58.:45:01.

on Facebook, we spend too much time and money pandering to the

:45:02.:45:05.

self-inflicted injuries. Youngsters think it is fine to take legal highs

:45:06.:45:10.

and self-inflicted drugs, no it isn't, it is the slippery slope.

:45:11.:45:14.

Think of the money and time wasted in hospitals to save these people so

:45:15.:45:17.

they can do it again. Life is tough for everybody, get over it. Do you

:45:18.:45:19.

want to react to that? I think until you have actually been

:45:20.:45:30.

few active addiction, to understand that, for me, addiction is a mental

:45:31.:45:34.

illness. When I was using drugs, people might think that I had a

:45:35.:45:39.

choice on whether or not to do that, but once I was mentally and

:45:40.:45:43.

physically addicted to it it's kind of became my whole life. I was

:45:44.:45:48.

saying yesterday it is kind of like when you put a horse into a race,

:45:49.:45:52.

they have got blinkers on, they don't see anything else around them,

:45:53.:45:59.

they have just got complete tunnel vision. That is kind of what it was

:46:00.:46:03.

like when I was using. I was rounded from a really early age, I had a

:46:04.:46:07.

really traumatic childhood. It is not as simple as one day I decided

:46:08.:46:11.

to use drugs, I will just pick them up. At the end of the day, there are

:46:12.:46:17.

people out there using, there are people out there that will overdose.

:46:18.:46:25.

Nalaoxone will save their life. It does not make them bad people

:46:26.:46:29.

because they are using drugs. For me, it can only be positive. Now I

:46:30.:46:37.

get to work with people and I get to see it on a daily basis, and I am

:46:38.:46:43.

very passionate about trying to make people more aware of Nalaoxone, and

:46:44.:46:47.

the fact that it can save people's lives. I get people coming out of

:46:48.:46:52.

prison with no tolerance, who might think that they can come out of

:46:53.:46:55.

prison and use the same amount of drugs as they did before they went

:46:56.:47:00.

into prison, they are at massive risk of overdose. And like Stacey

:47:01.:47:05.

said, about the families as well. Because obviously I have had a

:47:06.:47:09.

partner that has died from it. On that particular day, if I had had a

:47:10.:47:14.

Naloxone kit with me, she would probably still be here today.

:47:15.:47:18.

When you look back on your life, what was it that made you decide in

:47:19.:47:25.

the end to stop taking drugs? I kind of got to a point where I had just

:47:26.:47:30.

had enough, you know? You have to hit rock bottom. I got to a point

:47:31.:47:34.

where it was either using drugs was probably going to kill me, my life

:47:35.:47:41.

was just chaos, you know? I was sick of hurting other people. The thing

:47:42.:47:45.

with addiction, it is a family illness. It is not just about poor

:47:46.:47:50.

me, I am addicted to drugs. I never used to think about the impact that

:47:51.:47:56.

it would have on my family, my loved ones, people around me. And society

:47:57.:48:00.

in general. I didn't think about that stuff. I got to a point where I

:48:01.:48:05.

had just had enough. I wanted to change my life, I did not want to be

:48:06.:48:12.

that person any more, I wanted to become a better person. I just got

:48:13.:48:16.

sick of it, if I'm honest. Thank you, Carl and Stacey.

:48:17.:48:23.

Still to come, did the Mafia steel two appraisers Vanguard painting

:48:24.:48:26.

stolen from a new theme in Amsterdam in 2002? -- two priceless Vincent

:48:27.:48:32.

van Gogh paintings? Leaders from around the world have

:48:33.:48:36.

been paying their final respects to the former Israeli President

:48:37.:48:38.

Prime Minister Shimon Peres. The 93 year old Nobel Peace Prize

:48:39.:48:41.

winner suffered a stroke two weeks Picking attending the funeral

:48:42.:48:50.

included Prince Charles, Tony Blair, Barack Obama and Bill Clinton.

:48:51.:48:55.

Mahmoud A bars, the Palestinian president, shook hands with Israeli

:48:56.:48:58.

President Benjamin Netanyahu shortly before the ceremony began.

:48:59.:49:00.

Speaking at the funeral, Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin

:49:01.:49:03.

Netanyahu said ex-President Shimon Peres was a great

:49:04.:49:05.

That so many leaders came from around the world to bid

:49:06.:49:09.

farewell to Shimon is a testament to his optimism, his quest

:49:10.:49:13.

The people of Israel deeply appreciate the honour

:49:14.:49:25.

And the State to which he dedicated his life.

:49:26.:49:36.

He swept so many with his vision and his hope.

:49:37.:49:48.

But we find hope in his legacy, as does the world.

:49:49.:50:11.

President Obama paid tribute to Mr Peres' stature as both

:50:12.:50:14.

a defender of Israel and a maker of peace.

:50:15.:50:19.

He understood, in this war-torn region, where, too often, Arab

:50:20.:50:22.

youths are taught to hate Israel, from an early age.

:50:23.:50:30.

He understood just how hard peace would be.

:50:31.:50:37.

I am sure he was alternatively angry and

:50:38.:50:39.

bemused, to hear the same critics who called him hopelessly naive

:50:40.:50:46.

depend on the defence architecture that he himself had helped to build.

:50:47.:50:50.

But he understood, from hard-earned experience, that true security comes

:50:51.:51:06.

through making peace with your neighbours.

:51:07.:51:12.

We won them all, he said of Israel's wars, but we did not win

:51:13.:51:15.

the greatest victory that we aspired to.

:51:16.:51:19.

Release from the need to win victories.

:51:20.:51:31.

President Obama paying tribute to Shimon Peres at his funeral.

:51:32.:51:39.

Those born in the early 80s now have about half the wealth that those

:51:40.:51:42.

born in 70s had at same age, a new report by the Institute

:51:43.:51:45.

The IFS says that today's thirty-something generation has

:51:46.:51:51.

missed out on house price increases and better pensions.

:51:52.:51:53.

Let's talk to Andrew Hood, who is an economist at the Institute

:51:54.:51:56.

of Economic Affairs and one of the authors of the report.

:51:57.:52:02.

Thank you very much for joining us. It is a very short difference in

:52:03.:52:10.

terms of age for a huge difference in terms of wealth. How has that

:52:11.:52:15.

happened? Because there has been a sharp fall in the homeownership

:52:16.:52:19.

rate. Looking at those born in the early 1980s, at the age of 30, 40%

:52:20.:52:24.

owned their own home, compared to more than 55% of those born in the

:52:25.:52:30.

1970s. That figure is more than 55% for those born in the 40s, 50s and

:52:31.:52:35.

60 's. Will the trend continue at this sort of rate? I don't know

:52:36.:52:40.

about this sort of rate, but as long as house prices continue to rise

:52:41.:52:45.

faster than earnings, as they have over the past decade and beyond, it

:52:46.:52:50.

is likely that that home ownership trend we are seeing across

:52:51.:52:54.

generations is likely to continue. That is partly because it is not

:52:55.:52:58.

about the fact that people can't afford the mortgage is, they can't

:52:59.:53:02.

afford the deposits. It is quite a tight snapshot over a

:53:03.:53:06.

short time frame. Would you expect that to change or will this be a

:53:07.:53:10.

moment looked back on as the moment weather was a big divide?

:53:11.:53:17.

Taking a longer view, the issue is not just the wealth that those in

:53:18.:53:21.

their 30s have now, it is how they will build up as they move towards

:53:22.:53:26.

retirement. Not only do they own fewer homes, meaning they have less

:53:27.:53:30.

wealth now, they will not benefit to the same extent from future house

:53:31.:53:35.

price increases. On top of that, you have the fact that generous company

:53:36.:53:39.

pensions in the private sector are much less available to those

:53:40.:53:43.

currently in their 30s to those that win their 30s 20 ago.

:53:44.:53:50.

Rolling forward, people will own their houses, it is just who and

:53:51.:53:55.

where they are concentrated? Can you evaluate what you think the future

:53:56.:54:00.

trends would be? The houses that are older generations and the current

:54:01.:54:05.

retired population hold will have to go to somebody. The question is who.

:54:06.:54:11.

That is where this difference in inequality between generations might

:54:12.:54:14.

turn into an inequality within the younger generation. Obviously it

:54:15.:54:19.

will matter whether your parents were homeowners, that determines

:54:20.:54:22.

whether you will inherit the wealth that comes from their house. Other

:54:23.:54:27.

research we have done has shown that those who already have higher wealth

:54:28.:54:31.

are much more likely to expect to inherit, so it could be that wealth

:54:32.:54:36.

inequality in the younger generation is driven by the inheritances coming

:54:37.:54:41.

from the richer, older generation. Thank you very much, Andrew.

:54:42.:54:43.

Two priceless paintings by Vincent van Gogh have been

:54:44.:54:45.

recovered by Italian police - 14 years after they were stolen

:54:46.:54:48.

The missing masterpieces were found in Naples, among millions

:54:49.:54:51.

of euros' worth of assets seized from the city's

:54:52.:54:53.

Our correspondent Jane Frances Kelly has been covering the story for us.

:54:54.:55:04.

What has emerged? I have read that, allegedly, these paintings were

:55:05.:55:12.

recovered from the house of an international drugs dealer. This has

:55:13.:55:17.

not been confirmed. But the Italian government is cracking down on the

:55:18.:55:23.

Camorra, or the Naples Mafia, because of a spiral in drugs related

:55:24.:55:30.

violence, extortion and so on. This has led to the recovery of these two

:55:31.:55:36.

paintings that, as you mentioned, were taken from the Van Gogh Museum

:55:37.:55:42.

in Amsterdam in 2002. This seed is apparently got through the roof. It

:55:43.:55:47.

was a mystery how they managed to get away with the paintings -- the

:55:48.:55:51.

seeds apparently got through the roof. The paintings were cut from

:55:52.:55:57.

their frames. The paintings, you have the View of

:55:58.:56:01.

the Sea at Scheveningen, I hope that I am pronouncing that correctly. It

:56:02.:56:05.

was painted in 1882, a small painting. Apparently I have read

:56:06.:56:09.

that Sonya fought against the elements and pieces of sand became

:56:10.:56:15.

embedded in the wet paint. -- I have read that Van Gogh fought against

:56:16.:56:20.

the elements. The second painting is from 1884, Congregation Leaving the

:56:21.:56:23.

Reformed Church in Nuenen. This was for his mother, and, partly, his

:56:24.:56:28.

father, the 's at this church. He lived with them until they went to

:56:29.:56:35.

Antwerp. He committed suicide in 1890. If you have broken into the

:56:36.:56:40.

Van Gogh Museum, you get your pick of Van Goghs, why those two? I'm

:56:41.:56:48.

afraid I don't know the answer. Are they particularly significant? They

:56:49.:56:52.

are the early period of his career. The museum has over 200 paintings,

:56:53.:56:58.

I'm afraid only the people who stole them can tell us that. Maybe they

:56:59.:57:03.

were commissioned to steal those particular items. One does not know.

:57:04.:57:09.

After knee is very, very famous paintings will go underground. --

:57:10.:57:13.

often these very, very famous will go underground. You can't sell them

:57:14.:57:17.

on the open market, whole departments are looking for stolen

:57:18.:57:20.

art. People would be aware, you could not turn up at an auction

:57:21.:57:24.

house with them, but they could be used as collateral in drugs deaths

:57:25.:57:29.

or, potentially, to a private collector. So they will go straight

:57:30.:57:35.

back to the museum? Yes, but we do not know when. Presumably with

:57:36.:57:40.

better security? I would have thought that, after that, security

:57:41.:57:45.

would have been improved, yes. Thank you very much.

:57:46.:57:46.

There will be continuing coverage of the Rosetta mission and that crash

:57:47.:57:58.

landing into a comet. That is due at around 2:15pm. The spacecraft itself

:57:59.:58:06.

will be travelling very slowly, the comet will be travelling very

:58:07.:58:10.

quickly, so making sure they crash will be something of a mission, but

:58:11.:58:14.

it brings to an end that time in history for the Rosetta spacecraft.

:58:15.:58:17.

Joanna Gosling speaks to the scientists behind the Rosetta probe project. Plus tributes to Shimon Peres who has been laid to rest in Jerusalem and the former heroin addict who has been saved by an overdose antidote three times.