04/01/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


04/01/2017

The man who interrogated Saddam Hussein gives his impressions of the former Iraqi leader. Some private ambulance staff claim there is not enough training to do their job.


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Hello it's Wednesday, it's 9:00, I'm Victoria Derbyshire.

:00:08.:00:10.

Muddled thinking. Ill founded arguments. How Britain's outgoing

:00:11.:00:28.

ambassador to the describes the Brexit strategy and how it will

:00:29.:00:29.

affect negotiations. This programme has discovered that

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some staff at a private ambulance company have had as little

:00:31.:00:35.

as one hour's training We'll bring you the full exclusive

:00:36.:00:38.

story after 9.15 this morning and keen to hear your experiences

:00:39.:00:46.

of private ambulance companies. didn't really tell me what to do. He

:00:47.:01:00.

just gave me the blue lights and said off you go. That is

:01:01.:01:02.

astonishing. It is astonishing. Janet Jackson's given

:01:03.:01:07.

birth to her first baby We'll get advice from other mums

:01:08.:01:11.

who gave birth at the age of 50. Welcome to the programme,

:01:12.:01:24.

we're live until 11:00 this morning. As always, we'll bring

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you the latest breaking news and developing stories and we're

:01:29.:01:30.

really keen to hear from you. A little later we'll be hearing how

:01:31.:01:33.

four days into January some fat cat bosses have already earned more this

:01:34.:01:36.

year than the average British worker Use the hashtag Victoria LIVE

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and If you text, you will be charged Britain's outgoing ambassador

:01:40.:01:46.

to the European Union, criticised the government's

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preparations for Brexit. In his resignation letter he said

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he didn't know what ministers' negotiating objectives

:01:56.:01:57.

were and called on his colleagues to challenge

:01:58.:02:00.

what he called muddled thinking. Our Diplomatic Correspondent,

:02:01.:02:04.

James Landale, reports. Sir Ivan Rogers has been

:02:05.:02:09.

Britain's ambassador to the EU for three years,

:02:10.:02:11.

and his criticisms about the Government's preparations

:02:12.:02:15.

for Brexit will be hard to ignore. In his resignation e-mail, he says

:02:16.:02:18.

there is a short supply of... He reveals that even he does not

:02:19.:02:31.

know what the Government's negotiating objectives

:02:32.:02:35.

for Brexit will be. But it is Sir Ivan's implicit

:02:36.:02:38.

and thinly veiled criticism He urges fellow officials never

:02:39.:02:41.

to be afraid to speak truth to power, and to challenge

:02:42.:02:47.

what he calls muddled thinking He says they should support each

:02:48.:02:50.

other in difficult moments when they have to deliver messages

:02:51.:02:57.

that are disagreeable to those So, Sir Ivan's charge

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is a serious one - that the Government isn't ready

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for Brexit and it is ignoring Let's cross to Westminster

:03:06.:03:08.

and to our Political What will be the reaction to this

:03:09.:03:25.

resignation e-mail? There has been widespread reaction this morning. A

:03:26.:03:34.

number of fronts, believe campaigners, Iain Duncan Smith is

:03:35.:03:40.

saying, it wasn't possible for the government to trust Sir Ivan

:03:41.:03:43.

Rodgers. If you look at the Manor of this letter, he doesn't seem to be

:03:44.:03:47.

in sync with the government's views on Brexit and perhaps it was better

:03:48.:03:52.

for him to go. But remain campaigners have been regretting his

:03:53.:03:56.

departure. They say there has been a lot of experience, Sir Ivan Rodgers

:03:57.:04:05.

felt he was too close to Brussels. But he knew how Brussels work. We

:04:06.:04:09.

heard from the former head of the Foreign Office, the former head of

:04:10.:04:15.

the diplomatic service who said he thinks Sir Ivan Rodgers will be a

:04:16.:04:18.

great loss just several months before Theresa May is due to press

:04:19.:04:23.

the button on Article 50, the process of leaving the European

:04:24.:04:29.

Union. He thinks one of the reasons he left is because his advisor

:04:30.:04:32.

wasn't being listened to in Downing Street. What comes through in that

:04:33.:04:37.

note is a certain amount of frustration from Ivan Rogers, on

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what he says the negotiating position has been coordinated in

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London and the advice from negotiators in Brussels is being

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included in that. By the time we trigger Article 50, we need clarity

:04:52.:04:55.

about the objectives and the purpose of the negotiation. How much of a

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problem is this for Theresa May and Downing Street? Having to replace

:05:00.:05:04.

your senior EU representative at this point is not something that is

:05:05.:05:09.

desirable. But we will have to get on with it, the Prime Minister will

:05:10.:05:12.

have to go ahead and there will be a selection process involving the

:05:13.:05:15.

Foreign Office, the Foreign Secretary, the Cabinet Secretary and

:05:16.:05:19.

the Prime Minister, to find someone who is qualified and able to take

:05:20.:05:23.

over from Ivan. That is one of the problems that has been pointed out

:05:24.:05:29.

to her, the process and the timescale for the replacement. The

:05:30.:05:33.

clock is ticking and Theresa May has said Article 50 has to be invoked

:05:34.:05:38.

before the end of March. But from my conversations this morning, there

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isn't a clear process in place to find a replacement for Sir Ivan

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Rodgers. One of the key jobs he did was meet representatives from all of

:05:47.:05:52.

the other EU member states every week. So in terms of getting the

:05:53.:05:56.

intelligence from Brussels, what other countries might be up to, is

:05:57.:06:00.

vitally important. So far it looks as though it might be a

:06:01.:06:04.

recommendation from a senior civil servant as to who his successor

:06:05.:06:08.

should be. But the fact no timescale is in place for his replacements,

:06:09.:06:13.

suggest it was a surprise to Downing Street that he left at this stage,

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even though he was due to stand down before the end of the. That will be

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a challenge for Theresa May. But the biggest political challenge will be

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to answer the central accusation in his central Brexit resignation

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letter, is that the government wouldn't give us a running

:06:30.:06:33.

commentary on Brexit, or share the negotiating strategy with us, but

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they don't know what the objectives are when they go into those crucial

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negotiations with the rest of the EU. Thank you very much.

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Now, a news summary from the BBC Newsroom.

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Former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides

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emergency cover for the NHS, say they were given just an hour's

:06:52.:06:54.

A company based in Essex called the 'Private Ambulance Service'

:06:55.:06:58.

is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times.

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The company says the level of training of its staff exceeds

:07:01.:07:03.

Victoria will have more on this after quarter past.

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An Israeli military court has convicted a soldier of manslaughter

:07:11.:07:13.

for killing a wounded Palestinian who had stabbed another soldier.

:07:14.:07:17.

Sergeant Elor Azaria, who's now 20, shot Abdul Fatah al-Sharif

:07:18.:07:20.

while he was apparently incapacitated in the

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It happened during a wave of Palestinian knife attacks.

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Sharif and another Palestinian had stabbed and wounded an Israeli

:07:29.:07:31.

soldier in Hebron before troops opened fire, wounding Sharif

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Footage shows Sharif was then shot dead from a few metres away.

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The BBC's Yolande Knell is in Tel Aviv.

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Can you tell us a bit more about the sensitivities around this and the

:07:52.:08:00.

reaction? The panel of three judges are still handing down their verdict

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in this case. What they have said is they don't buy the defence claimed

:08:05.:08:09.

by the soldier that he believed that Abdul Fatah al-Sharif continued to

:08:10.:08:12.

pose a threat, because he saw him moving. He told the court he thought

:08:13.:08:16.

perhaps he had a suicide belt underneath his jacket. But the

:08:17.:08:21.

prosecution claimed this was an act of revenge after the earlier

:08:22.:08:27.

stabbing attack on soldiers. Elor Azaria had been a medic and treated

:08:28.:08:31.

one who was wounded. Sentencing in this case will take place at a later

:08:32.:08:37.

date. There was a small crowd of people supporting Elor Azaria

:08:38.:08:40.

outside the court with signs saying, the nation is behind you. There have

:08:41.:08:45.

previously been rallies in his support here in Tel Aviv, with

:08:46.:08:51.

thousands of people turning out. Some top Israeli officials have

:08:52.:08:55.

spoken also backing him, but the IDF has been clear, this is a breach of

:08:56.:09:02.

its moral values and military regulations and Palestinians and

:09:03.:09:04.

Israeli human rights groups who distributed the video that was shot

:09:05.:09:09.

in Hebron on the day, very disturbing footage, they have said

:09:10.:09:14.

this case is evidence that excessive force was being used in some cases

:09:15.:09:18.

during the wave of Palestinian attacks, which were mostly

:09:19.:09:22.

stabbings, but in some cases car ramming and shootings, over the past

:09:23.:09:23.

year. Thank you. Military and security experts

:09:24.:09:31.

in the UK are urging people to learn lifesaving skills in case they're

:09:32.:09:34.

caught up in a terror attack. They've launched an app called

:09:35.:09:36.

CitizenAid, which offers people a step-by-step guide to saving lives

:09:37.:09:38.

in the event of such an attack. They say people need to know how

:09:39.:09:42.

to give vital first aid, such as stopping severe bleeding,

:09:43.:09:44.

before paramedics arrive. The retailer Next says

:09:45.:09:46.

it is bracing for "tougher times" in 2017 as it reported

:09:47.:09:49.

a worse-than-expected The company said full-price sales

:09:50.:09:51.

fell by 0.4% in the 54 days to Christmas Eve compared

:09:52.:10:00.

with the previous year. It also said its profits

:10:01.:10:02.

for the year as a whole would be A think tank on high pay says top

:10:03.:10:05.

bosses will have earned more by lunchtime today than

:10:06.:10:15.

typical workers take The High Pay Centre says that

:10:16.:10:17.

midday, on what it calls "Fat Cat Wednesday"

:10:18.:10:21.

is the time some executives will pass the average

:10:22.:10:23.

UK salary of ?28,200. The government is considering plans

:10:24.:10:26.

to make firms reveal the pay gap between chief executives

:10:27.:10:29.

and average workers. Janet Jackson has given birth

:10:30.:10:39.

to her first child at the age of 50. A statement said the musician

:10:40.:10:43.

and her Qatari businessman husband Wissam Al Mana were "thrilled"

:10:44.:10:45.

to welcome their son. The singer stopped a world tour last

:10:46.:10:47.

April, telling her fans she was planning a family

:10:48.:10:50.

with her husband. That's a summary of

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the latest BBC News. We will be talking about private

:10:53.:11:07.

ambulance companies. Quite a few of you getting in touch. This e-mail

:11:08.:11:13.

from somebody who wishes to remain anonymous. I have worked as an NHS

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paramedic for an early 20 years and private Ambulance Service crews lack

:11:19.:11:24.

of training, other worrying, would be the least of my concerns. I am

:11:25.:11:30.

often embarrassed by the stuff that back me up and I readily find myself

:11:31.:11:35.

making excuses for them to patients and explained they are private

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ambulance personnel and not NHS. I would like to remain anonymous

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because of the fear of repercussions of voicing my concerns. Get in touch

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with us. Use the hash tag Victoria live on Twitter. A private Ambulance

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Service say they don't accept the nature of the allegations have been

:11:56.:11:56.

made. You can e-mail as well. And the Premier League

:11:57.:12:05.

leaders Chelsea are looking for a record-breaking

:12:06.:12:10.

night against Tottenham. They're looking for an historic 14th

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straight win in the English top And I'm sure they wouldn't

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mind setting that record against their arch enemies

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Tottenham. What's more, a win would extend

:12:19.:12:20.

their lead at the top So, a big night for Chelsea,

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a big night for the fans. If they do win, this is something

:12:23.:12:28.

that hasn't happened since top-flight football was first

:12:29.:12:31.

played in 1888. Formidable as Chelsea

:12:32.:12:33.

are at the moment, though, Spurs are enjoying a good run

:12:34.:12:35.

of form themselves. They've won their last four league

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games on the bounce, At one their revenge against Chelsea

:12:38.:12:55.

who had a hand in them not winning the league last season. Bournemouth

:12:56.:13:01.

will be kicking themselves? Arsenal's title ambitions

:13:02.:13:05.

were dented last night, but Bournemouth will still be

:13:06.:13:07.

kicking themselves, won't they? Arsenal fans have had quite a bit

:13:08.:13:09.

to celebrate in recent days, after Olivier Giroud's

:13:10.:13:12.

remarkable scorpion-kick goal. And although they didn't beat

:13:13.:13:13.

Bournemouth last night, this may The Gunners were 2-0 down

:13:14.:13:16.

at half-time, before Bournemouth So, Arsenal 3-0 down

:13:17.:13:20.

with half an hour to play, and would you believe it,

:13:21.:13:24.

they pulled it back. Who else but that man Giroud

:13:25.:13:27.

with the equalising goal. Mike Phelan, wasn't that long he was

:13:28.:13:50.

winning manager of the month? It was only in August, it shows how brutal

:13:51.:13:56.

football management can be. This is the third sacking of a Premier

:13:57.:13:57.

League boss in as many weeks. Phelan was manager of the month

:13:58.:14:02.

in August, before getting the role But Hull City are bottom

:14:03.:14:05.

of the league, and have been in the relegation

:14:06.:14:08.

zone since mid-October. It's indicative of the difficult

:14:09.:14:10.

season they're having At the start of the campaign

:14:11.:14:12.

the club had just 13 fit senior Also, the owners are trying to sell

:14:13.:14:16.

the club, which contributed to a breakdown in the relationship

:14:17.:14:22.

with the previous Understandable, then,

:14:23.:14:24.

that with all that happening in the background this season,

:14:25.:14:29.

Hull City have struggled Just one win in their last 18

:14:30.:14:31.

leagues games, and they're The club say they will announce

:14:32.:14:35.

a replacement in due course. One name being mentioned is former

:14:36.:14:39.

Birmingham City boss Gary Rowett. This programme has discovered that

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some staff at a private ambulance company have had as little as one

:14:49.:14:54.

hour's training to drive NHS trusts are increasingly

:14:55.:14:57.

using companies and charities to respond to emergency calls

:14:58.:15:00.

when they don't have The Private Ambulance Company,

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based in Basildon in Essex, has a contract to respond to 999

:15:03.:15:07.

calls for the NHS ambulance trust in the East of England,

:15:08.:15:10.

as well as emergency transport Whistle blowers have told this

:15:11.:15:15.

programme about a lack of training, dirty conditions in the vehicles

:15:16.:15:20.

and inappropriate equipment. The company denies the allegations,

:15:21.:15:24.

and says all its staff have Our reporter James Melley

:15:25.:15:27.

has been investigating. One hour's training on blue

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lights, that was it. It was quite clear that

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I was working with people that weren't trained,

:15:48.:15:50.

weren't competent in the job. And now I've got to find a way

:15:51.:15:57.

of living without him. When we dial 999 for an emergency,

:15:58.:16:13.

most people expect NHS ambulances and their highly-trained crews

:16:14.:16:19.

to respond, but increasingly, as NHS trusts struggle to meet demand,

:16:20.:16:24.

private companies are stepping One of these companies

:16:25.:16:28.

is the Private Ambulance Service, which is based in Basildon,

:16:29.:16:41.

in Essex. It carries out work like taking

:16:42.:16:43.

patients to hospital appointments, transferring sick people

:16:44.:16:47.

between hospitals, and it also provides cover for 999 calls

:16:48.:16:50.

for the East of England NHS But whistle-blowers have told us

:16:51.:16:53.

staff aren't properly trained, and the equipment they use is not

:16:54.:16:58.

up to scratch. Now, a woman is taking legal action

:16:59.:17:03.

against an ambulance The Private Ambulance Service

:17:04.:17:05.

was in the news last year, after the Essex coroner criticised

:17:06.:17:09.

it over the death of One of the company's crews

:17:10.:17:11.

responded to a call saying And he said, "I think

:17:12.:17:17.

it's my heart." She put the stethoscope

:17:18.:17:21.

on his chest and said, They ran tests and said Mr Page had

:17:22.:17:23.

got indigestion or had a hurt muscle He later died, having

:17:24.:17:29.

suffered a heart attack. And I've got to find a way

:17:30.:17:34.

of living without him. Mrs Page's solicitor Stefanie Prior

:17:35.:17:43.

is seeking compensation for her. What has the impact

:17:44.:17:54.

been on Kim Page? I don't think any words can describe

:17:55.:17:58.

how Kim feels on a daily basis. Preparing for Christmas

:17:59.:18:03.

was very hard for her. She also had a family

:18:04.:18:06.

wedding in America. I actually spoke to her

:18:07.:18:09.

when she was in America, the night before the wedding,

:18:10.:18:11.

and she was really in a bit of difficulty with the whole process

:18:12.:18:17.

of attending the wedding with Gary's What have you found out

:18:18.:18:20.

about the way the Private Well, I've been contacted

:18:21.:18:25.

by various individuals who were former employees

:18:26.:18:28.

of the Private Ambulance Service who were worried about

:18:29.:18:32.

the safety of patients. One particular former

:18:33.:18:34.

employee had reported them to Care Quality Commission twice,

:18:35.:18:37.

to no avail. We've spoken to several people

:18:38.:18:43.

that work or have worked "Paul" would only speak to us

:18:44.:18:46.

if we disguised his identity. He worked for PAS as a medic,

:18:47.:18:52.

but lost his job last year. What was it like when you

:18:53.:18:56.

started working there? Surprising, I never had any

:18:57.:18:59.

induction or training. Pretty much just sent

:19:00.:19:02.

out, and that was it. So you had no induction,

:19:03.:19:04.

no training? It was quite clear that

:19:05.:19:06.

I was working with people that, not through their own fault,

:19:07.:19:10.

that weren't trained. They weren't competent in the job,

:19:11.:19:12.

and they certainly weren't confident In particular, on the ambulance

:19:13.:19:14.

side, coming across what we call running calls, so you come

:19:15.:19:18.

across a patient, quite a few staff Didn't know how to take simple

:19:19.:19:22.

things like blood sugars, ECGs, didn't know how to do

:19:23.:19:27.

manual blood pressures. Is there an example where that

:19:28.:19:30.

happened that particularly We drove out of a hospital one day

:19:31.:19:34.

doing PTS, or patient transport service work,

:19:35.:19:39.

and there was a lady collapsed The colleague I was with at the time

:19:40.:19:42.

didn't have a clue what to do. As I say, she didn't know how

:19:43.:19:48.

to take a blood sugar, how to read ECGs, how to even

:19:49.:19:51.

do an ECG. I ended up treating the patient,

:19:52.:19:53.

by which time other crews coming out of the hospital ended

:19:54.:19:56.

up assisting us. When it's putting patients at risk,

:19:57.:19:58.

it's putting lives at risk, it's delaying what could be

:19:59.:20:01.

time-critical first We started to hear more disturbing

:20:02.:20:04.

stories about a lack of basic training for staff

:20:05.:20:12.

at the Private Ambulance Service. Dan Duke worked at the company

:20:13.:20:16.

in patient transport until 2013, The job could require him to drive

:20:17.:20:20.

under blue lights when taking an emergency patient

:20:21.:20:25.

between different hospitals. What training were you actually

:20:26.:20:28.

given, in order to drive One hour's training

:20:29.:20:31.

on blue lights, that's it. All I'd done was got in the vehicle,

:20:32.:20:39.

got everything ready, started to drive out,

:20:40.:20:44.

put the blue lights on and then it was, "Just drive,"

:20:45.:20:46.

all the way down the A127, By that time it was about 4:00,

:20:47.:20:52.

so there was quite a bit of traffic, so it was having to go

:20:53.:20:57.

through the traffic Then all the way along the seafront,

:20:58.:20:59.

and then back along the seafront up towards Leigh-On-Sea,

:21:00.:21:06.

back on the A127 and into Basildon Trading Estate,

:21:07.:21:10.

where they were based at. He told me once, "There's

:21:11.:21:14.

a sharp corner coming up, when you come off the end

:21:15.:21:21.

of the seafront and go round, there's a sharp turn,"

:21:22.:21:24.

and he told me, "Don't forget about that turn," but I

:21:25.:21:27.

already know it's there. But that's the only thing

:21:28.:21:30.

he really said to me He didn't really tell me what to do

:21:31.:21:33.

or anything like that. He just gave me everything, said,

:21:34.:21:37.

"Put the blue lights on, Dan says he now works for another

:21:38.:21:40.

ambulance company, where he receives The Private Ambulance Service says

:21:41.:21:52.

that staff are fully qualified, In law, emergency-service staff can

:21:53.:21:57.

break certain rules of the road So, what is an acceptable level of

:21:58.:22:04.

training to drive under blue lights? The East Midlands NHS

:22:05.:22:19.

Ambulance Service let me watch it train its staff

:22:20.:22:21.

on its four-week course. Just change that siren

:22:22.:22:25.

again to the phaser, They've stopped, they've

:22:26.:22:27.

seen you, that's good. Left-hand indicator,

:22:28.:22:34.

left hand mirror as we come out. Nice and slow, in case we come

:22:35.:22:42.

across one of these. What kind of dangers do ambulance

:22:43.:22:45.

drivers have to be aware of when they're driving

:22:46.:22:59.

under blue lights? If you imagine everything that's

:23:00.:23:01.

on the road or by the side of the road is a potential hazard,

:23:02.:23:04.

it's a potential hazard to us, so some of the particular ones

:23:05.:23:07.

would be, as you'd expect, We've got an exemption under law

:23:08.:23:11.

to treat a red traffic light So we can proceed at a slow walking

:23:12.:23:16.

pace through those traffic lights, with maximum observation all around,

:23:17.:23:24.

to make sure it's safe Of course, the other traffic that's

:23:25.:23:28.

crossing us has the green light, so they have got priority,

:23:29.:23:33.

and we can only proceed In your opinion, would it be

:23:34.:23:36.

possible to train somebody to drive under blue lights with an hour,

:23:37.:23:41.

a day of training? The fact that our whole

:23:42.:23:45.

course is four weeks long, and the first two weeks

:23:46.:23:49.

are the foundation, if you like, to actually move on to doing blue

:23:50.:23:52.

light training and then that We just couldn't, as

:23:53.:23:55.

an Ambulance Service Trust, sanction anything really

:23:56.:24:01.

like that, no. During our investigation,

:24:02.:24:07.

we were contacted on social media by several existing members of staff

:24:08.:24:10.

at the Private Ambulance Service. So, I can see a bug there

:24:11.:24:14.

on the floor of some description. That could be a used

:24:15.:24:21.

sheet on the stretcher. So what's happened here is they've

:24:22.:24:30.

come into work and they've found And there's another picture

:24:31.:24:33.

of some form of insect. I mean, the patient that's got

:24:34.:24:44.

to ride in that ambulance has the right for that ambulance to be

:24:45.:24:50.

clean and in a condition that is Patient Transport Services move some

:24:51.:24:53.

very ill and vulnerable people. So anything in there that could be

:24:54.:25:02.

a source of infection could get into somebody's system

:25:03.:25:05.

and could harm them. So, I can see what looks

:25:06.:25:07.

like a two-person carry chair, and by the looks of it,

:25:08.:25:15.

the foot strap is broken. I guess the issue with things

:25:16.:25:19.

like foot straps is it's not like moving parcels

:25:20.:25:22.

or pieces of equipment. When you move people,

:25:23.:25:25.

they're unpredictable. I think certainly there

:25:26.:25:27.

is a difficulty with the staff trying to perform things like manual

:25:28.:25:31.

handling and lifting If you drop someone's parcel,

:25:32.:25:35.

it doesn't matter, but if you drop someone's mother or their grandma,

:25:36.:25:45.

that's something that you can't take back,

:25:46.:25:47.

so the equipment needs to be safe. It's an absolute duty

:25:48.:25:49.

on the employer to make sure the equipment they provide

:25:50.:25:52.

is in safe working order. The Care Quality Commission told us

:25:53.:25:58.

it found poor standards in infection control,

:25:59.:26:00.

staff not having enough time between shifts,

:26:01.:26:03.

and poor leadership arrangements during an inspection at the Private

:26:04.:26:07.

Ambulance Service in August. A follow-up inspection found

:26:08.:26:10.

things were improving, including better cleaning procedures

:26:11.:26:13.

and there was an action plan We approached the Private Ambulance

:26:14.:26:16.

Service for an interview, The NHS East of England

:26:17.:26:21.

Ambulance Service, which uses the Private Ambulance Service

:26:22.:27:03.

to provide cover for But the solicitor representing

:27:04.:27:05.

the widow of Gary Page is worried what might happen if all the lessons

:27:06.:27:22.

aren't learned from his death. I'm concerned for other patients,

:27:23.:27:27.

because Gary's situation, it was quite obvious

:27:28.:27:31.

he was suffering from chest pain, he should have been transported

:27:32.:27:33.

to hospital, and this is just a simple thing that

:27:34.:27:37.

shouldn't have happened. There could be other patients

:27:38.:27:39.

in similar predicaments and the same thing might happen,

:27:40.:27:42.

or more serious medical conditions which could be left,

:27:43.:27:48.

which could be devastating If you work for a private

:27:49.:27:49.

ambulance company or you've experience of them, do get

:27:50.:28:01.

in touch this morning. Stuart says, I worked there for two

:28:02.:28:15.

years and I can back up the claims. I had been trained to drive under

:28:16.:28:20.

blue lights, but when I was assessed at the company, I was more qualified

:28:21.:28:26.

than the assessor. William says, your claims are quite correct, I had

:28:27.:28:31.

no driving training and I was expected to blue light immediately.

:28:32.:28:37.

I voiced my concerns as a retired police traffic officer, and I left

:28:38.:28:42.

after three years, it was 100% unsafe and the managers do not

:28:43.:28:46.

listen. Darren says, the blue light training I went through was for 15

:28:47.:28:49.

days and that was done by qualified instructors. The firm involved in

:28:50.:28:56.

our report, the Private Ambulance Service, said they do not accept the

:28:57.:28:58.

nature of the allegations. And if you want to watch that

:28:59.:29:00.

film again and share it, go to our programme page,

:29:01.:29:03.

which is bbc.co.uk/victoria. In the next hour we'll be hearing

:29:04.:29:05.

from a former worker of the Private Ambulance Service

:29:06.:29:07.

and her claims she felt she was putting lives at risk due

:29:08.:29:10.

to the working conditions. This news to do with Southern Rail.

:29:11.:29:22.

A six-day strike by drivers from Monday has been cut to three days.

:29:23.:29:28.

Good news of sorts. But there is a likelihood of further action. That

:29:29.:29:33.

is according to Aslef. A six-day strike which was chewed to start on

:29:34.:29:38.

Monday, and is still due to start on Monday, has been cut to three days,

:29:39.:29:43.

but Aslef say there is still a likelihood of further action.

:29:44.:29:45.

In his first British broadcast interview,

:29:46.:29:47.

we speak to the CIA analyst who questioned Saddam Hussein

:29:48.:29:49.

At 9:35am, we'll be speaking to Britain's oldest first-time mum.

:29:50.:29:58.

Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:29:59.:30:11.

Britain's outgoing ambassador to the European Union,

:30:12.:30:13.

Sir Ivan Rogers, has strongly criticised the government's

:30:14.:30:15.

In his resignation letter, Sir Ivan urged British colleagues

:30:16.:30:28.

The government said he had stood down so a successor could be

:30:29.:30:32.

in place before Brexit negotiations started.

:30:33.:30:33.

Former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides

:30:34.:30:36.

emergency cover for the NHS, say they were given just an hour's

:30:37.:30:38.

A company based in Essex called the 'Private Ambulance Service'

:30:39.:30:42.

is contracted to respond to emergencies during busy times.

:30:43.:30:55.

Whistle-blowers have set the level of some of the equipment in the

:30:56.:30:58.

ambulances is poor. The company says the level

:30:59.:31:00.

of training of its staff exceeds An Israeli military court has

:31:01.:31:02.

convicted a soldier of manslaughter for killing a wounded Palestinian

:31:03.:31:06.

who had stabbed another soldier. Sergeant Elor Azaria, who's now 20,

:31:07.:31:08.

shot Abdul Fatah al-Sharif while he was apparently

:31:09.:31:11.

incapacitated in the It happened during a wave

:31:12.:31:13.

of Palestinian knife attacks. Sharif and another Palestinian had

:31:14.:31:17.

stabbed and wounded an Israeli soldier in Hebron before troops

:31:18.:31:20.

opened fire, wounding Sharif Footage shows Sharif was then shot

:31:21.:31:22.

dead from a few metres away. The rail union Aslef says

:31:23.:31:35.

that a planned six-day strike by drivers on Southern

:31:36.:31:40.

Railway from next Monday has The network has been plagued

:31:41.:31:42.

by cancellations and delays for months as the two sides wrangle

:31:43.:31:46.

over pay, jobs and conditions. However Aslef also said this

:31:47.:31:49.

morning that there's still a likelihood

:31:50.:31:51.

of further action. Military and security experts

:31:52.:31:52.

in the UK are urging people to learn lifesaving skills in case they're

:31:53.:31:56.

caught up in a terror attack. They've launched an app called

:31:57.:31:58.

CitizenAid, which offers people a step-by-step guide to saving lives

:31:59.:32:01.

in the event of such an attack. They say people need to know how

:32:02.:32:05.

to give vital first aid, such as stopping severe bleeding,

:32:06.:32:09.

before paramedics arrive. A think tank on high pay says top

:32:10.:32:14.

bosses will have earned more by lunchtime today than

:32:15.:32:17.

typical workers take The High Pay Centre says that

:32:18.:32:19.

midday, on what it calls "Fat Cat Wednesday"

:32:20.:32:24.

is the time some executives will pass the average

:32:25.:32:27.

UK salary of ?28,200. The government is considering plans

:32:28.:32:29.

to make firms reveal the pay gap between chief executives

:32:30.:32:34.

and average workers. Janet Jackson has given birth

:32:35.:32:39.

to her first child at the age of 50. A statement said the musician

:32:40.:32:43.

and her Qatari businessman husband Wissam Al Mana were "thrilled"

:32:44.:32:45.

to welcome their son. The singer stopped a world tour last

:32:46.:32:49.

April, telling her fans she was planning a family

:32:50.:32:52.

with her husband. Congratulations to Janet Jackson and

:32:53.:33:06.

family. Did you give birth at 50? If so, get in touch.

:33:07.:33:13.

You know that feeling in January - never quite sure what year it is -

:33:14.:33:16.

well it happens to the best of us - including the Vice President

:33:17.:33:19.

34 senators elected the beginning that term January the 3rd 2007. 17.

:33:20.:33:35.

2017. 2017. Do you solemnly swear

:33:36.:33:42.

that you will support and defend the Constitution

:33:43.:33:44.

of the United States against all Chelsea are chasing an historic 14th

:33:45.:33:47.

straight win in the English top flight in one season when they

:33:48.:34:04.

travel to to Tottenham tonight. A win for the Blues would extend

:34:05.:34:07.

their lead at the top of the Premier League

:34:08.:34:11.

to eight points. Arsenal came back from 3-0 down

:34:12.:34:13.

to draw 3-3 with at Bournemouth. Olivier Giroud scored

:34:14.:34:16.

the equaliser in the 92nd minute, and keeps Arsenal fourth

:34:17.:34:18.

in the table. Mike Phelan, wasn't that long

:34:19.:34:22.

he was winning manager of the month? And there's lots of British tennis

:34:23.:34:37.

action this morning. Naomi Broady here has been knocked

:34:38.:34:40.

out of the Auckland Classic, the Hopman Cup team lost in Perth

:34:41.:34:42.

to France, but more positively Kyle Edmund

:34:43.:34:45.

is through to the quarter final The brother of a private

:34:46.:34:51.

detective found murdered 30 years ago has written

:34:52.:34:56.

to the Prime Minister Theresa May, asking her not to drop plans

:34:57.:34:58.

to investigate the relationship but first here's his

:34:59.:35:01.

brother's story. It's one of the biggest unsolved

:35:02.:35:10.

murders in British history. Daniel Morgan was a private

:35:11.:35:13.

detective working in London. 30 years ago, in 1987,

:35:14.:35:15.

he was found dead in a pub car park in Sydenham,

:35:16.:35:18.

in south-east London. He'd been struck three times

:35:19.:35:22.

with an axe in the back of the head. His Rolex had been stolen,

:35:23.:35:25.

there was ?1,000, though, Southern Investigations,

:35:26.:35:28.

the company Daniel Morgan set up with his business partner

:35:29.:35:33.

Jonathan Rees, was thought to be working with the police and News

:35:34.:35:38.

of the World journalists. It's thought that Mr Morgan

:35:39.:35:40.

was ready to expose Despite five police investigations,

:35:41.:35:43.

no-one has been successfully The family wanted an

:35:44.:35:46.

independent inquiry. They fear a corrupt police

:35:47.:35:52.

officer may be connected As Home Secretary, Theresa May

:35:53.:35:55.

was the only minister in 25 years In 2013 she set up an expert panel,

:35:56.:36:00.

investigating the role of corrupt police, and their relationships

:36:01.:36:06.

with journalists and But Daniel's brother,

:36:07.:36:10.

Alastair Morgan, says its work has been delayed due to what he called

:36:11.:36:15.

a "lack of full The Metropolitan Police said this

:36:16.:36:17.

was an exceptionally complex process, and they were working

:36:18.:36:23.

closely with the panel. Daniel Morgan's brother

:36:24.:36:26.

Alistair, who is here, believes police corruption prevented

:36:27.:36:33.

Scotland Yard from ever He is calling on Theresa May not

:36:34.:36:35.

to drop so-called Leveson 2 Alongside Alastair Morgan

:36:36.:36:41.

is Professor Tim Luckhurst, who's Professor of Journalism

:36:42.:36:50.

at the University of Kent who doesn't believe there's any

:36:51.:36:55.

need for a Leveson 2. The government is weighing this up,

:36:56.:37:03.

why do you think the government should go ahead? We have this

:37:04.:37:09.

enquiry looking into my brother's murder. When I accepted this

:37:10.:37:12.

proposal from the Home Secretary that this should be looked into in

:37:13.:37:19.

this way, I had, in the back of my mind, the firm idea that Leveson two

:37:20.:37:24.

was going to take place. And because a panel does not have statutory

:37:25.:37:28.

powers, it cannot subpoena witnesses, it cannot order them to

:37:29.:37:34.

give evidence or disclose papers or anything like that. I thought that

:37:35.:37:43.

if there were areas the panel could not deal with because they did not

:37:44.:37:48.

have the powers, then Leveson two would be available afterwards after

:37:49.:37:57.

a kind of backstop, if you like. Is that, bearing in mind, the cost of a

:37:58.:38:02.

potential Leveson two, running into the millions, is that the right way

:38:03.:38:06.

forward to try to find out what happened to your brother? Well, as I

:38:07.:38:16.

said it is a backstop. If the panel cannot get answers to seven very

:38:17.:38:23.

important questions, then this would be a means of doing that. I also

:38:24.:38:30.

think that Leveson two, the issue of journalists and the police has not

:38:31.:38:35.

been dealt with fully by leather someone. I know from my brother's

:38:36.:38:41.

case, there are areas that need to be looked into. Professor Lott

:38:42.:38:46.

cursed, it would be worth reminding our audience what Leveson two is

:38:47.:38:54.

meant to be? It is about regulation of the British press, it is a

:38:55.:38:59.

successor to Leveson one. Looking into relationships in the past

:39:00.:39:02.

between British journalist and the police. It is an aspect some people

:39:03.:39:07.

think it is worth pursuing. These relationships were very long time

:39:08.:39:11.

ago, there have been many enquiries into the conduct of the police since

:39:12.:39:17.

1987. The police have reformed their actions, journalists have reformed

:39:18.:39:21.

also and there is no need for Leveson two on that basis. More

:39:22.:39:26.

importantly, Leveson one is a spectacular failure and there is no

:39:27.:39:29.

need for Leveson two on that basis. More importantly, Leveson one is a

:39:30.:39:31.

spectacular failure and the Isner public demand for there is nothing

:39:32.:39:35.

more to explain between the relationship between journalists and

:39:36.:39:40.

the police? It may in the past, on occasion have thrown up allegations

:39:41.:39:44.

of corruption, the proper way to investigate those is to criminal

:39:45.:39:48.

prosecutions and through the courts. Which has happened? Most of those

:39:49.:39:55.

cases has turned out not to convict jealous, although in some cases they

:39:56.:39:59.

have convicted police officers. That is the right way to do it. Let's

:40:00.:40:05.

remember the fundamental point. Journalists exist to find out things

:40:06.:40:09.

which powerful people don't want the public to know. That means

:40:10.:40:13.

journalists often do need to have police sources, the work with police

:40:14.:40:18.

sources often reveals information that is dramatically in the public

:40:19.:40:27.

interest. That is what the attempt to prosecute journalists discovered.

:40:28.:40:32.

Your worry is that Leveson two could potentially bring in further

:40:33.:40:35.

regulation of the press and you think it could be a bad thing? I

:40:36.:40:42.

have been a critic of this process from the beginning. It has failed to

:40:43.:40:47.

win their support of any substantial British newspaper. It is not

:40:48.:40:53.

surprising it failed to gain the support of any substantial British

:40:54.:40:57.

newspaper, is it? It was the Guardian that broke the bone hacking

:40:58.:41:01.

story. The Godding campaign year after year to bring back an enquiry.

:41:02.:41:07.

Also it is refusing to abide by the conclusions. Nobody from the left of

:41:08.:41:12.

the Guardian, right through to the Daily Mail on the right believes the

:41:13.:41:15.

proposals Lord Le the Sun put forward are worth accepting. But

:41:16.:41:19.

tells us something very interesting. You think it could lead to more...

:41:20.:41:30.

It is out of date and it is the problem on how the Internet treat

:41:31.:41:35.

the news. Do you think that as a result of the criminal prosecutions

:41:36.:41:39.

of various public officials, members of the police service and

:41:40.:41:42.

journalists, that actually the media and the police have made significant

:41:43.:41:49.

changes to the way they operate? I don't really know about that, but

:41:50.:41:55.

what I am sure of, is that they haven't really got to the bottom of

:41:56.:42:01.

this. Leveson one didn't get to the bottom of the relationship between

:42:02.:42:04.

the press and the police, I am quite sure of that. Do you think Leveson

:42:05.:42:10.

two would? I think the police have been seriously compromised at a high

:42:11.:42:16.

level why their interaction with journalists in the past. This has

:42:17.:42:20.

not been examined properly. We will find out what Theresa May is going

:42:21.:42:25.

to do in the next few weeks. Thank you both very much.

:42:26.:42:27.

The Metropolitan Police told us it was working closely

:42:28.:42:29.

with the Home Office and Daniel Morgan Independent Panel

:42:30.:42:32.

on what is an exceptionally complex process.

:42:33.:42:34.

It added that the panel have had access to over one million

:42:35.:42:37.

We've been told to run and escape from a terrorist attack.

:42:38.:42:46.

Now experts want us to learn basic first aid and help the injured.

:42:47.:42:53.

We will talk more about that later. Janet Jackson has given birth to her

:42:54.:43:12.

first child at the age of 50. # Let's work together to improve our

:43:13.:43:15.

way of life will stop. # You've got one life to live, whose

:43:16.:43:42.

right, who's wrong? # That's the Way love goes.

:43:43.:43:57.

# Oh, baby. # Any time your world is crazy.

:43:58.:44:03.

# All you have to do is call me. # Come back to me...

:44:04.:44:36.

# Come back to me. # Lord knows, that I have tried.

:44:37.:44:45.

In April last year, she announced her pregnancy. My husband and I, my

:44:46.:44:56.

husband and I are planning a family so I am going to have to delay the

:44:57.:45:02.

tour. Please try and understand it is important I do this now. I have

:45:03.:45:07.

di Resta, Doctor's orders. But I have not forgotten about you. I will

:45:08.:45:12.

continue the tour as soon as I possibly can.

:45:13.:45:17.

Her birth is reported to have been "stress free" and "healthy" -

:45:18.:45:19.

You had your daughter at 51, tell us about the reaction from people when

:45:20.:45:33.

you had a baby at nearly 51. It was universally thrilled for me. Nobody

:45:34.:45:40.

raised their eyebrows and said, how old will you be on the school run? I

:45:41.:45:46.

did not notice any negative reaction until I wrote about it in the

:45:47.:45:49.

Guardian. Then there were lots of very miserable people who expressed

:45:50.:45:55.

themselves rather horribly. In the comments section. Give us a flavour,

:45:56.:46:00.

without giving them too much publicity. There was some miserable

:46:01.:46:09.

20-something who probably never did anything other than have children,

:46:10.:46:13.

who said, this is distorting, revolting, etc. But for years on, I

:46:14.:46:19.

have forgotten all of them. It is the most wonderful thing, the most

:46:20.:46:24.

magical thing I have ever done. Slightly grumpy for your rod running

:46:25.:46:28.

around behind me, she says she does not want to be on television, so we

:46:29.:46:33.

may have to coax her out, so you can meet Sadie. I don't blame her, to be

:46:34.:46:42.

honest. Tell us how you managed to become pregnant. Thanks to miracles

:46:43.:46:50.

of IVF. Did you have a number of attempts before a successful

:46:51.:46:54.

pregnancy? Yes, Sadie was the last roll of the dice. I honestly had

:46:55.:47:02.

rolled out -- ruled out the enterprise as a financial scam.

:47:03.:47:07.

There were two macro financial -- frozen embryos at their clinic in

:47:08.:47:10.

Barcelona, and they had extended the deadline by three months. They

:47:11.:47:16.

allowed me to go up to the age of 51, and I had just passed 51, so I

:47:17.:47:23.

did not know what got me to book that last flight to Barcelona, but I

:47:24.:47:25.

am glad that I did. We can speak to Sue Tollefsen

:47:26.:47:28.

who became Britain's oldest first-time mum when she gave birth

:47:29.:47:32.

to her only child I am sorry, it is Sarah. You gave

:47:33.:47:46.

birth at the age of 50. How are you? Quite a lot of people would expect

:47:47.:47:50.

it to be more tiring to be a mother for the first time at 50, is that

:47:51.:47:56.

true or not? I don't find that it is true. I try to stay fit and active.

:47:57.:48:06.

It depends a lot on your attitude. If you think you can do it, you can.

:48:07.:48:11.

Tell us about your circumstances leading to your pregnancy. I spent

:48:12.:48:17.

many years trying to get pregnant, almost six. I met my husband later

:48:18.:48:28.

on in life. In the end, I did it in Spain with a donor egg, but we had

:48:29.:48:32.

many attempts, there were many failed attempts. Describe your joy

:48:33.:48:38.

when finally there is a successful pregnancy after a number of

:48:39.:48:43.

attempts. It is indescribable. I will ask you to describe it, I am

:48:44.:48:51.

sorry! Disbelief, happiness, I was ecstatic. At the same time

:48:52.:49:01.

cautiously optimistic, because I knew getting pregnant was not the

:49:02.:49:04.

whole story, I needed to stay pregnant. When Andre was born and

:49:05.:49:14.

came into the world healthy, I was over the moon. You will not want to

:49:15.:49:19.

give any advice for Janet Jackson, but I will ask you anyway, what

:49:20.:49:23.

would you say to somebody giving birth at 50?

:49:24.:49:30.

Enjoyed it. Follow your own path. Have fun and enjoy every second.

:49:31.:49:44.

Naomi, can I ask you the same question? You are going to get a lot

:49:45.:49:51.

of unsolicited advice. Ignore whatever you want to ignore. Trust

:49:52.:49:57.

your instincts. This is going to be the one thing... Nobody tells a

:49:58.:50:06.

childless person how much fun it is. It is exhausting, but it is a lot of

:50:07.:50:10.

fun. I am sure Joe Jackson has the money to pay for a lot of help. The

:50:11.:50:15.

advice I would give her is to spend as much time as she can with her

:50:16.:50:19.

son, because it is the most wonderful, interesting thing you

:50:20.:50:25.

will ever do. What is Sadie bashing in the background? She has turned a

:50:26.:50:34.

toy on. That is a screen that says, no way am I doing what you want at

:50:35.:50:38.

this moment! She is very much her own person!

:50:39.:50:48.

Just before Christmas, we were telling you what was happening

:50:49.:50:50.

in the besieged Syrian city of Eastern Aleppo on a daily basis -

:50:51.:50:56.

at the time people were living under daily bomb attacks and waiting

:50:57.:50:58.

But after the fragile government ceasefire, news

:50:59.:51:02.

We'll speak to people who've left shortly -

:51:03.:51:10.

but first here's a reminder of the events in Aleppo.

:51:11.:52:06.

The situation inside of Aleppo is the doomsday.

:52:07.:52:13.

Every day dozens of people are dying, that's continuously.

:52:14.:52:16.

I might die just now, whilst speaking to you.

:52:17.:52:25.

The situation now is getting horrifically intensified.

:52:26.:52:30.

No one can imagine what happened inside Aleppo,

:52:31.:52:38.

We hope to have a ceasefire soon because those people

:52:39.:52:45.

It's catastrophe, the situation, it's a real catastrophe.

:52:46.:53:04.

Zouhir, are you comfortable with continuing to talk to us,

:53:05.:53:07.

I can't move anywhere else, there's nowhere else is safe

:53:08.:53:15.

This is a shame on the world, because it is 2016 and people

:53:16.:53:24.

are getting burned to death, and suffocated to death,

:53:25.:53:27.

Let's talk now to our correspondent Lina Sinjab in Beirut.

:53:28.:56:26.

We are speaking now to the freelance journalist we spoke to before

:56:27.:56:34.

Christmas. You got out on the 19th of December, what were the last few

:56:35.:56:36.

days like? We were evacuated, the last day was

:56:37.:56:54.

horrible. Even though there was no shelling. People were executed and

:56:55.:57:04.

were taken as hostages. It was chaos, people were covering in one

:57:05.:57:20.

area. There was no organisation from the Red Crescent or the Red Cross,

:57:21.:57:24.

they were struggling to organise the mob. People were waiting to get the

:57:25.:57:44.

bus. It was quite bad. We were waiting for quite a long time, it

:57:45.:57:49.

was freezing, and even after we got the bus, hours of waiting, we waited

:57:50.:57:59.

for another 12 or 13 hours on the buses. There were negotiations with

:58:00.:58:10.

the Russian and a radiant militias about evacuating the injured people.

:58:11.:58:17.

They were compromising about us leaving. After struggling for a long

:58:18.:58:31.

day, we have our life back. You still in touch with people who are

:58:32.:58:35.

still in eastern Aleppo? If so, what are they saying see you?

:58:36.:58:44.

Yes, there are people who were brought back to their home. Many of

:58:45.:58:52.

them were scared to be back in the East, but quite a few of them have

:58:53.:58:57.

gone onto the street. The regime have raided the houses,

:58:58.:59:13.

they have taken every piece of furniture, every machine. If it was

:59:14.:59:24.

the owner himself, they would take him out. They would take everything.

:59:25.:59:29.

And beating them as well. People were taken and arrested in

:59:30.:59:38.

the East and West. Until the age of 50, they were

:59:39.:59:55.

arrested because of their relationship with the opposition,

:59:56.:59:59.

activists or relatives. It was for the regime forces and

:00:00.:00:21.

militias to take anyone. Taking them and putting them in jail. It was

:00:22.:00:25.

chaos. Which thank you for talking to us.

:00:26.:00:44.

If it is OK, we will come back to you for states. He is now in Idlib,

:00:45.:00:54.

having been evacuated from Eastern Aleppo just before Christmas. It is

:00:55.:00:59.

coming up to 10am and we will have the latest news and sport, but

:01:00.:01:03.

before that we will have the weather with Carol.

:01:04.:01:09.

It is going to turn colder, widespread frost away from the coast

:01:10.:01:16.

and the fact it is cold today indicate we have clearer skies and

:01:17.:01:20.

some sunshine. We also have this weather from moving steadily south

:01:21.:01:26.

and westwards in the direction of the surplus producing thick cloud

:01:27.:01:32.

and spots of rain. Cold air is feeding in. It will continue to feed

:01:33.:01:37.

in behind it. The other thing we have today is strong wind coming

:01:38.:01:41.

down this North Sea coastline. If you are exposed to that it will feel

:01:42.:01:46.

cold and it will generate some large waves. Wintry showers getting in

:01:47.:01:50.

behind Aberdeenshire, Shetland in particular but some rain showers

:01:51.:01:54.

getting in across parts of Norfolk. For the rest of us, as the weather

:01:55.:01:58.

front continues to drift towards the south-west, a fair bit of cloud,

:01:59.:02:04.

patchy rain and maybe drizzle. But even so it will break here and there

:02:05.:02:07.

are allowing sunny spells. Sunshine across parts of East Anglia along

:02:08.:02:13.

with the showers and as we had further north across further England

:02:14.:02:18.

-- northern England. In the far North East we will see the wintry

:02:19.:02:21.

showers but they will be hit and miss. It will brighten up nicely

:02:22.:02:25.

across southern parts of Northern Ireland as we go through the day. It

:02:26.:02:29.

is the same to south Wales, the brightness streaming in across the

:02:30.:02:32.

North as the weather front continues into part of the Midlands and also

:02:33.:02:37.

down into the south-west England. Here too, some patchy rain. Under

:02:38.:02:40.

those clear skies in the evening that bridges will drop rapidly. By

:02:41.:02:47.

night, there is a lot of blue on the charts. In towns and cities, those

:02:48.:02:51.

are the times of temperature values. In rural areas, we're looking at

:02:52.:02:58.

temperatures as low as minus six and possibly minus seven. Widespread

:02:59.:03:00.

frost away from the coast first thing tomorrow morning. The remnants

:03:01.:03:03.

of the weather front affecting surplus tingling, temperature and

:03:04.:03:09.

Northern Ireland. But for the rest of us, a cold day and a crisp and

:03:10.:03:14.

sunny one. But later on the next set of other fronts waiting will come

:03:15.:03:18.

in, moving in from the heading steadily down to the south-east.

:03:19.:03:23.

Ahead of them there will be some frost and more fog around. Here

:03:24.:03:29.

comes the rain steadily southwards, winds around it and then a return to

:03:30.:03:33.

brighter conditions, but nonetheless there will still be some showers

:03:34.:03:37.

around. Starting to turn milder from the North as we go of the day,

:03:38.:03:41.

unless you are in Norwich, where it will still be chilly. It leads us

:03:42.:03:45.

into a mild and settled weekend as well.

:03:46.:03:49.

How Britain's outgoing ambassador to the EU describes

:03:50.:04:00.

This programme has discovered that some staff at a private ambulance

:04:01.:04:16.

company have had as little as one hour's training

:04:17.:04:18.

He didn't tell me what to do or anything like that. He just gave me

:04:19.:04:28.

everything, said put the blue lights on and off you go, sort of thing.

:04:29.:04:34.

That is astonishing. It is astonishing. If you work for a

:04:35.:04:40.

private ambulance company, let us know. And the former CIA man who

:04:41.:04:47.

came face-to-face with Saddam Hussein after he was captured in

:04:48.:04:49.

2003. Here's Joanna in the BBC Newsroom

:04:50.:04:56.

with the latest BBC News. Britain's outgoing ambassador

:04:57.:04:59.

to the European Union, Sir Ivan Rogers, has strongly

:05:00.:05:01.

criticised the government's In his resignation letter,

:05:02.:05:03.

Sir Ivan urged British colleagues in Brussels to challenge

:05:04.:05:06.

"muddled thinking and The government said he had stood

:05:07.:05:08.

down so a successor could be in place before Brexit

:05:09.:05:12.

negotiations started. This programme has learned that

:05:13.:05:18.

former drivers for a private ambulance firm that provides

:05:19.:05:22.

emergency cover for the NHS, say they were given just an hour's

:05:23.:05:24.

training to drive under blue lights. A company based in Essex called

:05:25.:05:27.

the 'Private Ambulance Service' is contracted to respond

:05:28.:05:30.

to emergencies during busy times. Whistleblowers have

:05:31.:05:33.

also told us that some equipment in the ambulances

:05:34.:05:36.

is in poor condition. The company says the level

:05:37.:05:40.

of training of its staff exceeds I never had any induction

:05:41.:05:59.

overtraining. Just send out. No induction overtraining? No, it was

:06:00.:06:06.

clear I was working with people, not through their own faults, not

:06:07.:06:09.

trained, and not confident with dealing with situations. Coming

:06:10.:06:13.

across what we call running calls, so you come across a patient. Few

:06:14.:06:15.

staff did know how to respond. The rail union Aslef says

:06:16.:06:20.

that a planned six-day strike by drivers on Southern

:06:21.:06:22.

Railway from next Monday has The network has been plagued

:06:23.:06:24.

by cancellations and delays for months as the two sides wrangle

:06:25.:06:28.

over pay, jobs and conditions. However Aslef also said this

:06:29.:06:31.

morning that there's still a likelihood

:06:32.:06:32.

of further action. An Israeli military court has

:06:33.:06:40.

convicted a soldier of manslaughter for killing a wounded Palestinian

:06:41.:06:42.

who had stabbed another soldier. Sergeant Elor Azaria, who's now 20,

:06:43.:06:48.

shot Abdul Fatah al-Sharif while he was apparently

:06:49.:06:55.

incapacitated in the It happened during a wave

:06:56.:06:57.

of Palestinian knife attacks. Sharif and another Palestinian had

:06:58.:07:00.

stabbed and wounded an Israeli soldier in Hebron before troops

:07:01.:07:02.

opened fire, wounding Sharif Footage shows Sharif was then shot

:07:03.:07:04.

dead from a few metres away. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:07:05.:07:13.

News - more at 10.30. Here is an e-mail from the chairman

:07:14.:07:24.

of a private ambulance company. He is called Jack. He says, I was

:07:25.:07:28.

distressed to hear your piece this morning. We are professional

:07:29.:07:32.

companies, just about all the paramedics and technicians use

:07:33.:07:36.

bikers are ex-trust employees and in the case of some of our bank

:07:37.:07:41.

employees, current trust employees. All our staff are properly trained

:07:42.:07:45.

to a high standard. We have been recognised by all the trusts of

:07:46.:07:48.

reworked for as a high-quality provider. I would urge you to come

:07:49.:07:52.

and visit us, meet our people and see for yourselves how the funding

:07:53.:07:56.

of the trusts directly affects the level of service the trusts are able

:07:57.:08:01.

to provide and how we support their service and have to respond as a

:08:02.:08:05.

result. Jeff, thank you very much for the offer. We would like to take

:08:06.:08:09.

you up on that, so we will get in touch.

:08:10.:08:11.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning.

:08:12.:08:13.

Use the hashtag Victoria LIVE and If you text, you will be charged

:08:14.:08:16.

Chelsea are looking for an historic 14th straight win in the English

:08:17.:08:22.

They play arch rivals Tottenham at White Hart Lane tonight.

:08:23.:08:26.

A win would extend their lead at the top of the table to eight points.

:08:27.:08:29.

If Chelsea do win, this is something that hasn't happened since top

:08:30.:08:32.

flight football was first played in 1888.

:08:33.:08:34.

There have been a few teams who have managed 14 wins on the bounce.

:08:35.:08:48.

But their run spanned two seasons - 2001-02 and the following year.

:08:49.:08:52.

50 years before that, Preston North End did

:08:53.:08:54.

Bristol City did it in the Second Division way back in 1905 -

:08:55.:09:00.

they only conceded one goal all season.

:09:01.:09:01.

And the season before, also in the Second Division,

:09:02.:09:04.

Manchester United put together 14 wins in a row, but remarkably

:09:05.:09:06.

only finished third, and missed out on promotion.

:09:07.:09:08.

So can Tottenham stop Chelsea joining them tonight?

:09:09.:09:12.

I think there is a bit of extra spice on this. What happened at

:09:13.:09:18.

Stamford Bridge at the end of last season. Chelsea remaining

:09:19.:09:23.

Tottenham's chances of winning the Premier League. But Chelsea beat

:09:24.:09:26.

them earlier this season. Tottenham will want to spoil the party. It is

:09:27.:09:31.

not often a lot of revenge in football because Time moves on in

:09:32.:09:34.

football and players change but these are the same set of players

:09:35.:09:38.

and Tottenham will be desperate to stop them getting the record.

:09:39.:09:44.

There was a remarkable comeback from Arsenal last night,

:09:45.:09:47.

who scored three goals in the last 20 minutes, to earn a 3-3

:09:48.:09:50.

Eddie Howe's side were in complete control as they led 3-0, Ryan Fraser

:09:51.:09:54.

But Arsenal fought back, and a stoppage-time header

:09:55.:09:57.

from Olivier Giroud completed the turnaround.

:09:58.:10:04.

Just watch the celebration. He is very nimble on his feet.

:10:05.:10:08.

Mike Phelan is the latest Premier League manager to be sacked,

:10:09.:10:11.

with Hull City bottom of the Premier League.

:10:12.:10:12.

Phelan replaced Steve Bruce on a temporary basis before

:10:13.:10:15.

the start of the season, and was appointed

:10:16.:10:17.

Despite winning their opening two league games in August,

:10:18.:10:20.

And there's lots of British tennis action this morning.

:10:21.:10:31.

Kyle Edmund is through to the quarterfinal of the Brisbane

:10:32.:10:33.

International. Naomi Broady here has been knocked

:10:34.:10:35.

out of the Auckland Classic, the Hopman Cup team lost in Perth

:10:36.:10:39.

to France, but more positively Kyle Edmund

:10:40.:10:44.

is through to the quarter final England rugby union head coach

:10:45.:10:46.

Eddie Jones says Dylan Hartley will captain England

:10:47.:10:50.

during the Six Nations, Hartley is currently serving

:10:51.:10:51.

a suspension after being sent off His six week ban will end

:10:52.:10:55.

before England play Dylan is doing everything he can,

:10:56.:11:14.

has worked hard and to get into the England side is to be very fit. Not

:11:15.:11:19.

playing games means he has got to undergo an unbelievably stringent

:11:20.:11:23.

fitness programme over the next five or six weeks. He is doing that and

:11:24.:11:31.

putting himself in the best putting it -- position to continue as

:11:32.:11:32.

captain. That is all the sport. Up until yesterday the UK's

:11:33.:11:37.

ambassador to the EU was a man But then he resigned,

:11:38.:11:40.

which was a surprise, not least because the UK

:11:41.:11:43.

starts its talks for exiting the European Union after Article 50

:11:44.:11:45.

is triggered, which we know will be And Sir Ivan, an experienced

:11:46.:11:48.

negotiator, was expected Overnight, an email he wrote

:11:49.:11:51.

to his staff explaining why he'd stepped down,

:11:52.:11:55.

referred to "muddled thinking". It also spoke of

:11:56.:11:57.

"ill-founded arguments". And he urged his staff

:11:58.:11:58.

to "speak truth to power", which sort of implies

:11:59.:12:02.

that the advice he'd been giving to Downing Street had

:12:03.:12:04.

fallen on deaf ears. So what does all this mean

:12:05.:12:06.

for Brexit negotiations? Let's speak to our guests. Did he

:12:07.:12:33.

jump, or was he pushed? Having had the chance to read the e-mail you

:12:34.:12:38.

referred to overnight, a man who has been in this game for a very long

:12:39.:12:41.

time, understands what will be most useful and helpful for the Prime

:12:42.:12:45.

Minister as she triggers Article 50 and has a two-year negotiation

:12:46.:12:50.

process, is to have someone in place for that cycle. He was due to retire

:12:51.:12:57.

in October, and his number two said she would be leaving the team to

:12:58.:13:00.

work for the Welsh government. He has seen that looking forward the

:13:01.:13:04.

best thing Theresa May could have at her disposal for these discussions

:13:05.:13:09.

is a full team who will be there for the duration. Wasn't he expected to

:13:10.:13:15.

have is contract extended? I'm not sure that is the right terminology

:13:16.:13:19.

for the diplomatic service! The view was, he had been in post for a while

:13:20.:13:25.

and he had planned to have, whether he is retiring going back into the

:13:26.:13:29.

private sector, I have no idea. But his message is clear he wanted to

:13:30.:13:33.

see a team in place that would be able to drive forward, a complex and

:13:34.:13:37.

detailed discussion over the next two. Jenny Chapman, according to

:13:38.:13:45.

Anne Marie, it was a very sensible decision and he took it in advance

:13:46.:13:48.

of his retirement so Theresa May could get the full team in place?

:13:49.:13:53.

That isn't what he said. He made it very clear in his e-mail that he is

:13:54.:14:01.

deeply troubled by the way the negotiation look as though they may

:14:02.:14:04.

be carried out. He could not have been more straightforward really.

:14:05.:14:13.

Quite transparent in his e-mail. Muddled thinking, he thinks the

:14:14.:14:17.

government doesn't have a plan and now we find the government doesn't

:14:18.:14:22.

have a plan and it has more or less experienced well-connected person to

:14:23.:14:26.

help Britain get what needs out of Brexit. It is bad news. The whole

:14:27.:14:35.

situation is deeply worrying. I disagree with Jenny. The start of

:14:36.:14:40.

his letter is very clear, the departure of his number two does fit

:14:41.:14:48.

will having a faulty. He was watching and hoping that when he was

:14:49.:14:52.

leading discussions with David Cameron in February, to get is a

:14:53.:14:56.

good deal. I was hopeful that there was a good deal, we wouldn't need to

:14:57.:15:00.

leave because we would have a new relationship. But failed. What he

:15:01.:15:05.

highlighted in his letter, Whitehall really hadn't driven forwards. I was

:15:06.:15:11.

shocked when we got to the other side of Brexit, Whitehall hadn't

:15:12.:15:15.

prepared for what was a 50-50 chance of out or in, Whitehall assumed the

:15:16.:15:19.

British people would stay in. That was very muddled thinking in

:15:20.:15:23.

Whitehall and he has tried and then decided a new team need to take that

:15:24.:15:28.

on. I was not surprised by those words, but they reflect the

:15:29.:15:32.

Whitehall view that now needs to change, civil servants need and are

:15:33.:15:37.

coming together would Theresa May's new departments. Jenny Chapman, do

:15:38.:15:41.

you think the muddled thinking was referring to civil servants or the

:15:42.:15:42.

Prime Minister and those around her? You cannot just say Whitehall had to

:15:43.:15:56.

prepare for the possibility of a vote to leave. The Government should

:15:57.:15:59.

have required the civil service to do that. There was a long lead-in

:16:00.:16:06.

into the referendum, it had ample opportunity to do that, and the

:16:07.:16:08.

Government failed to pre-empt this outcome. It is negligent on the

:16:09.:16:19.

Government. What we have now is a task that we must undertake

:16:20.:16:23.

seriously and carefully, and we need our best negotiators to do this.

:16:24.:16:31.

Everybody who has had anything to do with Simon Rogers, including George

:16:32.:16:34.

Osborne, has been incredibly, commentary about his skills,

:16:35.:16:41.

experience and networks. That would have had a huge impact. We have now

:16:42.:16:46.

lost that, but we need to move forward, and the Government have to

:16:47.:16:49.

be much better in the way that it approaches Brexit. We should be much

:16:50.:16:56.

further forward by now, we should have much more clarity. British

:16:57.:17:01.

people are getting a bit fed up with the lack of information. This is

:17:02.:17:05.

another case of the Government not dealing with Brexit as well as it

:17:06.:17:07.

should. This programme has discovered that

:17:08.:17:17.

some staff at a private ambulance company have had as little as one

:17:18.:17:20.

hour's training to drive NHS trusts are increasingly

:17:21.:17:22.

using companies and charities to respond to emergency calls

:17:23.:17:26.

when they don't have The Private Ambulance Company,

:17:27.:17:29.

based in Basildon in Essex, has a contract to respond to 999

:17:30.:17:35.

calls for the NHS Ambulance Trust in the East of England,

:17:36.:17:39.

as well as emergency transport Whistle blowers have told this

:17:40.:17:43.

programme about a lack of training, dirty conditions in the vehicles

:17:44.:17:47.

and inappropriate equipment. The company denies the allegations,

:17:48.:17:49.

and says all its staff have Here's a short extract

:17:50.:17:53.

from our reporter James When we dial 999 for an emergency,

:17:54.:17:57.

most people expect NHS ambulances and their highly-trained crews

:17:58.:18:14.

to respond, but increasingly, as NHS trusts struggle to meet demand,

:18:15.:18:19.

private companies are stepping One of these companies

:18:20.:18:22.

is the Private Ambulance Service, which is based in Basildon,

:18:23.:18:29.

in Essex. It carries out work like taking

:18:30.:18:32.

patients to hospital appointments, transferring sick people

:18:33.:18:35.

between hospitals, and it also provides cover for 999 calls

:18:36.:18:38.

for the East of England NHS But whistle-blowers have told us

:18:39.:18:41.

staff aren't properly trained, and the equipment they use is not

:18:42.:18:47.

up to scratch. We've spoken to several people

:18:48.:18:51.

that work or have worked "Paul" would only speak to us

:18:52.:18:55.

if we disguised his identity. He worked for PAS as a medic,

:18:56.:19:01.

but lost his job last year. What was it like when you

:19:02.:19:04.

started working there? Surprising, I never had any

:19:05.:19:07.

induction or training. Pretty much just sent

:19:08.:19:10.

out and that was it. So you had no induction,

:19:11.:19:12.

no training? It was quite clear that

:19:13.:19:14.

I was working with people that, not through their own fault,

:19:15.:19:18.

that weren't trained. They weren't competent in the job,

:19:19.:19:20.

and they certainly weren't confident In particular, on the ambulance

:19:21.:19:22.

side, coming across what we call running calls, so you come

:19:23.:19:27.

across a patient, quite a few staff Didn't know how to take simple

:19:28.:19:30.

things like blood sugars, ECGs, didn't know how to do

:19:31.:19:35.

manual blood pressures. We started to hear more disturbing

:19:36.:19:38.

stories about a lack of basic training for staff

:19:39.:19:46.

at the Private Ambulance Service. Dan Duke worked at the company

:19:47.:19:50.

in patient transport until 2013, The job could require him to drive

:19:51.:19:53.

under blue lights when taking an emergency patient

:19:54.:19:58.

between different hospitals. What training were you actually

:19:59.:20:03.

given in order to drive One hour's training

:20:04.:20:05.

on blue lights, that's it. So, what is an acceptable level of

:20:06.:20:13.

training to drive under blue lights? In your opinion, would it be

:20:14.:20:23.

possible to train somebody to drive under blue lights with an hour,

:20:24.:20:27.

a day of training? The fact that our whole

:20:28.:20:31.

course is four weeks long, and the first two weeks

:20:32.:20:35.

are the foundation, if you like, to actually move on to doing blue

:20:36.:20:38.

light training and then that We just couldn't, as

:20:39.:20:41.

an Ambulance Service Trust, sanction anything really

:20:42.:20:47.

like that, no. We approached the Private Ambulance

:20:48.:20:56.

Service for an interview. The NHS East of England

:20:57.:20:58.

Ambulance Service, which uses the Private Ambulance Service

:20:59.:21:36.

to provide cover for We asked the Private Ambulance

:21:37.:21:39.

Service to talk to us But in a statement they told us

:21:40.:22:00.

they do not accept the nature of the allegations that

:22:01.:22:05.

have been made. And that, "We outsource our

:22:06.:22:06.

blue-light driver training to an approved training organisation

:22:07.:22:08.

used by the NHS. We started using our current

:22:09.:22:11.

provider in January 2016. All staff receive induction training

:22:12.:22:15.

and full training where necessary." Your experiences of private

:22:16.:22:21.

ambulances welcome as always. We can speak now to Alan Howson,

:22:22.:22:25.

executive chairman of the Independent Ambulance Association,

:22:26.:22:27.

who represents the Also to Will Broughton,

:22:28.:22:30.

a paramedic and a trustee And Heide Stone, who worked

:22:31.:22:35.

for the Private Ambulance Service from October 2014 to March 2015

:22:36.:22:40.

and claims she was What do you think? It is not

:22:41.:22:55.

acceptable that somebody would only have one hour's training for blue

:22:56.:22:59.

light work. But at the time that company were doing PTS work, this

:23:00.:23:06.

was not 999... Patient transport services, it was not 909 support

:23:07.:23:09.

work. The training is very different. But this was an hour's

:23:10.:23:16.

training for blue light work. Blue light work, as defined, it was not

:23:17.:23:23.

that work. He said he was called upon from time to time to deliver

:23:24.:23:26.

patients from one hospital to another, not emergency, dedicated

:23:27.:23:33.

patient. Why would you have the blue lights on? You might still have the

:23:34.:23:39.

blue light on to transfer a patient, it might also be an emergency. And

:23:40.:23:45.

that clearly is unacceptable. At the time the programme or three weeks in

:23:46.:23:49.

length, it is now four weeks, and that is a national reference

:23:50.:23:52.

programme. These people were not getting three weeks. Not by the

:23:53.:23:57.

sound of it, that is not acceptable, and we are not here to defend that.

:23:58.:24:03.

What do you think? I very much agree, what has been presented is

:24:04.:24:10.

totally unacceptable. We would expect anybody driving and billiards

:24:11.:24:14.

under emergency conditions to have completed the four week nationally

:24:15.:24:19.

approved programme. Which is what the NHS does. And which this company

:24:20.:24:26.

in Basildon now do as well, from November 20 16th they brought the

:24:27.:24:32.

four-week training in. Private companies who are subcontracted

:24:33.:24:35.

working into a framework set by the Anne Boleyn stressed, and that will

:24:36.:24:39.

include reference to clinical training and driver training. They

:24:40.:24:44.

will have to provide records that there staff have been trained and

:24:45.:24:51.

certificated to those levels. Jeff, can you hear me? Maybe we have lost

:24:52.:24:58.

him. We will try to get him back in a moment. He is the chairman of a

:24:59.:25:02.

private ambulance company in the east of England. He wants to defend

:25:03.:25:05.

the kind of work that these firms do. Many of these firms. Which you

:25:06.:25:13.

would echo, as boss of the Independent ambulance Association?

:25:14.:25:16.

One of our members are ventilated and registered with the CQC. -- all

:25:17.:25:24.

of our members. They can have spot inspections, unannounced visits to

:25:25.:25:30.

audit activity. In terms of the rules of training, it is vague. The

:25:31.:25:35.

NHS does four-week training, but it is not compulsory? My understanding

:25:36.:25:46.

is it is not yet legally required. But it is required by the NHS trusts

:25:47.:25:51.

that all of their own employees have completed the programme. It is a

:25:52.:25:59.

broad question, Private and villains firms, are they safe? Yes. --

:26:00.:26:08.

Private ambulance firms. They are regulated, they held up to the same

:26:09.:26:12.

criteria, so yes, they are safe. Would you agree? Yes, they are all

:26:13.:26:20.

registered with the CQC. The paramedics working in the

:26:21.:26:22.

independent sector are all registered with the council and they

:26:23.:26:28.

meet their standards of proficiency, any of whom honour those of the

:26:29.:26:32.

College of paramedics, and meet their requirements as well. The

:26:33.:26:36.

other claims that we heard from current and former employees were

:26:37.:26:41.

dirty vehicles and inadequate equipment. I know you will say that

:26:42.:26:48.

is unacceptable, but it is going on. Dirty vehicles are a fact of life,

:26:49.:26:52.

whether it is the independent sector or the NHS. If they have a bad

:26:53.:26:57.

incident and the vehicle needs a complete the clean, it usually is

:26:58.:27:02.

put to one side whilst 18 will address that, while another vehicle

:27:03.:27:06.

is prepared. They are given time at the beginning of their shift to

:27:07.:27:11.

check the vehicle over, to restock, to check the facilities are working.

:27:12.:27:17.

Being handed, if your vehicle is dirty, you would clean it if there

:27:18.:27:22.

was no other vehicle available. It is a rare occurrence, and there is a

:27:23.:27:25.

procedure for reporting it. Let me read messages. This from somebody

:27:26.:27:30.

who wishes to remain anonymous, I fear reprisals from these people, I

:27:31.:27:36.

am a former employee of the Private Ambulance Service in Basildon, I was

:27:37.:27:41.

a team leader and asked to make checks on the vehicles. Most of the

:27:42.:27:44.

crews worked long hours but still had a duty of care to clean the

:27:45.:27:47.

vehicles after use. Some were cleaned, some were not. I reported

:27:48.:27:51.

the crew started not clean but nothing came of it. The company

:27:52.:27:56.

floated the rules to the highest degree. Agreement that was faulty

:27:57.:28:00.

still got sent out. Whitman went missing, leaving vehicles without

:28:01.:28:05.

life-saving it went. Debbie says, I worked for this company and I am

:28:06.:28:08.

sorry to say I can back up everything. I left you to getting

:28:09.:28:13.

ill and management would not help with any changes in my hours.

:28:14.:28:17.

Phillips says, shocked and appalled that these staff are given a one

:28:18.:28:21.

hour crash course, this surely poses a serious threat to the ordinary

:28:22.:28:27.

road user, who undergoes a rigorous examination before going behind the

:28:28.:28:35.

wheel. We have got Jeff back now. He is on the phone. Can you hear us? I

:28:36.:28:44.

can. You run a private company. What did you make about the claims that

:28:45.:28:50.

one hour's driver training for driving under the light? It is

:28:51.:28:58.

unusual. Ours is three weeks. I don't understand how that can be

:28:59.:29:04.

allowed. The company denied the nature of our allegations. From

:29:05.:29:10.

November they changed the way they train their drivers, they now get

:29:11.:29:15.

the four weeks, which is mirrored across the NHS. Tel is about your

:29:16.:29:19.

company and the service you provide. We provide a debate range of

:29:20.:29:27.

services, from blue light and... -- bluelight ambulances to patient

:29:28.:29:31.

transfer services, to a number of trust. What you offer is necessary

:29:32.:29:42.

because... Explain why. Because the trust do not have enough resources

:29:43.:29:48.

to cope. There are holes in what they can do, which we can fill. Cost

:29:49.:29:57.

is strangling the trust. We can put ambulances on the road at between 60

:29:58.:30:05.

and 70% of their costs, simply because of the massive overhead the

:30:06.:30:10.

NHS has to carry. The couple more e-mails. Somebody who wishes to

:30:11.:30:13.

remain anonymous, I have worked in the service for ten years, some

:30:14.:30:17.

Private services have better standards that the NHS. Robert says,

:30:18.:30:23.

I work for this company and I have successfully completed a three-week

:30:24.:30:25.

intensive qualification to drive on bluelight.

:30:26.:30:33.

If you want to share the film or watch it again, you can go to our

:30:34.:30:38.

programme page. we speak to the CIA analyst

:30:39.:30:40.

who questioned Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein: rude,

:30:41.:30:48.

arrogant and nasty but he could also The 1960's mass murderer

:30:49.:30:53.

Charles Manson has been taken to hospital from high-security

:30:54.:31:01.

prison in California. Britain's outgoing ambassador

:31:02.:31:10.

to the European Union, Sir Ivan Rogers, has strongly

:31:11.:31:13.

criticised the government's In his resignation letter,

:31:14.:31:15.

Sir Ivan urged British colleagues in Brussels to challenge

:31:16.:31:24.

"muddled thinking and The government said he had stood

:31:25.:31:26.

down so a successor could be in place before Brexit

:31:27.:31:29.

negotiations started. Shares in the retailer Next dropped

:31:30.:31:31.

14% this morning after it reported worse-than-expected sales

:31:32.:31:34.

over the festive period. The company said full-price sales

:31:35.:31:37.

fell by 0.4% in the 54 days to Christmas Eve compared

:31:38.:31:40.

with the previous year. It also said its profits

:31:41.:31:44.

for the year as a whole would be An Israeli military court has

:31:45.:31:47.

convicted a soldier of manslaughter for killing a wounded Palestinian

:31:48.:31:58.

who had stabbed another soldier. Sergeant Elor Azaria, who's now 20,

:31:59.:32:04.

shot Abdul Fatah al-Sharif while he was apparently

:32:05.:32:09.

incapacitated in the It happened during a wave

:32:10.:32:11.

of Palestinian knife attacks. Sharif and another Palestinian had

:32:12.:32:14.

stabbed and wounded an Israeli soldier in Hebron before troops

:32:15.:32:16.

opened fire, wounding Sharif Footage shows Sharif was then shot

:32:17.:32:18.

dead from a few metres away. The rail union Aslef says

:32:19.:32:26.

that a planned six-day strike by drivers on Southern

:32:27.:32:28.

Railway from next Monday has The network has been plagued

:32:29.:32:31.

by cancellations and delays for months as the two sides wrangle

:32:32.:32:34.

over pay, jobs and conditions. However Aslef also said this

:32:35.:32:40.

morning that there's still a likelihood

:32:41.:32:43.

of further action. Janet Jackson has given birth

:32:44.:32:50.

to her first child at the age of 50. A statement said the musician

:32:51.:32:53.

and her Qatari businessman husband Wissam Al Mana were "thrilled"

:32:54.:32:56.

to welcome their son. The singer stopped a world tour last

:32:57.:32:58.

April, telling her fans she was planning a family

:32:59.:33:00.

with her husband. That's a summary of the latest

:33:01.:33:04.

news, join me for BBC I wasn't text thing. I was looking

:33:05.:33:18.

at Twitter to get some of your comments, which I will read after

:33:19.:33:20.

the sport. Chelsea are chasing an historic 14th

:33:21.:33:23.

straight win in the English top-flight in one season,

:33:24.:33:26.

when they travel A win for the Blues would extend

:33:27.:33:28.

their lead at the top of the Premier League

:33:29.:33:32.

to eight points. Arsenal came back from 3-0 down

:33:33.:33:34.

to draw 3-3 with at Bournemouth. Olivier Giroud scored

:33:35.:33:36.

the equaliser in the 92nd minute, and keeps Arsenal

:33:37.:33:40.

fourth in the table. Mike Phelan has been sacked

:33:41.:33:42.

as manager of Hull City. The club are bottom

:33:43.:33:44.

of the Premier League, And have won just one league

:33:45.:33:46.

game in their last 18. And there's lots of British tennis

:33:47.:33:51.

action this morning. Naomi Broady, here, has been knocked

:33:52.:33:53.

out of the Auckland Classic. The Hopman Cup team lost

:33:54.:33:57.

in Perth to France. But more positively, Kyle Edmund

:33:58.:34:02.

is through to the quarter final That is all the sports an hour, but

:34:03.:34:14.

there will be more on the BBC News channel throughout the day.

:34:15.:34:15.

Thank you very much. Rude, arrogant and nasty,

:34:16.:34:18.

but he could also be charismatic, Those are the words used to describe

:34:19.:34:21.

the former Iraqi dictator by the man tasked with interrogating him,

:34:22.:34:26.

days after his capture And today we can talk to John Nixon

:34:27.:34:28.

in his first British He's the CIA analyst who sat

:34:29.:34:33.

opposite Saddam Hussein for dozens of hours,

:34:34.:34:43.

questioning him over the supposed location of weapons

:34:44.:34:45.

of mass destruction, the very weapons that intelligence

:34:46.:34:47.

services assured the world Iraq had, and provided the premise for forces

:34:48.:34:50.

to invade the country. Hello, good morning. People will

:34:51.:35:08.

remember he was found in that small, underground hole near a farm

:35:09.:35:15.

building, when did you come face-to-face with him? Just a few

:35:16.:35:22.

hours when he came out of the hole. He was brought down to the airport

:35:23.:35:26.

in Baghdad and that is when I first met him. What were your first

:35:27.:35:34.

impressions? I was kind of stunned. I just never thought that, I never

:35:35.:35:39.

thought we were going to find him and I never thought we were ever

:35:40.:35:47.

going to meet. At first he was a little... He was much more in

:35:48.:35:51.

control of himself than I thought. For a person who had just had his

:35:52.:35:57.

world tipped upside down. He acted like he came here every Saturday

:35:58.:36:00.

night and the US military, who were his captors, where his guests and he

:36:01.:36:06.

was hosting them. In terms of what you needed to get out of him, what

:36:07.:36:11.

was your aim? Washington had a number of questions that they wanted

:36:12.:36:18.

answered quite away. I put those to him that first night, but afterwards

:36:19.:36:24.

we sat down for a more informal debriefing process. The number one

:36:25.:36:29.

question was, where was the weapons of mass destruction. That is what

:36:30.:36:33.

Washington wanted to know. After that, it was more of a series of

:36:34.:36:37.

other questions that we had in terms of links to various groups, what

:36:38.:36:48.

were his intentions in the war? The insurgency was also another very

:36:49.:36:55.

important topic and then questions I personally had in terms of having

:36:56.:37:00.

been an expert on him and tried to get at some of the questions we were

:37:01.:37:05.

thinking about when we started. When he asked him where the matter

:37:06.:37:09.

weapons of mass destruction were, what was his reply? He didn't have

:37:10.:37:15.

any, he didn't have an ongoing weapons programme and he didn't

:37:16.:37:25.

intend to start one. He is the most secretive and suspicious person I

:37:26.:37:28.

have ever met. It is hard to believe him because he is so secretive. You

:37:29.:37:32.

felt like he was holding back on you, even when he was telling the

:37:33.:37:39.

truth. I was wary of what he was saying. As we began to check out

:37:40.:37:44.

other things and talk to other members of the nuclear programme,

:37:45.:37:49.

senior officials in the nuclear programme, we began to find that he

:37:50.:37:54.

was actually telling the truth. Which is the irony, I suppose. One

:37:55.:38:01.

of many? Yes, he was his own worst enemy in that regard. How long did

:38:02.:38:08.

it take you until you are saying to your superiors back in Washington,

:38:09.:38:12.

he is telling the truth and there are no weapons of mass destruction?

:38:13.:38:20.

I returned back to Washington in January and the irony is, nobody

:38:21.:38:24.

really came to talk to me, except a few officials, sort of mid-level

:38:25.:38:33.

bureaucrats. That is when I said to them, I don't think he has them.

:38:34.:38:39.

Then I spoke to a few of my colleagues and we sort of huddled

:38:40.:38:42.

together and came to the conclusion. Some of these colleagues had a lot

:38:43.:38:47.

more knowledge of the technical aspect of weapons and nuclear

:38:48.:38:55.

material than I did. We all kind of agree, this was the case. You said

:38:56.:39:01.

you had some of your own personal questions, having been an expert on

:39:02.:39:06.

him, give us a flavour of the questions you have the opportunity

:39:07.:39:11.

to ask him? I was a leadership analyst. One of the things we used

:39:12.:39:15.

to do was write profiles on people. I asked him a lot of things about

:39:16.:39:22.

his life and his experiences. It was kind of fascinating to get it from

:39:23.:39:27.

the horses mouth, if you will. So many things I have read from other

:39:28.:39:35.

scholars turned out to be false. Even going back to his

:39:36.:39:40.

characterisation of his stepfather, who, I had always been told,

:39:41.:39:45.

mercilessly beat him, not treated and this is why he turned out to be

:39:46.:39:54.

the where he was. I asked him, what was your relationship like? He said,

:39:55.:39:59.

I loved my stepfather. He was the most wonderful man, he made me what

:40:00.:40:03.

I am today. If it wasn't for him, I would never have achieved anything.

:40:04.:40:10.

Did you ever feel sorry for him? Yes, there was a time we were

:40:11.:40:15.

talking, I don't recall what we were talking about, I remember looking

:40:16.:40:19.

down at his sandals that he was wearing and thinking, you know, you

:40:20.:40:28.

have done terrible things and I don't approve of your methods, but

:40:29.:40:32.

this was not for us to come here and take you out of power. It was for

:40:33.:40:36.

the Iraqi people to have chosen to do that. If they couldn't do that,

:40:37.:40:41.

maybe it was meant for you to stay in power. I felt that this was all

:40:42.:40:47.

wrong. Thank you very much for talking to us. Thank you for your

:40:48.:40:50.

time this morning. Thank you for having me. John Nixon, talking to us

:40:51.:40:56.

live from Washington. His book 'Debriefing

:40:57.:41:03.

the President' is out now. More on the breaking news that a

:41:04.:41:10.

six-day strike by drivers on Southern rail has been cut to three

:41:11.:41:17.

days. Richard Wescott is here. Why? Don't get too excited. My suspicion

:41:18.:41:21.

is they were just announced those days further down the line. As I

:41:22.:41:26.

understand it, we have spoken to drivers off the record and they are

:41:27.:41:29.

not getting paid for each strike day. So potentially losing six days

:41:30.:41:34.

pay in January after Christmas is not a great thing for any union to

:41:35.:41:38.

do to its members. I am not saying that is the reason, but it could be.

:41:39.:41:44.

It doesn't mean there is any breakthrough. Informal talks

:41:45.:41:48.

yesterday, no plans to talk today or in the future. No closer to coming

:41:49.:41:53.

to a solution. I cannot see this ending any time soon. I suspect this

:41:54.:41:58.

is just moving three days further down the line. Just remind people

:41:59.:42:02.

what this dispute is over? It is about the role of guards on trains.

:42:03.:42:08.

But the problem is, what will happen here will happen on all rail

:42:09.:42:15.

franchises across the country. It is all about driver only operated

:42:16.:42:19.

trains, already half of services run that way and they want to bring in

:42:20.:42:23.

more. The unions see that as a threat to safety and the threat to

:42:24.:42:26.

their staff as well. This is a line in the sand, because what happens on

:42:27.:42:31.

Southern could be repeated all over the country. You suspect cutting it

:42:32.:42:36.

to three days just means they will move three days to a different

:42:37.:42:38.

month, more strikes potentially after that? Potentially, there is no

:42:39.:42:44.

rule on how many they can call. As long as they give the statutory

:42:45.:42:48.

notice, which is seven days, they can keep calling strikes. They had a

:42:49.:42:53.

vote and got the mandate. This could go on and on, potentially. Thank

:42:54.:42:55.

you, Richard. The 1960's mass murderer

:42:56.:43:01.

Charles Manson has been taken to hospital from high-security

:43:02.:43:03.

prison in California. It's not yet clear

:43:04.:43:05.

why the 82-year-old - who is serving nine concurrent life

:43:06.:43:07.

sentences - has been hospitalised. Manson, a cult leader,

:43:08.:43:13.

sent a group of his indoctrinated followers,

:43:14.:43:18.

known as the Family, to the home of heavily pregnant

:43:19.:43:19.

Hollywood actress Sharon Tate She and four others

:43:20.:43:22.

were stabbed to death. Let's get more insight into the man

:43:23.:43:27.

and why he's so notorious. Professor Craig Jackson is Head

:43:28.:43:30.

of Psychology at Birmingham City university and specialises

:43:31.:43:34.

in mass and serial murders. We don't know the reasons for this

:43:35.:43:46.

hospitalisation, but he is 82 and has been in jail for a long time.

:43:47.:43:51.

Let's go back to the 60s and what he did, what he ordered and the

:43:52.:43:58.

reaction around the world? Charles Manson is famous for being

:43:59.:44:02.

associated with the Sharon Tate murders. Essentially, he and his

:44:03.:44:07.

calls, his family were convicted for nine murders in 1969. But the

:44:08.:44:13.

pathology of Manson goes back much further. He had been in and out of

:44:14.:44:20.

state and federal prisons throughout his adolescence and early 20s for a

:44:21.:44:26.

variety of pimping, using guns for violence and robbery. This was a

:44:27.:44:30.

month up by 32 years of age had spent more than half his life in the

:44:31.:44:36.

federal prison system. He was a very troubled individual before the

:44:37.:44:38.

infamous Sharon Tate murders occurred. Tell us more about the

:44:39.:44:48.

cult and the family? He was a very disordered individual but was able

:44:49.:44:53.

to be charismatic. He had been on the fringes of the Californian music

:44:54.:44:59.

scene and was into the free love and drug-taking and dropout society. He

:45:00.:45:04.

tried to write a few pop songs and befriend musicians and people in the

:45:05.:45:08.

entertainment industry. Was very frustrated that kind of career never

:45:09.:45:13.

talk. His attempt to rehabilitate himself from his criminal past. He

:45:14.:45:18.

was very deluded, was suffering from severe psychoses. His distance from

:45:19.:45:26.

what we would see as normal life, partially because of his years in

:45:27.:45:31.

prison, from alcohol and drug abuse. His delusions began to take over his

:45:32.:45:35.

life and normality began to be very, very small.

:45:36.:45:40.

He had great believes in the helter-skelter, he seemed to believe

:45:41.:45:46.

that some kind of apocalyptic race war would be coming. He wanted his

:45:47.:45:52.

cold to commit a series of crimes that would hopefully in his eyes be

:45:53.:45:57.

blamed on black people, specially on the growing black power movement,

:45:58.:46:01.

which would facilitate the race war that he said would be inevitable.

:46:02.:46:06.

In the event of a terrorist attack in Britain we're told to run

:46:07.:46:09.

If we can't we should hide and call the emergency services once safe.

:46:10.:46:14.

But now military and security experts want us

:46:15.:46:16.

They want us to learn some basic first aid to help anyone injured.

:46:17.:46:21.

The team have developed an app called Citizenaid,

:46:22.:46:25.

which is a step-by-step guide to saving lives if the worst case

:46:26.:46:28.

We will discuss this more and have a live demonstration

:46:29.:46:36.

of basic first-aid treatment in just a moment.

:46:37.:46:38.

But first, watch this - it's a dramatisation of a terror

:46:39.:46:40.

What you will see next is a reconstruction and I should say

:46:41.:46:48.

some of you might find it upsetting - it lasts around 90 seconds.

:46:49.:46:52.

It was filmed on a set developed by ex-SAS personnel

:46:53.:46:54.

Yes, a shooting, there's a gunman in the street.

:46:55.:47:44.

The app says cap the wound and then put pressure on the wound.

:47:45.:48:10.

Keep the hand elevated, above the heart.

:48:11.:48:17.

Let's talk now to Brigadier Tim Hodgetts from the Defence Medical

:48:18.:48:20.

Services and Andrew Thurgood, a consultant emergency nurse.

:48:21.:48:24.

They both developed the CitizenAid app and will be demonstrating

:48:25.:48:28.

some of the potentially life-saving first-aid techniques.

:48:29.:48:32.

Richard Harding is head of the National Counter

:48:33.:48:34.

And we can also speak to Paul Dadge, who was on the train behind

:48:35.:48:39.

the Edgware Road bombing on July 7th.

:48:40.:48:45.

He helped victim Davinia Turrell, holding a mask over her burned face.

:48:46.:48:49.

It was one of the most-widely used images of the aftermath

:48:50.:48:52.

Let's talk about why this app might be useful in a particular scenario.

:48:53.:49:08.

I cannot imagine getting my phone out in the middle of some kind of

:49:09.:49:14.

attack and looking on an app. You are right, if you are in the heat of

:49:15.:49:19.

having to run away and hide and escape, that is not the time to get

:49:20.:49:26.

it out. We are talking about following the national police

:49:27.:49:29.

guidance, to run, hide and tell. Once you are in the safe place, you

:49:30.:49:33.

can then get out the app or the paper version and treat the patient.

:49:34.:49:41.

What kind of injuries are you giving advice about treating? We identify

:49:42.:49:48.

for different scenarios, one is an unexploded bomb, and an exploded

:49:49.:49:52.

bomb, then there is the active shooter and the knife attacker.

:49:53.:49:56.

There are different wind types that you see with gunshot and blast. But

:49:57.:50:01.

in terms of treatment it is about stopping the external bleeding. We

:50:02.:50:07.

know that in terms of avoidable deaths on the battlefield they are

:50:08.:50:10.

often attributed to external bleeding from limbs. But if we

:50:11.:50:17.

empower the bystander, the public, if we give them simple skills that

:50:18.:50:20.

they can apply in the first few minutes, they can save lives. We

:50:21.:50:25.

have demonstrated this statistically, we have had an

:50:26.:50:30.

increasing number of unexpected survivors in recent military

:50:31.:50:35.

campaigns because we have pushed skills and knowledge and simple

:50:36.:50:37.

equipment for forward. The slightly different thing in the civilian

:50:38.:50:42.

setting is you might not have equipment. Therefore, it is OK to

:50:43.:50:48.

improvise. We have within the app the opportunity to use equipment if

:50:49.:50:52.

you have it, but if you don't, it is still OK to improvise, and we show

:50:53.:50:57.

how you can pack a wind, press into the wind, elevate the bleeding limb,

:50:58.:51:01.

and then move on, using everyday clothing or household items. Andrew,

:51:02.:51:07.

helped him show us what you have and how you might be able to improvise

:51:08.:51:12.

in a scenario. We have rehearsed this! If you are going to practice a

:51:13.:51:19.

tourniquet, don't practice on each other. You can make a very simple

:51:20.:51:25.

limb yourself. Two rolled up magazine is inside a rolled up

:51:26.:51:28.

towel, shocked and he tries alike. We don't want to produce any harm

:51:29.:51:35.

when you don't need the tourniquet. You apply a tourniquet to a real

:51:36.:51:39.

person when they have bleeding that cannot be controlled by any other

:51:40.:51:43.

means. Nobody will spend time making that. But tell me again. A couple of

:51:44.:51:49.

magazines inside a towel, shot down a trouser leg. If you practice on

:51:50.:51:56.

yourself, it hurts. It is a key safety message. This is a leg. With

:51:57.:52:04.

a wound, we but start packing it with what is available. Use a sock

:52:05.:52:13.

to start. Packing, you have to fill the wound, you press hard. If it is

:52:14.:52:18.

a small wound you can press with your fingertips, if it is bigger

:52:19.:52:22.

with your knuckles or fingertips -- list. That is to stop the blood

:52:23.:52:30.

flowing. You don't let go. If you can, you also elevate it. If

:52:31.:52:35.

packing, pressure and elevation is not enough, and you still have

:52:36.:52:41.

life-threatening reading's bleeding, you move to your improvised

:52:42.:52:48.

tourniquet. Anti-war demonstrator. You can use a scarf, tie or belt. I

:52:49.:53:00.

have used a belt myself, a couple of years later he won a gold medal at

:53:01.:53:03.

the Paralympics, so these things do work. You have just tied a scarf

:53:04.:53:13.

around the lake. How tight? Not that you will spend much time considering

:53:14.:53:20.

that! We would use a spoon, I will pop it into the knot, tie it nicely

:53:21.:53:25.

in place, the knot holds the spoon in place. If there is not a spoon,

:53:26.:53:32.

scissors, a fork, a screwdriver, any straight device. If you cut in the

:53:33.:53:38.

basement, there is your nozzle. I am turning the pressure. When the

:53:39.:53:43.

bleeding stops, I don't need to turn anymore. That is useful. We have a

:53:44.:53:50.

tie, a belt, all of those other implements, the Sox, what is that?

:53:51.:53:57.

That is another scarf. If the first tourniquet does not stop the

:53:58.:54:01.

bleeding, you put a second just above it and do the same. Sometimes,

:54:02.:54:05.

with a big fight, you need a broader band. One tourniquet might not be

:54:06.:54:11.

enough. Two side-by-side gives a broader band. You have the

:54:12.:54:16.

experience as a nurse and from the military. Paul, you have been in the

:54:17.:54:22.

middle of an attack. How are you? Very well. What do you think of this

:54:23.:54:32.

idea? It put into an app the common-sense initiative that many

:54:33.:54:37.

people showed on the 7th of July, not just myself but other members of

:54:38.:54:43.

the public. People expect people to panic in that situation, that it was

:54:44.:54:50.

very calm. The ability now to take first aid to another level and have

:54:51.:54:56.

this information will be good. My view is we will face a terrorist

:54:57.:55:00.

attack in the UK, it is only a matter of time, so if people can

:55:01.:55:07.

prepare and look at apps like this, it can only be beneficial. Is

:55:08.:55:19.

another terrorist attack inevitable? Viewers will be aware that the

:55:20.:55:22.

national threat level is severe, each means an attack is considered

:55:23.:55:26.

highly likely. It has been for a couple of years. You will know from

:55:27.:55:32.

senior colleagues that we have said for some time that it is not a

:55:33.:55:35.

matter of if, it is a matter of when. We know from our experience

:55:36.:55:43.

both practically and from research that people who are prepared and

:55:44.:55:47.

have a plan have better outcomes. Which is why we support the

:55:48.:55:57.

programme. Can you tell us how many credible terror threats have been

:55:58.:56:00.

thwarted in the last 12 months? It is on helpful to talk about numbers.

:56:01.:56:08.

But it is true to say that both the police and the Security intelligence

:56:09.:56:11.

agencies are working tirelessly to prevent the threat that is presented

:56:12.:56:18.

to the UK. People will be aware of some of those incidents and arrests

:56:19.:56:22.

in the public domain, but there are many more which we are working on a

:56:23.:56:25.

behind-the-scenes which people will be unaware of. To give us a little

:56:26.:56:31.

insight, you say it is on helpful to talk about numbers, people would be

:56:32.:56:36.

interested to know how many are being thwarted. Is it on a weekly

:56:37.:56:44.

basis, a monthly basis? There are a number of investigations ongoing

:56:45.:56:47.

throughout the country continually. I will not be John on numbers, but

:56:48.:56:52.

we are continually vigilant and working to protect the citizens of

:56:53.:57:00.

the UK. The challenge is that at some point something will happen,

:57:01.:57:04.

and it's about how we make sure that people are prepared and able to

:57:05.:57:08.

support themselves, but also support ourselves to support communities to

:57:09.:57:12.

recover and manage those incidents as best as they can. Is the lone

:57:13.:57:18.

wolf type attack high on a list of your priorities? People will have

:57:19.:57:24.

seen from recent incidents across the world that there are a number of

:57:25.:57:30.

attack methodologies. Those involving individuals who are either

:57:31.:57:36.

tasked or motivated through the Internet and elsewhere are a real

:57:37.:57:42.

risk for us, because there is not much intelligence background for us

:57:43.:57:46.

to work on to interdict those attacks. Those are clearly a concern

:57:47.:57:52.

for us. We pay vigilance to those kinds of risks and threats. In terms

:57:53.:58:00.

of this app, you can download it. You said there is a paper leaflet as

:58:01.:58:06.

well. Where do people get it from? You can get the link from our

:58:07.:58:10.

website. The app is downloadable for free on the standard app stores.

:58:11.:58:15.

There is a small charge for the paper version.

:58:16.:58:21.

Thank you for your company today, we are back tomorrow at 9am. Have a

:58:22.:58:25.

good day. A team of spy creatures

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is on a mission to uncover the secret lives

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of wild animals. Their hidden cameras capture

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extraordinary behaviour.

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