13/07/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


13/07/2017

Why more teachers from ethnic minority backgrounds are not being recruited by schools. And hearing from a father whose child had the same genetic disorder as Charlie Gard.


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Hello it's Thursday, it's nine o'clock, I'm Victoria Derbyshire,

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Charlie Gard's parents return to the High Court in London this

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morning in a hearing that will decide if their terminally-ill

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son will be allowed access to experimental treatment in the US.

:00:21.:00:23.

They've got letters from up to seven doctors and scientists and it

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demonstrates that there's up to a 10% chance of this

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Medics at Great Ormond Street Hospital say the therapy won't work,

:00:31.:00:37.

and his life support systems should be turned off.

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Why can't schools recruit more teachers from ethnic

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We'll ask some what the barriers are and what more can be done

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And at Wimbledon, Johanna Konta faces Venus Williams on centre court

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today. Can she become the first British woman to reach a Wimbledon

:01:02.:01:03.

singles final since Virginia Wade? I don't take anything

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for granted and I demand of myself my best effort

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and I demand of myself my full commitment to what I do and then

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to make sure I prepare well and do Hello, welcome to the programme,

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we're live until 11 this morning. Also today - new figures this

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morning show applications for university courses have fallen

:01:26.:01:27.

by 4% among British students, and 5% for students

:01:28.:01:29.

from elsewhere in the EU. It's the first decline in uni

:01:30.:01:35.

applications since fees were last increased in England,

:01:36.:01:38.

back in 2012. If you've decided not

:01:39.:01:39.

to go to university because of the cost,

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let me know. Whether you're a school leaver

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or a would-be mature student, Our top story today,

:01:44.:01:45.

lawyers representing the parents of the terminally-ill baby,

:01:46.:01:57.

Charlie Gard, will return to the High Court in London this

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morning, to present what they claim is new evidence showing

:02:00.:02:02.

an experimental treatment Doctors at Great Ormond

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Street Hospital, where he's in intensive care,

:02:05.:02:07.

say the therapy won't work, and his life support systems

:02:08.:02:09.

should be turned off. Charlie Gard has been in intensive

:02:10.:02:29.

care since October last year. He has an extremely rare genetic condition.

:02:30.:02:33.

It has left him extremely brain damaged and unable to breathe

:02:34.:02:37.

without the help of a ventilator. Ever since his birth 11 months ago,

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there have been numerous legal battles, escalated to the highest

:02:42.:02:44.

level in the UK and Europe. All the courts have agreed that the baby is

:02:45.:02:47.

so welcome he must be allowed to die. But his parents have persuaded

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the original judge they should be permitted to present what they say

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this new scientific evidence today, suggesting an experimental treatment

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could help their son. My understanding as they have got

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letters from up to seven doctors and scientists, and it demonstrates

:03:08.:03:10.

there is up to a 10% chance of this ground-breaking treatment working,

:03:11.:03:14.

and they would know within a period of two to eight weeks whether or not

:03:15.:03:22.

baby Charlie is improving. And the treatment is noninvasive, it is not

:03:23.:03:25.

an operation, it is actually a food additive into his food. Charlie's

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parents have received offers of help from the Vatican and the United

:03:33.:03:36.

States, but the judge, Mr Justice Francis, has made it clear any new

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evidence must be presented swiftly, due to concerns about prolonging the

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little boy's suffering. Sophie Hutchinson, BBC News.

:03:45.:03:49.

Ben Brown is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:03:50.:03:51.

The BBC has learned that at least one person who survived

:03:52.:03:56.

the Grenfell Tower fire has been diagnosed with cyanide poisoning.

:03:57.:04:00.

12-year-old Luana Gomes was treated for the effects

:04:01.:04:02.

It isn't known what caused the poisoning, but her parents -

:04:03.:04:07.

who lost their unborn child after the fire - believe it may have

:04:08.:04:10.

been caused by the burning of insulation or plastics

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This was the home of the Gomes family on the 21st

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They have been living in a hotel since their release from hospital.

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Andreia Gomes was seven months pregnant and the baby was stillborn

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by caesarean section, while she and her daughters

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The family allowed BBC Newsnight to film their

:04:32.:04:38.

Their 12-year-old's diagnosis details cyanide poisoning.

:04:39.:04:43.

Her mother and sister were also treated for the risk of cyanide.

:04:44.:04:46.

This is the first confirmation of a cyanide poisoning diagnosis

:04:47.:04:48.

The highly toxic gas may have been released by the burning

:04:49.:04:55.

of insulation or plastics during the blaze.

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The Gomeses direct their ire at whoever made the decision

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to place cheaper fire retardant cladding on the tower.

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I'm very angry with them, because it could have all been avoided.

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And that is where the anger really stems from.

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It should never have happened like this.

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The residents never wanted the cladding in the first place.

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I don't know if it's the right word, but you just killed so many people

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and you just killed my son, because if we were in a normal

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situation, I could have gone out, and he was seven months,

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Because of the conditions, he passed away.

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The family has requested a full postmortem examination on their son

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They should have been celebrating his birth next month,

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and they had already decided to name him Logan.

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The government will today publish a long-awaited bill that

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will convert European Union laws into British legislation.

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The Repeal Bill is designed to ensure a smooth transition

:06:14.:06:15.

The Brexit Secretary, David Davis, has described it

:06:16.:06:19.

But political opponents have threatened to disrupt its passage

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With us now is Political guru, Norman Smith.

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Norman, publishing the bill is one thing, but getting it through the

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Commons, something else. What we have learned is that the government

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is now facing a titanic battle to get its Kebe Brexit Bill through

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Parliament, -- its key Brexit bill. Not only has the Liberal Democrat

:06:49.:06:52.

leader Tim Farron said he will make life hell for the government, but

:06:53.:06:55.

more significantly Labour have said they will vote against the

:06:56.:06:59.

legislation, unless there are significant changes. And when you

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put Labour MPs together with some conservative rebels, then that opens

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up the prospect that Mrs May could be defeated on this, which would

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plunge Brexit into chaos. And so this morning the Brexit Minister

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Steve Baker was appealing for all MPs to work together in the national

:07:17.:07:21.

interest. We will consider what they bring forward, and after we have

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published the bill and everyone has had a good chance to look at it, we

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look forward to what they bring forward, but this is a bill in the

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national interest and it is an essential next step as we leave the

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European Union. The Labour Party manifesto accepted the result of the

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referendum, so I'm hoping that people will come together in the

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national interest, support this bill and insure that we are able to leave

:07:41.:07:50.

the European Union in a way which is smooth and orderly, and which, as I

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say, gives individuals and businesses that certainty that the

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law will have some continuity as we leave. And more trouble for the

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government today over Brexit when they publish their what is called

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position paper on the future of Euratom, this is the organisation

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that manages the import and export of radioactive materials into

:08:09.:08:12.

Britain, with the Royal College of radiologists warning that if we

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leave Euratom, that might jeopardise the sort of isotopes cancer patients

:08:16.:08:19.

need for scans and treatments, and some Tory MPs threatening to rebel

:08:20.:08:24.

against the government's plans to quit Euratom.

:08:25.:08:33.

Applications for university courses have fallen by 4%. Figures from the

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admissions service UCAS show a sharp decline in those wanting to study

:08:41.:08:45.

nursing courses, down 19%, and they continued fall in the number of

:08:46.:08:50.

mature students as well. The number of EU students planning to study in

:08:51.:08:53.

the United Kingdom has also fallen by 5%. It is the first decline in

:08:54.:08:58.

applications since fees were last increased over ?9,000 of England

:08:59.:09:02.

five years ago. University leaders say the decline could be done to in

:09:03.:09:06.

Amber Rudd factors, including Brexit, higher fees and funding

:09:07.:09:11.

changes the trainee nurses and midwives -- a number of factors.

:09:12.:09:16.

School inspectors have raised what they call serious concerns about the

:09:17.:09:19.

standard of education in Derby. Ofsted says the city does not have

:09:20.:09:25.

enough high-quality Academy trusts, with the experience necessary, to

:09:26.:09:29.

improve underperforming schools. The warning coincides with new research

:09:30.:09:32.

by the cross-party commission on inequality in education, which says

:09:33.:09:36.

the gap between poor and rich children is now wider than it was a

:09:37.:09:41.

generation ago. The government says Derby has been selected as one of 12

:09:42.:09:45.

areas in England to receive extra support to help boost social

:09:46.:09:50.

mobility. President Donald Trump is in Paris, where he will be holding

:09:51.:09:54.

talks with President Macron, and also attending a steel day

:09:55.:09:59.

celebrations. High on the agenda will be US French actions in Syria

:10:00.:10:02.

and Iraq against so-called Islamic State. Despite the differences

:10:03.:10:06.

between the two leaders, Mr Macron has indicated he will work to

:10:07.:10:09.

reaffirm historic ties between the two allies, and to prevent the US

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from being isolated. Let's go live to our Paris correspondent, is used

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to. What sort of reception do you think Donald Trump will get in

:10:20.:10:27.

France? There is the reception from France and there is the reception

:10:28.:10:30.

from Macron. I think in France there is no question that there is a

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general feeling of suspicion, if not outright hostility to the man, not

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that that will express itself in demonstrations here in Paris. In

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fact, we are kind of entering holiday mode in Paris, now that we

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are in the middle of July, so there are no demonstrations planned, but

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there is, no question about it, and polls confirm it, yes, people don't

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like Trump in general. Macron on the other hand does have this very, very

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peculiar relationship with him, which isn't friendship, but is

:11:00.:11:05.

certainly based on a kind of openness and candidness, and a

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willingness to communicate. Macron's view is very much, I'm not Macron

:11:09.:11:13.

come he's not come, I'm France, is America, France and America talk, so

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we are going to talk and we will be friends because our relationship is

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old and fruitful and necessary. The things that divide us must not be

:11:25.:11:30.

allowed to dominate. And so the relationship, even though it is an

:11:31.:11:34.

old one, and it is hard to imagine anything that binds them on a

:11:35.:11:38.

personal level, is there, and both sides say there is a chemistry. So

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today will have ceremony, and tomorrow will have the March down

:11:44.:11:47.

the Champs-Elysees, where Trump will be guest of honour. This is 100

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years since the American entry into the First World War, and then there

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will be the talks, which will focus on the issues which divide, and

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there is no question there is many of them, above all climate and

:11:59.:12:03.

trade. But they will also focus on the things that bring the countries

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together and that will in course include the fight against terrorism

:12:09.:12:12.

against so-called Islamic State. Many thanks indeed. The owners of

:12:13.:12:18.

Southern Rail have been fined ?13.4 million for poor performance. The

:12:19.:12:23.

government said the fine on go the Thames Link railway would have been

:12:24.:12:26.

higher but most of the delays have not been Southern's fought. The

:12:27.:12:30.

Department for Transport said strikes and President levels of sick

:12:31.:12:34.

leave were also to blame but the RMC union has been critical, saying the

:12:35.:12:38.

government had let Southern and its parent company off the hook. The

:12:39.:12:43.

Natural History Museum in London has unveiled a skeleton of the blue

:12:44.:12:48.

whale in its entrance hall. Weighing 4.5 tonnes, it has been suspended

:12:49.:12:52.

from the ceiling with wires, so that it appears to dive down on the

:12:53.:12:55.

visitors, as they enter the building. The whale replaces Dippy,

:12:56.:13:02.

the Dick LeBeau Rocas, which will soon had out -- the diploid ochres,

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which will soon had out on a tour of the UK. That is a somebody -- the

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diplodocus. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:13:10.:13:10.

News - more at 9.30. This e-mail from Scott, my name is

:13:11.:13:18.

Scott Foster, I am starting university in computing the

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September. The fees and loans being as high as they are did not bother

:13:21.:13:24.

me, considering the conditions and percentages when paying it back.

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Bettering myself and my living is more important than a little bit of

:13:29.:13:32.

money. Good luck with your course, Scott. We are asking if you have

:13:33.:13:35.

been put off applying for university, because figures out

:13:36.:13:41.

today show there has been a 4% decline in British students applying

:13:42.:13:44.

to university here, the first decline since 2012, which was the

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last time the university tuition fees went up. So share your own

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experiences. Do get in touch with us

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throughout the morning - use the hashtag Victoria LIVE

:13:52.:13:53.

and If you text, you will be charged Here's some sport now

:13:54.:13:56.

with Leah Boleto. She'll be waking up

:13:57.:14:00.

this morning knowing she's got to get past five-time

:14:01.:14:09.

champion Venus William to become the first British woman to reach

:14:10.:14:11.

a Wimbledon final for 40 years. The last time that

:14:12.:14:14.

happen was back in 1977, There's every chance Jo could make

:14:15.:14:16.

the final, having beat Venus three out of the five

:14:17.:14:22.

times they've played. That match is second

:14:23.:14:24.

on Centre Court today. Meanwhile, world number one

:14:25.:14:27.

Andy Murray says it's possible he'll take several weeks off to recover

:14:28.:14:30.

fully from his hip injury. He was of course beaten in five sets

:14:31.:14:33.

by American Sam Querrey yesterday and looked in pain throughout,

:14:34.:14:37.

limping between points. Elsewhere, the former Fifa

:14:38.:14:46.

official, Chuck Blazer, seen The American had been banned

:14:47.:14:48.

from all football activities for life two years ago,

:14:49.:14:54.

after admitting charges He'd been suffering from cancer,

:14:55.:14:56.

but did turn whistle blower to help investigators uncover

:14:57.:15:00.

corruption in football. And England have secured

:15:01.:15:01.

their place in the semifinals They beat New Zealand by 75 runs,

:15:02.:15:03.

thanks to Natalie Sciver's century. England are joined in the last four

:15:04.:15:08.

by Australia, who beat India, and South Africa,

:15:09.:15:16.

who defeated Sri Lanka. That's all from me for now,

:15:17.:15:19.

but Sally will be live from Wimbledon for you at 9.30

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with all the latest. There's a shortage of teachers

:15:23.:15:30.

from ethnic minority backgrounds in English schools,

:15:31.:15:32.

and if the situation is to get any better,

:15:33.:15:34.

then many more people from diverse backgrounds need recruiting

:15:35.:15:37.

onto training schemes. It's hard to get a totally accurate

:15:38.:15:38.

picture of the current situation because of the way data

:15:39.:15:41.

on this is collected. But we know 27% of school pupils

:15:42.:15:44.

in England are from black However, in 2016, only 7%

:15:45.:15:47.

of teachers were BME. The Government puts the figures

:15:48.:15:53.

slightly higher, at 13%, but that is because they include

:15:54.:15:55.

white non-British teachers from other minorities in that

:15:56.:16:00.

number, such as Irish Now research from BBC Yorkshire has

:16:01.:16:02.

found that schools in England would need to recruit an extra

:16:03.:16:06.

69,000 ethnic minority teachers to reflect the diversity

:16:07.:16:08.

within the school population. Let's talk now to Dr Zubaida Haque

:16:09.:16:16.

from the Runnymede Trust. She's researched this

:16:17.:16:18.

issue extensively. Tobie Martins-Ojo works in a London

:16:19.:16:20.

school, co-ordinating volunteers, and wrote an article about the lack

:16:21.:16:22.

of black teachers. Patrick Dempsey who is the diversity

:16:23.:16:24.

lead for Teach First, the recruiter responsible for 5%

:16:25.:16:27.

of all teacher And Allana Gay is the deputy head of

:16:28.:16:28.

Lee Valley Primary School in London. And Nikki Cunningham-Smith,

:16:29.:16:35.

a teacher, who's joining Welcome to all of you. Obviously, I

:16:36.:16:47.

am going to ask you why you think there is such a shortage. You have

:16:48.:16:55.

done research, Zubaida. Tell us why. It is across the piece, starting

:16:56.:16:59.

from the beginning, in terms of recruitment, the Government have not

:17:00.:17:02.

done very well in terms of recruiting. Only one in ten of the

:17:03.:17:06.

new recruits are from ethnic minority backgrounds. Where the

:17:07.:17:12.

story is really interesting and worrying, if you like, is around

:17:13.:17:16.

retention, the teachers that stay within the occupation, and now

:17:17.:17:20.

increasingly research showing teachers are more likely to leave.

:17:21.:17:26.

Why is that? There are lots of reasons. First of all, it is

:17:27.:17:31.

important to know approximately 75% of black and ethnic minority

:17:32.:17:35.

teachers have told us in our very large surveys they are thinking of

:17:36.:17:40.

leaving. The reasons are around discrimination, sadly, workload and

:17:41.:17:48.

pay discrimination as well. Give us some examples. Workload, the

:17:49.:17:53.

Government have introduced a lot of bureaucracy. That is teachers across

:17:54.:17:59.

the board. Let us concentrate on discrimination. The disproportionate

:18:00.:18:11.

impact on BME teachers is day-to-day, the policies and

:18:12.:18:14.

practices keeping them out, an example of that would be, for

:18:15.:18:19.

instance, and this is a rather sad example, but a lot of the teachers,

:18:20.:18:24.

black and ethnic minority teachers in our surveys, talked about how

:18:25.:18:29.

they were given behavioural responsibilities, instead of more

:18:30.:18:32.

intellectual responsibilities. The issue is when it claims to -- when

:18:33.:18:39.

it comes to pay performance, behaviour is not counted as much as

:18:40.:18:49.

taking over a maths class. Because they are misdirected into

:18:50.:18:55.

behavioural issues on stereotypes... A headteacher sees a black teacher

:18:56.:18:59.

and says, you would be good to be in charge of discipline? Absolutely.

:19:00.:19:05.

You are a deputy head, Allana. Can you relate to this? That has come

:19:06.:19:10.

out for us. In my experience, when you go into teaching, as an ethnic

:19:11.:19:15.

minority, they preferred to put you at a pastoral level. What we have

:19:16.:19:21.

found is that the vast majority of our teachers find they are placed

:19:22.:19:28.

into a pastoral box, you are told, you are able to relate to those

:19:29.:19:33.

children, you take them. So they take the lower sets and they have

:19:34.:19:40.

behaviourally difficult children and they are not given the opportunity

:19:41.:19:44.

or fair distribution of the workload for everyone. What about cultural

:19:45.:19:48.

issues, going to the pub after school with your colleagues? For

:19:49.:19:53.

some ethnic minorities, that would be an issue because part of British

:19:54.:19:57.

culture is that in the pub you will have decisions and discussions and

:19:58.:20:01.

you feel excluded from those discussions. When you start

:20:02.:20:06.

self-selecting, later on, everyone starts excluding new. If you have

:20:07.:20:11.

certain requirements for your culture, you would like to take a

:20:12.:20:15.

part of, going out for eating meal, because everyone has to consider

:20:16.:20:21.

you, you become the problem in the group. If you do not have the social

:20:22.:20:25.

support, you will not survive in teaching. You need to have that to

:20:26.:20:29.

reinforce the work you are doing already. Let me bring in Nikki. Why

:20:30.:20:34.

do you think there is such a shortage? When I grew up, I never

:20:35.:20:42.

saw any ethnic minority teachers. From primary through the secondary.

:20:43.:20:49.

It was because my parents and pupils direction put me on the path towards

:20:50.:20:52.

further education and that is a missing link. I have been quite

:20:53.:20:58.

fortunate in my school is to be invited the senior leadership team,

:20:59.:21:02.

but when I go to meetings and I am in a more rural area, I find there

:21:03.:21:06.

is not fat spread of ethnic minorities to give those pupils role

:21:07.:21:15.

models -- there is not that spread. I never had that. I know that there

:21:16.:21:23.

are pupils who gravitate towards me and they are probably gravitating in

:21:24.:21:25.

the first instance because they finally have someone to identify

:21:26.:21:31.

with. Is that your view? That is the key point, the figures you

:21:32.:21:34.

mentioned, 7% of teachers in the teaching workforce, 25-30%,

:21:35.:21:41.

depending on how you look at it, black and minority ethnic pupils,

:21:42.:21:45.

there is a gap in that gap is expressing itself in exactly that, a

:21:46.:21:50.

lack of role models. It is a self-perpetuating problem. If you

:21:51.:21:53.

have a lack of role models, people in your primary classes are not

:21:54.:21:58.

thinking, I will be an educator. They are thinking, my role models

:21:59.:22:01.

are doing something else. We need to break that self-perpetuating... I

:22:02.:22:09.

agree. A lot of second-generation immigrants are not drawn to teaching

:22:10.:22:12.

because a lot of them might have grown up poor and you aren't -- you

:22:13.:22:22.

are drawn to jobs that pay better. I think it is just that cycle. I think

:22:23.:22:29.

you are not drawn to it. When I was writing the article and speaking to

:22:30.:22:34.

and searching for blackmail teachers, they said, teaching does

:22:35.:22:42.

not pay well for me -- black male teachers. Selecting yourself out, it

:22:43.:22:47.

is an issue, but we should not fall into the false trap where we think

:22:48.:22:51.

that is what is holding black and ethnic minority people back from

:22:52.:22:55.

applying for teaching. There are push and pull factors. It relates to

:22:56.:23:01.

the story within schools where you have to ask questions like, are the

:23:02.:23:05.

government, the national College of School leadership, are they

:23:06.:23:08.

recruiting in the right places, advertising in the right places,

:23:09.:23:12.

making the job attractive overall? Are they encouraging black and

:23:13.:23:16.

ethnic minority people to apply? It might not be a job you have fought

:23:17.:23:23.

about -- thought about. Has it been pitched to you? Absolutely, it sits

:23:24.:23:26.

at the recruitment level. That is how we break the cycle. 25% of

:23:27.:23:39.

pupils in classrooms. We are at 16% of our cohort that started a couple

:23:40.:23:42.

of weeks ago at black and ethnic minority backgrounds. We are doing

:23:43.:23:46.

better but not as well as we want to. But we are doing the things you

:23:47.:23:52.

are talking about. This is where it gets complicated because what is

:23:53.:23:55.

happening at the moment is even when the recruits are coming in, the

:23:56.:23:59.

evidence is suggesting they are not staying. There is quite a high

:24:00.:24:06.

dropout rate after three years, even with Teach First. I can see you want

:24:07.:24:14.

to come in, Nikki. What can happen is the advertisement does not give a

:24:15.:24:18.

clear picture. I know I personally have been used as a poster girl at

:24:19.:24:22.

times of areas. It gives the illusion we do have black and ethnic

:24:23.:24:29.

minority people in these areas. That is not always the case. I know I

:24:30.:24:33.

have been the only black girl on that course, in that environment,

:24:34.:24:39.

yet I am the first to be selected, be a part of it. Where are the

:24:40.:24:43.

advertisement is going out? Where is the careers advice at a lower level

:24:44.:24:48.

saying, you can achieve and you can do this? For me, it comes... You

:24:49.:24:55.

have the element where the recruitment process is very

:24:56.:24:59.

difficult because within ethnic minority communities, if we think of

:25:00.:25:03.

the people, when they had their expense of education, it was not

:25:04.:25:07.

necessarily positive. They then project those sorts of prejudices

:25:08.:25:11.

they experienced onto their children and say, you have got a good degree,

:25:12.:25:15.

why do you to teach? When you sign up for the course, you break the

:25:16.:25:19.

barrier, you go, you are the only one, you are again experiencing that

:25:20.:25:24.

isolation. You do not have the support network. What drew you to

:25:25.:25:31.

the profession? I love kids and I have a moral purpose, making sure

:25:32.:25:34.

there is a change in education. That is what is part of wrong with the

:25:35.:25:39.

advertising. When you say, come into teaching, you will get 65,000,

:25:40.:25:43.

however much. If you come into teaching to be a millionaire, good

:25:44.:25:47.

luck! If you come because you want to make a difference, you can see a

:25:48.:25:51.

change is necessary, that is when you will capture your ethnic

:25:52.:25:55.

minority because they have come here to seek change and we need to

:25:56.:26:04.

capture that and encourage them onto the courses and give them the role

:26:05.:26:07.

models. I would like to see Teach First put forward a lot more role

:26:08.:26:09.

models on their roster of trainers. We have talked about role models,

:26:10.:26:12.

advertising, what else could you suggest now to the Government to

:26:13.:26:17.

attract more teachers from black and ethnic minority backgrounds? They

:26:18.:26:20.

have to go beyond what they are doing. At the moment, it is

:26:21.:26:25.

piecemeal. An initiative here, a big campaign, they have got the

:26:26.:26:32.

leadership equality and diversity fund. They are small initiatives. No

:26:33.:26:38.

strategy? The question I would be asking in government, I have had

:26:39.:26:41.

these initiative since I came in, the figures have not changed, it

:26:42.:26:47.

was... We have a minute and a half, other ideas? There needs to be

:26:48.:26:54.

reached. There is clearly black and ethnic minority teachers, but I have

:26:55.:26:57.

never had anyone say, why haven't you got involved? I think they know

:26:58.:27:05.

we are there, why not outreach to people who have got into it

:27:06.:27:10.

recently? Hear from them, get them involved, get them talking to

:27:11.:27:15.

people, getting people involved that universities. The constant level of

:27:16.:27:20.

support. You also need to show it from the top as well because Ofsted

:27:21.:27:28.

does not have a good track record on diversity either. They all need to

:27:29.:27:34.

make that change as well. It is not just the bottom-up approach, in

:27:35.:27:37.

needs to be top down as well. The Government needs to follow through

:27:38.:27:41.

with the initiatives they bring forward because the conversation

:27:42.:27:43.

comes up again and the Government bring something out and drops it and

:27:44.:27:48.

you need to follow it through. I have got a statement from the

:27:49.:27:49.

Department for Education. "The proportion of teachers

:27:50.:27:51.

from minority ethnic groups The department provides a range

:27:52.:27:53.

of initiatives to ensure there are no barriers to any

:27:54.:27:57.

individual, including black and minority ethnic groups,

:27:58.:28:01.

joining the teaching profession." Ask them what the range is, what

:28:02.:28:09.

accountability they have, to show the impact. Even the equalities

:28:10.:28:15.

grant, think about it, when the course is finished, what is the

:28:16.:28:19.

follow-up that encourages those teachers to progress? Thank you, all

:28:20.:28:23.

of you. I know there is so much more you could say. I can see it in your

:28:24.:28:31.

face, Zubaida! On Nikki's face! Thank you for your input. Still to

:28:32.:28:35.

come on the programme... Lawyers for the parents

:28:36.:28:38.

of the terminally-ill baby, Charlie Gard, are to present

:28:39.:28:40.

to the High Court what they argue is new evidence that an experimental

:28:41.:28:42.

treatment in the US could help him. We'll be live outside the High Court

:28:43.:28:46.

for the latest hearing. And the Royal College

:28:47.:28:48.

of Radiologists is seeking reassurances from the Government

:28:49.:28:50.

that leaving the EU will not affect the UK's supply of vital diagnostic

:28:51.:28:53.

and cancer-treating materials We will bring you all you need to

:28:54.:29:01.

know about Euratom in the next half an hour. It sounds dull but it is

:29:02.:29:05.

incredibly important. The latest news headlines.

:29:06.:29:09.

Lawyers representing the parents of the terminally-ill baby,

:29:10.:29:11.

Charlie Gard, will return to the High Court in London this

:29:12.:29:15.

morning to present what they claim is new evidence showing

:29:16.:29:17.

an experimental treatment could help him.

:29:18.:29:19.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital, where he's in intensive

:29:20.:29:22.

care, say the therapy won't work, and his life support systems

:29:23.:29:25.

The BBC has learned at least one person who survived the Grenfell

:29:26.:29:37.

Tower fire has been diagnosed with cyanide poisoning. 12-year-old was

:29:38.:29:44.

treated for the effects of the highly toxic gas. It is not known

:29:45.:29:49.

what caused the poisoning but her parents who lost their unborn child

:29:50.:29:52.

after the fire believe it may have been caused by the burning of

:29:53.:29:56.

insulation or plastics during the blaze.

:29:57.:29:59.

As the Government prepares to publish its long-awaited bill

:30:00.:30:01.

that will convert European Union laws into British legislation,

:30:02.:30:03.

the head of the National Audit Office has said he's worried

:30:04.:30:06.

about failures in government leadership over Brexit.

:30:07.:30:08.

Sir Amyas Morse said ministers weren't presenting a united front

:30:09.:30:11.

The Brexit Minister, Steve Baker, has dismissed those concerns.

:30:12.:30:17.

Donald Trump is in Paris, where he'll hold talks

:30:18.:30:20.

with President Macron and attend Bastille Day celebrations.

:30:21.:30:24.

High on the agenda will be US-French actions in Syria and Iraq

:30:25.:30:27.

Despite differences between the two leaders, Mr Macron has indicated

:30:28.:30:31.

he will work to reaffirm historic ties between the two

:30:32.:30:33.

allies and prevent the US from being isolated.

:30:34.:30:40.

Applications for university courses starting this autumn have fallen

:30:41.:30:42.

Figures from the admissions service UCAS show a sharp decline in mature

:30:43.:30:50.

students and those applying to study nursing courses.

:30:51.:30:53.

It is the first decline in applications since fees were last

:30:54.:30:56.

increased to over ?9,000 in England, five years ago.

:30:57.:31:00.

University leaders say the decline could be down

:31:01.:31:02.

to a number of factors, including Brexit, higher fees

:31:03.:31:04.

and funding changes for trainee nurses and midwives.

:31:05.:31:15.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10.

:31:16.:31:18.

Let's head to Wimbledon now, and talk to Sally Nugent.

:31:19.:31:24.

Sally, you have had behind the scenes exciting access to Johanna

:31:25.:31:31.

Konta training. It is all about her today, isn't it? Yes, can you

:31:32.:31:36.

believe it? I have to say it wasn't in the last ten days, about eight or

:31:37.:31:40.

ten weeks ago we went to film with her at Roehampton, and she gave us a

:31:41.:31:44.

real insight into the work she has been doing to get this far. One of

:31:45.:31:47.

the most interesting things she said to me was we were walking around the

:31:48.:31:51.

courts, we spent hours with her and she did her routine and everything,

:31:52.:31:53.

and we got the one court, and she said I lived there. I said what,

:31:54.:32:03.

where, and she pointed to like a cubbyhole, there is a row of tiny

:32:04.:32:07.

bedrooms, so she lived on the court while she was training as a young

:32:08.:32:12.

player. That is the level of dedication. She wasn't even joking.

:32:13.:32:16.

That is the level of dedication she had to her sport, so I got a little

:32:17.:32:20.

bit of an insight into her training routine but I'm joined by somebody

:32:21.:32:24.

who knows an awful lot more, Justin Sherrin, you used to be her coach. I

:32:25.:32:29.

did, and what a pleasure that was, all the hard work we put in, all of

:32:30.:32:34.

the enthusiasm shoe showed after every session, and to see her on

:32:35.:32:37.

centre court today is a dream come true. I mentioned she lived next to

:32:38.:32:44.

the tentacle, she would sleep there, as -- next to the tennis court, as a

:32:45.:32:49.

kid, was her life completely unlike any other normal's teenager? You

:32:50.:32:55.

imagine what the normal 19, 18-year-olds do at university,

:32:56.:32:59.

having fun, having parties. If you want to be a supreme athlete and one

:33:00.:33:03.

day come to centre court community to be very dedicated from an early

:33:04.:33:10.

age. She faces Venus Williams right here on centre court today. It is an

:33:11.:33:17.

intimidating prospect at the best of times, but how will Joe be managing

:33:18.:33:21.

her nerves this morning? If you listen to the way she talks, she

:33:22.:33:24.

talks the talk and she certainly walks the walk and she will just be

:33:25.:33:29.

focusing on the tennis ball and their processes, and her team sets

:33:30.:33:32.

out fantastically for each match, and if the plan goes as well as it

:33:33.:33:35.

has done in previous matches, I think she will just think of it as

:33:36.:33:40.

any other match. What is the process, because she talks about the

:33:41.:33:43.

process. It is most like sometimes when you watch her, point by point,

:33:44.:33:47.

she is doing the same thing again and again and again. The great thing

:33:48.:33:54.

about tennis is, we know how it starts, either with a return or a

:33:55.:33:58.

serve. If you watch how meticulous she is with her ball bouncing, her

:33:59.:34:03.

breathing, it is about focusing on your target, presenting the ball to

:34:04.:34:06.

the sky and then ripping it. If you keep doing that over and over again

:34:07.:34:10.

for about ten years, you end up getting it in. Just the ten years!

:34:11.:34:16.

How do you beat Venus Williams? By returning well, you have to take

:34:17.:34:20.

away the great woman's serve, and you have got to get her running.

:34:21.:34:24.

Those 37 years I'm hoping we'll catch up with her legs. If Jo can

:34:25.:34:29.

hit the ball as well as she did against Halep, we could have a

:34:30.:34:34.

finalist on our hands. Disappointed to see Andy Murray go out yesterday.

:34:35.:34:38.

Very disappointing, but what has Andy given us in the last five or

:34:39.:34:42.

six years? So much pleasure and Joe and it is now -- Klizan joy, Joanna

:34:43.:34:50.

Contador's turn now. Present the ball to the sky and hit the hell out

:34:51.:34:52.

of it, that is all you need to do. Some of your e-mails about applying,

:34:53.:35:04.

applications are down in this country. As a college lever with a

:35:05.:35:08.

confirmed union Place, so many of my peers with the potential to get into

:35:09.:35:13.

university had been deterred by a lack of financial support and

:35:14.:35:15.

ridiculous level of debt we will all leave with. Sad to see so much

:35:16.:35:20.

potential lost due to the government's lack of support.

:35:21.:35:28.

Charlie says as a current university student, Fedetskyi written off after

:35:29.:35:33.

30 years anyway. I read on the BBC's website that only 33% of fees get

:35:34.:35:38.

paid and the scaremongering of being left with thousands of pounds worth

:35:39.:35:42.

of debt is not very truthful. We will talk about the university

:35:43.:35:45.

application numbers before ten o'clock.

:35:46.:35:48.

Charlie Gard's parents are back at the High Court today for another

:35:49.:35:51.

hearing in their ongoing fight for permission to take him abroad

:35:52.:35:53.

Sarah Campbell is outside the High Court. What will Mr Justice Francis

:35:54.:36:05.

be hearing today? We are just awaiting the arrival of Charlie's

:36:06.:36:22.

parents Chris card and Connie Yates. Charlie is now 11 months old, and

:36:23.:36:25.

the legal battle over his treatment has gone to the highest court in the

:36:26.:36:33.

UK. Every single decision so far has gone against his parents, who want

:36:34.:36:41.

to take him to America. Charlie's Doctors at Great Ormond Street

:36:42.:36:44.

Hospital believe that his brain damage is most likely irreversible

:36:45.:36:47.

and that he is most likely to be suffering pain, so they have been

:36:48.:36:50.

arguing throughout that this trip would not be in the best interests

:36:51.:36:54.

of Charlie, and what is in his best interests is to have his life

:36:55.:37:03.

support withdrawn. What changed is that last Friday, seven scientists,

:37:04.:37:07.

some clinicians, wrote a letter to Charlie's parents to be given to

:37:08.:37:11.

Great Ormond Street Hospital, detailing treatment, which they say

:37:12.:37:16.

is new, and experimental, it has never been tried on any trial or

:37:17.:37:19.

indeed any animal with Charlie's condition. They say it is worth

:37:20.:37:25.

trying and there is a chance it might have a positive benefit. Last

:37:26.:37:29.

Friday, Great Ormond Street Hospital applied to the High Court to have

:37:30.:37:33.

this hearing so that Mr Justice Francis, who is the original judge

:37:34.:37:36.

who made that original High Court decision back in April, that the

:37:37.:37:40.

life support should be withdrawn, he is hearing this new evidence today,

:37:41.:37:47.

and it will be up to him to decide whether this new evidence does have

:37:48.:37:54.

merit. We will be back with you when Charlie Gard's parents arrive.

:37:55.:37:59.

In a moment, we'll speak to Darran O'Neill, whose son, James,

:38:00.:38:02.

was born with the same condition as Charlie Gard.

:38:03.:38:04.

But first to the US, which is where Charlie's parents

:38:05.:38:07.

Six-year-old Art Estopinan, from Baltimore, in the US,

:38:08.:38:11.

His father, Art Senior, has been telling the BBC

:38:12.:38:14.

All of his muscles shut down, so it's basically a slow death.

:38:15.:38:21.

It's devastating, especially to see your son in that situation.

:38:22.:38:34.

We had a healthy, normal baby, and then all of sudden, 20 months

:38:35.:38:37.

later, a doctor is telling us that he is going to

:38:38.:38:40.

I mean, we were totally devastated, but I told her, "Doctor,

:38:41.:38:46.

I could assure you we are not taking our baby home to die."

:38:47.:38:49.

Do you want to throw it on the floor?

:38:50.:38:51.

So I was sort of calling all kinds of doctors from Harvard in the east

:38:52.:39:00.

to Stanford in the west, Ohio in the midwest

:39:01.:39:02.

So they started gearing me towards Columbia University Medical Centre

:39:03.:39:09.

in New York City, and when I talked to the doctor he said, "Yes,

:39:10.:39:13.

we are doing a clinical protocol," and we were like,

:39:14.:39:15.

wow, this is the hope that we are looking for.

:39:16.:39:19.

I didn't care if he was the first human to try this medication,

:39:20.:39:22.

because they only told us he was going to die.

:39:23.:39:26.

Because we had already called him the priest to give him the last

:39:27.:39:29.

rites because he hadn't opened his eyes in a few days.

:39:30.:39:33.

Luckily we were able to get the approval pretty fast

:39:34.:39:38.

and then we were able to give him the medication.

:39:39.:39:43.

Little by little, he started to get stronger.

:39:44.:39:45.

We are going to go in and play a little bit.

:39:46.:39:48.

Now he can move his hands, his fingers, he is able to vocalise.

:39:49.:39:51.

You know, like, little kids, when they want Mickey Mouse

:39:52.:40:03.

and you tell them no, we have to do this, that

:40:04.:40:05.

or the other, take a bath and he doesn't want to take a bath.

:40:06.:40:09.

But we are happy to see that, because he is reacting like a normal

:40:10.:40:12.

Dying with dignity is just not a dignity at all.

:40:13.:40:19.

Human beings are taught to fight and to go forward and to give up

:40:20.:40:23.

Let's now talk to Darren O'Neill whose son James was born with the

:40:24.:40:44.

same condition as Charlie Gard. Hello. And your little boy very

:40:45.:40:52.

sadly died after three months, and I wonder how long it was before

:40:53.:40:56.

yourselves, the medics, realised there was something wrong? Yes,

:40:57.:41:02.

James was born in 2008, in December, and he passed away in March 2009.

:41:03.:41:09.

The actual diagnosis for the depletion syndrome, we actually got

:41:10.:41:17.

that in the August after he died. Right. At the time, there was no

:41:18.:41:24.

actual recent research that had been done on the actual condition. They

:41:25.:41:31.

realised about three to four weeks before he died that he had a

:41:32.:41:35.

mitochondrial disorder, but because mitochondria is made up of 70

:41:36.:41:38.

different things, they didn't actually know what the strain was.

:41:39.:41:49.

And can you explain to our audience, Darran, how the symptoms manifested

:41:50.:41:53.

themselves? With James, it was quite weird, he was born quite similar to

:41:54.:41:58.

Art, a healthy baby, the only issue we had was about feeding. He was

:41:59.:42:03.

taking about four hours to take a bottle of milk. At first he was

:42:04.:42:06.

breast-feeding with his mum, and it puts a much strain on his mum that

:42:07.:42:16.

in the end we actually got some bottles of the doctor, so we went

:42:17.:42:19.

and bought some bottle feed, and he was still taking four hours, he just

:42:20.:42:22.

didn't have the energy, he didn't have the muscles to do the sucking.

:42:23.:42:32.

So after two weeks, he was put into hospital at Warrington general, and

:42:33.:42:36.

he was just treated for a feeding issue, at first. That is what they

:42:37.:42:42.

thought. As you are hearing Charlie Gard's parents speak, and what they

:42:43.:42:45.

are going through, it must bring up so many emotions for you and your

:42:46.:42:50.

family? Definitely. My heart goes out to them, it really does. Any

:42:51.:42:55.

parent who is in a position that you find yourself in when you get told

:42:56.:43:00.

your son or daughter will die, you will fight tooth and nail,

:43:01.:43:03.

regardless of whether the outcome is a positive or a negative one. You

:43:04.:43:07.

want to know that you have given your child every opportunity for the

:43:08.:43:17.

chance of life. And, as I say, unfortunately, when James died in

:43:18.:43:23.

2009, because it had been like 30 years since the last research paper

:43:24.:43:27.

was written, there was no actual research, there were no options of

:43:28.:43:32.

medication. The mitochondria, the easiest way to describe it is

:43:33.:43:36.

basically, if you take a car engine, take out the engine of the car, the

:43:37.:43:40.

car doesn't work, and that is exactly what the mitochondria

:43:41.:43:45.

depletion is. It is in the nucleus, basically. Basically in the nucleus

:43:46.:43:54.

of the eggs, so from the minute he was conceived, he already have this

:43:55.:44:01.

bonus. -- already had this illness. For James, the only way we could

:44:02.:44:07.

change James was basically take I suppose his spirit and put it into

:44:08.:44:12.

another body, really. I understand. Because every part of your body,

:44:13.:44:17.

every living gene, every living cell in your body, has mitochondria, and

:44:18.:44:22.

the depletion syndrome is basically because the body has not got enough

:44:23.:44:29.

mitochondrial. As Art's dad was describing before, the organ start

:44:30.:44:34.

to shut down, bit by bit. Darran, thank you, we are really grateful

:44:35.:44:38.

for your time, thank you so much. Thank you very much. Still to come

:44:39.:44:44.

on the programme, the number of students applying for uni students

:44:45.:44:47.

has fallen for the first time in five years. Brexit has been cited,

:44:48.:44:54.

rising tuition fees in England, your own pertinent experiences are really

:44:55.:44:57.

helpful for our conversation, which is coming up in the next few

:44:58.:44:58.

minutes. A decision will soon be

:44:59.:45:03.

made, which could affect The Government is going to outline

:45:04.:45:05.

its policy on whether the UK should remain part of Europe's nuclear

:45:06.:45:10.

regulator, called Euratom. Euratom is responsible for supplying

:45:11.:45:12.

vital radioactive isotopes, which we, in the UK, have to import

:45:13.:45:14.

because we don't make them ourselves, and which are used

:45:15.:45:17.

for cancer treatments. Doctors are concerned our deliveries

:45:18.:45:19.

could be disrupted if we leave this Medics have called for more clarity

:45:20.:45:21.

and assurance for patients who require treatment

:45:22.:45:29.

using these isotopes. The Government has accused the media

:45:30.:45:32.

of publishing alarmist stories about the risks of leaving, yet even

:45:33.:45:35.

some of their own Conservative MPs We will speak to one in a moment,

:45:36.:45:38.

as well as the President of the Royal College

:45:39.:45:46.

of Radiologists, but first, here's all you need to know

:45:47.:45:48.

about Euratom in 90 seconds. A group of MPs and some medics

:45:49.:45:54.

are concerned that the treatment of thousands of cancer patients

:45:55.:45:58.

could be disrupted or delayed if Britain leaves Europe's nuclear

:45:59.:46:07.

regulator as part of Brexit. The European Atomic Energy Community

:46:08.:46:10.

has controlled Europe's use and movement of nuclear

:46:11.:46:12.

energy since 1957. It's not part of the European Union,

:46:13.:46:19.

but it does use many of its Back in March, Theresa May sent

:46:20.:46:22.

a letter telling the EU It contained a clause,

:46:23.:46:25.

which set out the UK would also be This was hardly

:46:26.:46:33.

discussed, until now. Doctors are warning leaving

:46:34.:46:37.

Euratom will threaten the UK's supply of vital

:46:38.:46:40.

imported radioactive isotopes. These are widely used

:46:41.:46:44.

in scans and NHS treatments. The move could affect

:46:45.:46:49.

thousands of cancer patients. There are also warnings the UK

:46:50.:46:52.

could risk losing highly paid, The Government says there will be no

:46:53.:46:55.

impact on the availability of medical radioisotopes

:46:56.:47:03.

with the UK's exit from Euratom. Euratom places no restrictions

:47:04.:47:06.

on the export of medical isotopes So after leaving Euratom,

:47:07.:47:09.

our ability to access medical isotopes produced in Europe

:47:10.:47:15.

will not be affected. So I hope that clears up and I hope

:47:16.:47:23.

that reassures cancer patients around the country

:47:24.:47:27.

that the scaremongering that's The Government will clarify its

:47:28.:47:28.

position in a paper released today. Here with us now is Conservative MP

:47:29.:47:35.

Ed Vaizey, who is calling for the Government to reconsider

:47:36.:47:38.

its stance on Euratom. And the president of

:47:39.:47:40.

the Royal College of Radiologists, It is going to be fine, nothing to

:47:41.:47:53.

worry about, says Damian Green, you are scaremongering. I have not

:47:54.:47:57.

raised the issue of the effect on cancer treatment. I think he will

:47:58.:48:02.

talk about that in a minute, but I have an interest in nuclear research

:48:03.:48:06.

in general because we do nuclear research in my constituency in

:48:07.:48:09.

Oxfordshire and that is under threat if we leave the nuclear treaty with

:48:10.:48:14.

Europe. There are a whole range of issues, whether cancer treatment or

:48:15.:48:19.

nuclear research in terms of cleaner nuclear energy that could be

:48:20.:48:22.

threatened if we leave Euratom and the paper the Government is

:48:23.:48:25.

publishing today on the future of Euratom does not mention medical

:48:26.:48:31.

research so I do not think it will clarify the position on treatment.

:48:32.:48:38.

Dr Nicola Strickland, do you accept you are scaremongering? I am not

:48:39.:48:44.

scaremongering, it is my role in representing patients in this

:48:45.:48:48.

country and clinical radiologists and oncologist to make sure those

:48:49.:48:52.

patiently map are treated properly, so my role is merely to protect

:48:53.:48:57.

patients and make sure they do not suffer as a result of us leaving

:48:58.:49:02.

Euratom. The Government says they will not suffer, it will not affect

:49:03.:49:07.

access to the isotopes that we do not make in this country. We will

:49:08.:49:12.

still be able to import them. Why are you not reassured? We just do

:49:13.:49:16.

not know and we want more communication from the Government

:49:17.:49:20.

with the medical profession and with industry to know what the situation

:49:21.:49:24.

will be. At present, the radioisotopes are covered by the

:49:25.:49:29.

treaty. There has been some disagreement about that. They are

:49:30.:49:42.

actually listed under list A2 in the annex and air transport is also

:49:43.:49:45.

protected by the union in the nuclear treaty by which the tariffs

:49:46.:49:52.

cannot be increased and the transport is assured. We do not want

:49:53.:49:57.

patients getting investigations for cancer or treatment delayed as a

:49:58.:50:01.

result of hold-ups in the delivery of these materials or an increase in

:50:02.:50:06.

their prices. You think both of those are possibility? They are a

:50:07.:50:12.

possibility and we want some reassurance and to know what is

:50:13.:50:17.

actually going to happen. When the Government says, leaving Euratom as

:50:18.:50:21.

part of Brexit will have no impact on the supply, the availability, our

:50:22.:50:26.

access to the radioisotopes used in scans and treatments for thousands

:50:27.:50:29.

of patients, at the moment, you do not believe them, frankly? I am

:50:30.:50:34.

saying there is a risk and patients deserve some reassurance. OK. The

:50:35.:50:40.

Government publishing the paper today to clarify its position,

:50:41.:50:47.

hopefully, on Euratom. Would it work for you as a Conservative backbench

:50:48.:50:50.

MP if there is some kind of associate membership of Euratom? We

:50:51.:50:56.

leave the institutions to do with the EU, but we have some kind of

:50:57.:51:01.

associate membership? Let us look at what solution the Government can

:51:02.:51:04.

come up with. We have got into this mess partly because we have taken an

:51:05.:51:09.

ideological view of Brexit, it has to be pure, we cannot be subject to

:51:10.:51:16.

the jurisdiction of any things like the European Court of Justice.

:51:17.:51:21.

Euratom creates a mini free market in nuclear which is deeply

:51:22.:51:24.

controversial because it supports millions of pounds of investment in

:51:25.:51:29.

Oxfordshire in nuclear research and as Dr Nicola Strickland has pointed

:51:30.:51:32.

out, it enables the transport of nuclear material for cancer

:51:33.:51:36.

treatment. The Government wants to say it is going to completely

:51:37.:51:40.

replicate it. It is a bizarre process of leaving an institution

:51:41.:51:45.

and then trying to recreate it as perfectly as we possibly can. For

:51:46.:51:50.

me, the simplest thing would be to stay in that institution. If

:51:51.:51:53.

associate membership is the compromise the Government comes up

:51:54.:51:57.

with, Switzerland is an associate member, that might work, but

:51:58.:52:02.

remember, Switzerland is subject to the European Court of Justice. We do

:52:03.:52:06.

not want ideological pure Brexiteer is saying, that is not good enough

:52:07.:52:09.

because the European Court of Justice has the jurisdiction. We

:52:10.:52:16.

want security for cancer patients and my constituents who work in

:52:17.:52:19.

nuclear research and we want continued investment in nuclear

:52:20.:52:23.

research in the UK. Associate membership might not be on offer. I

:52:24.:52:29.

have been reading some legal opinion which suggests that when Article 50

:52:30.:52:33.

was triggered, that is it, we cannot pick and choose which bits we still

:52:34.:52:38.

want, we are leaving, the letter was written. This is also the big

:52:39.:52:43.

dilemma. I do not want to widen this discussion too much, but you saw the

:52:44.:52:47.

head of Ryanair saying, we are now in picking wall of the aviation

:52:48.:52:50.

agreements which allows us to fly cheaply around European destinations

:52:51.:52:58.

-- we are now undertaking all of the aviation agreements. Our European

:52:59.:53:02.

partners might say we want one thing and we say we want another thing. We

:53:03.:53:06.

need clarity from the Government and an indication they are prepared to

:53:07.:53:14.

compromise to save British jobs and things we take for granted like

:53:15.:53:18.

reliable cancer treatment and cheap air travel in Europe. Thank you

:53:19.:53:22.

both. I will read the statement then from the Government. There will be

:53:23.:53:26.

no impact on the availability of radioisotopes. The UK supports

:53:27.:53:32.

Euratom and will want to see continuity of cooperation in

:53:33.:53:35.

standards. We remain absolutely committed to the highest standards

:53:36.:53:38.

of nuclear safety, safeguards and support for the industry. New

:53:39.:53:43.

figures showed the number of people applying for UK university places is

:53:44.:53:44.

falling. UCAS, the university admissions

:53:45.:53:47.

service, says the number of British applications is down 4% compared

:53:48.:53:50.

to last year. And applications from students

:53:51.:53:52.

in other EU countries are down 5%. Some people are saying that higher

:53:53.:53:54.

tuition fees are putting off British students form applying to university

:53:55.:53:57.

and that uncertainty caused by Brexit is another reason people

:53:58.:53:59.

from other countries Let's talk now to Sally Hunt,

:54:00.:54:02.

the general secretary Good morning. What are your own

:54:03.:54:15.

theories? You have hit the nail on the head. When you know the average

:54:16.:54:20.

debt for the poorest student is ?57,000, the average debt is around

:54:21.:54:26.

?50,000, when you know that bursaries and grants have been

:54:27.:54:30.

replaced by loans, when you know that we have a 19% drop, for

:54:31.:54:37.

example, in student nurses applying. What we understand from this is that

:54:38.:54:41.

people are not stupid, government has repeatedly pretended this is not

:54:42.:54:46.

a debt, repeatedly said this is the only way we can fund the system, we

:54:47.:54:50.

now know the bluff is being called. People have looked, they understand

:54:51.:54:55.

the debt is huge, it does impact on their life, those people in the

:54:56.:55:02.

future sea 6.1% interest rate being slapped on it from September. It is

:55:03.:55:08.

putting people off. But it has not four years, has it? There has always

:55:09.:55:13.

been a benefit recognised, higher education, everyone knows that, I

:55:14.:55:17.

would say it over and over again, one of the best things you can do

:55:18.:55:22.

for yourself. But people are very uncertain in the current climate,

:55:23.:55:26.

very worried. People do not really understand where this Government is

:55:27.:55:31.

going on all sorts of issues, let alone higher education itself. They

:55:32.:55:33.

are worried about the economy, all sorts of things that make them

:55:34.:55:37.

think, shall I invest at this point in time? If you look in the Times

:55:38.:55:44.

Higher, they are reporting even vice chancellors are questioning whether

:55:45.:55:48.

the regime is sustainable. That need to look at it. It is a mess. What do

:55:49.:55:55.

you mean specifically? We have said for many years there should be a

:55:56.:55:59.

question put as to why the state are paying, why the families of students

:56:00.:56:05.

and students themselves are paying and business is not. There needs to

:56:06.:56:08.

be a more equitable spread and we have always advocated a business

:56:09.:56:15.

education tax and we have always said to look at corporation tax and

:56:16.:56:18.

we were glad to see the Labour Party picking up on that. Robert Halfon

:56:19.:56:23.

has just been elected as the Education Select Committee chair, a

:56:24.:56:27.

Tory, someone who understands government and someone who

:56:28.:56:29.

understands working-class people. I would say to him, get this on your

:56:30.:56:33.

agenda, get a review going and let us look for a way we can have a

:56:34.:56:37.

sustainable future for our economy and our people because we all need

:56:38.:56:42.

higher education to work. Does it matter if University applications

:56:43.:56:48.

have fallen by 4%? It does. When you are looking at Brexit and we

:56:49.:56:51.

understand we have to have an economy that has a lot of people who

:56:52.:56:55.

are skilled up, looking at the world as it is which is a very tense place

:56:56.:56:59.

now, you need to have a democracy that is vibrant and people who feel

:57:00.:57:03.

able and willing to share and participate. Those to -- two pillars

:57:04.:57:14.

alone tell us it needs access to higher education. It opens up

:57:15.:57:17.

opportunity. What is happening at the moment is people are being

:57:18.:57:22.

frightened by the debt and EU students in particular are saying to

:57:23.:57:26.

themselves, is there a future here for me? What will happen in terms of

:57:27.:57:30.

not just my education but also my sense of being welcome as a person

:57:31.:57:35.

who has writes or not? These things matter because we have to be part a

:57:36.:57:42.

world and we have to be part of a world in a positive way. Thank you.

:57:43.:57:48.

Let us bring you the latest weather. Sorry, let us do a statement from

:57:49.:57:56.

the Department for Education. About University applications. Young

:57:57.:57:59.

people continue to see the benefits of going to university with record

:58:00.:58:04.

application rates for 18-year-olds and those from disadvantaged

:58:05.:58:04.

backgrounds... Later, the sport. Before that, the

:58:05.:58:16.

weather. A largely fine day so far and we

:58:17.:58:25.

will continue to see Sunny spells with the rest of the day. This

:58:26.:58:30.

lovely picture from Shetland, sunny spells here. This afternoon,

:58:31.:58:33.

scattered showers developing across England and Wales, but across

:58:34.:58:39.

Northern Ireland, western Scotland, the showers more persistent.

:58:40.:58:43.

Temperatures reaching high teens, low 20s. Staying dry for Wimbledon

:58:44.:58:47.

this afternoon and feeling quite warm. Showers in the north-west

:58:48.:58:51.

spreading south-east through the night. Staying largely dry in the

:58:52.:58:54.

south. Temperatures tonight similar to last night. Towns and cities,

:58:55.:58:59.

double figures. In the countryside, low single figures in sunspots.

:59:00.:59:08.

Tomorrow, not bad on the whole -- some spots. Sunny spells around,

:59:09.:59:13.

more rain in the north-west later in the day. Temperatures similar once

:59:14.:59:18.

again. That is your forecast for now.

:59:19.:59:27.

Charlie Gard's parents return to the High Court in London today. They

:59:28.:59:37.

have got letters from up to seven doctors and scientists and it

:59:38.:59:42.

demonstrates there is up to a 10% chance of this ground-breaking

:59:43.:59:47.

treatment working. Doctors that Great Ormond Street said the therapy

:59:48.:59:50.

will not work and his life-support system should be turned off.

:59:51.:59:58.

A junior doctor's gripping account of working on the NHS's frontline.

:59:59.:00:01.

We'll be hearing how doctors deal with rota gaps,

:00:02.:00:03.

exhausted staff, and risks to patient safety, on a daily basis.

:00:04.:00:05.

And at Wimbledon Johanna Konta meets her date with destiny today,

:00:06.:00:08.

when she takes on Venus Williams in the women's singles semifinal.

:00:09.:00:11.

I'm fully aware that every single match that I'll get to play will be

:00:12.:00:18.

a testing one, and will challenge me.

:00:19.:00:21.

Theresa May tells the BBC she was devastated after hearing the exit

:00:22.:00:27.

poll results and says the result was a complete shock. Devastated enough

:00:28.:00:36.

to shed a tear? Yes, a little tear. At that moment? At that moment.

:00:37.:00:43.

Here's Ben Brown in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of todays news.

:00:44.:00:52.

Lawyers representing the parents of the terminally-ill baby,

:00:53.:00:53.

Charlie Gard, will return to the High Court in London this

:00:54.:00:56.

morning, to present what they claim is new evidence showing

:00:57.:00:58.

an experimental treatment could help him.

:00:59.:01:00.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital,

:01:01.:01:01.

where he's in intensive care, say the therapy won't work,

:01:02.:01:04.

and his life support systems should be turned off.

:01:05.:01:09.

Theresa May has said she shed a little tear after hearing the exit

:01:10.:01:17.

poll results on general election night. In an interview with BBC five

:01:18.:01:21.

live to mark the year Sinjah became Prime Minister, she said the result

:01:22.:01:26.

was a complete shock. I suppose devastated really because, as I say,

:01:27.:01:30.

I knew the campaign wasn't going perfectly, but still the messages I

:01:31.:01:34.

was getting from people I was speaking to, but also the comments

:01:35.:01:38.

we were getting back from a lot of people that were being passed on to

:01:39.:01:41.

become aware that we were going to get a better result than we did.

:01:42.:01:47.

Devastated enough to shed a tear? Yes, a little tear. Yes, at that

:01:48.:01:52.

moment. At that moment, yes. As the government prepares

:01:53.:01:56.

to publish its long-awaited bill that will convert European Union

:01:57.:01:59.

laws into British legislation, the head of the National Audit

:02:00.:02:01.

Office has said he's worried about failures in government

:02:02.:02:04.

leadership over Brexit. Sir Amyas Morse said ministers

:02:05.:02:05.

weren't presenting a united front The Brexit minister, Steve Baker has

:02:06.:02:08.

dismissed those concerns. The BBC has learned that at least

:02:09.:02:23.

one person who survived the Grenfell Tower fire has been

:02:24.:02:26.

diagnosed with cyanide poisoning. 12-year-old Luana Gomes,

:02:27.:02:28.

was treated for the effects It isn't known what caused

:02:29.:02:30.

the poisoning, but her parents - who lost their unborn child

:02:31.:02:34.

after the fire - believe it may have been caused by the burning

:02:35.:02:37.

of insulation or plastics Four former teachers at a leading

:02:38.:02:39.

independent school West Sussex, have been charged with a number

:02:40.:02:49.

of historical sex offences dating The men, who taught at

:02:50.:02:52.

Christ's Hospital School in Horsham, are alleged to have attacked 15

:02:53.:02:56.

suspected victims, both male and female,

:02:57.:02:58.

between 1980 and 1996, according to the Crown

:02:59.:03:00.

Prosecution Service. Donald Trump is in Paris,

:03:01.:03:11.

where he'll hold talks with President Macron and attend

:03:12.:03:13.

Bastille Day celebrations. High on the agenda will be US-French

:03:14.:03:15.

actions in Syria and Iraq Despite differences between the two

:03:16.:03:18.

leaders, Mr Macron has indicated he will work to reaffirm historic

:03:19.:03:22.

ties between the two allies and prevent the US

:03:23.:03:24.

from being isolated. Applications for university courses

:03:25.:03:30.

starting this autumn have fallen Figures from the admissions service,

:03:31.:03:32.

UCAS, show a sharp decline in mature students and those applying

:03:33.:03:39.

to study nursing courses. It is the first decline

:03:40.:03:41.

in applications since fees were last increased to over ?9,000

:03:42.:03:44.

in England, five years ago. University leaders say

:03:45.:03:46.

the decline could be down to a number of factors,

:03:47.:03:48.

including Brexit, higher fees and funding changes for trainee

:03:49.:03:50.

nurses and midwives. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:03:51.:04:01.

News - more at 10.30. Do get in touch with us

:04:02.:04:10.

throughout the morning - use the hashtag Victoria live

:04:11.:04:12.

and if you text, you will be charged Particularly about university

:04:13.:04:24.

applications, if you are a would-be mature student and had been put off

:04:25.:04:28.

from applying for a university place, or not, let us know.

:04:29.:04:30.

Here's some sport now with Leah Boleto.

:04:31.:04:34.

Britain's on the verge of having it's first woman reach

:04:35.:04:38.

a singles final at Wimbledon in 40 years, later.

:04:39.:04:42.

Johanna Konta takes on five-time champion

:04:43.:04:44.

Jo says she knows she got her work cut out, but appreciates the support

:04:45.:04:48.

It makes it more special, because it is home, and I do

:04:49.:04:53.

get that home support, which I don't get anywhere else.

:04:54.:04:56.

I guess it makes it that much sweeter.

:04:57.:05:05.

The Wimbledon crowd will be rooting for the British

:05:06.:05:07.

But her form at the All England Club has impressed many, including one

:05:08.:05:12.

former Grand Slam champion, who thinks Konta will know exactly

:05:13.:05:14.

In her mind, Jo knows what she needs to do, tactically, the beat Venus

:05:15.:05:29.

Williams. She has improved as a tennis player, a game is so much

:05:30.:05:33.

better now, mentally she is even stronger, she has really impressed

:05:34.:05:36.

me mentally with her game. She seems to stay in the present moment really

:05:37.:05:40.

well and in the zone. I have a feeling if she continues to play

:05:41.:05:43.

like she has since the beginning of this tournament, she has a very good

:05:44.:05:45.

chance to win today. So, support from former

:05:46.:05:49.

players for Konta - U2 are among those who've tweeted

:05:50.:05:51.

wishing her good luck. And Sir Mick Jagger did the same,

:05:52.:05:55.

saying Konta's gone further So Konta is the only British player

:05:56.:05:58.

left in the main singles draw Andy says it's possible he'll take

:05:59.:06:08.

several weeks off to recover fully from his hip injury,

:06:09.:06:16.

after he was beaten in five sets Murray looked to be struggling -

:06:17.:06:19.

in pain throughout The American came from two sets

:06:20.:06:23.

to one down and is through to his first ever grand slam semi-final,

:06:24.:06:27.

where he'll face Marin Cilic next. Cilic beat Novak Djokovic,

:06:28.:06:30.

who retired with injury. Roger Federer is the favourite

:06:31.:06:35.

to take the men's title now that three of the top four men's

:06:36.:06:37.

seeds are out. Federer looked impressive in beating

:06:38.:06:41.

last year's finalist He's bidding to win a record 8th

:06:42.:06:43.

Wimbledon title and will face Away from Wimbledon,

:06:44.:06:47.

the former Fifa official The American - seen

:06:48.:06:53.

here on the left - had been banned from all football

:06:54.:07:08.

activities for life, two years ago, after admitting

:07:09.:07:10.

charges of tax evasion. He'd been suffering from cancer,

:07:11.:07:12.

but did turn whistle blower to help investigators uncover corruption

:07:13.:07:15.

in football. Let's just return to Andy Murray

:07:16.:07:16.

for a moment, and as he exited Wimbledon yesterday,

:07:17.:07:19.

he was his usual We know he is always very

:07:20.:07:21.

supportive of women - and we saw another example yesterday

:07:22.:07:25.

in his post-match press conference when he corrected an American

:07:26.:07:27.

reporter on their tennis REPORTER: Sam is the first US player

:07:28.:07:30.

to reach a major semi-final Yes, first male player,

:07:31.:07:39.

that's for sure. That's all the sport,

:07:40.:07:51.

I'll be back with more at 10:30. Children beaten and tear-gassed by

:07:52.:07:59.

police, their belongings destroyed; That's the life for many child

:08:00.:08:01.

migrants stuck in Northern France, according to a report

:08:02.:08:06.

into what happened after the so-called 'jungle' camp

:08:07.:08:08.

in Calais was cleared The All Party Parliamentary Group

:08:09.:08:10.

on Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery decided

:08:11.:08:15.

to investigate reports that many of the unaccompanied children

:08:16.:08:17.

who were trying to get to Britain were at risk of being trafficked,

:08:18.:08:19.

because French Police were moving Let's talk to Fiona MacTaggart,

:08:20.:08:22.

Co-Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Trafficking

:08:23.:08:52.

and Modern Slavery, and a former Labour MP, Sue Clayton,

:08:53.:08:54.

is a documentary maker, who has witnessed police brutality

:08:55.:08:56.

against children in Calais. 'Bilal' was one of the few hundred

:08:57.:08:58.

children who arrived under He's 17 and came from Syria; Bilal

:08:59.:09:01.

is not his real name, and we're protecting his identity

:09:02.:09:05.

because he has family in Syria, Bilal, by the way, was not

:09:06.:09:27.

trafficked, as I say, he came on the dub scheme. Fiona McTaggart, from

:09:28.:09:30.

your research, what is happening to these unaccompanied children? The

:09:31.:09:35.

shocking thing is we are talking about children. I think in this

:09:36.:09:39.

country we are proud of our perfection of children, and yet

:09:40.:09:43.

children, many of whom have relatives here, who are stuck in

:09:44.:09:47.

Calais, who have run away from horrible situations, from war in

:09:48.:09:51.

Syria, oppression by the Taliban, the threat of being recruited into

:09:52.:09:55.

armies, they ran away. They want to come and join their family here, and

:09:56.:10:00.

they face chaos and oppression by the French police. The Dubs scheme,

:10:01.:10:04.

which is the scheme that you described, which allowed actually

:10:05.:10:08.

only 200, so far, children, like Bilal, to come to the UK, actually

:10:09.:10:13.

showed how we could properly process a group of people who are very

:10:14.:10:17.

vulnerable and enable them to come here. And instead, what happened is,

:10:18.:10:21.

after that first 200, nothing happened. So these children are

:10:22.:10:28.

still there, sleeping rough, facing CS gas and pepper spray from riot

:10:29.:10:34.

police in France almost every day. And they are not being treated like

:10:35.:10:39.

children. We aren't doing anything to protect them. And as a result,

:10:40.:10:42.

because they don't know how they can get to safety, they are at risk from

:10:43.:10:46.

criminals, from traffickers, they jump onto lorries, trying to get

:10:47.:10:53.

here safely. Of course some of them are wildly injured, if they get on a

:10:54.:11:01.

lorry. And what our report says is that the fear the government has,

:11:02.:11:06.

that having a proper legal way of letting these children come to the

:11:07.:11:12.

UK makes more of them try. They said it was a pull factor. Actually the

:11:13.:11:18.

opposite is true, the pull factors to Britain are cricket, television,

:11:19.:11:24.

football, speaking English, education here, those are the pull

:11:25.:11:27.

factors. We are not getting rid of any of those. The pull factors are

:11:28.:11:31.

not legal routes because when they were, the children did not know

:11:32.:11:37.

about them. So we need to treat them as children, protect them, that is

:11:38.:11:42.

what we expect. Sue, as a documentary maker, you got back from

:11:43.:11:46.

Calais yesterday, tell us what is happening there now. The jungle has

:11:47.:11:51.

been dismantled, apparently, but the unaccompanied children and young

:11:52.:11:54.

people are still there, as Fiona has described. That's right. Just to

:11:55.:11:59.

recap, the jungle was there. The UK does have a boarder at Calais, we

:12:00.:12:03.

have our border there and the jungle camp used to have 10,000 people

:12:04.:12:08.

staying there. And no one really knew, because it wasn't an official

:12:09.:12:12.

camp, that within that camp there were up to 2000 unaccompanied

:12:13.:12:15.

children. No one knew their names, if they had rights or not. I have

:12:16.:12:20.

been filming therefore nine months. What I found out was that almost all

:12:21.:12:24.

of them did have a right under the Dubs scheme, which you have just

:12:25.:12:27.

described, or under another law called Dublin three, if they have

:12:28.:12:32.

family members in the UK. So I followed right through what has

:12:33.:12:36.

happened to those children. Only 200 were accepted, and the rest are

:12:37.:12:39.

stuck in the forest, the words, they are sleeping rough. The French

:12:40.:12:43.

police RTA guessing them and spraying -- they are tear gassing

:12:44.:12:49.

them, and pepper spraying them, just when they are asleep that night, not

:12:50.:12:53.

when they are doing anything bad, but what concerns me more is that

:12:54.:12:56.

the British government, because we do have a boarder at Calais, has an

:12:57.:12:59.

arrangement where they pay to support the French policing. So even

:13:00.:13:03.

though the French policing is very harsh, I would like to know more

:13:04.:13:07.

clearly from the Home Office what part the Home Office is playing in

:13:08.:13:12.

supporting those police methods. Let me bring in Bilal. Thank you for

:13:13.:13:16.

talking to us. You have come from Syria, Bilal is not your real name,

:13:17.:13:22.

we are not using your real name because there is a war going on in

:13:23.:13:25.

Syria and your family is still there. You have not been trafficked,

:13:26.:13:29.

you came under the Dubs scheme, you have not been treated badly, is that

:13:30.:13:34.

correct? Yes. I decided to leave my family come at the first prison

:13:35.:13:37.

because of the war in my country, the second reason, I did not want to

:13:38.:13:42.

shed any blood for my country, I don't want to be any part of the war

:13:43.:13:47.

in my country or of anyone. The third reason I cannot see my future

:13:48.:13:52.

there. I just see a dark future, so I decided to be said, to follow my

:13:53.:13:57.

future, to make my life again. And why did you want to come to Britain?

:13:58.:14:01.

I always wanted to go to Britain, before the walk one of my ambitions

:14:02.:14:05.

was to come here legally and study here. We hear a lot about this

:14:06.:14:10.

country, we love this country, about the Marquess, the safety, the

:14:11.:14:14.

humanitarian life, everything gives it the best advantage to come here.

:14:15.:14:18.

What was it like when you were in the so-called jungle in Calais? Life

:14:19.:14:24.

in the jungle is a really demanding life, really difficult, you will

:14:25.:14:29.

face a lot of trouble there. Like what? When you arrive there, the

:14:30.:14:33.

ambition is to get there, OK, but when you arrive, you will face a lot

:14:34.:14:36.

of things, you will try to survive in this horrible place, to find

:14:37.:14:41.

food, clothes, just to survive. After that time you will lose your

:14:42.:14:44.

ambition, you will think you can't even move, just to survive. When you

:14:45.:14:49.

arrive at this place, you lost everything. And what kind of a

:14:50.:14:53.

welcome have you had in this country, Bilal? A lot of pressure

:14:54.:15:03.

groups -- a lot of groups like Citizen UK, they welcomed us, and a

:15:04.:15:06.

lot of British people welcomed us and I am really happy with that. Do

:15:07.:15:10.

you want to stay in Britain, or do you have an ambition to go back home

:15:11.:15:14.

one day, perhaps when the war is over, whenever that may be? If the

:15:15.:15:19.

war is over and make country is free again and democracy for everyone,

:15:20.:15:22.

maybe I will go back there but if not I am happy to stay here. Who

:15:23.:15:28.

have you left back there? Mum and dad, my sisters, everyone. I am the

:15:29.:15:31.

only one from a family who came here. OK, but you must really miss

:15:32.:15:37.

them. I miss them so much, but I have no choice, this is the only

:15:38.:15:38.

thing to protect myself. Thank you. Why do you believe it is partly the

:15:39.:15:51.

responsibility of British taxpayers to look after people like Bilal,

:15:52.:15:58.

desperate to get to Britain for the reasons Bilal has explained, to help

:15:59.:16:03.

them come here? A very large proportion of the children in Calais

:16:04.:16:07.

have relatives here and we have a legal responsibility under a

:16:08.:16:11.

convention called the Dublin Convention to enable them to be

:16:12.:16:16.

looked after by their families here. That is the first group, which would

:16:17.:16:19.

be quite straightforward to deal with. We do not know how many

:16:20.:16:23.

because unfortunately the only people who have done a census of

:16:24.:16:28.

voluntary organisations and the Government has never used that

:16:29.:16:31.

information to process people. The second group is people who are

:16:32.:16:38.

profoundly vulnerable. When Alf Dobbs who himself as a refugee was

:16:39.:16:43.

six came here on Kindertransport which was a scheme to enable

:16:44.:16:48.

children who were at risk from the Nazis to be protected, when he moved

:16:49.:16:54.

the amendment to the Bill, the Government and he and

:16:55.:16:59.

parliamentarians of all kinds were talking about perhaps 3000 being the

:17:00.:17:03.

specified number of children, actually 200 have come. In our

:17:04.:17:08.

report, we did research with the local authorities about how many

:17:09.:17:12.

extra places there are to look after those children. Something like 700,

:17:13.:17:16.

800 places are available. The Government says we were full but the

:17:17.:17:21.

Government was wrong. They did not count figures. We can look after

:17:22.:17:28.

these children. Are seeing -- you are saying reopen the scheme in

:17:29.:17:34.

print 3000? We open the scheme and make sure the children there at the

:17:35.:17:39.

moment are safe. At the moment, they risk. There is sexual exploitation,

:17:40.:17:44.

they are getting into survival sex, being assaulted by the police, it is

:17:45.:17:52.

not safe. Actually, I am just an average middle-aged woman, but I

:17:53.:17:55.

think I have a responsibility to help children to be safe. Thank you.

:17:56.:18:03.

It has certainly really changed, the jungle. The jungle itself, there was

:18:04.:18:08.

at least some kind of food, provision. Now they are living even

:18:09.:18:11.

worse than we would treat animals. No clean water, clean toilets. They

:18:12.:18:17.

have absolutely nothing. No food. A lot of them do still definitely have

:18:18.:18:23.

a legal claim. As long as the Home Office is not there, who will prove

:18:24.:18:32.

that claim? The Home Office sent a statement.

:18:33.:18:34.

"We are committed to supporting vulnerable children who are caught

:18:35.:18:37.

Our strategy is clear, we believe the best way to help

:18:38.:18:41.

the most vulnerable children is by resettling refugees directly

:18:42.:18:43.

"It is completely untrue to say that the Dubs scheme

:18:44.:18:46.

The Government remains committed to resettling 480 children -

:18:47.:18:52.

Thank you very much. You look... The expression on your face. Go on? I

:18:53.:19:04.

feel cynical because when they say we remain committed to 480 people

:19:05.:19:08.

achieved under consultation, actually, the only reason it went up

:19:09.:19:13.

from 300 was because of a successful legal case against the Government.

:19:14.:19:20.

It is not a scheme, it was a law, passed in Parliament. They have

:19:21.:19:23.

reduced it to a scheme and the Government thinks it can close it

:19:24.:19:28.

but it was a British law passed by the parliament that should be

:19:29.:19:31.

expected. Thank you for coming on the programme. -- that should be

:19:32.:19:35.

respected. More now on the news that the number

:19:36.:19:39.

of people applying for UK UCAS, the university admissions

:19:40.:19:42.

service, says the number of British applications is down 4% compared

:19:43.:19:45.

to last year. And applications from students

:19:46.:19:47.

in other EU countries are down 5%. The fall is being blamed by some

:19:48.:19:50.

on high tuition fees and the uncertainty

:19:51.:19:53.

caused by Brexit. The interest rate is also going to

:19:54.:19:54.

go up in September. Let's talk now to Professor Les

:19:55.:19:58.

Ebdon, director of Fair Access to Higher Education,

:19:59.:20:01.

who is in our studios in Dunstable. Hello. Good morning. What is your

:20:02.:20:13.

own theory? We can explain them fall in the number of 18-year-olds

:20:14.:20:18.

because of the decline in the number in the population. The percentage of

:20:19.:20:24.

18-year-olds who have applied for university has gone up from 37.2%

:20:25.:20:30.

last year to 37.9% this year. No evidence it is putting them off. But

:20:31.:20:35.

we do see a full in the numbers of mature students. It may well be

:20:36.:20:41.

mature students are put off. Those over the age of 21, for example,

:20:42.:20:46.

seem to be less inclined to apply for university under the current

:20:47.:20:53.

funding system. Are you worried? I am reassured the number of

:20:54.:20:57.

18-year-olds has held up but I worried about the number of mature

:20:58.:21:01.

students because many of them are from disadvantaged backgrounds and I

:21:02.:21:05.

have asked universities to do more to help them in terms of flexible

:21:06.:21:10.

provision, meeting other needs mature students have in terms of

:21:11.:21:15.

childcare and so on, putting on programmes more attractive to them.

:21:16.:21:22.

Like what? Well, I was visiting two very different universities this

:21:23.:21:29.

week, Birkbeck College and London Metropolitan University. Both of

:21:30.:21:34.

them do a lot of work to raise the confidence of mature learners, that

:21:35.:21:38.

they can return to education, and also provide flexible opportunities

:21:39.:21:41.

for them to do so with a timetable suiting the kinds of needs parents,

:21:42.:21:46.

for example, have. OK. But that does not address tuition fees. No, it

:21:47.:21:54.

does not. That is a decision for Parliament. Not for me as the

:21:55.:22:00.

regulator. You say in terms of mature students, you are worried

:22:01.:22:04.

about it, maybe it is about flexibility and the timetable, but

:22:05.:22:09.

it is also about that money, isn't it? Well, I am encouraged the number

:22:10.:22:15.

of 18-year-olds has not fallen, the number of disadvantaged students as

:22:16.:22:19.

a percentage... In terms of the mature students? I think the fees

:22:20.:22:24.

are a disadvantage for those students, they feel they have other

:22:25.:22:28.

debts and they do not want student debt. Maybe there are opportunities

:22:29.:22:32.

to study part-time and in different ways. OK. Thank you very much. This

:22:33.:22:42.

e-mail from Chris, my husband served a five-year electrical

:22:43.:22:44.

apprenticeship. In effect, he paid for his day release to college and

:22:45.:22:49.

paid tax on his weekly wage which helped fund those people luckily

:22:50.:22:53.

enough to attend a university. Today more and more are tending and

:22:54.:22:57.

without them contributing, it is unsustainable for their studies to

:22:58.:23:01.

be paid for from general taxation. They should accept most of them will

:23:02.:23:06.

become higher earners eventually. Another says, from speaking to

:23:07.:23:09.

academics around the country, it is becoming clear that since the price

:23:10.:23:13.

increase of tuition fees, universities are being run like a

:23:14.:23:17.

business as opposed to a place of learning, some courses without the

:23:18.:23:21.

student numbers are being closed. Masters courses are less encouraged

:23:22.:23:25.

because of less profit being made and more students from overseas are

:23:26.:23:30.

encouraged because of more profit. Courses with little profit get no

:23:31.:23:38.

funding. Wimbledon, Johanna Konta takes on B as Williams in the

:23:39.:23:39.

semifinals today. It's a moment she says she's dreamt

:23:40.:23:44.

of since she was nine years old. Let's take a look at the stunning

:23:45.:23:47.

victory over world number two Simona Halep on Tuesday that

:23:48.:23:50.

got her there. It's a very special

:23:51.:23:52.

day for Johanna Konta. It is extra special for British

:23:53.:23:56.

tennis fans, they have waited 33 years to be able to say that one

:23:57.:24:00.

of their own is in Whenever you engage in one of these

:24:01.:24:03.

titanic tussles, you always My trust in my own ability

:24:04.:24:12.

has got to be there. With the situation

:24:13.:24:27.

and moments like this, than necessarily what I believe

:24:28.:24:28.

I can or cannot do. I have always believed

:24:29.:24:32.

in my own ability but I think I have needed to accumulate

:24:33.:24:35.

experiences and time. That is a magnificent tie-break

:24:36.:24:38.

from Simona Halep and Konta has got I go into every tournament,

:24:39.:24:41.

including the championships here in Wimbledon, to be involved

:24:42.:24:48.

in the event until the very end. But I am fully aware that every

:24:49.:24:52.

single match I will get to play will be a testing one

:24:53.:24:56.

and will challenge me. Look at that, somehow Jo Konta

:24:57.:25:01.

has forced a final set. I don't take anything

:25:02.:25:10.

for granted and I demand of myself my best effort

:25:11.:25:12.

and I demand of myself my full commitment to what I do and to make

:25:13.:25:16.

sure I prepare well and I do # I rise up, I rise up like the day,

:25:17.:25:19.

I rise up # And I'd do it

:25:20.:25:36.

a thousand times again #. You are the first British woman

:25:37.:25:40.

since 1978 to reach the semifinals at Wimbledon and now winning that

:25:41.:25:48.

quarterfinal match means that you will be in the top five

:25:49.:25:51.

of the women's rankings When you tot up all these

:25:52.:25:53.

achievements, do you ever pat yourself on the back

:25:54.:26:10.

and go, well done? Um, it is difficult because I guess

:26:11.:26:12.

in both an unfortunate and fortunate position that we are in tennis,

:26:13.:26:18.

things move very quickly so before you know it, the championships

:26:19.:26:22.

will be over and it is already In that sense, because things

:26:23.:26:25.

are so fast-moving, it's almost an art to reflect well

:26:26.:26:30.

and to acknowledge the good things that you do and actually

:26:31.:26:33.

that is something I work on to make sure I acknowledge the good things

:26:34.:26:38.

that I am doing, but I will let you know after Wimbledon how my pat

:26:39.:26:42.

on the back went, OK? We can speak now to tennis

:26:43.:26:47.

commentator, David Law. How is she going to do? I think

:26:48.:27:00.

she's going to do well. Whether she is going to win, another matter. She

:27:01.:27:06.

is up against a five-time champion in Venus Williams, but she is 37 now

:27:07.:27:12.

and a player that Johanna Konta has beaten more often than not. I think

:27:13.:27:18.

personally it matches up really well for her. The know-how on the grass

:27:19.:27:22.

and at Wimbledon on the Centre Court, it certainly favours Venus

:27:23.:27:31.

Williams, but Johanna Konta... I've personally think she will win this

:27:32.:27:35.

match. I was watching Venus Williams on Monday, I was there, she does not

:27:36.:27:40.

move like a normal 37-year-old. You would think she is 25, unbelievable.

:27:41.:27:47.

She is a miracle. For her age and given meal must as she has had, the

:27:48.:27:50.

injuries, she has been playing for 20 years. -- given the injuries she

:27:51.:28:03.

has had. She is suffering from a fatiguing illness she has had to

:28:04.:28:06.

deal with. She has a veto on diet. She has had to change her life. At

:28:07.:28:13.

37, still able to get to the final four of Wimbledon. -- she is a VPN.

:28:14.:28:19.

I think it is about 52-48 in the favour of Johanna Konta but it can

:28:20.:28:24.

go either way. If Johanna Konta does beat Venus Williams and makes it to

:28:25.:28:29.

the final, what will the pressure be like on her, from the great British

:28:30.:28:35.

public, the media, everybody? It is noticeable looking today, I think

:28:36.:28:39.

today is the first day looking at the newspapers that you really

:28:40.:28:43.

realise the significance of what she is doing. The first time she has

:28:44.:28:48.

gone further than Andy Murray at Wimbledon, a big deal in itself. On

:28:49.:28:51.

the front pages of newspapers, wrapped in the Union flag, a huge

:28:52.:28:56.

moment for her. I think a couple of the matches she has won this week

:28:57.:29:02.

have informed everybody in the country who this person is. We

:29:03.:29:06.

intend circles have known for a couple of years. She has announced

:29:07.:29:09.

herself on the biggest stage of all, the last couple of weeks, and she

:29:10.:29:13.

has done incredibly well because the pressure against Simona Halep,

:29:14.:29:19.

playing to become the world number one, and Johanna Konta refused to

:29:20.:29:27.

yield, highly impressive. Do you know how? Do you come across her a

:29:28.:29:32.

lot? I just see her in interviews, she seems like a really nice woman.

:29:33.:29:37.

I think she is. I do not know her hugely well. I interviewed her for

:29:38.:29:41.

half an hour towards the end of last year. As we were trying to get to

:29:42.:29:45.

know her. One of our colleagues on BBC 5 Live did a show that was on

:29:46.:29:50.

last night, we repeated it last night, The Real Johanna Konta. She

:29:51.:29:59.

is concentrating on what is in front of her. She is very keen to talk

:30:00.:30:03.

about the very much process of how she goes about her business, just to

:30:04.:30:08.

keep it simple, to not worry about the pressure, to not think about the

:30:09.:30:12.

millions watching on hoping she wins, that is her way of handling

:30:13.:30:17.

it. To me, certainly as a dad, I think she is an inspiration. I have

:30:18.:30:21.

a daughter who was calling me up and saying, I really like this Johanna

:30:22.:30:26.

Konta, I want to be like her. I think she is a great role model and

:30:27.:30:30.

she is doing an amazing job at Wimbledon. Thank you very much,

:30:31.:30:37.

David. Coverage of that match on five live and BBC television. Still

:30:38.:30:41.

Theresa May has admitted she shed a "little tear" when she saw

:30:42.:30:45.

the exit poll on election night - we'll have the details.

:30:46.:30:48.

We'll be speaking to doctor Rachel Clarke, to find out what it's

:30:49.:30:52.

With the news, here's Ben Brown in the BBC Newsroom.

:30:53.:31:04.

The parents of terminally-ill baby Charlie Gard have arrived

:31:05.:31:06.

at the High Court in London this morning, to present what they claim

:31:07.:31:09.

is new evidence showing an experimental treatment

:31:10.:31:11.

Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital -

:31:12.:31:18.

where he's in intensive care - say the therapy won't work.

:31:19.:31:21.

A solicitor for the family read a statement on their behalf.

:31:22.:31:28.

They said they now had over 800,000 signatures on various petitions.

:31:29.:31:33.

Theresa May has said she shed "a little tear" after hearing

:31:34.:31:36.

the exit poll result on general election night.

:31:37.:31:38.

In an interview with BBC Five Live, to mark a year since she became

:31:39.:31:41.

Prime Minister, she says the result "was a complete shock".

:31:42.:31:44.

Well, I felt, I suppose, devastated really, because,

:31:45.:31:48.

as I say, I knew the campaign wasn't going perfectly, but still

:31:49.:31:51.

the messages I was getting, from people I was speaking to,

:31:52.:31:54.

but also the comments we were getting back from a lot

:31:55.:31:57.

of people that were being passed onto me, were that we were going

:31:58.:32:00.

Yes, at that moment, that private moment?

:32:01.:32:12.

As the government prepares to publish its long-awaited bill that

:32:13.:32:24.

will convert European Union laws in the British legislation, the head of

:32:25.:32:28.

the audit office has said he is worried about failures in government

:32:29.:32:35.

leadership over Brexit. Sir Amyas Morse said leaders were not

:32:36.:32:38.

preventing -- possessing a united front in dealing with the

:32:39.:32:42.

challenges. The Brexit Minister Steve Baker has dismissed those

:32:43.:32:43.

concerns. The BBC has learned that at least

:32:44.:32:43.

one person who survived the Grenfell Tower fire has been

:32:44.:32:46.

diagnosed with cyanide poisoning. 12-year-old Luana Gomes

:32:47.:32:49.

was treated for the effects It isn't known what caused

:32:50.:32:51.

the poisoning, but her parents, who lost their unborn child

:32:52.:32:55.

after the fire, believe it may have been caused by the burning

:32:56.:32:58.

of insulation or plastics Four former teachers at a leading

:32:59.:33:00.

independent school in West Sussex have been charged with a number

:33:01.:33:11.

of historical sex offences dating The men, who taught at

:33:12.:33:13.

Christ's Hospital School in Horsham, are alleged to have attacked 15

:33:14.:33:17.

suspected victims, both male and female,

:33:18.:33:19.

between 1980 and 1996, according to the Crown

:33:20.:33:21.

Prosecution Service. Donald Trump is in Paris,

:33:22.:33:33.

where he'll hold talks with President Macron and attend

:33:34.:33:35.

Bastille Day celebrations. High on the agenda will be US-French

:33:36.:33:37.

actions in Syria and Iraq Despite differences between the two

:33:38.:33:40.

leaders, Mr Macron has indicated he will work to reaffirm historic

:33:41.:33:44.

ties between the two allies and prevent the US

:33:45.:33:46.

from being isolated. Join me for BBC Newsroom,

:33:47.:33:53.

live at 11 o'clock. This is an e-mail from teeth on

:33:54.:34:11.

university applications, which have fallen a bit in this country. I am

:34:12.:34:15.

surprised and this had not fallen sooner, my son is about to go and is

:34:16.:34:20.

looking at close to 60 K debt on leaving. My big fear with the

:34:21.:34:24.

current system is that the debt is linked to an individual, and grows

:34:25.:34:29.

at 6% per annum, so does not go away for 30 years. With an initial debt

:34:30.:34:34.

of 60 K, someone would end up owing ?325,000 at the end of 30 years,

:34:35.:34:39.

then written off, so costing the taxpayer five times the original

:34:40.:34:40.

amount. Here's some sport now

:34:41.:34:42.

with Leah Boleto. A big day for Johanna Konta

:34:43.:34:44.

she knows five-time champion Venus William stands in her way

:34:45.:34:47.

of becoming the first British woman to reach

:34:48.:34:49.

a Wimbledon final for 40 years. The last time that

:34:50.:34:52.

happen was back in 1977, There's every chance Jo could make

:34:53.:34:54.

it, having beat Venus three out That match is second

:34:55.:34:58.

on Centre Court today. Meanwhile, World No 1 Andy Murray

:34:59.:35:06.

says it's possible he'll take several weeks off to recover fully

:35:07.:35:08.

from his hip injury. He was of course beaten

:35:09.:35:15.

in five sets by American, and looked in pain throughout,

:35:16.:35:17.

limping between points. Elsewhere, the former Fifa

:35:18.:35:21.

official Chuck Blazer - seen here on the left -

:35:22.:35:22.

has died aged 72. The American had been banned

:35:23.:35:25.

from all football activities for life, two years ago,

:35:26.:35:29.

after admitting charges He'd been suffering from cancer,

:35:30.:35:31.

but did turn whistle blower to help investigators uncover corruption

:35:32.:35:35.

in football. Germany's Marcel Kittel has

:35:36.:35:41.

won his fifth stage on this year's Tour de France with victory

:35:42.:35:44.

in Stage 11. Chris Froome retains the leaders

:35:45.:35:46.

yellow jersey and will be looking to defend his 18 second overall

:35:47.:35:49.

lead, as the race heads That is the latest sport headlines.

:35:50.:36:06.

A new era begins at the Natural History Museum today.

:36:07.:36:09.

We're about to see the unveiling of the complete skeleton

:36:10.:36:12.

of the giant diving blue whale, which is the largest

:36:13.:36:14.

Our report, Rebecca Morell, is down at the museum now.

:36:15.:36:23.

Lagat that, that is amazing. Yeah, it really is quite gobsmacking

:36:24.:36:33.

actually. So this is the new star attraction at the Natural History

:36:34.:36:39.

Museum, 25 metres long, 4.5 tonnes of blue whale, and they have given

:36:40.:36:43.

it the name, Cowan hope. Putting the wail in here has not been entirely

:36:44.:36:46.

without controversy because replaces much loved Diddy the dinosaur, who

:36:47.:36:54.

was in the hall since 1974, but the Natural History Museum said it had

:36:55.:36:57.

been time for a change and to find out why, I am joined by Richard said

:36:58.:37:00.

then, the principal curator of mammals here the museum. Richard,

:37:01.:37:06.

you were one of the people championing getting a wail in here.

:37:07.:37:11.

Why was that? We wanted to put a specimen at the scent of the museum,

:37:12.:37:15.

at the heart of the museum, a species people could relate to, but

:37:16.:37:20.

something that represented what we as a species, the human race, can do

:37:21.:37:25.

when we put our minds to trying to conserve something. There was a

:37:26.:37:29.

complete ban based on the hunting of blue whales in 66. We had taken them

:37:30.:37:33.

right the edge of extension, and we realise we were about to lose them,

:37:34.:37:36.

and we should do is work together and bring them back, and this is

:37:37.:37:40.

what we have done. We wanted the specimen to basically talk to people

:37:41.:37:47.

in that way and give them way to reach the natural world. This has

:37:48.:37:54.

been in the museum. You made a life changing visit here when you were

:37:55.:37:58.

ten years old. I came down on a school trip in Birmingham in 1976,

:37:59.:38:06.

the last year of my primary school. Money was tight, but I got the cash,

:38:07.:38:12.

saw the then I was told by one of the gallery attendants, you are

:38:13.:38:16.

looking at the bones of an animal that is out there in the ocean. I

:38:17.:38:21.

was blown away. I was no idea what I was looking at. It really was a life

:38:22.:38:25.

defining moment. If you had said to me back then I would be the person,

:38:26.:38:30.

40 years on, making a change, breathing new life into the specimen

:38:31.:38:33.

and displaying her for visitors to come for at least the next 20, 30

:38:34.:38:37.

years, I would not have believed you. The logistics have been

:38:38.:38:41.

incredibly difficult, not only have you had to dismantle a dinosaur, you

:38:42.:38:45.

have had to move it from one part of the museum to another, and the post

:38:46.:38:49.

has been really important. Tell us a little bit about what it has been

:38:50.:38:52.

like to put this thing in here, it is not easy, is it? No. Making the

:38:53.:38:58.

recommendation that the blue well should be the new specimen here was

:38:59.:39:02.

quite a thing because ultimately we had to take it down, around all the

:39:03.:39:06.

other specimens in the mammal hall, its old location. Four other huge

:39:07.:39:12.

skeletons, the blue whale medal was done fairly effortlessly, we had a

:39:13.:39:16.

great team of removals workers and a great team of conservatives in the

:39:17.:39:20.

museum getting it out into a aircraft hanger in Bicester where it

:39:21.:39:23.

was worked on from a crew from Canada that built the new frame. And

:39:24.:39:27.

then I had to work designing this new pose, this is a lunge feeding,

:39:28.:39:31.

diving posture, and I wanted it to represent the knowledge we now have

:39:32.:39:35.

about the heavy of these blue whales, to really make it exciting

:39:36.:39:38.

for people and I think we have achieved that. And getting it,

:39:39.:39:42.

because it was assembled side, assembling it back in here and

:39:43.:39:46.

winching it up to the ceiling. These are really old girders up here, you

:39:47.:39:49.

want to be certain this thing isn't going to fall down on someone's

:39:50.:39:53.

Head! That was it like winching up? That only took place at a few weeks

:39:54.:39:58.

ago. We finished the winching in May, but it was relatively

:39:59.:40:02.

nerve-racking, because it had to be done though slowly, centimetre by

:40:03.:40:05.

centimetre. On each of the suspension points you can see up on

:40:06.:40:09.

the roof girders, there was a man, so there were ten men in total with

:40:10.:40:14.

cranks slowly winching the specimen into position, but the structural

:40:15.:40:16.

engineers have signed off the integrity of the roof structure, so

:40:17.:40:20.

we knew that the building could actually take the load thank you

:40:21.:40:26.

very much. There is a party later this evening to show it off but

:40:27.:40:29.

tomorrow will really be the test of the team here, because that is when

:40:30.:40:33.

the public will come in and be greeted with this enormous beast.

:40:34.:40:40.

It's huge mouth wide open as if it will swallow them up -- its huge

:40:41.:40:46.

mall. It has been swapping one giant creature, BP, for an even bigger one

:40:47.:40:49.

post they will be up to them to decide whether the wail has been a

:40:50.:40:54.

worthwhile replacement, but I have to say, it does look fantastic.

:40:55.:40:57.

They will love it, I'm sure, it is a thing of absolute beauty and

:40:58.:41:02.

astonishing. Thank you. Theresa May says she shed "a little

:41:03.:41:05.

tear" after hearing the exit poll In a BBC interview to mark a year

:41:06.:41:10.

since she became Prime Minister, she says the result

:41:11.:41:14.

"was a complete shock". As the campaign was going on, I

:41:15.:41:23.

realised was not going perfectly but

:41:24.:41:28.

throughout the whole campaign the was was that it would be a better

:41:29.:41:31.

one for us than it was. We did not see the result that came coming, and

:41:32.:41:35.

if I'm honest, I've heard stories about quite a view Labour MPs who

:41:36.:41:38.

actually did not think they would keep their seats, and ended up

:41:39.:41:42.

keeping those seats. So when the result came through, it was a

:41:43.:41:48.

complete shock. Complete shock? When was that moment for you, of

:41:49.:41:54.

realisation? It was when I heard the exit poll. To be honest with you, I

:41:55.:41:59.

didn't actually watch the exit poll myself, I have a little bit of

:42:00.:42:02.

superstition about things like that, my husband watched it for me and

:42:03.:42:05.

came and told me come and I was shocked at the result that had come

:42:06.:42:09.

through in the exit poll. It took a few minutes for it the sort of sink

:42:10.:42:15.

in, what that was telling me. My husband gave me a hug, and then I

:42:16.:42:20.

got on to the phone the Sisi HQ, the Conservative Party, to find out what

:42:21.:42:25.

had happened. That must have been a moment for Philip to tell you, it

:42:26.:42:29.

must've been quite hard for him? It was, but as you know he has been a

:42:30.:42:33.

huge support for me over the years, and there are times when I perhaps

:42:34.:42:36.

get him to read a newspaper article for me and tell me what it says,

:42:37.:42:41.

rather than reading it directly. When you had that hug, did you have

:42:42.:42:47.

a cry, how did you feel? I felt I suppose devastated really because as

:42:48.:42:51.

I say, I knew the campaign was not going perfectly, but still the

:42:52.:42:55.

messages I was getting from people I was speaking to, but also the

:42:56.:42:59.

comments we were getting back from a lot of people that were being passed

:43:00.:43:03.

on to me were that we were going to get a better result than we did.

:43:04.:43:10.

Devastated enough to shed a tear? Yes, a little tear. At that moment,

:43:11.:43:16.

that private moment? Yes. And then you obviously just have to breast

:43:17.:43:24.

yourself down. You have a responsibility. You are a human

:43:25.:43:27.

being, you have been through that experience but I was there as leader

:43:28.:43:30.

of the party and I had a responsibility then to, as we went

:43:31.:43:33.

through the night, to determine what we were going to do the next

:43:34.:43:38.

morning. Did you feel in anyway and extra pressure not to step down,

:43:39.:43:43.

because you are only the second woman to hold this office of Prime

:43:44.:43:47.

Minister comedy that play a role? No, I can honestly say it didn't.

:43:48.:43:51.

What I looked at was what I believed was important, important for the

:43:52.:43:56.

country was getting a government. We were the largest party, I think we

:43:57.:44:00.

had a responsibility, and I think I had a responsibility as leader of

:44:01.:44:04.

the party and Prime Minister. You know, in a sense it can be easy

:44:05.:44:09.

sometimes if something like this happens just to walk away, and to

:44:10.:44:14.

leave some deals to deal with it. Just like David Cameron. Well, what

:44:15.:44:18.

I have said to my colleagues, I thought it was important, I have got

:44:19.:44:22.

us into this and I will work to get it out. Norman is at Westminster

:44:23.:44:25.

obviously. What else did she say? We did not get a vast amount more

:44:26.:44:33.

from Mrs May, but she is a very sort of private individual, not one of

:44:34.:44:38.

those politicians who gushes. She likes to keep herself to herself,

:44:39.:44:42.

and I felt that is the most we have seen her really open up power it

:44:43.:44:45.

anyway. You do get a sense I think how much relies on her husband, that

:44:46.:44:55.

he was relied upon to see what the exit poll was, and then to come and

:44:56.:44:58.

comfort her. She also said very often she gets him to read newspaper

:44:59.:45:01.

articles, because she doesn't want to read all the pretty grim stuff

:45:02.:45:06.

that may be written about her. She said too, which I thought was

:45:07.:45:09.

interesting, she was asked about what she made up Jeremy Corbyn, and

:45:10.:45:13.

she said she sort of had new respect for him, in the wake of the attack

:45:14.:45:17.

in Finsbury Park which was obviously in his constituency, and the fact he

:45:18.:45:20.

had gone there overnight, and been there overnight, and she kind of

:45:21.:45:25.

took that on board, and recognised what a good constituency MP he was.

:45:26.:45:30.

On the sharp end political questions, the armour plating comes

:45:31.:45:32.

down again and she doesn't give anything away. She was asked how

:45:33.:45:35.

long will you go on as Prime Minister, and she doesn't really

:45:36.:45:40.

give any answer there. She was asked when you get the Brexit legislation

:45:41.:45:43.

through Parliament, and she does not really give any answer there. Her

:45:44.:45:47.

default position is a very defensive one. But we did get a little glimpse

:45:48.:45:50.

of the more personal side of Theresa May. Tell our audience about the

:45:51.:46:01.

repeal bill and why they should care. The paradox is it is not

:46:02.:46:06.

really revealing anything, it is doing the opposite. It takes the

:46:07.:46:13.

thousands of EU laws from Europe and puts them in Britain. -- the paradox

:46:14.:46:20.

is, it is not really repealing anything. It takes them from the

:46:21.:46:24.

European Court of Justice and put them into British legislation. When

:46:25.:46:28.

we leave the EU, all of the laws will become redundant. The laws

:46:29.:46:33.

cover vast amounts of our everyday lives, they have to be put into

:46:34.:46:37.

British law. It matters hugely for the smooth transition to leaving the

:46:38.:46:42.

EU. And politically, it matters because it is going to be the main

:46:43.:46:47.

pitched battle over Brexit with all of the signs Mrs May is facing a

:46:48.:46:52.

titanic struggle to get this through, and if she doesn't, we are

:46:53.:46:57.

really in legislative limbo land when it comes to Brexit. In the last

:46:58.:47:04.

few minutes, the parents of Charlie Gard had of arrived at the High

:47:05.:47:11.

Court. They did not speak to the press, but their solicitor gave the

:47:12.:47:14.

statement. We are continuing to spend every moment working around

:47:15.:47:18.

the clock to save our dear baby Charlie. We have been requesting

:47:19.:47:23.

this specialised treatment since November. Never have the hospital,

:47:24.:47:32.

the courts, we have never asked for anything, except for the permission

:47:33.:47:38.

to go. We have raised over ?1.3 million and we have had invitations

:47:39.:47:46.

from specialised doctors in the US and Italy. They have offered their

:47:47.:47:54.

ground-breaking treatment to us and they are confident they can help

:47:55.:47:58.

Charlie. We will continue to make the case for us to seek treatment

:47:59.:48:04.

for Charlie with doctors that are actually specialised in

:48:05.:48:08.

mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome and we hope the judge and the courts

:48:09.:48:15.

will finally ruled in favour of us seeking treatment elsewhere. We love

:48:16.:48:25.

him more than life itself. If he is still fighting, then we are still

:48:26.:48:31.

fighting. Obviously, we will update you from the High Court on BBC News

:48:32.:48:34.

through the day. She's been called a Nazi by a woman

:48:35.:48:38.

whose life she had saved, threatened with violence

:48:39.:48:41.

by the father of a dying patient, been the victim of sexually indecent

:48:42.:48:44.

behaviour by another patient, and crashed her car after falling

:48:45.:48:46.

asleep at the wheel These are some of the insights that

:48:47.:48:48.

Rachel Clarke has revealed in the book she's written to show

:48:49.:48:52.

what it's really like to work She spent ten years working

:48:53.:48:55.

as a journalist before retraining as a NHS doctor

:48:56.:49:00.

but says her first night on call in a British hospital

:49:01.:49:03.

was more frightening than when she was trapped

:49:04.:49:05.

in a warzone in the Congo, as she'd left medical school

:49:06.:49:08.

with lots of knowledge, but no one had taught her

:49:09.:49:10.

what to actually do with it all. She's also become well known

:49:11.:49:13.

for her active role in the junior doctor's strike last year,

:49:14.:49:16.

which included camping out overnight She gave up medicine for six months

:49:17.:49:18.

last year but returned to work Rachel is here. Her book, Your Life

:49:19.:49:33.

in My Hands, is published today. Explain to the audience more about

:49:34.:49:37.

the comparison with being in a war zone in Congo and why it was worse,

:49:38.:49:41.

the first time he worked in a British hospital. Being under fire

:49:42.:49:47.

obviously is a terrifying experience but you kind of powerless, nothing

:49:48.:49:51.

you can do, pinned down, trapped. The first night when I was on call,

:49:52.:49:57.

I had to do everything, I had all the responsibility, I was in the

:49:58.:50:02.

dark corridors, alone, scampering around with my bleep the nurses were

:50:03.:50:06.

calling me on every time they were worried about a patient and my

:50:07.:50:11.

training for that was five years of exams and libraries and textbooks

:50:12.:50:15.

and here I was with real patients, really

:50:16.:50:27.

sick patient this awful fear that if I got it wrong, patients might die

:50:28.:50:31.

on my watch. And nothing had prepared me for that. The actual

:50:32.:50:34.

challenge for the very first time putting all of your knowledge into

:50:35.:50:36.

action and helping patients. Although theoretically I knew I had

:50:37.:50:39.

seen you back up if I needed it, the fear you were the first port of call

:50:40.:50:41.

and you might get it wrong, terrifying. One hell of a

:50:42.:50:47.

responsibility and puts into perspective the jobs of the rest of

:50:48.:50:51.

us. If you think most medical students when they start out as

:50:52.:50:57.

doctors probably 24, they may have experienced nothing but school and

:50:58.:51:03.

university, and suddenly... You do have placements, training, don't

:51:04.:51:07.

you? You do. But you do not have the responsibility. Then for the first

:51:08.:51:12.

time, you are confronting potentially a dying patient, by

:51:13.:51:15.

yourself, the middle of the night, it is on you for the first time, and

:51:16.:51:19.

the only way to learn to cope with that is to do it, you have to

:51:20.:51:24.

experience the terror and it is experiencing the terror that

:51:25.:51:26.

toughens you up and gives you the skills. Tell us about some of the

:51:27.:51:32.

conditions you describe in the book, the conditions you worked and as a

:51:33.:51:37.

junior doctor. They can be pretty stark and shocking. The

:51:38.:51:41.

understaffing now in British hospitals for nurses as well as

:51:42.:51:46.

doctors really has to be seen to be believed. One in ten junior doctor

:51:47.:51:52.

rotors have gaps, one in ten doctors missing, one in six GPs are missing,

:51:53.:51:58.

and the patients still flood into the hospitals. You are all looking

:51:59.:52:04.

after too many patients, stretched too thinly. Sometimes I have worked

:52:05.:52:09.

nights or my friends have where we have wept at the end of the night

:52:10.:52:14.

because we are so strung out, exhausted, you just think, I cannot

:52:15.:52:18.

keep doing this. It is only 4am, six hours to go, I cannot do it, but you

:52:19.:52:24.

have to keep going the patients rely on you. Are you saying that if there

:52:25.:52:30.

were even more nurses and doctors, you know the Government says there

:52:31.:52:33.

are more doctors than ever, numbers going up, you are saying that is not

:52:34.:52:37.

enough, if there were more, people like yourself in the past would not

:52:38.:52:43.

have been crying? Completely. The numbers the Government come out

:52:44.:52:48.

with, I would argue, they are red herrings. What matters is the

:52:49.:52:52.

numbers per number of patients. It is the doctors per head of

:52:53.:52:57.

population. The numbers of patient humour going up. We have an

:52:58.:53:02.

increasing population. The Government never give the right

:53:03.:53:06.

statistics. You know they would say they do. Patients, your time with

:53:07.:53:13.

patients, that is your motivation for becoming a junior doctor, you

:53:14.:53:18.

want to help people, save lives. Some of them were pretty horrible to

:53:19.:53:22.

you and that is quite shocking in your book. Give us some examples.

:53:23.:53:30.

A is the place where you tend to experience most of the abuse,

:53:31.:53:35.

sometimes, from patients. A really highly charged environment, often

:53:36.:53:39.

filled with people under the influence of alcohol or drugs, and

:53:40.:53:44.

also patients or relatives going through horrifically frightening

:53:45.:53:50.

experiences themselves. The expressed emotion is ramped up. I

:53:51.:53:55.

think all of us working in those difficult environments, we try very

:53:56.:53:58.

hard to remember that patients might not be acting in a coherent,

:53:59.:54:06.

competent way because of illness or intoxication or they are very

:54:07.:54:10.

frightened and that can provoke real aggression which you just try and

:54:11.:54:14.

absorb because it is part of the environment. However, there is a lot

:54:15.:54:19.

of abuse that is completely unacceptable as well. I have seen

:54:20.:54:26.

the most horrible racist abuse meted out to fellow doctors and nurses.

:54:27.:54:30.

That has increased since Brexit, I think, and it is completely

:54:31.:54:34.

unacceptable in every shape and form. The NHS is meant to have a

:54:35.:54:39.

zero tolerance approach. If we booted out every patient who was

:54:40.:54:44.

racist to a doctor or nurse, we would be kicking out so many people,

:54:45.:54:49.

it would be unsustainable. It is really hard working in an

:54:50.:54:52.

environment where sometimes patients can be fouled to you. You are under

:54:53.:55:00.

such difficult circumstances anyway, sometimes people are angry because

:55:01.:55:04.

they have been waiting ten hours and you totally understand and you

:55:05.:55:07.

empathise with it. You want the system to be different as much as

:55:08.:55:11.

they do and you cannot fix it for them. You left the NHS for six

:55:12.:55:16.

months last year and went back into a different role. Why did you leave?

:55:17.:55:23.

By the time I reached summer last year, I felt pretty broken by the

:55:24.:55:29.

combination of having worked a lot of the last year under a really

:55:30.:55:33.

difficult roto gap situations where I was often having to do the job of

:55:34.:55:39.

two doctors and in the end it takes a cumulative toll and you start to

:55:40.:55:43.

feel burnt out and eat human night by constantly trying to live with

:55:44.:55:48.

that. At the same time, the cumulative pressure of the doctors

:55:49.:55:52.

dispute which was very toxic and undermining for us all. -- and

:55:53.:56:03.

dehumanising. What did it achieve? I believe it achieved a lot because

:56:04.:56:06.

for the first time junior doctors were politicised in such a way we

:56:07.:56:10.

spoke out about what we believed were the problems facing our

:56:11.:56:16.

patients, we just felt duty bound to speak out about the understaffing.

:56:17.:56:20.

The very act of speaking out meant it was worth it, even though you did

:56:21.:56:24.

not achieve ultimately what he wanted to? In terms of the contract,

:56:25.:56:28.

we failed, but in terms of highlighting the dangers of

:56:29.:56:31.

understaffing the patients, I think we achieved a lot. And that is not

:56:32.:56:36.

over. We are politicised now and we will continue speaking out because

:56:37.:56:40.

we believe it is acting in the best interest of our patients and if the

:56:41.:56:45.

Government will not speak out, we will. This statement from the

:56:46.:56:46.

Department of Health. "There are currently over half

:56:47.:56:53.

a million clinical staff working in the NHS -

:56:54.:56:55.

including over 106,000 doctors. But we know hospitals

:56:56.:56:57.

are busier than ever - that's why we have increased

:56:58.:56:59.

the number of doctors every year since 2010 and plan to dramatically

:57:00.:57:02.

increase medical school places by up to 1,500 from 2018/19 -

:57:03.:57:05.

to make sure the NHS continues to deliver excellent patient care

:57:06.:57:07.

long into the future." You were broken, you left, you

:57:08.:57:16.

repaired yourself, you came back. Why? I missed patients, as simple as

:57:17.:57:26.

that. Even the horrible ones? All of them. The horrible ones are a small

:57:27.:57:31.

minority and the longer... As the weeks went by, I just missed looking

:57:32.:57:37.

after patients, a pretty simple thing for most doctors, we get up

:57:38.:57:41.

and go to work because we want to look after patients. You are not

:57:42.:57:46.

meant to say it when you apply to medical school, but we all want to

:57:47.:57:49.

help people and I wanted to still be doing that and the feeling grew

:57:50.:57:53.

stronger and it was almost a relief for me because I discovered the

:57:54.:57:58.

thing that had driven me away from one career into another, it was

:57:59.:58:02.

still there inside of me, bruised and battered, but I loved patients

:58:03.:58:07.

and I wanted to get back to them. Thank you very much for coming on

:58:08.:58:10.

the programme. The book is out today. Thank you for watching.

:58:11.:58:15.

'From the heights of the Scottish Highlands

:58:16.:58:33.

'to the shores of East Anglia, I've travelled across Britain...'

:58:34.:58:38.

'..to learn about the food I cook for my family...'

:58:39.:58:41.

A look at why more teachers from ethnic minority backgrounds are not being recruited by schools.

The programme hears from the father of a child who had the same rare genetic disorder as baby Charlie Gard.

And Theresa May admits she shed a tear on election night when she heard the exit poll result.