03/08/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


03/08/2017

Tina Daheley presents. Rugby legend Jonny Wilkinson reveals how his performance coach changed his life. Plus how Deliveroo has taken steps to protect its drivers from violence.


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Hello - it's Thursday, it's nine o'clock, I'm Tina Daheley

:00:07.:00:09.

in for Victoria, welcome to the programme.

:00:10.:00:13.

Mental health patients across the UK are spending years in treatment

:00:14.:00:20.

units awaiting discharge, according to figures

:00:21.:00:21.

I used to see other people, like, leaving before me and I'd be, like,

:00:22.:00:28.

"Yeah, but I've been ready a long time, and I'm more equipped."

:00:29.:00:31.

We'll have all the details and ask why this is happening.

:00:32.:00:40.

One of the UK's major courier companies tells us they're taking

:00:41.:00:43.

action to protect their moped riders from acid atttacks.

:00:44.:00:51.

I was just knocking on the window of a few cars, I was just

:00:52.:00:55.

They're not opening because probably they were scared.

:00:56.:00:58.

I was really scared, I don't know what to do.

:00:59.:01:01.

We will show you the full report in 18 minutes. -- in a few minutes.

:01:02.:01:10.

And rugby legend Jonny Wilkinson is live in the studio

:01:11.:01:13.

to talk about his career and how his performance

:01:14.:01:15.

Welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning.

:01:16.:01:29.

We're also talking about foster carers this morning and asking

:01:30.:01:31.

if they should get the same pay and employment rights

:01:32.:01:34.

If you've fostered children, is this something you'd support,

:01:35.:01:37.

or is it wrong to think of the role as a 'job' in the

:01:38.:01:41.

And keys that are causing delays at European airports this summer,

:01:42.:01:56.

there's a warning this morning that the situation shows no sign of

:01:57.:01:59.

improving. Do get in touch on all the stories

:02:00.:02:01.

we're talking about this morning - use the hashtag Victoria live

:02:02.:02:05.

and If you text, you will be charged There are fresh concerns

:02:06.:02:08.

about the state of mental A BBC investigation has revealed

:02:09.:02:12.

that some patients are waiting more than three years to be discharged

:02:13.:02:16.

from hospital, despite being Figures, obtained through freedom

:02:17.:02:18.

of information requests, show that at least five patients

:02:19.:02:21.

waited more than 1,000 days. Hundreds of others have been waiting

:02:22.:02:24.

for more than six months. The government says the NHS

:02:25.:02:27.

is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to treat mental health

:02:28.:02:29.

patients in the community. Our social affairs correspondent,

:02:30.:02:31.

Michael Buchanan, reports. It helps when I'm bored or anything

:02:32.:02:37.

and I haven't got anything to do. Toni shows me round her home,

:02:38.:02:46.

where she lives with five other The 32-year-old suffers

:02:47.:02:49.

from schizophrenia and She has spent almost half her life

:02:50.:02:59.

in psychiatric hospitals. She moved here last year,

:03:00.:03:02.

though, and loves it. But arguments over who should pay

:03:03.:03:04.

for her care means she spent months longer in hospital

:03:05.:03:07.

than she needed to. I would see other people,

:03:08.:03:09.

like, leaving before me. I would be like, yeah,

:03:10.:03:12.

but I've been ready for a long time. Many psychiatric patients

:03:13.:03:16.

would recognise Toni's experience. We've discovered that at least five

:03:17.:03:24.

patients waited more than three While more than 200 spent six

:03:25.:03:26.

months longer in hospital Often, people are in a revolving

:03:27.:03:38.

door of hospital placement, and then a failed community

:03:39.:03:42.

placement, because that step So, by providing a comprehensive

:03:43.:03:45.

package of support, we hope The complex where Toni lives

:03:46.:03:52.

is is provided by a national charity The complex where Toni lives

:03:53.:04:00.

is provided by a national charity who say there aren't

:04:01.:04:02.

enough similar units. Toni says she will soon move

:04:03.:04:04.

into a small bungalow on the complex, a further step

:04:05.:04:09.

towards rebuilding her life. Too many mental health patients

:04:10.:04:12.

are being denied a similar chance. Speaking to the BBC a little

:04:13.:04:14.

earlier, Dr Arpan Dutta from the Royal College

:04:15.:04:23.

of Psychiatrists explained why health services are struggling

:04:24.:04:25.

to discharge patients. These services are quite fragmented,

:04:26.:04:35.

I suppose. That needs developing, in terms of integration of services.

:04:36.:04:39.

There is a big divide between health and social care. And, in a lot of

:04:40.:04:43.

placements for people are jointly funded. In my work, it is linking up

:04:44.:04:48.

with social workers, and with other professions, trying to identify

:04:49.:04:54.

appropriate placements for people. I suppose it is finding the right

:04:55.:04:58.

placement for the right person, and that is often creating a delay.

:04:59.:05:01.

Ben Brown is in the BBC Newsroom with a summary

:05:02.:05:03.

Children from the very poorest families in some parts of England

:05:04.:05:10.

are continuing to fall further behind at school.

:05:11.:05:12.

The Education Policy Institute says by the end of secondary school,

:05:13.:05:15.

the most disadvantaged children can be two years behind their peers.

:05:16.:05:25.

The government says it's directing an extra ?72 million

:05:26.:05:27.

It starts in primary school and widens in the years that follow,

:05:28.:05:32.

the attainment gap between poorer and wealthier children.

:05:33.:05:38.

Now, for some disadvantaged kids, that gap did close slightly

:05:39.:05:40.

But when you look at the very poorest children, it didn't.

:05:41.:05:47.

The report calculates that by the time they sit their GCSEs

:05:48.:05:50.

But the picture does vary nationwide.

:05:51.:05:57.

You can speculate that funding would be a factor in certain

:05:58.:05:59.

We know that aspirations are quite important,

:06:00.:06:03.

So, I think all of these things will be having - and more -

:06:04.:06:11.

Disadvantaged children are more likely to earn less in future

:06:12.:06:15.

Put simply, it leads to wasted potential.

:06:16.:06:22.

The Department for Education says there is over ?2 billion this year

:06:23.:06:25.

to support schools in this area, and money to help young

:06:26.:06:28.

people in so-called social mobility cold spots.

:06:29.:06:32.

Today's report acknowledges there has been progress overall

:06:33.:06:35.

but the conclusion - it's far too slow.

:06:36.:06:44.

If the rate of change over the last decade

:06:45.:06:47.

continues, the study says it

:06:48.:06:48.

would take a staggering 50 years before the gap is closed.

:06:49.:06:51.

The Venezuelan President, Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed

:06:52.:06:55.

allegations of fraud in the country's controversial

:06:56.:06:56.

A company based in London responsible for providing

:06:57.:06:59.

the voting system - has claimed electoral authorities

:07:00.:07:01.

inflated the turn-out figure by at least 1 million.

:07:02.:07:06.

The opposition has called for more mass demonstrations.

:07:07.:07:14.

A cot death charity has said that it will no longer endorse the use

:07:15.:07:18.

of Finnish-style baby boxes, designed for newborns to sleep in.

:07:19.:07:20.

The cardboard box - filled with baby products and a mattress -

:07:21.:07:23.

has been connected with low infant mortality rates in

:07:24.:07:25.

They're now given out to some new parents through the NHS,

:07:26.:07:31.

but the Lullaby Trust warns there is no evidence

:07:32.:07:35.

that they reduce the likelihood of sudden infant death syndrome.

:07:36.:07:40.

More than 200 buildings have failed fire safety tests,

:07:41.:07:42.

implemented in the wake of the Grenfell Tower fire.

:07:43.:07:46.

In the second in a set of six tests ordered by the government,

:07:47.:07:49.

100 high-rises failed to meet current regulations.

:07:50.:07:54.

The BBC has learnt that cladding and insulation panels failed

:07:55.:07:56.

the test within seven minutes of being set alight.

:07:57.:08:02.

The Chris Evans' Breakfast Show on Radio 2 has lost almost half

:08:03.:08:05.

a million listeners in the past year, according

:08:06.:08:07.

to the latest figures from the research body,

:08:08.:08:09.

Just over nine million people tuned in every week

:08:10.:08:13.

in the second quarter of 2017, compared to 9.4 million

:08:14.:08:16.

BBC Radio 4's Today programme has seen a surge in listeners,

:08:17.:08:22.

with 7.6 million people tuning in a week in the second

:08:23.:08:24.

Elsewhere, Nick Grimshaw's breakfast show on BBC Radio 1 added more

:08:25.:08:31.

than 350,000 listeners in the last quarter, drawing in 5.5

:08:32.:08:34.

The UK has become a nation of 'binge watchers' according to research

:08:35.:08:43.

New research suggests eight in ten adults now view multiple episodes

:08:44.:08:49.

of their favourite shows in a single sitting.

:08:50.:08:53.

Though most of us still watch at least some live TV each week.

:08:54.:08:59.

The food delivery company Deliveroo has told this programme it's

:09:00.:09:02.

bringing in new safety measures to protect drivers from attacks.

:09:03.:09:10.

It follows a wave of moped crime in London and horrific acid attacks

:09:11.:09:13.

where delivery drivers have been victims.

:09:14.:09:15.

Around 450 acid attacks were recorded by police

:09:16.:09:17.

The company says it's to introduce measures including the ability

:09:18.:09:22.

for drivers to report unsafe areas and trialling the use

:09:23.:09:24.

Health warnings are in place across Europe as temperatures reach

:09:25.:09:32.

A record-breaking heatwave is currently affecting

:09:33.:09:37.

swathes of the continent - from Romania to Spain and Portugal.

:09:38.:09:39.

As much of Europe sizzles, just what is the best

:09:40.:09:44.

An almost continent wide heatwave has pushed temperatures above 40

:09:45.:09:52.

Celsius, breaking records, and sending people and their pets

:09:53.:09:54.

In Austria, the elephants at Vienna zoo took to the pool to cool.

:09:55.:10:12.

The city's horses had to go home it was so hot.

:10:13.:10:15.

Others, though, weren't quite so lucky.

:10:16.:10:16.

The heat is centred on Italy, it's experiencing its worst

:10:17.:10:19.

11 of its 20 regions could soon declare a state of emergency.

:10:20.:10:34.

It is unusual to see temperatures above 40 degrees across such a large

:10:35.:10:41.

area but in packs keep coming from this with water shortages, power

:10:42.:10:45.

cuts in places but heat implications as well, with old people and those

:10:46.:10:50.

with existing health conditions really suffering in temperatures

:10:51.:10:51.

like this. After last week's wildfires

:10:52.:10:54.

in France, firefighters With dry conditions,

:10:55.:10:56.

risk of further fires is high. In southern Spain, forecasters

:10:57.:11:00.

described the weather as extreme. A high of 47 degrees

:11:01.:11:03.

is expected in Cordoba. Plumes of heat are pushing towards

:11:04.:11:15.

the Balkans, in Romania ice cream wasn't the only thing melting. But,

:11:16.:11:21.

work must go on. TRANSLATION: We are drinking a lot of water, we take

:11:22.:11:25.

more breaks and cut the working schedule. We work eight hours a day.

:11:26.:11:30.

In neighbouring Hungary, this steam gate helps people to cool off.

:11:31.:11:36.

TRANSLATION: When we go out, we put hats on the kids, factor 50 suncream

:11:37.:11:41.

on them and we try and stay in the shade. And, the advice is to drink

:11:42.:11:47.

plenty of water, and despite the leader of the Mediterranean sun, sea

:11:48.:11:53.

and sand, stay indoors during the hottest hours of the day -- lure of

:11:54.:11:57.

the Mediterranean sun. Sarah Caulker, BBC News.

:11:58.:11:59.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9.30.

:12:00.:12:03.

Later this hour, Jonny Wilkinson will be in the studio with me. Send

:12:04.:12:10.

us any questions you want us to ask him. He will be in with his

:12:11.:12:13.

performance coach who he says changed his life.

:12:14.:12:14.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

:12:15.:12:17.

use the hashtag Victoria live and If you text, you will be charged

:12:18.:12:20.

Let's have a look at the sport, and the story everyone is talking about,

:12:21.:12:29.

Neymar's record move to PSG? But it's the cash

:12:30.:12:34.

everyone's talking about. So let take a look at

:12:35.:12:37.

the numbers quickly - he'll be paid about 80 pence

:12:38.:12:39.

a second and I've just had a look at his Twitter followers -

:12:40.:12:43.

he has 30 million so he's set to be You could probably buy four

:12:44.:12:46.

Kyle Walkers who joined Man City He is a great player -

:12:47.:12:52.

he scored 68 goals for Barcelona last season, he's pretty much

:12:53.:12:59.

a national hero in Brazil where he was born and grew up

:13:00.:13:02.

and that's where I first saw him play at the World Cup

:13:03.:13:05.

in Brazil three years ago and I thought he was incredible

:13:06.:13:08.

but lots of pressure on his shoulders -

:13:09.:13:11.

he's just 25 years old. while we're all flapping

:13:12.:13:14.

about the money there's one man who doesn't think the

:13:15.:13:17.

price tag is too bad. For 200 million, I do not think he

:13:18.:13:27.

is expensive. I think the fact that now you are going to have more

:13:28.:13:34.

players at 100 million, you will have more players of 80 million, and

:13:35.:13:40.

more players of 60 million... I think that is the problem. Neymar is

:13:41.:13:46.

one of the best players in the world. Always good value with Jose

:13:47.:13:47.

Mourinho. It's a story that's being reported

:13:48.:13:48.

all over the world - So in France the big headline

:13:49.:13:51.

there is - he arrives. Meanwhile in Barcelona

:13:52.:14:01.

it's Hasta Nunca - which basically means see you never

:14:02.:14:02.

or good riddance. Here the FT are talking

:14:03.:14:07.

about the record transfer - and Spanish Newspaper Mundo

:14:08.:14:10.

Deportivo is looking at how Barca may spend their little nest egg

:14:11.:14:12.

with Liverpool forward Phillipe Coutinho high on their list

:14:13.:14:14.

- although the Reds boss Jurgen Klopp says Coutinho isn't

:14:15.:14:17.

leaving Anfield this summer - even if the Catalan side came

:14:18.:14:19.

in with an offer in the region A staggering amount of money on

:14:20.:14:30.

offer there. Incredible sums of money, but

:14:31.:14:35.

meanwhile, the England Lionesses are looking to reach the finals of the

:14:36.:14:38.

year is tonight? Yes, a brilliant story.

:14:39.:14:40.

England's women are looking to make the final.

:14:41.:14:42.

They're taking on hosts, the Netherlands.

:14:43.:14:43.

There's good news and bad news with England chances so get the bad

:14:44.:14:46.

news out the way first - they're missing two key players.

:14:47.:14:49.

So despite looking good in training here the Lionesses

:14:50.:14:52.

won't have keeper Karen Bardsley - she's out because of injury replaced

:14:53.:14:55.

by Siobhan Chamberlain and they're also without midfielder Jill Scott.

:14:56.:14:57.

But the good news - they're still the highest-ranked

:14:58.:15:00.

And their record is pretty good - they've won all four games

:15:01.:15:06.

so far, scored 11 goals and only conceded one.

:15:07.:15:08.

They'll be looking to go one better than two years ago

:15:09.:15:10.

where they were knocked out in the semi finals of the World Cup.

:15:11.:15:14.

For Chamberlain - she's ready to step up

:15:15.:15:16.

If I can push KP as hard as possible, likewise with the rest of

:15:17.:15:28.

us, we can push one another to be the best. Ultimately I want to be

:15:29.:15:33.

out there playing and if I can make other best she can be to stop

:15:34.:15:38.

myself, that's the best way. We do not want the misfortune of others to

:15:39.:15:41.

be playing but if it happens you have to grasp it with both hands.

:15:42.:15:46.

I've been around some good sports people, these players work as hard

:15:47.:15:49.

as anyone I've ever worked with or seen. They are absolutely obsessed

:15:50.:15:53.

with being the best they can be. Now they have these two skills in

:15:54.:15:58.

abundance, the sky is the limit for this group.

:15:59.:16:01.

All of the build-up and full commentary is available on BBC

:16:02.:16:02.

Radio five Live from seven o'clock. We will be watching, thank you.

:16:03.:16:08.

The very poorest schoolchildren are falling up to two years

:16:09.:16:10.

behind their better off classmates by the time they finish

:16:11.:16:13.

That's according to a new report by the Education Policy Institute.

:16:14.:16:16.

It's based on data from all state schools, and suggests that

:16:17.:16:19.

youngsters who have spent the majority of their time

:16:20.:16:21.

at secondary school on free school dinners -

:16:22.:16:23.

a key measure of poverty - are increasingly lagging behind

:16:24.:16:26.

The Department for Education says the attainment gap has narrowed over

:16:27.:16:32.

the past six years and ?2.5 billion of extra funding

:16:33.:16:34.

is being invested in schools to help the most disadvantaged pupils.

:16:35.:16:40.

She's a single parent of four children.

:16:41.:16:47.

She works part-time but has had to rely on benefits to make ends meet.

:16:48.:16:51.

Her youngest son is 17 and just doing his exams.

:16:52.:16:53.

And Tash Moriarty, head teacher of Harefield Academy in Watford.

:16:54.:16:55.

She has done a lot of work focusing on helping disadvantaged children.

:16:56.:17:03.

I will start with you, four kids, single parent, you been on benefits

:17:04.:17:12.

as well. Yep. Tell us about the financial pressures you were put

:17:13.:17:17.

under. They are sort of universal to most people, but when you are on a

:17:18.:17:21.

very, very low fixed income, it is hard to budget, it is hard to make

:17:22.:17:27.

sure that you are providing for your children, especially things like

:17:28.:17:31.

educational trips. Even down to things like good diet. Paying all

:17:32.:17:38.

your bills. Really bringing up healthy children is the most

:17:39.:17:42.

important thing. So how did that affect their attainment at school?

:17:43.:17:50.

I'm not really sure. My youngest son, who is 17 now, when he was

:17:51.:17:54.

doing his GCSEs in 2016, we got to the point where it was looking as

:17:55.:18:00.

though he wasn't going to be able to obtain a Seagrave in maths. -- a C

:18:01.:18:15.

in maths. I had to pay for a Chuter. That cost about ?60 per lesson, so I

:18:16.:18:19.

could only do that -- pay for a tutor. I had to scrimp and save to

:18:20.:18:24.

find that money, but I was amazed. He got a B. So it made a difference,

:18:25.:18:32.

but what I found really interesting was the fact that the tutor said it

:18:33.:18:38.

was confidence. Confidence. And I think that is a huge problem with

:18:39.:18:44.

children from underprivileged backgrounds, confidence. Shouldn't

:18:45.:18:49.

that be taught in schools? Is that what you were paying money for,

:18:50.:18:54.

essentially, to instil confidence in your children? No, obviously schools

:18:55.:19:02.

play a part in instilling confidence, but if you are in an

:19:03.:19:05.

environment where a lot of children have privilege, holidays, and you

:19:06.:19:10.

don't, you can't really connect with those kind of children. I don't know

:19:11.:19:15.

because I have never been a teacher, so I don't know how teachers view

:19:16.:19:20.

children from different backgrounds. I don't know if it is something they

:19:21.:19:24.

can spot straightaway or if they feel maybe it is just too much hard

:19:25.:19:29.

work to help a child who is experiencing difficulties. It is a

:19:30.:19:34.

balance between home life and school life, but poverty at home can affect

:19:35.:19:43.

things like where you live. Overcrowding. The pressures of the

:19:44.:19:53.

adult at home are so great that maybe sometimes seeing how your

:19:54.:19:56.

children are doing kind of gets put to one side a little bit. Do you

:19:57.:20:02.

think it makes a difference if other children from that school also from

:20:03.:20:07.

an disadvantaged background, or is it worse if they are not? I always

:20:08.:20:12.

feel that a school should be a really good mix, neither all

:20:13.:20:19.

middle-class children, or under privileged children. A mix is what

:20:20.:20:24.

you need as long as the children who are lacking confidence are brought

:20:25.:20:26.

up to the level that the privileged children are. What are the kind of

:20:27.:20:33.

disadvantages children face in your school? Amanda has picked up on

:20:34.:20:38.

them, there are some practical ones, access to resources, so if you are

:20:39.:20:44.

in an environment where there are limited advantages. The facilities

:20:45.:20:52.

of the home environment can impact. If there is overcrowding, as has

:20:53.:20:56.

already been alluded to, it makes it very difficult to find the right

:20:57.:20:59.

kind of space to affect homework positively. Homework is a

:21:00.:21:04.

significantly important part of a child's development. We factor in a

:21:05.:21:09.

large portion of time that is required to reinforce the curriculum

:21:10.:21:15.

through homework time and if the facilities that a child has at home

:21:16.:21:18.

to complete that homework effectively are not up to scratch,

:21:19.:21:21.

it is very difficult for the child to succeed in the same way. Some of

:21:22.:21:25.

those practical elements are very important. They are very

:21:26.:21:32.

characteristic of socially disadvantaged families and how gaps

:21:33.:21:38.

can be created through those areas. So for example funding music

:21:39.:21:43.

activities, arts activities, dance lessons, drama lessons, all of those

:21:44.:21:47.

kinds of creative activities and sports activities cost an awful lot

:21:48.:21:50.

of money. No question that they motivate a child, they add to a

:21:51.:21:53.

child's confidence, their aspiration and resilience. If you could capture

:21:54.:21:59.

into words what the biggest difference is between socially

:22:00.:22:06.

disadvantaged and advantage committed their natural resilience

:22:07.:22:08.

and aspiration. Much of that comes from from home environment. Mandy is

:22:09.:22:17.

a very important active parent who has supported her child as much as

:22:18.:22:23.

possible. Families from a lower financially vulnerable background

:22:24.:22:29.

often would be there are generations within that family of low

:22:30.:22:34.

aspiration, that there is no history of anyone in that family aspiring of

:22:35.:22:38.

going to university or further education, and in that environment

:22:39.:22:41.

it is very difficult for children to break through to recognise a reason

:22:42.:22:46.

to want to aspire any higher. It puts an inordinate amount of

:22:47.:22:49.

pressure on schools to try and raise that aspiration. We have talked

:22:50.:22:52.

about the research already and what that shows. One of the main things

:22:53.:22:56.

it shows actually around disadvantaged students that they are

:22:57.:23:03.

mostly impacted by low aspiration and low academic self-concept, so if

:23:04.:23:06.

they believe is they are not going to achieve it is difficult to

:23:07.:23:15.

improve that. So you are saying it is down to low aspiration? Yes, it

:23:16.:23:22.

is a very complex matter, but low aspiration of the family for the

:23:23.:23:27.

child, low academic self-concept and belief in what they are capable of

:23:28.:23:31.

achieving and all of those have a knock-on effect in the class. It

:23:32.:23:39.

often manifests as a lack of confidence, a lack of emotional

:23:40.:23:43.

resilience in the classroom, an unwillingness perhaps to share

:23:44.:23:45.

experiences, to voice their opinions, having access to the right

:23:46.:23:49.

vocabulary to voice their opinions, those sorts of things. If as we are

:23:50.:23:53.

hearing today it will take 50 years to close that gap, what can be done

:23:54.:24:00.

to speed that up? The first thing to say is measuring that gap is key. 50

:24:01.:24:03.

years to close that gap is largely based on statistics that report on

:24:04.:24:07.

payment as opposed to progress. There has been a move in the last

:24:08.:24:11.

few years to shift that and a report on student progress as opposed to

:24:12.:24:16.

student attainment. Attainment is a threshold measure, there is no

:24:17.:24:21.

reason to suggest that children should be aspiring to a particular

:24:22.:24:24.

threshold, we ought to be looking to get them to progress within their

:24:25.:24:27.

capabilities. We need to recognise in closing that gap that it starts

:24:28.:24:31.

very young, the most damage is done in the first five years of a child's

:24:32.:24:35.

life, which is very much informed by what goes at home. As opposed to

:24:36.:24:41.

school. The other important thing to the standards that June from

:24:42.:24:44.

socially disadvantaged families, the Gavern progress and attainment will

:24:45.:24:49.

grow much faster than those from advantaged backgrounds, and

:24:50.:24:51.

consequently once those gaps exist, if they are not address they will

:24:52.:24:55.

become wider, and the gap in the child's achievement will continue to

:24:56.:25:00.

grow. So it is very important first of all to go back and look at the

:25:01.:25:04.

parenting side and look at support that can be given to parents, and

:25:05.:25:08.

that comes in the early years as much as it does in schooling. There

:25:09.:25:12.

needs to be an awful lot funding put into schools. One thing the pupil

:25:13.:25:25.

premium will be maintained at ?2.5 billion, coming back to the point

:25:26.:25:28.

about parenting, what extra support would you need as a parent, would

:25:29.:25:33.

you be calling for? That is a really hard actually. I suppose for me I

:25:34.:25:38.

have always been puzzled where the pupil premium has gone, what exactly

:25:39.:25:45.

is that used for. So for example with my son having difficulties in

:25:46.:25:52.

attaining the C in maths. That was recognised from the school that he

:25:53.:25:59.

was on the sort of D scale, so why wasn't, say, the pupil premium used

:26:00.:26:04.

in such a way to help them? Instead, he came home, they are saying he

:26:05.:26:10.

can't get a C, what am I going to do? And so I had to deal with that,

:26:11.:26:17.

I had to really dig deep, and I knew I could pay the three months. If I

:26:18.:26:22.

did not pay for that three months, and he didn't get a grade C, he

:26:23.:26:27.

would not have been able to stay on for his A-levels, and that could

:26:28.:26:33.

have had a huge consequence as it has gone on. So I am really

:26:34.:26:38.

intrigued as to what exactly pupil premium is used for. Is it

:26:39.:26:41.

specifically targeted for the children who it was meant for? It is

:26:42.:26:46.

supposed to go to individual children but the reality is it does

:26:47.:26:49.

not always but that is a whole other conversation. Thank you for coming

:26:50.:26:50.

in. The Department for Education gave us

:26:51.:27:02.

the statement. Coming up, England rugby legend

:27:03.:27:44.

Jonny Wilkinson will be live in the studio to talk

:27:45.:27:47.

about how his sporting coach After the Grenfell Tower disaster,

:27:48.:27:49.

3,000 residents living in a building with similar cladding

:27:50.:27:56.

in the Chalcots Estate in Camden were told to pack up and leave

:27:57.:28:00.

so urgent safety work could be done. Six weeks on - the Council says

:28:01.:28:03.

the work is complete Residents have now been told

:28:04.:28:06.

to return to their flats. But some have told the BBC that -

:28:07.:28:09.

despite millions of pounds being spent on the evacuation -

:28:10.:28:12.

the work that's been done is shoddy and incomplete

:28:13.:28:15.

and puts lives at risk. Our reporter Sangita Myska

:28:16.:28:19.

can tell us more. What was the urgent work that needed

:28:20.:28:32.

doing? As you just mentioned, after the grand full disaster, the London

:28:33.:28:36.

Fire Brigade went into the Charcot 's estate and carried out advanced

:28:37.:28:42.

safety checks the fire. Four of those towers needed urgent internal

:28:43.:28:47.

work done in the communal areas of the flats to keep residents say. As

:28:48.:28:51.

you say, we all remember those pictures of all those thousands of

:28:52.:28:54.

people pouring out of their flats, given a few hours to pack up and

:28:55.:29:00.

find hotel rooms. What London Fire Brigade wanted was a range of

:29:01.:29:04.

measures to stop fire and smoke spreading from one part of the

:29:05.:29:07.

building to another. The aim obviously is to limit the risk of

:29:08.:29:10.

injury and death in the event of a fire. Camden council say the work is

:29:11.:29:16.

complete, it has been signed off by buildings inspectors from two other

:29:17.:29:20.

councils may have been working closely with the London Fire

:29:21.:29:23.

Brigade. But residents I have spoken to say they are really alarmed by

:29:24.:29:27.

the quality of the work. They say it is shoddy, incomplete and poses a

:29:28.:29:32.

potential risk. You have been down there, what did you see? I was shown

:29:33.:29:37.

around one of those towers. I ought to say that Camden council did ask

:29:38.:29:41.

us not to record inside. We went ahead. I was shown around by one

:29:42.:29:49.

resident around a tower called Taplow. 23 stories high. He showed

:29:50.:29:54.

me a range of work at various residents believe is shoddy. Let's

:29:55.:29:59.

take a look at the fire doors was to be can see seals, which are supposed

:30:00.:30:04.

to be fire and smoke resistant. I think we can argue that work is

:30:05.:30:08.

questionable since those seals only went up a week or so ago. That fire

:30:09.:30:19.

door runs to the only fire stairs. It does not in fact shut. Moving on

:30:20.:30:26.

to the staircases that that leads on to, if you have a look there, at the

:30:27.:30:32.

edge of each staircase you should have a working, fit for purpose

:30:33.:30:37.

black strip, a nonslip strip that I dearly can be seen in the dark. You

:30:38.:30:43.

can see it is very badly worn away. On those sets of stairs there were

:30:44.:30:47.

no strips at all, that was quite good compared to some of the others.

:30:48.:30:52.

Let's move on to the front door of flats, should have been sealed at

:30:53.:30:55.

the top and the bottom and around that letterbox. On that letterbox

:30:56.:30:58.

there was no sealant at all. If you skip to the next photo, you can see

:30:59.:31:03.

at the bottom, when it comes up, at the bottom of that particular door,

:31:04.:31:08.

the gap was so big that I was able to fit my entire hand underneath.

:31:09.:31:12.

That is a close-up on another front door. That close is supposed to bang

:31:13.:31:20.

doors shut. When you run out, there is a fire in your flat, the whole

:31:21.:31:23.

idea is that you will get your possessions, grab your kids and ran

:31:24.:31:26.

outside and hopefully the door will shut behind you. Contain that fire.

:31:27.:31:31.

That was either missing or broking on several front doors.

:31:32.:31:36.

I've shown these photographs to two experts, one was categoric, he says

:31:37.:31:44.

that he does not believe that this tower is safe to live in. He has

:31:45.:31:49.

gone in and he has done his own look around, that is his opinion. After

:31:50.:31:53.

these repairs have been done? After these repairs have been done and

:31:54.:31:57.

signed off. Then, the other expert told us as far as he was concerned,

:31:58.:32:01.

just looking at those photos, he believed the work has not been

:32:02.:32:05.

carried out to British safety standards. And what about the inside

:32:06.:32:12.

of the flats? This is really interesting, Tina, when the enhanced

:32:13.:32:15.

safety checks were undertaken, it would appear, at least, they were

:32:16.:32:20.

not done on the insides of the flat. I was actually recording a piece for

:32:21.:32:25.

radio, and as we went around the building, we saw several issues. All

:32:26.:32:30.

of which are on BBC Online, viewers can see the photographs and other

:32:31.:32:35.

issues. We were asked to stop recording, I was asked to go into

:32:36.:32:44.

someone else's flat, she asked me to go in she wanted to show me

:32:45.:32:47.

something. There was a room where electric cables come out the fuse

:32:48.:32:49.

box and electric meters. There were a lot of exposed cables, boxed in

:32:50.:32:53.

with cardboard. She alleges the boxing in with cardboard was done by

:32:54.:32:59.

Camden Council contracted electricians. Take a look, the

:33:00.:33:05.

cables run right into her ceiling. The ceiling, obviously, this is the

:33:06.:33:09.

ground floor of the tower. The ceiling obviously adjoins to the

:33:10.:33:13.

flat upstairs. This goes right to the heart of what the urgent works

:33:14.:33:17.

were about, which was containment. Making sure that if a fire breaks

:33:18.:33:21.

out it is contained in a limited area, allowing people to get out. On

:33:22.:33:25.

the outside of these blocks, I should mention, all four blocks, is

:33:26.:33:31.

cladding which is very similar, not the same, but similar to that used

:33:32.:33:34.

at the Grenfell Tower and today we have seen that story about fire

:33:35.:33:41.

safety checks being undertaken for a second time. Obviously, this is of

:33:42.:33:46.

great alarm and worry to some of the residents living there. In light of

:33:47.:33:49.

everything you have shown us, what has the response been from Camden

:33:50.:33:53.

Council and the fire brigade? We have put every one of these very

:33:54.:33:58.

specific allegations to Camden Council. We invited the council

:33:59.:34:05.

leader life, and I'm sorry to say she declined other invitation. The

:34:06.:34:10.

council said the urgent work was signed off and undertaken

:34:11.:34:12.

immediately, signed off from building control in two other London

:34:13.:34:17.

boroughs, Lambeth and Westminster, and they worked closely with the

:34:18.:34:20.

London Fire Brigade. Thank you very much.

:34:21.:34:21.

A delivery driver tells us about the moment but as it was thrown into his

:34:22.:34:31.

face. And rugby champion Jonny Wilkinson joins us in the studio in

:34:32.:34:36.

a few minutes time. Send in any questions you want us to ask him.

:34:37.:34:40.

Here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:34:41.:34:46.

Some mental health patients are waiting three years to be

:34:47.:34:50.

discharged from hospital, despite being medically fit to leave.

:34:51.:34:52.

Figures, obtained by the BBC through freedom of information

:34:53.:34:54.

requests, show that at least five patients waited more

:34:55.:34:59.

Meanwhile, hundreds more have been waiting for more than six months.

:35:00.:35:11.

Children from the very poorest families in some parts of England

:35:12.:35:14.

are continuing to fall further behind at school.

:35:15.:35:16.

The Education Policy Institute says by the end of secondary school,

:35:17.:35:18.

the most disadvantaged children can be two years behind their peers.

:35:19.:35:21.

The government says it's directing an extra 72-million-pounds

:35:22.:35:23.

into areas with low social mobility.

:35:24.:35:27.

The Venezuelan President, Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed

:35:28.:35:29.

allegations of fraud in the country's controversial

:35:30.:35:31.

A company based in London responsible for providing

:35:32.:35:38.

the voting system - has claimed electoral authorities

:35:39.:35:42.

inflated the turn-out figure by at least 1 million.

:35:43.:35:44.

The opposition has called for more mass demonstrations.

:35:45.:35:53.

A cot death charity has said that it will no longer endorse the use

:35:54.:35:56.

of Finnish-style baby boxes, designed for newborns to sleep in.

:35:57.:35:59.

The cardboard box - filled with baby products and a mattress -

:36:00.:36:02.

has been connected with low infant mortality rates in

:36:03.:36:04.

They're now given out to some new parents through the NHS,

:36:05.:36:08.

but the Lullaby Trust warns there is no evidence

:36:09.:36:10.

that they reduce the likelihood of sudden infant death syndrome.

:36:11.:36:19.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News. More from me at ten o'clock.

:36:20.:36:24.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10.00.

:36:25.:36:27.

Brazilian striker Neymar could become the World's most

:36:28.:36:30.

He's expected to complete his transfer from Barcelona

:36:31.:36:33.

to Paris Saint Germain for just under 200 million pounds.

:36:34.:36:38.

He's likely to earn three quarters of a million pounds a week.

:36:39.:36:41.

We're less than 11 hours away now from England's Euro 2017 semi final

:36:42.:36:44.

Manager Mark Sampson says their mission isn't just

:36:45.:36:53.

to become the best team in Europe - but the best team in the world.

:36:54.:36:56.

Celtic are just one tie away from the group stages

:36:57.:36:59.

James Forrest's strike helped the Scottish champions past

:37:00.:37:02.

The draw for the playoff round will take place tomorrow.

:37:03.:37:07.

And, breaking news that has reached us in the last few minutes. The

:37:08.:37:13.

former world heavyweight champion Wladimir Klitschko has announced his

:37:14.:37:17.

retirement from boxing. It had been expected that the 41-year-old would

:37:18.:37:21.

announce a rematch with Anthony Joshua, who beat him in April at

:37:22.:37:25.

Wembley for the world heavyweight title. More on that just after ten.

:37:26.:37:29.

He changed my life" - that's how England rugby

:37:30.:37:32.

legend Jonny Wilkinson describes his kicking

:37:33.:37:34.

He's an elite performance coach - who started out teaching economics

:37:35.:37:39.

in a secondary school and ended up coaching some of the biggest names

:37:40.:37:42.

in sport - including golfers Luke Donald and Padraig Harrington,

:37:43.:37:45.

the England Rugby team and British Lions,

:37:46.:37:47.

the England Cricket team and Manchester City.

:37:48.:37:53.

Dr Dave Alred has written a book called the Pressure Principle -

:37:54.:37:56.

which he says can help everyone manage stress and perform

:37:57.:37:59.

Jonny Wilkinson and Dr Dave Alred are here -

:38:00.:38:04.

and we'll speak to them shortly - do get in touch now if you do

:38:05.:38:08.

But first let's have a look at some of Jonny Wilkinson's most

:38:09.:38:12.

# I feel the chemicals burn in my bloodstream

:38:13.:38:21.

Jonny Wilkinson is here - with his elite performance

:38:22.:39:19.

Do you ever get fed up of watching your best bits back? I don't do it a

:39:20.:39:28.

huge amount any more to be honest! They are great things but not my

:39:29.:39:32.

best bets, as Dave will allude to, the best bits are always to come.

:39:33.:39:37.

You describe Dave as a genius who changed your life, why? And the bank

:39:38.:39:41.

during that time in my life, I was at the point, like a lot of people

:39:42.:39:45.

are, where they feel there is a limit, that they have reached a

:39:46.:39:52.

point where they cannot go any further. When was that? Early for

:39:53.:39:56.

me, 16 or 17, that was when the process started. I was after

:39:57.:40:00.

perfection, I reached a point where I was living accidentally. Some days

:40:01.:40:04.

it was good, others it was not great. What Dave did for me, he

:40:05.:40:09.

opened my eyes to space, space for improvement and space to move and to

:40:10.:40:15.

grow. That space, as Dave will mention as well, is not out there,

:40:16.:40:20.

but it is in you already. It just needs revealing. What you have

:40:21.:40:25.

uncovered is not your limit, and going beyond those is where

:40:26.:40:32.

everything in life exists. Beyond what you think. Dave began my

:40:33.:40:35.

journey to discovering that space and I've been on that journey ever

:40:36.:40:39.

since. It has been amazing. Talk to me about that journey, when did you

:40:40.:40:45.

work with Jonny? And how much progress has he made since then?

:40:46.:40:50.

Poo-mac the progress has been magnificent book the number one

:40:51.:40:53.

thing was when he turned up at the age of 16 at Loughborough

:40:54.:40:59.

University, it was just a case of me thinking, OK, I had already got in

:41:00.:41:05.

my mind about wherever you are now, you can get better. It does not

:41:06.:41:08.

matter who you are. I started working then. What really impressed

:41:09.:41:18.

me was the intensity in which he wanted to get better. I think that

:41:19.:41:23.

intensity, you know, has been justly rewarded. It is a thing that goes on

:41:24.:41:30.

throughout your life, and in terms of the media, people are just

:41:31.:41:34.

looking at a playing career but, for me, it is well beyond that. It is

:41:35.:41:40.

just a question of, you know, I am here today. Tomorrow I am going to

:41:41.:41:45.

be better. And, I am going to look back and see how I have improved

:41:46.:41:49.

from last week. Nearly anybody can do that in any walk of life. And, I

:41:50.:41:55.

think the other issue is, which is really important, is so many people

:41:56.:42:00.

focus on what they cannot do as a starting point. Then, they try and

:42:01.:42:04.

look to improve that. I would rather focus on what you can do as a

:42:05.:42:09.

starting point. Then, improve everything. Dave, you say in your

:42:10.:42:14.

book that you believe Jonny was a better rugby player in 2014 and he

:42:15.:42:20.

was at the peak of his career in 2003. Why? I felt bad when you work

:42:21.:42:26.

with somebody a lot, you see them in practice and you see what they do in

:42:27.:42:30.

games, there are certain things where you see a benchmark of

:42:31.:42:34.

improvement. I think that, statistically, he was, excuse the

:42:35.:42:42.

embarrassment here, but statistically a better player and

:42:43.:42:45.

more balanced player, and more able to manage what was going on around

:42:46.:42:53.

him. I felt that, by then, for whatever reason, we had really got

:42:54.:42:59.

onto the bandwagon, getting in what we call the ugly zone, working on

:43:00.:43:04.

and enjoying it. It sounds strange, to enjoy failing, but it is enjoying

:43:05.:43:09.

where you start making mistakes, and then getting better from that. I

:43:10.:43:17.

felt that the time in Toulon, in my opinion, was long overdue, in terms

:43:18.:43:21.

of being in a different environment where you have control, and even to

:43:22.:43:26.

the last week, where we worked together in Paris, we did something

:43:27.:43:33.

for the first time. It is just the thrill of finding things that you

:43:34.:43:38.

can do differently and better at the margin. What did you do? New

:43:39.:43:45.

training ideas. What I was going to say is that when you are so sure of

:43:46.:43:48.

who you are and everything, and how life works, you are on a journey

:43:49.:43:53.

which is narrowing to a point. Until 2003 I was so sure everything should

:43:54.:43:59.

be. Going past that point, you have to make decisions. When you go on a

:44:00.:44:03.

journey going away from a point and into open space, it is about the

:44:04.:44:08.

ugly zone. Anything that feels ugly and uncomfortable, it is normally

:44:09.:44:12.

outside of your journey. Even in the last week or last few days, we were

:44:13.:44:16.

looking at roles, ideas, for processes, fixes, feelings and

:44:17.:44:22.

preparations, to challenge what is there so when the day comes, you are

:44:23.:44:28.

in as big a space, spontaneous and creative, but also as focused and

:44:29.:44:32.

controlled as you could ever be. It is really a choice. That's the

:44:33.:44:36.

amazing thing. It can be a feeling of compulsion. This is how it has to

:44:37.:44:40.

be, it never has to be any certain way. I know it challenges people in

:44:41.:44:45.

so many situations but from the sporting perspective, you are

:44:46.:44:50.

ultimately the creator of your own parameters. And come easy live

:44:51.:44:54.

within them. If you do not like that feeling, you have to expand and

:44:55.:44:58.

break them and open them right up. What was the turning point for you?

:44:59.:45:02.

When did you realise, in your own life, sporting career or a

:45:03.:45:06.

combination of both, that you had managed to control how you were

:45:07.:45:09.

dealing with things, and dealing with the pressure? And, were

:45:10.:45:12.

comfortable in how you were dealing with it? For me, it was nothing to

:45:13.:45:18.

do with sport. My work with Dave within the sport was amazing, making

:45:19.:45:24.

so much sense the entire time. I was a pretty petulant child, sometimes,

:45:25.:45:28.

during some training sessions... He can give you many examples of that,

:45:29.:45:32.

I'm sure! But the actual moment for me came through mental health. That

:45:33.:45:38.

struggle there is a perfect way of understanding who you believe

:45:39.:45:41.

yourself to be and what you believe yourself to be is not real. That is

:45:42.:45:45.

the whole point, it exists in your mind as an identity to function as

:45:46.:45:51.

well. It is nothing to do with existentially who you are. If you

:45:52.:45:56.

confuse the two, you end up in a dark place and mental health gave me

:45:57.:46:00.

an opportunity and space between the two. They presented me with that in

:46:01.:46:04.

and around sport. I was not conscious of seeing it. Because,

:46:05.:46:08.

Dave was almost allaying the path for me. That mental health allowed

:46:09.:46:13.

me to see the path with my own eyes and that's why I appreciate him more

:46:14.:46:16.

than ever and I also understand the depth of what he was doing and what

:46:17.:46:27.

he has written about in his book. That consciously, when you look at

:46:28.:46:30.

it, it makes so much more sense at the time, I said it seems to work to

:46:31.:46:33.

keep going but that is what real coaches do.

:46:34.:46:37.

Can you talk this through your approach, when it comes to elite

:46:38.:46:42.

athletes and the teams and individuals who have worked with,

:46:43.:46:45.

they are under a unique and immense amount of pressure in a very public

:46:46.:46:50.

arena. I think the problem we have is that sport team, and if you

:46:51.:46:57.

excuse, the media, and if the media is stories we tell ourselves about

:46:58.:47:04.

ourselves is always result driven, and results are outcomes, and once

:47:05.:47:08.

people start focusing on the outcome and lose the point of the process,

:47:09.:47:13.

in other words, you know, I teach you the process and we adhere to

:47:14.:47:17.

that process, no matter what. And it is getting people to understand that

:47:18.:47:22.

that's the key. That once we start worrying about the outcome of, then

:47:23.:47:27.

we are in trouble. And I think in anything you do, what is the

:47:28.:47:31.

process, what are the fundamentals? You might say to me, well, Dave, if

:47:32.:47:36.

I was teaching you the goalkick, for example. Well, we could try! There

:47:37.:47:44.

are no limits! If I teach you the goalkick, I might say keep your eye

:47:45.:47:47.

on the ball, and you might say to me I can see the ball but I can also

:47:48.:47:50.

see the target and I'm worried about this and that. But if I say to you I

:47:51.:47:54.

want you to see the piece of stitching on the ball, that becomes

:47:55.:47:59.

so engaging, that that displaces everything else. The minute I said

:48:00.:48:02.

to you instead of just hitting the target, I want to hit a spot in the

:48:03.:48:08.

middle of the target. Consciously I lock you into that process, and

:48:09.:48:15.

practice is about looking into that process over and over again, so when

:48:16.:48:19.

it comes to the day of reckoning, it doesn't matter where you are, if you

:48:20.:48:22.

see the stitching and the spot, the ball goes over. OK, well, may be in

:48:23.:48:29.

your case it would. Well, not all the time. So if it is a

:48:30.:48:33.

high-pressure situation, it is a World Cup and you are taking that

:48:34.:48:35.

decisive kick, what is going through your mind and how do you approach

:48:36.:48:39.

that situation, with what you have learned from Dave? As Dave was

:48:40.:48:44.

saying about the outcome side driving the fear of failure and the

:48:45.:48:48.

anxiety and that side of it, it is impossible to commit to something

:48:49.:48:52.

you don't want to happen. So fear of failure might give you a motivation

:48:53.:48:55.

of sorts, but you cannot fully commit everything you have got

:48:56.:48:58.

something you don't want to happen, you can't protect and go after

:48:59.:49:01.

something at the same time. When you release it through excitement and

:49:02.:49:04.

passion, you automatically engage every part of you, so that whole

:49:05.:49:09.

thing becomes about a desire. A desire to make things happen, to put

:49:10.:49:12.

the ball on that exact area, to visualise it, to get excited about

:49:13.:49:16.

how good this can be. As soon as you open that space of positive

:49:17.:49:21.

proactive motivation, it becomes a process of acceleration that

:49:22.:49:23.

continues through the event and be on the event, and in any walk of

:49:24.:49:29.

life, and in any dictionary as well you will always see the definition

:49:30.:49:34.

of an event comes afterwards. Even in the dictionary, there is the word

:49:35.:49:37.

and then the definition comes afterwards. A goalkick, it doesn't

:49:38.:49:40.

stop at the goalkick, life doesn't stop at the event can you continue

:49:41.:49:43.

beyond it and you make it inevitable. Any thoughts about what

:49:44.:49:48.

may have. You are accelerating. It is the whole point of hesitancy. As

:49:49.:49:54.

it gets to the ball, it slows down, in golf, but as you accelerate

:49:55.:49:56.

beyond you define what happens before because you link it into a

:49:57.:49:59.

straight process, which is what they've is talking about. So that

:50:00.:50:03.

desire to go beyond has to come through excitement and passion. That

:50:04.:50:07.

is what happens in those events, you have define your own reason for the

:50:08.:50:10.

excitement and passion, how good could this moment be? Not what

:50:11.:50:15.

happens it isn't. And then how do you deal with failure, which is

:50:16.:50:17.

overseeing an important part of that process. There is no such thing as

:50:18.:50:25.

failure. There is an unintended outcome, but there is no failure.

:50:26.:50:29.

That is interesting how the language, and Jonny were saying

:50:30.:50:33.

about excitement and enjoying it, I think the problem we have is that if

:50:34.:50:36.

you look at a five-year-old, when they do something well, they enjoy

:50:37.:50:41.

it, they vibrate with excitement. They are reinforcing the behaviour

:50:42.:50:46.

they want to repeat. As adults, we tend not to, we are Joe Cool when it

:50:47.:50:51.

goes right, but when something goes wrong, there is a whole song and

:50:52.:50:54.

dance and a tantrum that goes with it. So we are in fact reinforcing

:50:55.:51:01.

the very behaviour we don't want. So, if you like, I am trying to

:51:02.:51:06.

rekindle the five-year-old excitement in a way to reinforce

:51:07.:51:09.

behaviour want to repeat, and success and the ball going in the

:51:10.:51:13.

right place or the putt going in the hole, or the drive going down the

:51:14.:51:16.

centre of the fairway, or whatever it is. You should enjoy it. And we

:51:17.:51:22.

tend not to. I think we have lost enjoyment. So it is almost stripping

:51:23.:51:26.

away that social conditioning, worrying about what people think and

:51:27.:51:30.

being in the moment? I was going to say about the failure thing as well,

:51:31.:51:34.

now if I have a failure in my life, I love it, because if everything

:51:35.:51:38.

turns out as you expect, you cannot grow. If this interview you are

:51:39.:51:44.

doing now, if I say every single word, and I gave you a vision of how

:51:45.:51:47.

ever thing would turn outcome you might say that relieves my fear, but

:51:48.:51:51.

after two days you would say I don't want to do this job any more. I need

:51:52.:51:55.

that buzz that comes from not knowing. When you can get excited

:51:56.:51:58.

about the unknown, you get confidence will stop that whole

:51:59.:52:01.

point of the fear of failure is I wanted, I wanted, I want everything

:52:02.:52:08.

that, the social side of it is that when you have confidence about the

:52:09.:52:12.

unknown, there is no you to battle with Kamui just flow because the

:52:13.:52:15.

world is unknown, you are unknown, the two things flow together. When

:52:16.:52:19.

you have a known and an unknown, you have a big old fight and that is the

:52:20.:52:23.

story of rugby and any sport. Most guys want to know how it turns out

:52:24.:52:27.

before they play, and that is the feeling everyone talks about being

:52:28.:52:30.

unable to work it out and deal with the fear. We have a question which I

:52:31.:52:38.

can give you, from Wayne, who is on Twitter. He says he would like to

:52:39.:52:41.

know if Jonny and Dave believes the theory that some stress is a good

:52:42.:52:50.

thing? If stress can be turned into excitement about the actual bars of

:52:51.:52:52.

achieving something you have never done before. Then, wow, you know, go

:52:53.:53:00.

for it. I liken it a little bit too if I was to teach you to do a

:53:01.:53:05.

standing long jump. Kicks, now a standing long jump! LAUGHTER

:53:06.:53:11.

Busy day. You would have to slightly change your shoes, and you clear,

:53:12.:53:15.

say, six feet on a carpet, and then I say right, there is a puddle six

:53:16.:53:19.

feet, there is not much of a challenge. But round the back there

:53:20.:53:23.

is a garage that is 12 feet off the ground and a gap that is six foot

:53:24.:53:27.

and I ask you to jump that, and you say, hang on a minute. And then I

:53:28.:53:32.

reinforce the process over and over again, and you jump it, the rush you

:53:33.:53:38.

will get from actually defeating what could have been a disastrous

:53:39.:53:42.

outcome is fantastic, and that's what you live for. I know what I

:53:43.:53:48.

doing after the show today then! Yes. What I like about what they've

:53:49.:53:52.

is saying as well is if there is energy there, you can use it to go

:53:53.:53:57.

somewhere. You can't do anything without energy and drive. If you

:53:58.:54:00.

don't like something, or you really like it or you really don't like it,

:54:01.:54:04.

either way you've got energy there. It's the bit in the middle that is

:54:05.:54:08.

impossible to do anything with. If you have the person that is not

:54:09.:54:11.

really bothered, that you can't shift, but in understanding

:54:12.:54:16.

something with my hate to say much, that energy, that energy is your

:54:17.:54:22.

route, to do what you want with. It doesn't have to be stress. Stress is

:54:23.:54:29.

friction. If it is just you and acceptance, there is a lot of flow

:54:30.:54:33.

there. It is very interesting, in your book you talk about the fact

:54:34.:54:37.

everyone is different and deals with situations differently. Some

:54:38.:54:40.

athletes, sports men and women you have worked with need, almost

:54:41.:54:44.

thrive, on that feeling of fear and stress. You talk about someone you

:54:45.:54:49.

work with would always throw up before playing. I know who that is!

:54:50.:54:57.

Yeah, but that's really just... The irony of it is if I went into the

:54:58.:55:00.

loo with him and said OK, don't worry, you don't have to play, I

:55:01.:55:05.

would probably get belted. You see, so what it is, it is an exciting and

:55:06.:55:10.

excitement. If you look at anxiety and the physiological impact of

:55:11.:55:16.

anxiety, it is not far off massive excitement, and it is just switching

:55:17.:55:23.

that. That is the key. I think that people when they say I'm nervous, my

:55:24.:55:28.

reaction straightaway is that is awesome. That means we are really

:55:29.:55:35.

going to go well today. At weekend, for whatever reason, think that

:55:36.:55:39.

nervousness and anxiety is a prerequisite to failure. We talk so

:55:40.:55:43.

much about anxiety now. Loo macro very much so. We have another

:55:44.:55:48.

comment coming in, Sally on twitter says loving this interview, so

:55:49.:55:51.

motivating and inspiring. There you go. People also want to know what is

:55:52.:56:02.

going on with you at the moment, and also your thoughts on commit has

:56:03.:56:06.

been a fantastic summer for women's sport, and the Lionesses are taking

:56:07.:56:09.

part in the semifinal in the Netherlands tonight. England women

:56:10.:56:14.

cricket team and Wimbledon. What are your thoughts on the RFU's decision

:56:15.:56:19.

not to give the England women 15 side players a new contract? We were

:56:20.:56:25.

talking about this, Dave and I about something else, not necessarily

:56:26.:56:29.

this, and saying that, and this is an interesting way of looking at it,

:56:30.:56:32.

when you asked me what we are up to at the moment, my drive is very much

:56:33.:56:36.

in deeper, deeper mental health journey that goes even beyond that.

:56:37.:56:41.

One of the things you can get caught out on, as soon as you think you

:56:42.:56:46.

know something, the error is compounded, and everything you say

:56:47.:56:49.

or do from that moment, the assumption of you think you know

:56:50.:56:52.

something. From that moment, everything you go down is an Louisa

:56:53.:56:56.

Reeve journey. It is better to start with I don't know, my first answer

:56:57.:57:02.

is I don't know what is going on with that agreement, I don't know

:57:03.:57:05.

what the people feel about it. If I am to make any assumption, whatever

:57:06.:57:10.

I say afterwards will be imaginary. I know this is getting away from the

:57:11.:57:14.

question, but when you start living in an imaginary world can you live

:57:15.:57:18.

your life irrelevantly. I know it is great to have opinions on things but

:57:19.:57:22.

actually freedom comes from saying you know what, I don't know, I don't

:57:23.:57:25.

know what I think about it. Mostly because I have no idea what is going

:57:26.:57:29.

on. I am not in that space. We would love everybody to have everyone the

:57:30.:57:33.

opportunity to do what they want, but there are people out there with

:57:34.:57:36.

budgets and decisions that I do know about. In that respect I would love

:57:37.:57:41.

to have that comment for you but I don't. OK. And we are out of time

:57:42.:57:48.

anyway. Jonny, David, thank you for coming in. Coming up, should foster

:57:49.:57:53.

carers get the same implement rights as other council employees? We will

:57:54.:57:57.

be debating the issue after 10am this morning. Now the latest weather

:57:58.:58:03.

with Carol. It has been very hot across parts of Europe of late.

:58:04.:58:08.

Yesterday's top temperatures, 44 in Sardinia, 43 in Rome for example.

:58:09.:58:13.

There is a red heat warning out across Sardinia, parts of Italy, the

:58:14.:58:17.

Brooklands and south Poland, also looking at high humidity. That kind

:58:18.:58:23.

of weather is life-threatening. Closer to home, sunshine and

:58:24.:58:26.

showers, some heavy, possibly than three with hail across Northern

:58:27.:58:29.

Ireland, Scotland and northern Ireland. Further south, it will

:58:30.:58:33.

rattle through quite quickly on a brisk wind across England and Wales.

:58:34.:58:39.

Here you are not likely to be as heavy or as frequent. Through the

:58:40.:58:43.

course of this morning, we continue with that combination of sunshine

:58:44.:58:46.

and showers, the heaviest, some slow-moving ones across Scotland,

:58:47.:58:49.

and pretty slow moving across northern England and Northern

:58:50.:58:51.

Ireland. Whipping through on that win. In England and Wales, you will

:58:52.:58:56.

find you will have sunshine, you might see a shower and then the

:58:57.:58:58.

sunshine will come back quite quickly. The Northern Ireland and

:58:59.:59:04.

Scotland, looking at that mixture of sunshine and showers, this morning's

:59:05.:59:08.

rain continuing to drift further north and the northern England again

:59:09.:59:11.

we are looking at some heavy showers. We won't all see one but if

:59:12.:59:14.

you catch one it will be slow-moving. South through the

:59:15.:59:18.

Midlands, East Anglia, Essex and Kent, down to the Isle of Wight, in

:59:19.:59:24.

south-west England and Wales, the showers will be fewer and further

:59:25.:59:27.

between, not as heavy, some dry weather and some sunny spells.

:59:28.:59:30.

Through this evening and overnight, we hang the windy conditions. A lot

:59:31.:59:35.

of dry weather but showers whipping in from the Western wind, and the

:59:36.:59:39.

rain across northern England comes south across much of the rest of

:59:40.:59:43.

Scotland. It is not going to be a cold night, temperatures 13 to 15

:59:44.:59:47.

Celsius. Tomorrow we start off with that rain in Scotland, but through

:59:48.:59:51.

the day it will turn more showery in nature, still quite brisk winds in

:59:52.:59:56.

the North, showers coming into Northern Ireland, northern England

:59:57.:00:00.

as well. Fewer showers for England and Wales, a lot of sunshine, a lot

:00:01.:00:04.

of tri- weather, and if you get into the sunshine, out of the win, a high

:00:05.:00:09.

of 24 will feel quite pleasant. As we had from Friday into Saturday, a

:00:10.:00:12.

little ridge of high-pressure moves in but still quite windy across the

:00:13.:00:16.

north, so the showers coming in with that win. A quick look at Saturday's

:00:17.:00:22.

forecast, the showers coming in, there will be showers across England

:00:23.:00:25.

and Wales, this looks perhaps a bit worse than it will be, but in

:00:26.:00:29.

between there will be some sunshine, high is up to 21 and the Sunday a

:00:30.:00:32.

lot of dry weather. Hello, it's Thursday,

:00:33.:00:37.

it's ten o'clock, I'm Tina Daheley One of the UK's major courier

:00:38.:00:47.

companies tells us what they are doing to protect their staff from

:00:48.:00:51.

acid attacks, as figures show the problem is on the rise...

:00:52.:00:53.

I was just knocking on the window of a few cars, I was just

:00:54.:00:58.

They're not opening because probably they were scared.

:00:59.:01:01.

I was really scared, I don't know what to do.

:01:02.:01:03.

We will show you the full report in a few minutes.

:01:04.:01:09.

Rugby legend Jonny Wilkinson tells this programme

:01:10.:01:11.

how his coach changed his life, both on and off the pitch.

:01:12.:01:15.

What Dave did for me, at that point, he opened my eyes to space, space

:01:16.:01:25.

for improvement and space to move and to grow. That space, I'm sure

:01:26.:01:31.

Dave will go on about it as well, is not out there, it is in you already.

:01:32.:01:36.

It just needs revealing. What you have uncovered is not your limits.

:01:37.:01:38.

You can see that full interview on our website.

:01:39.:01:42.

England's women are just one win away from the final of Euro 2017.

:01:43.:01:48.

They face the Netherlands in the semifinal tonight.

:01:49.:01:53.

But does the female sport get the coverage it deserves?

:01:54.:01:58.

Here's Ben in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of todays news.

:01:59.:02:06.

Some mental health patients are waiting three years to be

:02:07.:02:12.

discharged from hospital, despite being medically

:02:13.:02:13.

Figures, obtained by the BBC through freedom of information

:02:14.:02:17.

requests, show that at least five patients waited more

:02:18.:02:19.

Meanwhile, hundreds more have been waiting for more than six months.

:02:20.:02:24.

Children from the very poorest families in some parts of England

:02:25.:02:27.

are continuing to fall further behind at school.

:02:28.:02:31.

The Education Policy Institute says by the end of secondary school,

:02:32.:02:34.

the most disadvantaged children can be two years behind their peers.

:02:35.:02:38.

The government says it's directing an extra 72-million-pounds

:02:39.:02:40.

The Venezuelan President, Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed

:02:41.:02:49.

allegations of fraud in the country's controversial

:02:50.:02:50.

A company based in London responsible for providing

:02:51.:02:55.

the voting system - has claimed electoral authorities

:02:56.:02:58.

inflated the turn-out figure by at least 1 million.

:02:59.:03:00.

The opposition has called for more mass demonstrations.

:03:01.:03:06.

A cot death charity has said that it will no longer endorse the use

:03:07.:03:10.

of Finnish-style baby boxes, designed for newborns to sleep in.

:03:11.:03:12.

The cardboard box - filled with baby products and a mattress -

:03:13.:03:15.

has been connected with low infant mortality rates in

:03:16.:03:17.

They're now given out to some new parents through the NHS,

:03:18.:03:23.

but the Lullaby Trust warns there is no evidence

:03:24.:03:25.

that they reduce the likelihood of sudden infant death syndrome.

:03:26.:03:34.

Residents of a North London tower block have told the BBC that urgent

:03:35.:03:37.

safety work carried out in the wake of the Grenfell Tower disaster

:03:38.:03:40.

People living on the Chalcots Estate in Camden were among about 3000

:03:41.:03:45.

people who were told to leave their homes,

:03:46.:03:48.

with only a few hours notice, six weeks ago.

:03:49.:03:52.

The work was carried out by Camden Council,

:03:53.:03:55.

which has told the BBC it's now been signed off by Building Control

:03:56.:03:58.

The food delivery company Deliveroo has told this programme it's

:03:59.:04:05.

bringing in new safety measures to protect drivers from attacks.

:04:06.:04:10.

It follows a wave of moped crime in London and horrific acid attacks

:04:11.:04:14.

where delivery drivers have been victims.

:04:15.:04:16.

Around 450 acid attacks were recorded by police

:04:17.:04:18.

The company says it's to introduce measures including the ability

:04:19.:04:24.

for drivers to report unsafe areas and trialling the use

:04:25.:04:27.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10.30.

:04:28.:04:38.

Do get in touch with us throughout the morning -

:04:39.:04:43.

use the hashtag Victoria live and if you text, you will be charged

:04:44.:04:46.

The big rematch between Anthony Joshua and Wladimir Klitschko

:04:47.:04:53.

will not go ahead after the former heavyweight world champion

:04:54.:04:55.

We had been waiting for confirmation of another fight between the two

:04:56.:05:03.

in Las Vegas in November but the 41-year-old has

:05:04.:05:05.

decided to hang up his gloves after 27 years.

:05:06.:05:07.

As an amateur he won gold at the Atlanta Olympics

:05:08.:05:10.

in 1996 before becoming the World Heavyweight Champion

:05:11.:05:11.

He's thanked his team, family and fans for their support.

:05:12.:05:21.

Brazilian striker Neymar is set to earn three quarters of a million

:05:22.:05:24.

pounds a week when he completes a world record move from Barcelona

:05:25.:05:27.

to Paris St-Germain for just under 200 million pounds.

:05:28.:05:33.

It would make him the world's most expensive player with extras

:05:34.:05:36.

from sponsorships as well but there's one person

:05:37.:05:38.

who doesn't think the price tag is too expensive.

:05:39.:05:44.

For 200 million, I do not think he is expensive. I think the fact that

:05:45.:05:56.

you will have more players at 100 million, and you will have more

:05:57.:06:01.

players of 80 million, and more players of 60 million... And, I

:06:02.:06:05.

think that is the problem. Because, Neymar is one of the best players in

:06:06.:06:07.

the world. It's a story that's being talked

:06:08.:06:07.

about all over the world So in France the big headline

:06:08.:06:10.

there is HE ARRIVES. in Barcelona it's Hasta Nunca -

:06:11.:06:15.

which basically means SEE Deportivo is looking at how Barca

:06:16.:06:19.

could spend their little nest egg with Liverpool forward

:06:20.:06:31.

Phillipe Coutinho high on their list - although the Reds boss

:06:32.:06:33.

Jurgen Klopp says Coutinho isn't leaving Anfield this summer -

:06:34.:06:35.

even if the Catalan side came in with an offer in the region

:06:36.:06:38.

of 100 million pounds. It's the women's Euro 2017

:06:39.:06:42.

semi-finals tonight England are taking on hosts,

:06:43.:06:45.

the Netherlands. Karen Bardsley - she's out

:06:46.:06:49.

because of injury replaced by Siobhan Chamberlain and they're

:06:50.:06:55.

also without midfielder Jill Scott. But England are still

:06:56.:07:00.

the highest-ranked team And their record is pretty good -

:07:01.:07:01.

they've won all four games so far, They'll be looking to go one

:07:02.:07:06.

better than two years ago where they were knocked out

:07:07.:07:10.

in the semi-finals of the World Cup. I've been around some good sports

:07:11.:07:20.

people, but these players now, they work as hard as anyone I have ever

:07:21.:07:24.

worked with or seen. They are absolutely obsessed with being the

:07:25.:07:28.

best they can be. Now they have those two skills in abundance, the

:07:29.:07:29.

sky is the limit for this group. That's all for now Tina -

:07:30.:07:31.

more from us at 10:30. Lear, thank you. Let me read some

:07:32.:07:40.

comments coming in to do with our interview with Jonny Wilkinson. And

:07:41.:07:45.

his elite performance coach. Dave on Twitter says that Wilkinson is such

:07:46.:07:50.

a role model and a top speech by the coach too. Someone else says it is

:07:51.:07:55.

fascinating with Johnny and his coach, not failure but unexpected

:07:56.:07:59.

consequence. You need passion and excitement. Matt Cassidy says Jonny

:08:00.:08:02.

Wilkinson and his coach Dave talking so much sense about mental health

:08:03.:08:09.

and how to handle anxiety. Great advice. And "Focus on the things you

:08:10.:08:16.

can do and do it better, rather than the things you can't". And Jackson

:08:17.:08:21.

Moody says, great interview with Jonny Wilkinson on the importance of

:08:22.:08:27.

training within a zone of pressure, and mistakes, progress of process.

:08:28.:08:30.

Thank you very much, keep those coming in.

:08:31.:08:32.

The food delivery company Deliveroo has told this programme it's

:08:33.:08:34.

bringing in new safety measures to protect drivers from attacks.

:08:35.:08:37.

It follows a wave of moped crime that's hit London and horrific acid

:08:38.:08:40.

attacks where delivery drivers have been victims.

:08:41.:08:41.

Around 450 acid attacks were recorded by police

:08:42.:08:43.

It comes as the Royal College of Emergency Medicine warns

:08:44.:08:51.

corrosive liquids are fast replacing knives as the weapon of choice

:08:52.:08:54.

for criminals and there needs to be more awareness about how

:08:55.:08:57.

Catrin Nye has this exclusive report.

:08:58.:09:08.

London is currently in the midst of a moped crimewave.

:09:09.:09:17.

Three weeks ago, Deliveroo driver Jabed Hussain was the first victim

:09:18.:09:20.

in a series of five acid attacks in 90 minutes in north-east London.

:09:21.:09:25.

I was just knocking on the windows of a few cars,

:09:26.:09:32.

They're not opening because probably they were scared.

:09:33.:09:35.

Just running on the street like a crazy.

:09:36.:09:43.

In the last year, the Met Police recorded more than 16,000 incidents

:09:44.:09:48.

involving motorised two wheeled vehicles, compared with

:09:49.:09:53.

Deliveroo says since the acid attacks more than 70 drivers have

:09:54.:10:00.

said they don't want to finish an order because of safety fears.

:10:01.:10:05.

And seven drivers have said they don't want

:10:06.:10:07.

So the company is adding new features.

:10:08.:10:13.

After I mark delivered, I get the opportunity to give

:10:14.:10:15.

feedback to the network as to whether the delivery

:10:16.:10:17.

So if I've had an incident where I've been concerned for my safety,

:10:18.:10:22.

And I would choose the option here, safety concerns.

:10:23.:10:28.

This is new. The safety concerns is new.

:10:29.:10:31.

And is that a direct response to the acid attacks

:10:32.:10:33.

So we have had delivery feedback for a few weeks now,

:10:34.:10:41.

so prior to the terrible attacks, but adding safety concerns

:10:42.:10:45.

as an explicit option is a response to those incidents.

:10:46.:10:49.

As well as that feature in the app, the company are employing

:10:50.:10:52.

new specialist safety staff, and will trial helmet

:10:53.:10:54.

mounted cameras for drivers in the London Borough of Hackney,

:10:55.:10:57.

so they can hand footage directly to the police.

:10:58.:10:59.

Hackney now has a reputation as a trouble spot.

:11:00.:11:06.

Riders across the country need to have the right channels

:11:07.:11:08.

so they can communicate any kind of issues through.

:11:09.:11:12.

And currently, we have those in the form of the app,

:11:13.:11:15.

so they can communicate on an order if they have any kind of issue.

:11:16.:11:18.

And that is really important for us, but also I think it's

:11:19.:11:21.

These cameras are just being trialled in Hackney, why just there?

:11:22.:11:25.

Any new technology, you need to test.

:11:26.:11:28.

You need to make sure it does the things it's meant to do.

:11:29.:11:31.

If it does, then absolutely, will take this across the country.

:11:32.:11:37.

Deliveroo drivers are all self-employed, so not entitled

:11:38.:11:39.

They also all use their own bikes and mopeds to deliver.

:11:40.:11:45.

Do you feel guilty at all that they are putting themselves at risk,

:11:46.:11:48.

but they don't get sick pay, they don't get repairs

:11:49.:11:55.

As I said before, the safety of our riders is the most

:11:56.:11:59.

important thing to us, and it is our responsibility

:12:00.:12:01.

as a company to step up our efforts, so they can feel safe on the road

:12:02.:12:05.

For Jabed, the fear of being attacked again means

:12:06.:12:08.

he now won't work after 10 o'clock at night.

:12:09.:12:10.

And he says other drivers are doing the same.

:12:11.:12:16.

Jabed - who you heard from in that film - is here now.

:12:17.:12:23.

And as we were hearing, Jabed had acid thrown on him in the spate

:12:24.:12:26.

of attacks three weeks ago, as he was riding home

:12:27.:12:28.

And in a moment we'll speak to Dr Jessica Payne

:12:29.:12:32.

from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine -

:12:33.:12:35.

it's warning today that the public should be taught how to give first

:12:36.:12:38.

Thank you so much for coming in, Jabed. It is an ongoing

:12:39.:12:48.

investigation, we cannot talk about the details of what happened but how

:12:49.:12:52.

have you been coping since it happened? Well, since the incident

:12:53.:12:58.

happened, I am really scared to go out by myself, and with my family as

:12:59.:13:07.

well. I feel unsafe, I always lock my car doors and windows. If I see

:13:08.:13:14.

something going past, I get scared. I feel like something maybe will

:13:15.:13:19.

happen again. Can you imagine going back to work at any point in the

:13:20.:13:24.

near future? Yes, I love my job, I love what I'm doing because it is

:13:25.:13:29.

flexible. As I said, I love my job and I want to go back. But, there

:13:30.:13:34.

are safety concerns. It is not safe, for me. I do not think I'm going to

:13:35.:13:43.

be back until it is safe. Until this happened, did you ever have fears

:13:44.:13:47.

for your safety? I understand you've done this job for five years? Four

:13:48.:13:53.

or five years. Until this happened, did you have concerns before? No, I

:13:54.:13:57.

was free to work anywhere I used to go. From one o'clock, 12 o'clock, it

:13:58.:14:01.

did not matter. I would go everywhere. I did not have problems

:14:02.:14:05.

before. I never struggled like that before. Recently, even with the bike

:14:06.:14:16.

crimes, it goes over the limit now. So, we want to speak to the mayor

:14:17.:14:23.

and spoke to local mayors, like John Wicks of Tower Hamlets. He told us

:14:24.:14:31.

to speak to the police. It is going over the limit now. We did not get

:14:32.:14:40.

any results. What do you think should be done? Well, we need to

:14:41.:14:43.

start at the bottom. If you think, we are going to arrest them, and

:14:44.:14:46.

then you've released them, what is the point? If they are released

:14:47.:14:55.

without charge. We need to get a proper law for that. They should be

:14:56.:15:01.

in prison. So, tougher penalties? Doctor Payne, what is your response

:15:02.:15:06.

to the recent rise in so-called acid attacks? I suppose there is a

:15:07.:15:09.

professional and personal response. I live and work in north-east

:15:10.:15:13.

London, so I share the concerns of the community that I work for. I

:15:14.:15:17.

lock my doors on the way home and roll up my windows now. From a

:15:18.:15:21.

professional point of view, I think it is important that we try and

:15:22.:15:28.

disseminate the knowledge of how to manage these attacks, if you see

:15:29.:15:32.

them on the streets. And, we wrote an article published in the British

:15:33.:15:35.

medical Journal, to increase awareness among the medical

:15:36.:15:38.

community of the increase and frequency of which we see these

:15:39.:15:42.

attacks at the moment. And we are hearing about, it was commented on

:15:43.:15:48.

today, is the fact that we hear about these incidents more, is that

:15:49.:15:53.

part of the problem in terms of triggering copycat incidents? I do

:15:54.:15:57.

not think so. I think that actually having more awareness of these

:15:58.:15:59.

attacks is a good thing. It means that the public have a heightened

:16:00.:16:05.

awareness of what to do if they were to witness something like this. And

:16:06.:16:10.

I think these attacks have been happening for the last six months,

:16:11.:16:15.

and increasingly so. So it is probably just now that we are seeing

:16:16.:16:16.

this coming through in the press. What should people do? Firstly call

:16:17.:16:33.

909, make sure it is safer you to approach. Be aware that you need to

:16:34.:16:41.

protect yourself -- call 999. Avoid getting the corrosive substance on

:16:42.:16:44.

your hands or yourself, encourage the person who is going to be in

:16:45.:16:49.

pain and distressed to take off any items of clothing that might be

:16:50.:16:53.

contaminated or jury that might be contaminated, and tried to irrigate,

:16:54.:16:57.

wash, the areas affected with as much water as possible. That could

:16:58.:17:02.

be a shower, it could be bottled water, for as long as possible until

:17:03.:17:06.

it takes the emergency services to arrive. Thank you so much for coming

:17:07.:17:08.

in to us. UberEats told us: "Couriers can log

:17:09.:17:11.

in when and where they want, they are under no obligation

:17:12.:17:14.

at all to deliver in an area "The safety of the couriers that

:17:15.:17:17.

have signed up to UberEATS is our top priority and we don't

:17:18.:17:21.

want anyone to feel unsafe That's one of the reasons

:17:22.:17:24.

we don't set shifts or zones for them to operate in" On blocking:

:17:25.:17:27.

"If you don't accept three requesst the system thinks you're taking

:17:28.:17:31.

a break, so can log you off - but couriers just

:17:32.:17:34.

need to log in again. There is no blocking

:17:35.:17:36.

or anything like that." Still to come, do baby boxes

:17:37.:17:53.

contribute to cot death? Should foster carers get

:17:54.:17:59.

the same employment rights A couple in Glasgow who have been

:18:00.:18:01.

working as foster carers for six years have won the right to be

:18:02.:18:05.

classed as employees Their skills are very specialised -

:18:06.:18:08.

and the judgment would not apply However, it does raise the question

:18:09.:18:12.

about the nature of the work that foster carers do and the rights

:18:13.:18:22.

they should be entitled to. We can speak now to Jimmy Johnstone

:18:23.:18:29.

- the foster carer in Glasgow Also here is Jenny Poultney

:18:30.:18:32.

who was in foster care And Andy Elvin - the chief

:18:33.:18:36.

executive of the Adolescent Why did you decide to take the

:18:37.:18:53.

action in the first place? We did not decide to take action, it was

:18:54.:18:57.

Jimmy. He felt in his particular situation that he was an employee,

:18:58.:19:01.

and having looked at the case I would agree with him, in his

:19:02.:19:06.

particular situation, he was an employee. The council had advertised

:19:07.:19:09.

the foster care is to join into the sea man had advertised a salary, and

:19:10.:19:13.

as soon as you say that, you are in tune in their is an

:19:14.:19:15.

employer-employee relationship but what he was doing was a very

:19:16.:19:19.

specialised programme for particularly young people and a very

:19:20.:19:22.

successful programme hopefully but that is not what foster care

:19:23.:19:26.

generally is. Foster care generally is not being involved in that kind

:19:27.:19:30.

of specialist activity, it is looking after vulnerable children.

:19:31.:19:33.

And there is an issue with employment rights, because the

:19:34.:19:36.

self-employment status is important to a lot of foster carers, they are

:19:37.:19:40.

independent of the agency they work for. They can say no to a placement

:19:41.:19:45.

if they think it is not right for them or their child. As an employee

:19:46.:19:50.

you have much less right to say no to a reasonable request from your

:19:51.:19:52.

manager and the resources something magical about foster care that is

:19:53.:19:55.

lost if young people think that the person looking after them is looking

:19:56.:19:59.

after them because it is their job. If they then have paid holiday, what

:20:00.:20:03.

are they having holiday from, me, the child. It is not something you

:20:04.:20:09.

want to have the say to young people. We do not value people who

:20:10.:20:15.

care enough, and allowances for foster carers, and this is the

:20:16.:20:19.

allowance to cover the costs of raising a child in your house, often

:20:20.:20:23.

they are not high enough. The feed to pay for the expertise of the

:20:24.:20:27.

foster carer is often not at the right level, particularly as minimum

:20:28.:20:29.

wage goes up this will be increasingly an issue. But those

:20:30.:20:36.

things can all be sold without going into an employer-employee

:20:37.:20:38.

relationship, which I think would destroy something magical and unique

:20:39.:20:44.

about foster care. Let's here from Jimmy, why did you bring about this

:20:45.:20:48.

case in the first place, why did you want to be an employee? Hello,

:20:49.:20:53.

thanks Andy for saying some of the nice things you said. About foster

:20:54.:21:07.

care. It was because a virginity of care as a workforce.

:21:08.:21:27.

We complained, ask for support and ultimately we were victimised and

:21:28.:21:33.

harassed. We had no other direction to go. We took legal action, that is

:21:34.:21:42.

why this came about. For people who don't know, how is your job as a

:21:43.:21:45.

foster carer, both of your jobs, how is that different to most other

:21:46.:21:52.

foster carers? We have been in a treatment foster care work. As Andy

:21:53.:21:57.

says, we do get a salary, that is what is different. Fundamentally

:21:58.:22:03.

there is no difference. In the judgment that our tribunal has

:22:04.:22:11.

stated, the judge has stated the level of control over us as foster

:22:12.:22:17.

carers, and that is a fundamental, that is part of being a foster

:22:18.:22:22.

carer. So although we have a salary, we have holidays, that is slightly

:22:23.:22:27.

different but fundamentally we are just foster carers, same as any

:22:28.:22:31.

other foster carer. I want to bring Jenny into the conversation, good

:22:32.:22:35.

morning. Morning. Can you tell us about your experience of growing up

:22:36.:22:42.

with foster parents? I've had good experiences and bad experiences,

:22:43.:22:50.

mostly good. I think I was fortunate enough to find the right path, that

:22:51.:22:54.

unfortunately some of my own siblings haven't had the same

:22:55.:23:00.

opportunities that I have had. That the same time, when you are a job in

:23:01.:23:07.

that situation, being seen in that position as a job is not

:23:08.:23:11.

appropriate. Why not? Because you feel like a job. You go into care

:23:12.:23:17.

and you want to fit income you want to be part of a family. To be seen

:23:18.:23:22.

as a job causes emotional difficulties. Do you think that

:23:23.:23:28.

people who go into foster care, some people are motivated then by money,

:23:29.:23:32.

and that's bad, and has that been your experience? Not so much my

:23:33.:23:40.

experience but I have seen that within my own family. I believe you

:23:41.:23:48.

take on a child, you want to have them brought up the way he would

:23:49.:23:52.

bring your own kids up, but when you are so obviously treated

:23:53.:23:55.

differently, it has an impact. It has an impact on the child, as to

:23:56.:24:04.

how they are brought up, what part they take. Jimmy, do you understand

:24:05.:24:09.

the point there could be for other people a danger of it becoming a job

:24:10.:24:15.

if you become an employee, or if foster carers become employees? It

:24:16.:24:25.

is more than a job. Howdy respond to Jenny's comments? I am sorry that

:24:26.:24:27.

you have found some of these things you are not happy with. Foster care

:24:28.:24:36.

work is the same type of work as residential care work. You have

:24:37.:24:40.

young people in residential homes, and they are in care. Foster care

:24:41.:24:46.

workers are doing a job just as anyone else in this country. The

:24:47.:24:52.

fundamental problem is they don't have any rights. This leads to a

:24:53.:24:57.

chronic shortage of foster care in the UK. You have to ask yourself

:24:58.:25:05.

why. It is part of these rights. It is a 24-7 job, isn't that the point

:25:06.:25:09.

com you don't just clock off at a certain time, which I'm sure you

:25:10.:25:12.

don't, but that is the difference? That is the difference but of the

:25:13.:25:18.

day it is a job. To help us do our job better, and if we had rights to

:25:19.:25:26.

represent ourselves, and the money issue, that is a side issue, this is

:25:27.:25:31.

a bit duty of care towards a set of workers. You have people leaving

:25:32.:25:36.

foster care work because they have had enough, they are not supported,

:25:37.:25:40.

they have not got access to anything, they are not respected.

:25:41.:25:45.

Things are changing. 20, 30 years ago, providing a bed for a young

:25:46.:25:55.

person, these things have changed. We are a highly skilled workforce,

:25:56.:25:58.

we have to gain professional qualifications, that is

:25:59.:26:07.

across-the-board. Things have changed now, we need help to carry

:26:08.:26:11.

out this job. There is a chronic shortage of foster care workers and

:26:12.:26:17.

you have to ask why. Thank you for now. Andy, can you see why foster

:26:18.:26:22.

carers need support and they need to have rights, sometimes the same

:26:23.:26:24.

rights employees would have elsewhere? Absolutely, I just want

:26:25.:26:29.

to correct if you things, there isn't a chronic shortage of foster

:26:30.:26:32.

carers who stopped there is a shortage of foster carers for

:26:33.:26:37.

particular groups of children, for teenagers, 13 and 14 euros coming

:26:38.:26:42.

into care. We need the sibling groups, and for parent and child

:26:43.:26:45.

placements where the parent is placed with a young baby in a foster

:26:46.:26:47.

care placement but generally there is not a chronic shortage of foster

:26:48.:26:52.

carers. Foster carers are heroes of the state, they do an astonishing

:26:53.:26:58.

piece of work, an astonishing role for young people, they transform

:26:59.:27:07.

young people. They work on shifts. You are replicating general

:27:08.:27:09.

population families, you go on holiday with your foster children,

:27:10.:27:12.

you involve your foster children in the things you do as a family and

:27:13.:27:16.

that is the most important thing to foster children, they feel part of

:27:17.:27:19.

something, they feel valued, cared for and loved. Having an employment

:27:20.:27:25.

employer relationship is very dangerous, because we might kill

:27:26.:27:29.

what is magical about foster care, and foster carers are independent,

:27:30.:27:33.

they can refuse placements when they are not employed. They can push back

:27:34.:27:37.

against social workers and their fostering agency because they are

:27:38.:27:40.

independent of us. There are mechanisms to our own agencies for

:27:41.:27:45.

them to protest about actions towards them, if they work for the

:27:46.:27:49.

local authority, they can work to a local authority, they can go through

:27:50.:27:51.

the local authority complaints process the same as anyone else.

:27:52.:27:57.

These things can be done. Yes, this is absolutely right that support for

:27:58.:28:00.

foster carers is not good enough in some places, training and support

:28:01.:28:05.

needs to be better. Our allowances high enough, generally no. They need

:28:06.:28:09.

to be higher. I just want to read out one comment that has come on

:28:10.:28:14.

from Ashley on twitter. He says fostering should not be a job, it

:28:15.:28:18.

should be a way of life. You don't put your own child in the respite to

:28:19.:28:23.

go on holiday, so a similar one to the point you made. A spokesman for

:28:24.:28:28.

Glasgow City Council, we can give you now.

:28:29.:28:33.

Of This Decision And It Would Be Inappropriate To Comment On This

:28:34.:28:37.

"However, We Do Note That The Employment Judge Has

:28:38.:28:40.

Explicitly Made Clear That His Findings In This Case

:28:41.:28:42.

Do Not Extend To The Status Of Mainstream Foster Carers."

:28:43.:28:47.

If you're flying to Europe in the next few weeks then you're

:28:48.:28:49.

undoubtedly worried about reports of people queuing for

:28:50.:28:51.

hours passport control - and in some cases missing flights.

:28:52.:28:54.

Tighter security checks were brought in for those entering and leaving 26

:28:55.:28:57.

European countries because of recent terror attacks, with many holiday

:28:58.:28:59.

destination airports unprepared and under-staffed to cope

:29:00.:29:01.

with the greater scrutiny of passports and visas.

:29:02.:29:03.

And with more people travelling throughout August,

:29:04.:29:04.

Thomas Reynaert is Managing Director of 'Airlines for Europe' -

:29:05.:29:17.

a lobby group setup by Easyjet, Ryanair, British Airways

:29:18.:29:19.

A very good morning to you. Good morning, Tina. How bad is the

:29:20.:29:39.

situation? First of all, safety and security very important to us and

:29:40.:29:42.

our passengers, we do understand Mike governments are putting into

:29:43.:29:46.

place these measures again, just having them implemented properly.

:29:47.:29:51.

That is one thing. According to our latest report unfortunately it

:29:52.:29:54.

doesn't look like the situation is traumatically improving. We know

:29:55.:29:57.

that some of the national governments basically said they

:29:58.:30:01.

would put more staffing resources and other resources into improving

:30:02.:30:04.

the situation, but we haven't seen any dramatic changes unfortunately.

:30:05.:30:09.

This is the busiest week of the holiday season, can you talk to us

:30:10.:30:12.

about the impact it has had on flights and people who are trying to

:30:13.:30:18.

travel? First of all people having to queue much longer than expected,

:30:19.:30:23.

sometimes more than double. We have seen extreme cases in summer the

:30:24.:30:26.

airports of up to four hours queueing just to get through border

:30:27.:30:32.

control. Just because staffing wasn't there. That is one thing.

:30:33.:30:37.

People queueing a long time. I have seen hundreds of flights from

:30:38.:30:42.

airline members being delayed, with an average delay of 30 minutes. But

:30:43.:30:47.

you can see what kind of operation or disruption this is causing.

:30:48.:30:51.

Passengers are really annoyed because of this. How much influence

:30:52.:30:58.

can we have, can the government have, on the other countries that

:30:59.:31:02.

are worst affected? I know the aviation Minister has called up to

:31:03.:31:06.

say this is not good enough, can you speed this up, but actually how much

:31:07.:31:08.

influence the rehab? These discussions are ongoing among

:31:09.:31:17.

governments, the sad thing is, the governments involved knew this was

:31:18.:31:22.

going to happen for more than many months ago. Since the regulation has

:31:23.:31:26.

been officially put in place in April, member states have six months

:31:27.:31:30.

to implement it. Not even all of the member states have implemented the

:31:31.:31:35.

regulation which is worrying. Come October, when all member states are

:31:36.:31:39.

meant to implement this, we may see more trouble. So, the only thing

:31:40.:31:43.

member states can do is to make sure that, as they have committed to

:31:44.:31:48.

earlier this year, is to have the proper resources. I'm thinking

:31:49.:31:52.

mainly staffing resources but also technology and commitment resources

:31:53.:31:55.

for people for the immigration service to do their job properly.

:31:56.:32:00.

More resources are urgently needed, especially in holiday destinations,

:32:01.:32:06.

and we have a peek, as you say, this week. It will not be easier for

:32:07.:32:11.

people to travel due to these problems. It isn't going to get any

:32:12.:32:17.

better any time soon, then? What advice would you have for

:32:18.:32:21.

passengers? As you may have heard from travel agents so far, check

:32:22.:32:24.

with your airline if you want to be sure, but we have seen some airlines

:32:25.:32:28.

recommending people come three hours in advance to the airport, just to

:32:29.:32:31.

give you an idea. Thank you. With the news, here's Ben

:32:32.:32:34.

in the BBC Newsroom. Some mental health patients

:32:35.:32:37.

are waiting three years to be discharged from hospital,

:32:38.:32:42.

despite being medically Figures, obtained by the BBC

:32:43.:32:43.

through freedom of information requests, show that at least five

:32:44.:32:46.

patients waited more Meanwhile, hundreds more have been

:32:47.:32:48.

waiting for more than six months. Children from the very poorest

:32:49.:32:54.

families in some parts of England are continuing to fall further

:32:55.:32:57.

behind at school. The Education Policy Institute says

:32:58.:33:01.

by the end of secondary school, the most disadvantaged children can

:33:02.:33:04.

be two years behind their peers. The government says it's directing

:33:05.:33:07.

an extra 72-million-pounds The Venezuelan President,

:33:08.:33:09.

Nicolas Maduro, has dismissed allegations of fraud

:33:10.:33:19.

in the country's controversial A company based in London

:33:20.:33:21.

responsible for providing the voting system -

:33:22.:33:25.

has claimed electoral authorities inflated the turn-out figure

:33:26.:33:29.

by at least 1 million. The opposition has called for more

:33:30.:33:32.

mass demonstrations. Residents of a North London tower

:33:33.:33:39.

block have told the BBC that urgent safety work carried out in the wake

:33:40.:33:42.

of the Grenfell Tower disaster People living on the Chalcots Estate

:33:43.:33:45.

in Camden were among about 3000 people who were told

:33:46.:33:49.

to leave their homes, with only a few hours

:33:50.:33:51.

notice, six weeks ago. The work was carried

:33:52.:33:54.

out by Camden Council, which has told the BBC it's now been

:33:55.:33:57.

signed off by Building Control That's a summary of the news this

:33:58.:34:16.

morning, join me at 11 o'clock on the BBC News Channel.

:34:17.:34:19.

Some comments on foster carers, Claire says that foster carers do

:34:20.:34:24.

not clock on and clock off, it is a full-time job, 24/7, difficult but

:34:25.:34:28.

very rewarding. Another says they have been in foster care and each

:34:29.:34:31.

individual circumstances different so sometimes it could be considered

:34:32.:34:36.

a job, sometimes not. Thank you very much indeed. Time for a look at the

:34:37.:34:37.

sport with Leah. Former world heavyweight champion

:34:38.:34:41.

Wladimir Klitschko has It had been expected the 41-year-old

:34:42.:34:43.

would announce a re-match with Anthony Joshua -

:34:44.:34:46.

who beat him at Wembley in April He'll become the world's most

:34:47.:34:49.

expensive footballer when Neymar's expected

:34:50.:34:57.

to complete his transfer from Barcelona to Paris Saint Germain

:34:58.:34:59.

for just under 200 million pounds. He's likely to earn three quarters

:35:00.:35:03.

of a million pounds a week. We're less than 11 hours away now

:35:04.:35:06.

from England's Euro 2017 semi final Manager Mark Sampson

:35:07.:35:09.

says their mission isn't just to become the best team in Europe -

:35:10.:35:12.

but the best team in the world. James Forrest scored the only goal

:35:13.:35:17.

of the game to take Celtic into the play-off rounds

:35:18.:35:20.

of the Champions League. They won 1-0 against

:35:21.:35:22.

Rosenborg last night. The draw for the playoff

:35:23.:35:24.

round will take place tomorrow. That's all from us for now, back to

:35:25.:35:30.

you, Tina. Thank you, Leah. A cot death charity has raised

:35:31.:35:38.

concerns over the use of Finnish-style baby boxes,

:35:39.:35:41.

which babies can sleep in. Issuing new advice to parents,

:35:42.:35:43.

the Lullaby Trust said there was no evidence baby boxes reduced the rate

:35:44.:35:46.

of sudden infant death syndrome. The cardboard box, filled with baby

:35:47.:35:48.

products and a mattress, can itself be used as a bed,

:35:49.:35:51.

and has been given to new parents executive of the Lullaby Trust,

:35:52.:35:54.

by Francine Bates, the Chief who is a parent who used

:35:55.:36:09.

a baby box for her son. Welcome, why have you changed your

:36:10.:36:18.

advice? We haven't changed it, but we have issued new advice. Not

:36:19.:36:23.

necessarily with baby boxes, they have become very popular, there are

:36:24.:36:26.

a lot of companies selling them online and selling them in shops, as

:36:27.:36:32.

you have said. There are also NHS professionals giving them out to

:36:33.:36:37.

parents. Free of charge. Because they have become so popular, we

:36:38.:36:45.

felt, as the leading SIDS charity in the country, we should investigate,

:36:46.:36:48.

and see if the claims that they would reduce sudden infant death

:36:49.:36:53.

syndrome were correct or not. We do have concerns that some of the hype,

:36:54.:36:58.

if you like, surrounding baby boxes has become exaggerated so we wanted

:36:59.:37:02.

to put the record straight. Specifically, what are those

:37:03.:37:07.

concerns? That the company is promoting baby boxes say that this

:37:08.:37:10.

is a box used in Finland and in Finland, they have seen a

:37:11.:37:15.

significant drop in SIDS and infant mortality. It is true that Finland

:37:16.:37:19.

has a drop-in infant mortality, it has one of the best rates in the

:37:20.:37:22.

world but the Finnish government themselves have just tweeted

:37:23.:37:26.

recently and have stated that there are a multiplicity of factors as to

:37:27.:37:30.

why infant mortality is lower in Finland, and it isn't just to do

:37:31.:37:34.

with the box. The second issue is, there are no safety standards

:37:35.:37:39.

anywhere in the world that cover a cardboard box to place your baby to

:37:40.:37:44.

sleep in. We feel very strongly that if we are going to promote baby

:37:45.:37:49.

boxes, if they are to become popular, we should work with

:37:50.:37:53.

manufacturers and retailers to bring in a standard which specifically

:37:54.:37:57.

covers the cardboard box as a safety standard. Isn't it better than

:37:58.:38:02.

nothing, if you aren't using anything? We would certainly agree

:38:03.:38:06.

that using a cardboard box would be better than nothing at all, like

:38:07.:38:10.

putting your baby on a bean bag or sleeping on the sofa with your baby,

:38:11.:38:15.

which has a very high risk in relation to SIDS. Our advice still

:38:16.:38:19.

is that the best place to put your baby to sleep is a cot or a Moses

:38:20.:38:25.

basket, certainly at night, beside your bed for the first six months,

:38:26.:38:32.

in the same room. And what are your experiences of using a baby box? And

:38:33.:38:36.

your response to Francine's comments? Well, we got our box from

:38:37.:38:43.

Finland, it was brought in by my parents from Finland. We didn't use

:38:44.:38:49.

any English scheme, I cannot comment on those. We were very happy, it's

:38:50.:38:53.

the traditional thing to do back home. That is why we wanted it. Our

:38:54.:39:02.

son slept in it for the first five months, at night-time, for naps. The

:39:03.:39:07.

box was placed next to our bed, on my side, and I was able to reach for

:39:08.:39:13.

him, and feed him whenever he needed. We were quite happy with it.

:39:14.:39:20.

What Francine was saying, and all of the comments I have read online, I

:39:21.:39:27.

tend to agree. The box itself, I do not think would make any difference.

:39:28.:39:35.

It has to be looked at in context. As it was done in Finland, that was

:39:36.:39:41.

basically the way of getting people into antenatal care, in their 30s,

:39:42.:39:48.

when we start. It is not just the box, it is a lot of other things.

:39:49.:39:54.

And going back to Finland, like you were saying, the lowest infant

:39:55.:40:04.

mortality rates in the world, according to the UN, this box scheme

:40:05.:40:08.

will be rolled out for all newborns across Scotland, and some areas in

:40:09.:40:12.

England give out the boxes, does it worry you? The Scottish Government

:40:13.:40:15.

decided to roll out their box programme. We do not cover Scotland,

:40:16.:40:22.

we are not involved in the programme. I understand the box that

:40:23.:40:26.

they will be using is of very high quality. But, what we are concerned

:40:27.:40:34.

about is that parents are not bamboozled by too much slick

:40:35.:40:38.

marketing. I completely agree that it is a range of different factors

:40:39.:40:44.

that have led to the amazing result in Finland in relation to infant

:40:45.:40:47.

mortality. We should not just focus on the box as to the reason why

:40:48.:40:53.

infant mortality is low in Finland. There are a lot of factors and in

:40:54.:40:58.

this country we need to provide comprehensive advice to all parents

:40:59.:41:01.

about safer sleep and ensure parents get the support they need in those

:41:02.:41:05.

first crucial weeks when their baby is born. Thank you to both of you.

:41:06.:41:13.

The baby box company who manufacture the box for some NHS trusts say that

:41:14.:41:21.

these box exceed UK standards for cribs and cradles and add their baby

:41:22.:41:26.

boxes have been used in Finland for 80 years, and since their

:41:27.:41:32.

introduction, Finland has seen a dramatic reduction in infant

:41:33.:41:36.

mortality rates, which we have just been discussing. Game Of Thrones

:41:37.:41:39.

actor Kit Harrington has called upon the government to fund six years

:41:40.:41:43.

backpay for overnight carers. If charities had to pay up instead, he

:41:44.:41:48.

fears people such as his cousin, Lauren, who has down syndrome and

:41:49.:41:49.

autism, could suffer as a result. Back to baby boxes, I am joined from

:41:50.:43:54.

our Aberdeen studio by the Scottish Government minister for childcare

:43:55.:43:58.

and early years, Mark McDonald. Thank you for joining us. In terms

:43:59.:44:05.

of what we have just been talking about, do have concerns about the

:44:06.:44:09.

introduction of baby boxes in Scotland this month? It is important

:44:10.:44:13.

parents in Scotland, who will receive these boxes as of the 15th

:44:14.:44:17.

of this month, recognise we've put a lot of work in in Scotland into

:44:18.:44:22.

ensuring we meet the highest possible standards in relation to

:44:23.:44:27.

these boxes and we have secured the British safety standard

:44:28.:44:29.

accreditation for domestic cribs, for the Scottish baby box. We have

:44:30.:44:36.

positive feedback for organisations like the Royal College of Midwives

:44:37.:44:39.

in Scotland about the ability of these boxes to promote safe

:44:40.:44:42.

sleeping. It is really important, as we roll out the baby box nationally

:44:43.:44:46.

in Scotland, is parents have that reassurance. I suppose parents in

:44:47.:44:50.

Scotland could be concerned, if they are hearing today, that Francine

:44:51.:44:57.

Bates, the chief executive from the Lullaby Trust, that these were being

:44:58.:45:00.

marketed as products to reduce sudden infant death syndrome. They

:45:01.:45:05.

have issued new advice, what would you say to them? I think that is a

:45:06.:45:13.

distinction between the commercially available baby boxes, which are

:45:14.:45:17.

obviously private enterprises, and what we are doing in Scotland. We

:45:18.:45:21.

have never promoted these Scottish baby boxes on the basis of reducing

:45:22.:45:25.

sudden infant death syndrome, but we have said that, by achieving this

:45:26.:45:31.

accreditation in relation to the domestic crib, we can ensure that

:45:32.:45:38.

parents get positive messages about safe sleeping at as we saw from our

:45:39.:45:43.

pilot projects in Orkney and Clackmannanshire, parents coming

:45:44.:45:46.

back with positive feedback about the quality of materials within the

:45:47.:45:51.

baby boxes, debut mattresses within that box -- the new mattresses and

:45:52.:45:56.

we have had interactions with the Scottish cot death trust which

:45:57.:46:00.

operates in Scotland, and would not be the first to raise concerns about

:46:01.:46:04.

-- and they would be the first to raise concerns about this if they

:46:05.:46:06.

thought it was not safe. Thank you. England's women are just one win

:46:07.:46:10.

away from the final of Euro 2017. The Lionesses are through to

:46:11.:46:14.

the semi-finals after their first They're now the highest-ranked team

:46:15.:46:16.

left in the competition and will face hosts,

:46:17.:46:20.

the Netherlands tonight. Manager Mark Sampson said

:46:21.:46:22.

he thinks its been a long time since there was a "genuine belief

:46:23.:46:25.

that an English team can go and win It's already been a successful year

:46:26.:46:28.

for women's sport in England, with the cricket team winning

:46:29.:46:33.

the World Cup and British number one Johanna Konta reaching

:46:34.:46:36.

the Wimbledon semi-finals. The last women's football game

:46:37.:46:40.

was watched by 3.3 million people, making it the biggest peak TV

:46:41.:46:42.

audience for women's football. But does the female sport get

:46:43.:46:45.

the coverage it deserves? With us are Sarah King,

:46:46.:46:54.

and daughter, Isabelle. They're huge fans of women's

:46:55.:46:57.

football, and Isabelle Rachel Brown Finnis,

:46:58.:46:59.

former England goalkeeper, is speaking to us from Holland,

:47:00.:47:04.

where she is doing commentary And in our Coventry studio

:47:05.:47:07.

is Annie Zaidi, South Asian football Welcome to all of you to the

:47:08.:47:26.

programme to talk about women's football. Izzy, how did you first

:47:27.:47:32.

get into football? I think it was through my primary school. They sent

:47:33.:47:36.

out letters about a club and I wanted to see what it was about and

:47:37.:47:39.

get involved and it kind of escalated from there. And have you

:47:40.:47:44.

been following England boss might progress? I followed every match I

:47:45.:47:48.

can and catching up on the other group results, the knockout rounds,

:47:49.:47:52.

online. So when you started playing at primary school, to where you are

:47:53.:47:57.

now, a lot older, what you think about how much coverage there has

:47:58.:48:00.

been available of women's coverage on TV, how much you get to read

:48:01.:48:03.

about women's football, you see in the papers, how much coverage they

:48:04.:48:07.

get compared to the men's game and other sports? When I started there

:48:08.:48:11.

was virtually nothing. I didn't fully hear about women's football

:48:12.:48:14.

until the 2015 World Cup and that is when I first wanted to go in, wanted

:48:15.:48:20.

to watch it. It has grown massively, the coverage. I still think they

:48:21.:48:23.

could be more, competitive men's game but that it has grown. It is

:48:24.:48:28.

good. What about attitudes towards women's football and the fact that

:48:29.:48:33.

you play? Since they won bronze at the World Cup that attitude has

:48:34.:48:36.

become a lot more positive, people can realise what it could lead to

:48:37.:48:39.

because now we are in the semifinals, one win away from the

:48:40.:48:44.

final. So I think people are enjoying it, and seeing it as more,

:48:45.:48:51.

more competitive now. Have you ever received any negativity about

:48:52.:48:59.

playing? No, I haven't. How encouraging has mum been? She didn't

:49:00.:49:02.

originally watch women's football until I got into it, so I think that

:49:03.:49:06.

has been quite a big part of getting her to watch it was me playing it.

:49:07.:49:10.

But she has been very supportive, yes. Mum, however potent is it for

:49:11.:49:15.

people like yourselves, parents, to encourage their daughters to play?

:49:16.:49:22.

It is fully important, I don't think we should differentiate between what

:49:23.:49:25.

girls and boys should do. If it is something your child is passionate

:49:26.:49:28.

about computer age them to do it whatever it is. As Isabel said, I

:49:29.:49:34.

didn't really watch women's football until she became interested in it,

:49:35.:49:37.

and we would go down and watch Arsenal women's team, and it is

:49:38.:49:40.

fantastic, the games are really exciting. It is a really exciting

:49:41.:49:46.

sport so we should be doing what we can to encourage people to watch it

:49:47.:49:49.

on the television, and to encourage girls to take it up as well. What

:49:50.:49:56.

about role models in women's football? I think there are some

:49:57.:50:00.

excellent role models. One of the Izzy's favourite players and one of

:50:01.:50:06.

mine too, Jordan Nobbs. When you see her play, her work ethic is

:50:07.:50:10.

fantastic, she fits in 100% every time, she never gives up and I think

:50:11.:50:14.

that is really good. For me to say the Isabel looked at how she takes

:50:15.:50:18.

on challenges, how she performs when she goes out, and that is something

:50:19.:50:23.

you can aspire to and work hard and you can get some really good results

:50:24.:50:31.

too. The big showpiece is tonight, let's go to Rachel Brown Finis, who

:50:32.:50:38.

is there. Good morning. How are you? Very excited ahead of the night's

:50:39.:50:44.

game. Very windy here, so more like English conditions. What is the

:50:45.:50:50.

atmosphere like out there? We are here in the centre where some fans

:50:51.:50:56.

will be, just three kilometres down the road is the stadium, FC 20, so

:50:57.:51:00.

we will be in the middle of the fan zone a little bit later on today is

:51:01.:51:04.

the atmosphere starts building. They have already constructed a lot of

:51:05.:51:08.

the fan zone. It is a big event, loads of things for the children to

:51:09.:51:12.

do, for people to learn more about women's football, Dutch football, so

:51:13.:51:18.

I think it is going to be absolutely brimming Dodt blooming later on. Can

:51:19.:51:22.

you talk to me about the journey at the beginning of the tournament to

:51:23.:51:27.

where we are now? England flew through the group stages, beating

:51:28.:51:31.

Scotland 6-0 in the opening game, really put a stamp on the

:51:32.:51:35.

tournament. Jody Taylor scored a hat-trick in that game, so she has

:51:36.:51:38.

been prolific from the start and has continued that. The second game they

:51:39.:51:44.

beat Spain 2-0, very clinical, not too many chances, gave up a lot of

:51:45.:51:46.

possession England but ultimately came out on top. In the third game

:51:47.:51:52.

mark Sampson made ten changes to his starting line-up. It gave every

:51:53.:52:00.

lioness in his squad a chance of starting a game. People did not

:52:01.:52:04.

expect to encounter France so early on, they were touted as favourites,

:52:05.:52:08.

but most of the Lionesses who were starting that game were fresh, they

:52:09.:52:12.

had pretty much the whole week. So what England have been is

:52:13.:52:15.

authoritative in their performances, they have been clinical and when

:52:16.:52:18.

they have needed to defend, they have been a white wall of defenders.

:52:19.:52:24.

They have been relentless. One of your guests there just said that the

:52:25.:52:28.

team never give up. Jordan Nobbs is one of those players, but it runs

:52:29.:52:35.

right across the team, from a when England are not in possession, every

:52:36.:52:37.

one of those players is giving everything to ensure that the

:52:38.:52:42.

goalkeeper has nothing to do. We have lost Karen Bardsley from the

:52:43.:52:47.

starting line-up. Talking of goalkeepers, really bad news for

:52:48.:52:51.

Karen Bardsley, have you spoken to her or seen her? I have dropped her

:52:52.:52:55.

a message, she is busy being consoled by her team-mates, we have

:52:56.:53:01.

spoken to her team-mates. As buoyant as ever. What resonates across the

:53:02.:53:06.

whole team is that feeling of togetherness, and that feeling of a

:53:07.:53:11.

collective goal. It is not about one player, if one player is out,

:53:12.:53:15.

another player will come in, the belief is in no way dented with the

:53:16.:53:18.

loss of Karen Bardsley. Siobhan Chamberlain will come in. They won't

:53:19.:53:27.

have Jill Scott, she is suspended but they will bring in someone like

:53:28.:53:35.

Fara Williams, who has over 160 caps for her country. The depth of squad

:53:36.:53:43.

that England have now surpasses any from the three remaining teams of

:53:44.:53:46.

this competition, and now the expectation is England should go on

:53:47.:53:49.

and win the tournament. How exciting is that? Really exciting. 3.3

:53:50.:53:58.

million watching England's win against France. Are you able to soak

:53:59.:54:08.

up how people you are reacting at home? We are a little bit. Hearing

:54:09.:54:16.

those figures is fantastic. We are doing the commentary on five live,

:54:17.:54:19.

and we know people have been listening, getting involved in

:54:20.:54:23.

Facebook live and on social media. But that is testament to where the

:54:24.:54:30.

journey really started, 2015 is where all the games were shown live

:54:31.:54:36.

on TV. People rarely got home country, Laura Bassett scored an own

:54:37.:54:39.

goal, which meant they got knocked out of the semifinals of the World

:54:40.:54:43.

Cup but they then on to beat Germany in the third-place play-off and get

:54:44.:54:46.

their first-ever medal at a World Cup. Since then, the nation has been

:54:47.:54:50.

behind women's football and those viewing figures prove it. It is

:54:51.:54:57.

moving in the right direction. Certainly is. No prediction for the

:54:58.:55:03.

right? I will throw it back at you after I pitch in, but I am going to

:55:04.:55:09.

go with a two goal differential. Even though Holland had been firing,

:55:10.:55:13.

their forward line are really strong, I am going to go with a 2-0

:55:14.:55:20.

win to England. Slightly less optimistic, 2-1, because it is a

:55:21.:55:23.

home tournament for England but I have no doubt that England will go

:55:24.:55:27.

on to win. Either of those scores I will be happy with. Annie, tell us a

:55:28.:55:33.

bit more about what you do and how you got involved with football? Good

:55:34.:55:39.

morning. I have been a focal coach for over eight years, from the elite

:55:40.:55:46.

and hopefully to the professional game now, just recently completed my

:55:47.:55:50.

one-year development elite coaching programme with the FA. I am aspiring

:55:51.:55:57.

to become an elite coach. And hopefully you will be, what do you

:55:58.:56:04.

make of England's progress? Let's just say when we beat France my

:56:05.:56:08.

next-door neighbour came knocking asking if everything was OK because

:56:09.:56:12.

he had me screaming! I said yes, everything is fine, we reached the

:56:13.:56:15.

semifinals at excite what do you think about the journey that women's

:56:16.:56:20.

football has been on? There have been a lot of hard-core fans but a

:56:21.:56:24.

smaller number of them and it is now getting all of this extra attention,

:56:25.:56:29.

England obviously did so well in Canada at the women's World Cup,

:56:30.:56:33.

Mark Sampson has now led them to the semifinals at two major tournaments.

:56:34.:56:40.

It is a snowball effect from 2015, which has increased participation,

:56:41.:56:46.

the watching, the viewers, and even the media has been supporting the

:56:47.:56:51.

games. Writing in the newspaper, articles on social media. Everything

:56:52.:56:56.

is working on the right direction. I would say we need to do more at

:56:57.:57:00.

grassroot levels rather than at top level because I think at top-level,

:57:01.:57:06.

we are in the quarterfinals tonight, semifinals tonight. We need to do a

:57:07.:57:12.

bit more work at grassroots level to increase grassroots participation.

:57:13.:57:18.

Are there enough opportunities for people to get involved, and the

:57:19.:57:23.

young girls to get involved in playing at a grassroots level?

:57:24.:57:28.

Definitely, with the FA women's strategy launch, which was launched

:57:29.:57:34.

earlier this year by Baroness Sue Campbell. They are strong

:57:35.:57:39.

aspirational females within the national governing body, and they

:57:40.:57:41.

have a vision of where they want to be. I think it is going in the right

:57:42.:57:45.

direction, a little bit more investment would be fine, everyone

:57:46.:57:48.

could do with more money in rescuing a woman's game. We are playing catch

:57:49.:57:58.

up but I think every thing will work out fine. I am going to leave it

:57:59.:58:05.

there because I want to get a quick word from AZ. Prediction for the

:58:06.:58:13.

night? 3-1, England. I think 2-1 England. BBC Newsroom Live is coming

:58:14.:58:15.

up next, thank you for your company today, have a good day.

:58:16.:58:20.

Tina Daheley presents. Rugby legend Jonny Wilkinson talks about his career and how his performance coach changed his life.

Catrin Nye reports on how Deliveroo has taken steps to protect its drivers from violence after a run of attacks.

The programme hears from a panel of guests on why the UK's poorest children are finishing secondary school two years behind their classmates.