08/09/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


08/09/2017

Former England cricketer Chris Lewis talks with Chloe Tilley about how he went from being a professional sportsman to serving time for drugs smuggling.


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It's Friday, it's nine o'clock, I'm Chloe Tilley.

:00:07.:00:09.

State of emergency is declared in the British Virgin Islands as

:00:10.:00:22.

hurricane and it continues to devastate region. Pictures show the

:00:23.:00:25.

island flattened. All of us have been affected by Irma

:00:26.:00:29.

and some more than others. Apart from the structural damage

:00:30.:00:32.

there've sadly been reports 14 people have died in the region

:00:33.:00:35.

with another British territory, Turks and Caicos Islands,

:00:36.:00:45.

the latest to be hit. The tiny island of Barbuda is almost

:00:46.:00:47.

entirely destroyed. A lot of the people there cannot

:00:48.:00:50.

stay in that condition. A lot of houses, a lot

:00:51.:00:55.

of structures, a lot of commercial places,

:00:56.:01:00.

cell towers, everything We will have all of the details,

:01:01.:01:12.

including the latest on the rescue effort.

:01:13.:01:12.

Also this morning: From England cricketer

:01:13.:01:13.

Former England cricketer Chris Lewis tells us

:01:14.:01:16.

Welcome to the programme, we're live until 11 this morning.

:01:17.:01:34.

We're also talking to two women who only learnt to read properly

:01:35.:01:37.

If you've struggled with literacy as an adult then

:01:38.:01:42.

Do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning -

:01:43.:01:49.

use the hashtag #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged

:01:50.:01:52.

Our top story today, Hurricane Irma - one

:01:53.:01:56.

of the strongest storms ever recorded in the Atlantic -

:01:57.:01:59.

is continuing its path of destruction through the Caribbean.

:02:00.:02:02.

At least 14 people have died and hundreds of buildings have been

:02:03.:02:05.

Deaths have been reported in the US and British Virgin Islands,

:02:06.:02:10.

Barbuda and St Martin were the first to feel the full force of the winds

:02:11.:02:17.

and storm surge followed by Puerto Rico.

:02:18.:02:21.

Haiti and the Turks and Caicos islands are the latest places

:02:22.:02:24.

This is what it's like to look out of your hotel room

:02:25.:02:38.

in the Turks and Caicos, knowing that one of the strongest

:02:39.:02:41.

storms in recent memory is heading your way.

:02:42.:02:43.

Starting to hear the noise of the wind as well,

:02:44.:02:45.

But we're not even close to the worst bit yet.

:02:46.:02:53.

On the British Virgin Islands there have been

:02:54.:02:58.

With communications severely disrupted, the governor issued this

:02:59.:03:01.

audio message declaring a state of emergency.

:03:02.:03:06.

All of us have been affected by Irma, and some more than others.

:03:07.:03:10.

Apart from the structural damage, there have sadly been reports

:03:11.:03:13.

My thoughts and prayers are with each and every one of you.

:03:14.:03:24.

At least one person is believed to have died on the British

:03:25.:03:27.

territory of Anguilla, where residents sheltered

:03:28.:03:29.

in the strongest part of their homes for safety.

:03:30.:03:33.

We were in the bath with a mattress above us.

:03:34.:03:35.

That's how we sort of managed to keep safe and dry.

:03:36.:03:40.

I think a lot of people were in a similar situation.

:03:41.:03:44.

We've seen houses with cars that have been just picked up

:03:45.:03:48.

Barbuda was one of the first islands to be hit by Irma.

:03:49.:03:55.

It is now less than 48 hours away from the impact

:03:56.:03:58.

Jose has sustained wind speeds of 120 mph and it looks likely

:03:59.:04:04.

to gain in strength over the next day or two.

:04:05.:04:07.

The UK Government has been facing criticism that it didn't respond

:04:08.:04:21.

quickly enough to help people in overseas territories. Let's go live

:04:22.:04:24.

to the Foreign Office and Andy Moore. Let's talk about that

:04:25.:04:30.

criticism, first of all. Tell us more about it? Well, the criticism

:04:31.:04:36.

has come from those on the islands, representatives of the islands in

:04:37.:04:40.

the UK. Someone like Baroness Amos, who used to coordinate relief effort

:04:41.:04:45.

for the UN. She said Britain had acted too late. We have heard from

:04:46.:04:50.

the Prime Minister, ?32 million has been allocated for disaster relief

:04:51.:04:53.

and there are a lot of military assets in the regional on the way

:04:54.:04:56.

there. First, you have the Royal Fleet auxiliary ship. That is

:04:57.:05:01.

offering help to the residents of Anguilla, the British territory.

:05:02.:05:05.

That ship as helicopters, it has earth moving equipment, it has

:05:06.:05:08.

emergency rations on board. Then there is a task group, the first

:05:09.:05:11.

elements of which are leaving this morning from Brize Norton. These

:05:12.:05:20.

giant C17 aircraft, carrying personnel and rations, some of them

:05:21.:05:24.

carrying helicopters, which are very important in the relief effort. Then

:05:25.:05:28.

you have HMS Ocean, the flagship of the Royal Navy. Again, it is an

:05:29.:05:35.

aircraft carrier, on its way from the Mediterranean to the Caribbean.

:05:36.:05:39.

But it will take up to two weeks to get there. Let's head over to the

:05:40.:05:41.

BBC newsroom. Annita McVeigh is in the BBC

:05:42.:05:43.

Newsroom with a summary At least five people have died

:05:44.:05:45.

after an earthquake with a magnitude The earthquake struck

:05:46.:05:51.

off the Pacific Coast A tsunami warning has been issued

:05:52.:05:54.

for Mexico and six other Local authorities say it's

:05:55.:05:58.

the strongest quake to hit the country since the devastating

:05:59.:06:03.

1985 tremor that brought down buildings and killed

:06:04.:06:06.

thousands of people. Journalist Franc Contreras

:06:07.:06:09.

is in Mexico City and described I could hear my dog

:06:10.:06:11.

barking, animals barking. Dogs barking all over

:06:12.:06:18.

the neighbourhood, I should say. Suddenly, you could start to feel

:06:19.:06:28.

the building move quite heavily. You could hear loud

:06:29.:06:31.

cracks in the concrete. It sounded like a giant

:06:32.:06:33.

wooden branch being just People were streaming out

:06:34.:06:35.

of the hallways here, on the floor that I live on I saw

:06:36.:06:39.

a man in his pyjamas, carrying his little

:06:40.:06:42.

daughter in her pyjamas. The mother was carrying

:06:43.:06:44.

the little dog. Everybody walking out,

:06:45.:06:47.

single file, into the streets. Trying to avoid high power lines,

:06:48.:06:50.

electricity lines that could fall on you, in the case of an earthquake

:06:51.:06:53.

of this sort. Young offenders from ethnic minority

:06:54.:06:59.

backgrounds will become "the next generation" of adult criminals

:07:00.:07:02.

unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review

:07:03.:07:04.

led by the MP David Lammy. The inquiry makes a series

:07:05.:07:12.

of recommendations - these include allowing some

:07:13.:07:14.

prosecutions to be deferred, or even dropped, if suspects get

:07:15.:07:16.

treatment for issues such as drug Noel Williams was 11 when he first

:07:17.:07:19.

got involved in gangs. By the age of 13 he was imprisoned

:07:20.:07:26.

for robberies and drug dealing. I'm in and out of the system,

:07:27.:07:31.

been there three times. A lot of bullying goes

:07:32.:07:33.

on and as we say lack of prison staff so they don't pick up

:07:34.:07:36.

on certain things, people are self-harming,

:07:37.:07:39.

if they don't cut their arms He's now turned his life around

:07:40.:07:42.

but he believes race and ethnicity plays a part in how you're treated

:07:43.:07:48.

and punished within It's unjust, of course it's unjust,

:07:49.:07:50.

and if you look at the sentences we get, they're longer,

:07:51.:08:00.

sentences are harsher and people are coming out not rehabilitated,

:08:01.:08:02.

sometimes they come out and reoffend at an accelerated rate

:08:03.:08:05.

to their counterparts too. The Lammy Review makes a number

:08:06.:08:10.

of key recommendations, such as removing identifying

:08:11.:08:13.

information about ethnicity when cases are passed from police

:08:14.:08:16.

to prosecutors so racial bias doesn't influence

:08:17.:08:18.

charging decisions. I'm very worried about our

:08:19.:08:23.

prison system, I think where there's clearly overt

:08:24.:08:25.

discrimination going on and some of the treatment

:08:26.:08:31.

is just unacceptable. It's one of the largest reviews

:08:32.:08:40.

of its kind and highlights that radical reform is urgently needed

:08:41.:08:43.

to bring fairness to The government is accusing Labour

:08:44.:08:45.

of a "cynical" attempt to block The bill paves the way for leaving

:08:46.:08:51.

the European Union in March 2019. Labour and other opposition parties

:08:52.:08:55.

have promised to vote against it next week insisting it gives

:08:56.:08:59.

sweeping powers to ministers The Brexit secretary David Davis

:09:00.:09:01.

claimed Britons "will not forgive" Labour if they try to "delay

:09:02.:09:08.

or destroy" the process Pilots at package tour airline

:09:09.:09:11.

Thomas Cook are staging a 12-hour The walkout, which started

:09:12.:09:21.

at 3am, is by members of the British Airline

:09:22.:09:25.

Pilots' Association. It is thought to be the first

:09:26.:09:26.

strike by pilots in the UK Union members voted by nine-to-one

:09:27.:09:29.

to take industrial action An appeal by the company

:09:30.:09:38.

to overturn the ballot result The Nobel prize winner

:09:39.:09:42.

Malala Yousafzai has called on the leader of Myanamar,

:09:43.:09:48.

Aung San Suu Kyi, to help the country's Rohingya Muslim

:09:49.:09:50.

minority. Thousands of Rohingya have fled

:09:51.:09:52.

because of violence. Malala called for an international

:09:53.:09:55.

response to the violence in Myanmar. She spoke to the BBC

:09:56.:09:58.

as she prepares to start England's first new grammar school

:09:59.:10:00.

in five decades has opened. The academically-selective school

:10:01.:10:11.

in Sevenoaks is being set up as an annexe to The Weald

:10:12.:10:13.

of Kent Grammar in Tonbridge - meaning it escaped a legal

:10:14.:10:16.

ban on the opening of Critics say it's

:10:17.:10:19.

by-passing the law. A 13-year-old girl who died

:10:20.:10:21.

from a brain aneurysm has helped eight different people through organ

:10:22.:10:24.

donation - a record number. Jemima Layzell, from

:10:25.:10:35.

Somerset, died in 2012. Her parents said she was clever,

:10:36.:10:37.

compassionate and creative - and would have been "very proud

:10:38.:10:39.

of her legacy". NHS Blood and Transplant

:10:40.:10:41.

said no other donor had That's a summary of the latest BBC

:10:42.:10:43.

News - more at 9.30. Let's get some sport now. Let's talk

:10:44.:10:58.

about the US open. Lots of people getting excited that Venus Williams

:10:59.:11:01.

might reach her first final since 2002, but it wasn't meant to be?

:11:02.:11:06.

There's nothing better than watching an underdog triumph. Venus Williams

:11:07.:11:14.

was beaten by a player that was on their sofa, with a large cast on her

:11:15.:11:21.

left foot in January, watching the Australian open on television. I'm

:11:22.:11:24.

talking about and seeded American Sloane Stephens. She more than

:11:25.:11:28.

bounced back from her injury. She defeated the ninth seed.

:11:29.:11:34.

She'll face Madison Keys who crushed Coco Vandeweghe in straight sets.

:11:35.:11:37.

The pair will both be making their grand slam final

:11:38.:11:39.

debuts on Saturday - the last time that happened was 15

:11:40.:11:42.

years ago when Serena Williams beat her sister Venus.

:11:43.:11:44.

It feels absolutely amazing. You know, these are the moments growing

:11:45.:12:00.

up that you dream about. To be sitting here as US open finalist, it

:12:01.:12:04.

feels amazing. She is a close friend of mine, so to be able to play her

:12:05.:12:11.

in both of our first finals is a really special moment, especially

:12:12.:12:13.

with everything we have gone through this year. Always nice to see

:12:14.:12:18.

genuine joy from a sports person. Let's talk about cricket. A dramatic

:12:19.:12:23.

first day in the deciding first test? Yes, it was going so well as

:12:24.:12:27.

Ben Stokes reached a new career high, taking six wickets, helping

:12:28.:12:32.

bowl the West Indies out for just 123. But then England struggled in

:12:33.:12:37.

reply. Poor batting from England. It put them into trouble, really. Joe

:12:38.:12:43.

Root's side closed and 46-4. Afterwards, Ben Stokes came out

:12:44.:12:46.

quite positive and said England will be able to handle it. That's all for

:12:47.:12:48.

now. I will have more in 30 minutes. Hurricane scientists say they have

:12:49.:12:59.

never seen anything like this on modern record, as Hurricane Irma

:13:00.:13:03.

hurtles through the Caribbean with two weather systems in its wake, a

:13:04.:13:07.

meteorologist described it as unparalleled. This is what looks

:13:08.:13:12.

like the satellite. Hurricane has already caused devastation, with

:13:13.:13:20.

Jose and patio close behind. It has taken lives and destroyed properties

:13:21.:13:26.

from Barbados, poor to regard the British Virgin Islands. Flooding,

:13:27.:13:28.

power cuts in the northern parts of the Dominican Republic and in Haiti.

:13:29.:13:33.

Tens of thousands are in need of shelter after the high winds laid

:13:34.:13:37.

waste to buildings. The Turks and Caicos are the latest to feel the

:13:38.:13:42.

force. The wind speed has dropped, but it is still reaching 165 mph as

:13:43.:13:47.

it heads towards the southern tip of the United States. Its path now goes

:13:48.:13:53.

over the Turks and Caicos. You can see it clipping Cuba's northern

:13:54.:14:00.

coast before hitting the Bahamas and ploughing into the Florida

:14:01.:14:02.

peninsula. Preparations are being made in the islands that are yet to

:14:03.:14:08.

feel the force of it. In Cuba, thousands of tourists have been

:14:09.:14:11.

moved to safety from exposed coastal resorts. In the Bahamas, people are

:14:12.:14:15.

boarding up, stocking up on packing up. In Miami, preparations as well.

:14:16.:14:20.

There is a state of emergency in Florida. Hurricane Irma is set to

:14:21.:14:24.

hit overnight on Sunday. These people are preparing to bunker down

:14:25.:14:27.

while thousands of others have been clogging the roads and airports as

:14:28.:14:32.

they flee. Let's go back to the British Virgin Islands and hear more

:14:33.:14:37.

now from the governor. That public announcement that he made after the

:14:38.:14:38.

hurricane hit. People of the British

:14:39.:14:41.

Virgin Islands, this Simon Cross, who moved to the

:14:42.:15:31.

British Virgin Islands two years ago, told us what happened in the

:15:32.:15:33.

force of the storm. In our house, the major

:15:34.:15:35.

warning was when a skylight was blown off

:15:36.:15:37.

the We could hear the wind is blasting

:15:38.:15:38.

through the upstairs of the house, and at that point,

:15:39.:15:42.

we thought maybe the roof was going to go,

:15:43.:15:45.

so that was our main indicator to get

:15:46.:15:46.

the hell downstairs into the basement, the most secure

:15:47.:15:49.

part of the building. We had shutters that had been

:15:50.:15:52.

secured, and I had been pulling around and had a lot

:15:53.:15:57.

of confidence that they would protect the building,

:15:58.:16:02.

and the next thing you know, they are ripped

:16:03.:16:04.

off the French doors that were protecting us

:16:05.:16:06.

in the Ten minutes later,

:16:07.:16:08.

the other one went off the other French doors,

:16:09.:16:13.

so we were completely exposed. Missiles from trees

:16:14.:16:17.

or debris or whatever can easily just penetrate through there,

:16:18.:16:19.

but fortunately, nothing happened. When the eye came, it gave

:16:20.:16:21.

us almost a half-time to re-evaluate, see

:16:22.:16:30.

what we could do in the meantime to get ready

:16:31.:16:34.

for the Myself and the father of the family

:16:35.:16:36.

quickly rushed upstairs and did our best to nail

:16:37.:16:44.

timber over the skylight wind from getting

:16:45.:16:47.

underneath the roof. We just about managed to do that

:16:48.:16:50.

before the second wave came, at which point we rushed

:16:51.:16:53.

downstairs to the basement. And the wind was scary

:16:54.:16:57.

and ferocious enough that we all ended up huddling in the adjoining

:16:58.:17:06.

bathroom, which managed to still have a small window protected

:17:07.:17:11.

by metal shutters, and that was the Fortunately, these mahogany

:17:12.:17:14.

French doors managed to hold, but the wind was like nothing

:17:15.:17:21.

I've ever known in my life. Let me bring you this news, which is

:17:22.:17:38.

just reaching us from our defence correspondent, Jonathan Beale. The

:17:39.:17:46.

Royal Navy ship RFA mounts Bay is on the way to help in relief efforts

:17:47.:17:49.

following Hurricane Irma. The ship has already stopped off in Anguilla

:17:50.:17:54.

and is carrying 50 Royal Marines and army engineers. That is reaching us,

:17:55.:18:03.

that is a Royal Navy ship is on its way to help with relief.

:18:04.:18:08.

The tiny island of Barbuda has been hit badly, with up to 95% of

:18:09.:18:16.

buildings destroyed. Karl Josef spoke to us earlier and told us what

:18:17.:18:18.

he saw. We did an overview of Barbuda,

:18:19.:18:20.

and by and large, a lot You saw large patches of water

:18:21.:18:22.

as you went, as we took that view going to the

:18:23.:18:35.

helipad in Barbuda. Also, what struck me before we even

:18:36.:18:37.

touched down was the fact There were no leaves

:18:38.:18:40.

on the trees whatsoever. The hurricane had completely

:18:41.:18:46.

ravaged not only the houses and structures but the trees

:18:47.:18:48.

on the island, so the vegetation All you saw was bark and stems,

:18:49.:18:50.

and everything just brown, so that wasn't a good sign,

:18:51.:19:00.

even before you touched down in Once we got there, we were met

:19:01.:19:04.

at the helipad with folks trying to get

:19:05.:19:11.

off the island itself. A lot of people were trying to seek

:19:12.:19:17.

refuge, of course, in A lot of people were trying to get

:19:18.:19:20.

off of the island by any means necessary, because

:19:21.:19:28.

a lot of the houses, like I said before,

:19:29.:19:32.

were That is a word that the prime

:19:33.:19:33.

minister of Antigua and Barbuda used just yesterday,

:19:34.:19:44.

when he first touched down into He basically said that a lot

:19:45.:19:46.

of the people cannot stay in Is there any food, any shelter,

:19:47.:19:53.

left for the people in When I went there today,

:19:54.:19:58.

as I journeyed down that main street towards the wharf,

:19:59.:20:10.

maybe in about 2007, I can't remember which year,

:20:11.:20:15.

the government had built a strong complex for fisheries,

:20:16.:20:18.

where they were supposed That is one of the main things

:20:19.:20:20.

that Barbuda does - it So they built a very

:20:21.:20:27.

strong complex to house the lobster, the fish to be exported

:20:28.:20:37.

throughout the Caribbean and the rest of the world,

:20:38.:20:43.

so a lot of people tried to make their way down

:20:44.:20:46.

to Today, when I went down there,

:20:47.:20:47.

that is where a lot of the distribution of food, water,

:20:48.:20:53.

clothes, that was being done down So, if folks wanted to get stuff

:20:54.:20:56.

for their children and for their families, they would have

:20:57.:21:04.

made their way there. Most of the people were

:21:05.:21:07.

gathered there today. That is where the main

:21:08.:21:10.

sort of shelter was. I'm glad you said where the shelter

:21:11.:21:15.

is, because after the hurricane would have passed and done damage

:21:16.:21:20.

to Barbuda, if they got, like, simple drizzle or simple rain,

:21:21.:21:26.

they would Of course, we know that

:21:27.:21:28.

Hurricane Jose could be That is just today

:21:29.:21:36.

the cabinet made a decision. I think at first it was voluntary,

:21:37.:21:46.

and I think they used more stronger language today,

:21:47.:21:58.

that they don't just want it to be a They are compelling folks

:21:59.:22:02.

without having to say compelling people to

:22:03.:22:04.

evacuate to Antigua. Provisions are being made to house

:22:05.:22:06.

folks from Barbuda in Antigua, because irrespective of

:22:07.:22:09.

what sort of weather pattern comes on Saturday, when Jose

:22:10.:22:13.

is expected to come, Most folks won't be

:22:14.:22:17.

able to sustain it. Ride-mac we will have much more on

:22:18.:22:37.

hurricane Irma later in the programme. -- we will have much more

:22:38.:22:45.

on Irma later in the programme. "If you're black, you're treated

:22:46.:22:50.

more harshly by the criminal justice system than if you're white" -

:22:51.:22:53.

an admission from Theresa May soon So will the final report

:22:54.:22:56.

from a major review commissioned by Downing Street and carried out

:22:57.:22:59.

by the Labour MP David But when it came to drug offences,

:23:00.:23:02.

ethnic minorities are around 240% more likely to be sent to prison

:23:03.:23:40.

compared to white offenders. Ethnic minority male prisoners

:23:41.:23:50.

are more likely to be placed Here's the report's author,

:23:51.:23:53.

MP David Lammy, speaking a little We have now created a situation

:23:54.:24:24.

in our country were 41% of our youth prison system,

:24:25.:24:33.

that's young people as young as ten and as old as 18, is from a black

:24:34.:24:38.

or minority ethnic background. I mean, that's more than double

:24:39.:24:43.

the amount of black and ethnic minority young people

:24:44.:24:46.

in our country. That is a significant issue and it

:24:47.:24:50.

suggests that our adult prison population will grow as well

:24:51.:24:53.

if we don't try to do The Secretary of State for Justice

:24:54.:25:12.

says the ministry of justice wants to eradicate all injustices within

:25:13.:25:16.

society. What struck me about the report too was the reality is that

:25:17.:25:20.

very large numbers of British people from

:25:21.:25:25.

our black and ethnic minority communities lack confidence in the

:25:26.:25:26.

criminal justice system. No minister, no Government of any

:25:27.:25:29.

political colour can be happy David Lammy's recommendations

:25:30.:25:31.

offer a possible route for doing some of that,

:25:32.:25:36.

and we'll be responding in detail Let Speaker Jeremy Corbyn could --

:25:37.:25:56.

to Jeremy Crook. And Helen Beresford is director of engagement for social

:25:57.:26:02.

justice charity. Jeremy Corbyn first of all, is there discrimination in

:26:03.:26:10.

the justice system, is there a perception of it all a reality?

:26:11.:26:18.

There are many black and Muslim men in prisons who face discrimination.

:26:19.:26:21.

We can look at the inspection reports every year, which show clear

:26:22.:26:28.

bias in prisons and complaints about how black and Asian prisoners are

:26:29.:26:32.

treated. There is no doubt that there is overworked and unconscious

:26:33.:26:35.

issues in prisons for black and Asian prisoners, so I welcome the

:26:36.:26:39.

report because it has put a real spotlight on this issue and the need

:26:40.:26:48.

for prisons to reflect our prisons, which are diverse, to better assess

:26:49.:26:53.

prisoners when they come to prison at first, and to make sure that the

:26:54.:26:58.

best possible practical solutions are put in place to make sure

:26:59.:27:03.

prisoners can be rehabilitated, given support and not suffer bias

:27:04.:27:09.

and discrimination in prison that they have often experienced outside.

:27:10.:27:13.

I'm sure a lot of people watching will be thinking, how are people who

:27:14.:27:17.

are black or Asian treated differently in prison? In terms of

:27:18.:27:20.

how a prisoner is given opportunity to go and get learning, to have

:27:21.:27:26.

opportunity to work in prison, they feel that it is often based on

:27:27.:27:32.

privilege and the bias of particular officers giving priority to white

:27:33.:27:36.

prisoners rather than black and Asian. Muslim prisoners often wonder

:27:37.:27:43.

whether their faith is understood by officers who are not from that

:27:44.:27:48.

background and who can often disrespect that faith and their

:27:49.:27:50.

individuality and therefore not give a full and proper service to those

:27:51.:27:54.

individuals. The stereotyping black and Muslim men and women in our

:27:55.:27:59.

society also permeates prisons as well, so we shouldn't be surprised

:28:00.:28:02.

by that, but it is about making sure that officers are given the right

:28:03.:28:06.

training and support to make sure they can meet the needs of

:28:07.:28:10.

individuals fully so we don't have men coming out of prison and

:28:11.:28:13.

reoffending at high rates because they are black or Muslim, but also

:28:14.:28:17.

while they are in prison, that they can get the support they need and

:28:18.:28:20.

can be treated with respect and dignity. Let's talk about before

:28:21.:28:24.

they get to prison, because one of the issues raised in the report,

:28:25.:28:29.

Helen, is about this deficit of trust, David Lammy suggesting that

:28:30.:28:33.

more black defendants would plead guilty and therefore get a discount

:28:34.:28:37.

on their sentence if they had confidence that the magistrate would

:28:38.:28:41.

give them a reasonable and fair sentence. Like Jeremy, we really

:28:42.:28:45.

support the launch of this report. It is really important to look

:28:46.:28:48.

across the whole justice system and beyond, as you say, before people

:28:49.:28:54.

enter the justice system, and afterwards as well, including the

:28:55.:28:59.

criminal record issue. David Lammy rightly highlights this issue of a

:29:00.:29:04.

trust deficit. We know from our work with disadvantaged people and adults

:29:05.:29:09.

across the country that there can be this mistrust around engaging with

:29:10.:29:14.

statutory services. In particular, we find this is with the police, but

:29:15.:29:18.

actually, the impact of that mistrust with the police is across

:29:19.:29:22.

all of the justice system and all statutory services as well. Once you

:29:23.:29:25.

have had a negative experience of something like that, you are less

:29:26.:29:30.

likely to engage positively in future. How do you change that? Is

:29:31.:29:34.

it as simple as saying, let's get more black and ethnic minority

:29:35.:29:39.

officers in the police, judges, magistrates, or is that too

:29:40.:29:42.

simplistic? That is fundamentally important. We do need more police

:29:43.:29:47.

officers, prison officers, magistrates and judges, so I think

:29:48.:29:50.

David Lammy is right to say that should be addressed, and there is a

:29:51.:29:55.

target to reach that in time for 2025 in the case of judges. We have

:29:56.:30:01.

only 6% of police officers in the country from black and Asian

:30:02.:30:04.

backgrounds, so we need to do better. Clearly, we have to improve

:30:05.:30:08.

stop and search. That is the real issue that diminishes trust in the

:30:09.:30:11.

police. Not just for young people but for older people. If we can get

:30:12.:30:16.

a grip on that and reduce that, make sure it is targeted and looks at

:30:17.:30:21.

criminals rather than the whole community, that would be a step

:30:22.:30:25.

forward. It is not about numbers only, it is about leadership, prison

:30:26.:30:29.

governors, the Secretary of State, the chief of their probation and

:30:30.:30:31.

prison service saying, this is something we must make progress on

:30:32.:30:34.

and do it now, because it has been an issue for a long period of time.

:30:35.:30:39.

We had been working on it for format years through the Young Review and

:30:40.:30:43.

we have seen little improvement in the outcomes for black and Muslim

:30:44.:30:45.

men, for example. I want to pick up on some

:30:46.:30:52.

controversial elements, some people might think this is not fair. Things

:30:53.:30:56.

like prosecutions being deferred, people not being sentenced until

:30:57.:31:00.

they have taken part in a community programme, things like sealed

:31:01.:31:02.

criminal records, after you have served a certain amount of time, if

:31:03.:31:07.

you can prove you have moved on, employers would not necessarily know

:31:08.:31:10.

you have a criminal record. Some people would feel uncomfortable with

:31:11.:31:14.

that? If I start with criminal records, we have a very complex,

:31:15.:31:17.

confusion and other true system of disclosure of criminal records at

:31:18.:31:22.

the moment. It has a huge impact from Julie Macron how people move

:31:23.:31:27.

from being involved in crime into a positive future, but they are held

:31:28.:31:33.

back by having to disclose, or not knowing when to disclose, employers

:31:34.:31:35.

that don't know what the rules are, and they are more likely to be risk

:31:36.:31:42.

averse, in terms of blame people that have a criminal record. We run

:31:43.:31:47.

an advice service advising individuals and employers on right

:31:48.:31:50.

and responsible at ease. But we know we have to have fundamental change.

:31:51.:31:54.

If we want to give people a chance to move on, do not reoffend, to get

:31:55.:31:59.

a job, one of the core things about rehabilitation and moving on to life

:32:00.:32:02.

after crime, we need to get those things right. We absolutely support

:32:03.:32:07.

a fundamental review of the criminal records regime and looking at this

:32:08.:32:11.

new optional sealed disclosure. Thanks for coming in and talking to

:32:12.:32:12.

us. Still to come, from international

:32:13.:32:18.

cricket to drug smuggling. Chris Smith tells us about the string of

:32:19.:32:26.

bad decisions that landed him in prison. And two mothers who

:32:27.:32:29.

struggled with reading and writing tell us how hard it became when they

:32:30.:32:33.

had children and how they have managed to learn.

:32:34.:32:35.

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of todays news.

:32:36.:32:38.

Hurricane Irma has left a trail of destruction as it sweeps

:32:39.:32:41.

It's already destroyed almost all buildings on Barbuda.

:32:42.:32:46.

At least 14 people have been killed by the storm.

:32:47.:32:49.

The Red Cross says an estimated 1.2 million people

:32:50.:32:51.

A state of emergency has been declared in the British Virgin

:32:52.:33:04.

Islands. Images show buildings razed to the ground and debris scattered

:33:05.:33:07.

across streets. At least five people have died

:33:08.:33:09.

after an earthquake with a magnitude The earthquake struck

:33:10.:33:12.

off the Pacific Coast A tsunami warning has been issued

:33:13.:33:15.

for Mexico and six other Local authorities say it's

:33:16.:33:20.

the strongest quake to hit the country since the devastating

:33:21.:33:25.

1985 tremor that brought down buildings and killed

:33:26.:33:27.

thousands of people. Young offenders from ethnic minority

:33:28.:33:36.

backgrounds will become the next generation of adult criminals

:33:37.:33:39.

unless the justice system is reformed, according to a review

:33:40.:33:41.

led by the MP David Lammy. The report makes more than 30

:33:42.:33:44.

recommendations including allowing some prosecutions to be deferred

:33:45.:33:46.

or even dropped if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug

:33:47.:33:48.

or alcohol problems. Pilots at package to a airline

:33:49.:34:03.

Thomas Cook are staging a 12 hour strike in a dispute over pay. The

:34:04.:34:07.

walk-out, which started at 3am, is by members of the British Airline

:34:08.:34:12.

Pilots Association. It is thought to be the first strike by pilots in the

:34:13.:34:16.

UK since the mid-19 70s. Union members voted 9-1 for industrial

:34:17.:34:23.

action in a turnout of 87%. An appeal by the company to overturn

:34:24.:34:27.

the result was rejected by the High Court. A 13-year-old girl who died

:34:28.:34:30.

from a brain aneurysm has helped eight different people through organ

:34:31.:34:38.

donation, a record number. Jemima Rozelle from Somerset died in 2012.

:34:39.:34:42.

Her parents said she was passionate and creative and would have been

:34:43.:34:46.

very proud of her legacy. The NHS said no other donor had helped us

:34:47.:34:51.

many people. That is a summary of the latest BBC News. Moore at ten

:34:52.:34:52.

o'clock. Venus Williams missed out on her

:34:53.:34:53.

first US Open final for 15 years. She lost to Sloane Stephen

:34:54.:34:58.

in New York last night. The world number 83 was recovering

:34:59.:35:00.

from injury in January It all means they'll

:35:01.:35:07.

be two new faces in the women's final this year -

:35:08.:35:14.

Stephens will go up against fellow American Madison keys who beat

:35:15.:35:17.

CoCo Vandeweghe who later admitted she felt "crummy" about being dumped

:35:18.:35:20.

out of the tournament. Ben Stokes says England will remain

:35:21.:35:26.

positive on day two of the final It was all going so well as he took

:35:27.:35:29.

six wickets to help bowl But England then struggled in reply

:35:30.:35:34.

- and Joe Root's side Newcastle manager Rafael Benitez

:35:35.:35:39.

will not hold his pre-match press conference later this morning ahead

:35:40.:35:43.

of Sunday's game against Swansea. He is still recovering

:35:44.:35:45.

from a hospital procedure to address an infection resulting

:35:46.:35:48.

from a previous hernia operation. From England cricketer

:35:49.:35:58.

to convicted drugs smuggler. Chris Lewis played 32 Tests and 53

:35:59.:36:03.

One-Day internationals for England after his international debut

:36:04.:36:06.

against the West Indies in 1991. He was tipped as

:36:07.:36:09.

the next Ian Botham. But 17 years later after retiring

:36:10.:36:13.

from cricket due to injury he was caught with cocaine worth

:36:14.:36:19.

more than ?140,000 in his luggage after arriving

:36:20.:36:22.

on a flight from the Caribbean He was sentenced to 13 years -

:36:23.:36:24.

and released in 2015 after serving Chris Lewis has now written

:36:25.:36:31.

a book about his life. It's called "Crazy: Road

:36:32.:36:35.

to Redemption" and he's here's How does that feel? I was watching

:36:36.:36:48.

your body language as I was reading that, to say England cricketer, you

:36:49.:36:53.

sat up tall, as soon as I said drug smuggler, your body language

:36:54.:36:56.

changed. Is it hard to hear even now? Yes, definitely. But it is just

:36:57.:37:01.

one of those things I have to get used to. The fact is, I did try to

:37:02.:37:08.

import drugs. As well as being an England cricketer, now I have the

:37:09.:37:13.

label of being a drug smuggler. It is hard to take. But it is part of

:37:14.:37:19.

the consequences of doing what I did. Let's look back at cricket,

:37:20.:37:23.

first, before we talk about that. I know one of the things you said and

:37:24.:37:26.

you write about in your book is the major impact on your career of going

:37:27.:37:30.

to the ECB and saying you were approached about match fixing in

:37:31.:37:36.

cricket. Tell us a bit about the approach, and also about the

:37:37.:37:39.

response? The approach came out of the blue. It came from somebody I

:37:40.:37:48.

had known vaguely. It was the owner of a local shop. He called and said

:37:49.:37:53.

that he had a business proposition. I went along to the meeting,

:37:54.:37:56.

eventually. The business proposition turned out to be an attempt to

:37:57.:38:03.

influence cricket matches, England against New Zealand. The only thing

:38:04.:38:09.

to do from there was to report it to the relevant authorities, which you

:38:10.:38:14.

are supposed to do. I did. I told them all that was said. But,

:38:15.:38:20.

consequently, later on, it came out that I was accusing England players,

:38:21.:38:30.

I was a Judas. Within two or three months of that happening, I was out

:38:31.:38:34.

of cricket. It is worth pointing out that further allegations were made

:38:35.:38:38.

by another person at a future date about the Indian businessman. It was

:38:39.:38:41.

investigated and no action was taken against him. Do you feel that your

:38:42.:38:46.

career was taken away from you then, as a result? No, ultimately, choices

:38:47.:38:51.

were made by me. By the end, I didn't want to be on the cricket

:38:52.:38:53.

field. Certainly, those things played a major role in it coming to

:38:54.:39:03.

an end so early. I had a contract with three years left, I was looking

:39:04.:39:07.

forward to doing that. That was going on to be a benefit. But all

:39:08.:39:11.

that happened in that year, going on to cricket feels, being booed by

:39:12.:39:16.

spectators, receiving letters, being called Judas, it became my time to

:39:17.:39:22.

leave. I didn't want to be in that environment any more. That

:39:23.:39:27.

environment, it seemed it did not want me at that time. So I left in a

:39:28.:39:36.

huff and a puff. Your career started with people saying you could be the

:39:37.:39:40.

next Ian Boulton, huge excitement and presumably pressure? Not

:39:41.:39:44.

initially. As a young man, you are quite excited, being compared to

:39:45.:39:49.

somebody you grew up watching and admired, it was certainly

:39:50.:39:51.

flattering. When it gets to the point when you are not performing

:39:52.:39:55.

like the great man, and the expectation is for you to do that,

:39:56.:40:00.

the pressure does build. I think that goes with the territory. If you

:40:01.:40:06.

want to be an elite sportsmen, or elite at anything, there is going to

:40:07.:40:12.

be pressure to perform. You got hassle in the dressing rooms, didn't

:40:13.:40:16.

you, about being a bit flash, spending too much cash, also

:40:17.:40:19.

questions about your private life, questions that maybe you were gay.

:40:20.:40:25.

You had a hard time in the dressing room? The dressing room can be a

:40:26.:40:30.

hard place. Everybody isn't all necessarily pally. There is a lot of

:40:31.:40:39.

men there, and a lot of testosterone. I think a lot of those

:40:40.:40:44.

came out, I use the word different loosely, I did things differently, I

:40:45.:40:48.

didn't go to the pub, I didn't do things that cricketers traditionally

:40:49.:40:52.

do. I have my own life away from cricket, I have my own friends away

:40:53.:40:57.

from cricket. I like dancing late at night. In that, I wasn't necessarily

:40:58.:41:05.

taking part in things that were traditionally seen as stuff for

:41:06.:41:11.

cricketers. I don't think it helps, when sometimes you take your clothes

:41:12.:41:15.

off for a woman's magazine. These are all things being seen. You did

:41:16.:41:20.

do, there was a shoot a feud months earlier, and it came out, what much

:41:21.:41:25.

was it, an important test? Just before the Test match at Lord's, the

:41:26.:41:30.

Ashes Test match. It was bad timing. In a lot of things, I use the word

:41:31.:41:34.

differently, I didn't necessarily fit the traditional mould. That was

:41:35.:41:40.

always good to be problematic going forward. So, you have had this

:41:41.:41:46.

successful career. People watching this will say how do you go from

:41:47.:41:50.

that, being an England cricketer earning a decent amount of money, to

:41:51.:41:54.

ending your career and trying to smuggle ?140,000 worth of liquid

:41:55.:42:00.

cocaine into Gatwick Airport? In my case, it probably started a long

:42:01.:42:04.

time before that. Cricket was fun, it was living the dream. But that

:42:05.:42:10.

dream was always going to end. As a sportsman, you are told that your

:42:11.:42:13.

career is only going to last for so much time. You think you understand

:42:14.:42:17.

that, but you also believe it isn't going to happen to you. In my case,

:42:18.:42:20.

I didn't actually take full advantage of the opportunity. The

:42:21.:42:24.

opportunity to learn different things, to get ready for that moment

:42:25.:42:30.

when cricket would end. Of course, I hoped that cricket would carry on

:42:31.:42:35.

longer. As with most things, it doesn't really end to your script.

:42:36.:42:38.

It ended early. What had happened is that I haven't prepared. Life after

:42:39.:42:44.

cricket became difficult very quickly. Was just a decision that

:42:45.:42:52.

you are saying? A lot of people watching this would say I have

:42:53.:42:55.

struggled to put a roof over my kid's heads, to put food on the

:42:56.:42:58.

table, I don't become a drug smuggler. What happens in your mind?

:42:59.:43:03.

I agree. Lots of people are in difficult situations and have to

:43:04.:43:06.

make difficult choices, and they don't become a drug smuggler. In my

:43:07.:43:11.

case, what happened was, over a period of time, I had left cricket

:43:12.:43:16.

sometime before, but over a period of time the worry I got myself into,

:43:17.:43:22.

in mental state, where I became that desperate. Things that I never

:43:23.:43:29.

thought of before became an option. Whether drugs were concerned, it was

:43:30.:43:33.

more an immediate thing, trying to solve a situation right there and

:43:34.:43:42.

then, and I made the wrong choices. Simply because, mentally, I was in a

:43:43.:43:45.

place where it seemed, at the time, I was not really thinking. I was

:43:46.:43:50.

more desperate and thinking properly, and made a desperate

:43:51.:43:55.

choice. The moment when you did get caught, you are talking about the

:43:56.:44:00.

concern of what your mum would think, about your brother. How did

:44:01.:44:03.

it affect your relationships, that one moment, presumably everything in

:44:04.:44:09.

your life changed? I suppose I am still assessing that. My brothers,

:44:10.:44:15.

my mum, they have been very supportive through this difficult

:44:16.:44:19.

time. Bearing in mind that I have embarrassed them and put them in a

:44:20.:44:23.

difficult situation, they have been very supportive. But as a family,

:44:24.:44:31.

people that you love, you look to get over the difficult times and

:44:32.:44:34.

move on. That is what we're doing as a family. As an older brother, my

:44:35.:44:39.

job was always to try to guide my younger siblings. Where that was

:44:40.:44:45.

concerned, I certainly got it wrong. But it is also about going back to

:44:46.:44:52.

that and taking the reins again, showing to your family and the

:44:53.:44:57.

public at large who you are and that that incident is not your defining

:44:58.:45:01.

moment. It was six and a half years of your life in prison. What was

:45:02.:45:07.

that like, being in prison, being someone who is famous, recognised,

:45:08.:45:12.

and England sportsmen? Initially it was just terrifying, until, over a

:45:13.:45:16.

period of months or even a year, you eventually find the strength to

:45:17.:45:20.

believe that, actually, I can do this. It's going to be long, it's

:45:21.:45:25.

going to be hard, but after a period of time you understand, maybe after

:45:26.:45:28.

a year or a year and a half, I can do this, if I break it down into

:45:29.:45:33.

little bits. I've already done a year, so I can do another year and

:45:34.:45:37.

get to the end. Eventually, you get to a place where you believe you can

:45:38.:45:40.

do it. At the beginning, certainly, there was not much light. Everything

:45:41.:45:46.

turned to sand, not by anybody else's hand, but my own. And you

:45:47.:45:54.

could really see's a bright spot in the sky, and eventually get a bit of

:45:55.:45:59.

hope and you can get to the end of it, and you hope that you can

:46:00.:46:00.

rebuild afterwards. Have you been able to rebuild? Can

:46:01.:46:08.

have people treated you since you came? And how is your financial

:46:09.:46:13.

situation is leaving prison? It is difficult, because of course trust

:46:14.:46:17.

has been eroded, in a number of ways. You have to rebuild trust.

:46:18.:46:20.

There are consequences of doing what I did. It means now that you're a

:46:21.:46:26.

criminal, is that potentially finding work isn't so easy, but that

:46:27.:46:31.

is part of the consequences of making those decisions. The making

:46:32.:46:38.

up after still goes on now, moving ahead still goes on now. It is a

:46:39.:46:42.

slower process than before, because there are many other things you have

:46:43.:46:45.

to consider now that you didn't before. Do you feel you have to give

:46:46.:46:50.

something back? I know you are working trying to get more young

:46:51.:46:54.

ethnic minority boys into cricket. I know you helping cricketers to

:46:55.:47:00.

prepare for life after sport. Do you feel you owe people that? I wouldn't

:47:01.:47:07.

say that I feel that I owe, but I feel as a person it is certain that

:47:08.:47:11.

the right thing to do. It is what I want to do, and it is the place I am

:47:12.:47:15.

in in my life at the moment. I have made mistakes, but through those

:47:16.:47:19.

mistakes, I have gained an awful lot of experience, and it would be a

:47:20.:47:23.

pity not to try to share that so that other people don't make the

:47:24.:47:30.

same mistakes, because all the mistakes I made were avoidable with

:47:31.:47:34.

a little thought, planning and foresight. Which you don't

:47:35.:47:37.

necessarily always have as a young person. Thank you ever so much for

:47:38.:47:41.

coming in to speak to us. I am very grateful to you by speaking to us.

:47:42.:47:46.

We have contacted the England and Wales Cricket board about the claims

:47:47.:47:52.

made by Chris Lewis is about match fixing. The ECB says many of the

:47:53.:47:56.

people involved at the time had now left the organisation. They said

:47:57.:47:59.

they would meet with Chris about his claims and discuss them in detail.

:48:00.:48:05.

They also put out that in 2010 the ECB became the first board to set up

:48:06.:48:09.

their own dedicated anti-corruption unit with monitoring of matches and

:48:10.:48:13.

advice for players about the dangers posed by the illegal betting market.

:48:14.:48:21.

Coming up: Turks and Caicos are the latest islands to feel the force of

:48:22.:48:28.

Hurricane Irma. It's supposed to be one

:48:29.:48:29.

of the greatest - and simplest - pleasures of being a parent,

:48:30.:48:31.

reading to your child. But it's thought as many

:48:32.:48:34.

as five million adults in the UK struggle with basic literacy

:48:35.:48:36.

and it's a largely hidden problem. It's an issue being highlighted

:48:37.:48:39.

today by Project Literacy - a global campaign involving more

:48:40.:48:41.

than a hundred organisations committed to ending illiteracy

:48:42.:48:43.

worldwide by 2030. Let's speak now to Sarah Todd

:48:44.:48:48.

and Donna Stayner, two mums who couldn't read

:48:49.:48:53.

but are now learning, and to Emma Buckle who's

:48:54.:48:57.

from Project Literacy. Thank you, all, for coming in. Donna

:48:58.:49:08.

and Sarah, first of all, Donna, explain to me but like many people

:49:09.:49:13.

are watching thinking, how can you go through the British school system

:49:14.:49:17.

and not be able to read? Guillemot I didn't really go through school. I

:49:18.:49:23.

left at 14. But still, 14. I got bullied a lot and moved around, so I

:49:24.:49:34.

wasn't able to learn. What about you? My dyslexia wasn't picked up

:49:35.:49:37.

until the last year before I left primary school. It was only in that

:49:38.:49:42.

last year that I realised there is something missing here and other

:49:43.:49:46.

people are able to do things I can't. What impact does it have on

:49:47.:49:50.

your day-to-day life? I was on a train a few months ago, and a man

:49:51.:49:58.

asked a lady what station we were at, and we were next to the sign,

:49:59.:50:02.

and he said, sorry, I can't read. That must be difficult. It is, yes.

:50:03.:50:08.

In your day-to-day life, if you go shopping or if you get a letter in

:50:09.:50:14.

the past to the back post, what did you do? I would handed over to my

:50:15.:50:19.

husband or another member of my family. What about you? I would

:50:20.:50:26.

cheat slightly. I would see brands and products that my parents would

:50:27.:50:30.

buy and I would know that was possibly say. When it came to the

:50:31.:50:35.

post, when I moved into my new flat, I had no idea what paperwork I was

:50:36.:50:38.

meant to fill in, what I was meant to do. A week later, my dad would

:50:39.:50:43.

visit and I would be like, I've got these letters, I don't understand

:50:44.:50:49.

and I need you to read them. He would read them and be like, you

:50:50.:50:52.

were meant to deal with them last week. And I would be like, I don't

:50:53.:50:56.

know what they say, so he would deal with all the paperwork, and it just

:50:57.:51:02.

felt like one more thing taken away from me that I'm not able to deal

:51:03.:51:10.

with. So your parents were aware - what about you, Donna? I have been

:51:11.:51:18.

down in Blandford, and I originally come from Kent, so my parents are

:51:19.:51:23.

down in Kent, so... Thank you for coming in as well, Emma. How common

:51:24.:51:28.

is this type of situation that Donna and Sarah had shared with us? A lot

:51:29.:51:32.

more common than we would imagine in the UK. Over 5 million adults who

:51:33.:51:39.

struggle with literacy in the UK, and it's a problem that they

:51:40.:51:43.

struggle with that actually has implications far beyond reading and

:51:44.:51:47.

writing, as you mentioned - the day-to-day struggles of being able

:51:48.:51:51.

to read medication or understand it, which has an impact on your health,

:51:52.:51:56.

or being able to understand transport and the impact on

:51:57.:51:59.

day-to-day getting around, or even on employability and the job

:52:00.:52:03.

opportunities you can access for the good and livelihood of your family.

:52:04.:52:07.

It is an issue that we are addressing as Project Literacy in

:52:08.:52:15.

collaboration with our partners. We're working with over 100 partners

:52:16.:52:21.

worldwide. In the UK, as I mentioned, it is an issue that is

:52:22.:52:25.

often hidden, as you mentioned. What we're trying do is to bring that to

:52:26.:52:32.

light and raise the awareness about it through Project Literacy. It is

:52:33.:52:40.

having an impact on people's learning, and that is our mission.

:52:41.:52:45.

Project Literacy really is the foundation for that. Donna, did you

:52:46.:52:52.

find it embarrassing? It was very embarrassing, and I just used to

:52:53.:52:55.

feel sick, basically, not being able to read to my children and that. And

:52:56.:53:01.

they spotted it? Nothing gets past children, does it? My oldest did,

:53:02.:53:08.

because very bright. What did he say? He said, Mum, why can't you

:53:09.:53:16.

help me with my homework? Why is it always Dad? What about you? My big

:53:17.:53:24.

bugbear was when my children were small, they bring you these lovely

:53:25.:53:28.

books and some were easy to read, but other books they would bring, I

:53:29.:53:37.

would be like, no, no, no, let's turn on the TV, and I would find

:53:38.:53:41.

something else to do because I couldn't read the stories they

:53:42.:53:45.

wanted me to, which was heartbreaking. I was a single

:53:46.:53:48.

parent, and I was the only one reading to them until my mum and dad

:53:49.:53:51.

got there, and they would be like, please, and I would be like, no. It

:53:52.:53:56.

is heartbreaking not to be able to read bedtime story to your children,

:53:57.:54:00.

or not to be able to read to them at all. Now they are at a critical age,

:54:01.:54:04.

at school, and I need to be able to read to them, and am glad I can.

:54:05.:54:10.

Before, it was heartbreaking. What was the moment that force you to

:54:11.:54:14.

say, I am going to go out and learn to read? It was going to hospital

:54:15.:54:21.

with my an 11-year-old -- with my 11-year-old, because he has a nut

:54:22.:54:24.

allergy. I felt awful taking him to the hospital and saying, he has

:54:25.:54:32.

eaten nuts again because I cannot read the ingredients on the foods to

:54:33.:54:41.

check. Did you know where to go? Not at first. I've got in touch with the

:54:42.:54:46.

children's centre in Blandford. And it is thanks to the group that I

:54:47.:54:53.

have come on so quickly. When my children first joined, they were two

:54:54.:54:57.

and a half years. They couldn't say to their mother, you need to do

:54:58.:55:01.

something about this. The Government suggest that as a single parent you

:55:02.:55:05.

don't go to work until they are five years old, but before then you go to

:55:06.:55:09.

the job centre and go to the workforce interview, where they give

:55:10.:55:14.

you options to do courses or to gain extra skills before you go into the

:55:15.:55:19.

world of work. The lady I had was lovely, her name was Carol, and she

:55:20.:55:23.

said, what do you like to do for fun? And I said, drive to the beach,

:55:24.:55:30.

followed Brown signs. She said, what is your biggest bugbear? I said, I'm

:55:31.:55:34.

not very good at cooking, looked at the floor, burst into tears. She

:55:35.:55:39.

said, what is the problem? I said, I can't read to my children, and I

:55:40.:55:43.

would love to be able to read bedtime stories to them. She said,

:55:44.:55:55.

actually, I know a charity called Read Easy, and they are amazing,

:55:56.:55:59.

take on adults who can't be, and they will take you from nothing to

:56:00.:56:03.

something. Then I met Jenny through that, and she got me a few coaches,

:56:04.:56:09.

and like I say, I have gone from being a withering old caterpillar

:56:10.:56:14.

that is stubborn and refuses to admit to being dyslexic to now, as

:56:15.:56:18.

everyone keeps on saying, this amazing, confident butterfly that is

:56:19.:56:22.

more than happy and begs my children, please, let me read to

:56:23.:56:26.

you! How long does it take to learn to read? We know that children are

:56:27.:56:30.

little sponges and pick things up really fast. My five-year-old

:56:31.:56:37.

terrifies me, she's so quick. Is it hard as an adult? I have been going

:56:38.:56:43.

on for 18 months and I'm still not quite there yet, but I find it a

:56:44.:56:50.

easier. It took me to met years, and I kept persisting. I think the thing

:56:51.:56:55.

that helped me the most was, I would start with the project, got so far,

:56:56.:56:59.

I came to my mum and dad and said, I've got something to show you. I

:57:00.:57:02.

pulled out a book and started reading, and my mum and dad were

:57:03.:57:07.

like... Every time I've done something, my mum and dad have

:57:08.:57:11.

always gone, we're really proud of you, well done. It feels really nice

:57:12.:57:14.

for me to know that someone is really proud of you, but it gave me

:57:15.:57:19.

that tiny bit more encouragement to go forward and read. When I

:57:20.:57:24.

completed it... Sorry. It was really nice. Don't apologise. One Sunday I

:57:25.:57:30.

thought, I will go to church on Sunday, and I was asked to read a

:57:31.:57:33.

passage, and I was like, I'm going to do this. Before I read, I said

:57:34.:57:40.

you'll have to excuse me if I'm wobbly, but it is the first time I

:57:41.:57:45.

have read in front of strangers in public, and afterwards they give me

:57:46.:57:47.

a round of applause, which was amazing. Anyone who has difficulty

:57:48.:57:53.

reading who is watching this only needs to listen to you to get

:57:54.:57:58.

inspiration. If there is one person sitting at home thinking, that is

:57:59.:58:03.

me, what would you say to them? Ignore the world where you they say

:58:04.:58:08.

to you, because you have an issue, you have a label. Just say, I have

:58:09.:58:13.

an issue, where can I get help from? It is out there if you speak up. You

:58:14.:58:19.

can go to your GP, go to your local centre, people are there to help

:58:20.:58:23.

you. No one will point at you and laugh. They are there with open arms

:58:24.:58:27.

and they will say, we're here, we will help you out, what do you need?

:58:28.:58:31.

It is taking the first step in having that confidence. Just like

:58:32.:58:37.

with previous issues I've had, I thought, they will laugh at me and

:58:38.:58:42.

take the Mickey out of me and go, oh, another person with an issue,

:58:43.:58:45.

and instead they were like, well done, you have taken the first step.

:58:46.:58:52.

For someone feeling a bit nervous and stubborn because of all the

:58:53.:58:55.

bullying and possibly the down comments they have had, just do it.

:58:56.:59:00.

Take that first step, get onto an organisation. People are waiting to

:59:01.:59:04.

help you. It has been an absolute pleasure to talk to. We could talk

:59:05.:59:08.

for rages, but we have to go to the weather. -- for ages.

:59:09.:59:17.

Things are feeling pretty autumnal in the next few days, low pressure

:59:18.:59:22.

in charge of the weather. It is not a complete wash-out. This picture

:59:23.:59:28.

was taken this morning on the coast of Norfolk - quite cloudy there. In

:59:29.:59:33.

Kent, Seabrook, quite a lot of rain over the canal, a great picture. --

:59:34.:59:44.

a grey picture. There are some clear spells of weather but also some

:59:45.:59:48.

shallots, even longer spells of rain across southern England and South

:59:49.:59:52.

Wales too. Showers, but brightness in between. Some could be heavy, the

:59:53.:59:56.

odd rumble of thunder, and across Scotland, we have lighter winds, so

:59:57.:00:01.

the showers will be slow moving into the afternoon. Temperatures only

:00:02.:00:04.

14-15dC, and there could be standing water on the roads. More brisk winds

:00:05.:00:10.

for Northern Ireland, so the shower was rattling through fairly quickly

:00:11.:00:14.

here will stop and it is a story of sunny spells and hit and miss

:00:15.:00:17.

scattered showers across northern England and Wales. In the

:00:18.:00:20.

south-east, you will see more persistent rain in the afternoon,

:00:21.:00:23.

with a return to sunshine and showers in the West. It will be one

:00:24.:00:28.

of those days where you have sunglasses on one minute and a

:00:29.:00:31.

brolly out the next. Across northern and western parts of the country, we

:00:32.:00:36.

will continue to see that blustery, showery theme, whereas further east,

:00:37.:00:40.

there will be light winds and drier conditions to start Saturday. In

:00:41.:00:44.

this countryside, we will see single figures first thing. Through the day

:00:45.:00:48.

on Saturday, not too bad to start off, a bit of sunshine in Scotland,

:00:49.:00:53.

southern and eastern England. Elsewhere, showers through the

:00:54.:00:56.

morning pushing to the east and becoming more widespread in the

:00:57.:01:02.

afternoon. Temperatures 15-19dC. Some brighter interludes, but you

:01:03.:01:05.

are quite likely to see a few passing shower was almost anywhere,

:01:06.:01:09.

I think. Most of them fade away overnight, with a small ledge of

:01:10.:01:14.

high pressure, which sets us up for a mainly dry start across central

:01:15.:01:18.

and eastern areas on Sunday. It is all on the change again through

:01:19.:01:21.

Sunday, as the next front moves in from the west. Things will turn

:01:22.:01:28.

wetter and windier later in the day. That unsettled theme continues into

:01:29.:01:31.

the new working week. Still rather cool and windy, with showers for

:01:32.:01:36.

Monday and juicy. That is how the weather looks in the UK. I will be

:01:37.:01:40.

back in about 15 minutes with a detailed look at Hurricane Irma.

:01:41.:01:45.

Hello, it's Friday, it's ten o'clock. Hurricane Irma continues

:01:46.:01:51.

tearing through the Caribbean. The British Overseas Territory

:01:52.:01:53.

of Turks and Caicos in the Caribbean are the latest islands to feel

:01:54.:01:56.

the force of Hurricane Irma, which is now known to have

:01:57.:01:58.

killed at least 14 people. Many Brits are stuck

:01:59.:02:01.

in the Caribbean - travel and communications

:02:02.:02:03.

in the region are We were in the bath with a mattress

:02:04.:02:12.

above us. That is how we managed to keep safe and dry. I think a lot of

:02:13.:02:15.

people were in a similar situation. We will be speaking to people

:02:16.:02:17.

affected by the strong winds that have flattened parts

:02:18.:02:20.

of the Caribbean At least six people have died as an

:02:21.:02:37.

8.2 magnitude earthquake southern Mexico. Suddenly you could feel the

:02:38.:02:41.

building with quite heavily. You could hear loud cracks in the

:02:42.:02:43.

concrete. It sounded like a giant wooden branch being broken open

:02:44.:02:51.

violently. Moving home can be stressful at the best of times, but

:02:52.:02:56.

new research suggests 250,000 private renters in England are being

:02:57.:02:59.

forced into debt because they are having to move regularly. We speak

:03:00.:03:00.

to some of them. Good morning. Now all of the news.

:03:01.:03:16.

Their Hurricane Irma has left a trail of destruction as it sweeps

:03:17.:03:22.

across the Caribbean. It is already destroyed almost all buildings on

:03:23.:03:25.

Barbuda. The Red Cross says an estimated 1.2 million people have

:03:26.:03:26.

been affected. The British Virgin islands has

:03:27.:03:32.

declared a state of emergency. Images show buildings destroyed and

:03:33.:03:41.

debris Cross streets. The governor said there were reports of

:03:42.:03:45.

casualties and fatalities and help had been requested from the UK.

:03:46.:03:48.

At least six people have died after an earthquake with a magnitude

:03:49.:03:51.

The earthquake struck off the Pacific Coast

:03:52.:03:54.

A tsunami warning has been issued for Mexico and six other

:03:55.:03:58.

Local authorities say it's the strongest quake to hit

:03:59.:04:01.

the country since the devastating 1985 tremor that brought down

:04:02.:04:03.

buildings and killed thousands of people.

:04:04.:04:10.

Young offenders from ethnic minority backgrounds will become the next

:04:11.:04:13.

generation of adult criminals unless the justice system

:04:14.:04:15.

is reformed, according to a review led by the MP David Lammy.

:04:16.:04:18.

The inquiry makes a series of recommendations -

:04:19.:04:20.

these include allowing some prosecutions to be deferred,

:04:21.:04:23.

or even dropped, if suspects get treatment for issues such as drug

:04:24.:04:26.

Jeremy Cooke from the Black Training And Enterprise Grid told the

:04:27.:04:41.

programme that we need to have the resources to make sure that people

:04:42.:04:44.

come out of prison and avoid reoffending.

:04:45.:04:45.

It's about making sure that prison officers

:04:46.:04:47.

are given the right training, the right support so they can meet

:04:48.:04:50.

individuals' needs fully so we don't have people coming out of prison

:04:51.:04:54.

and reoffending at high rates because they are black or Muslim.

:04:55.:04:58.

The Nobel prize winner Malala Yousafzai has called

:04:59.:05:00.

on the leader of Myanamar, Aung San Suu Kyi, to help

:05:01.:05:02.

the country's Rohingya Muslim minority.

:05:03.:05:04.

Thousands of Rohingya have fled because of violence.

:05:05.:05:06.

Malala called for an international response to the violence in Myanmar.

:05:07.:05:08.

She spoke to the BBC as she prepares to start

:05:09.:05:11.

A 13-year-old girl who died from a brain aneurysm has helped

:05:12.:05:17.

eight different people through organ donation - a record number.

:05:18.:05:19.

Jemima Layzell, from Somerset, died in 2012.

:05:20.:05:22.

Her parents said she was clever, compassionate and creative -

:05:23.:05:25.

and would have been "very proud of her legacy".

:05:26.:05:29.

NHS Blood and Transplant said no other donor had

:05:30.:05:31.

That is a summary of the latest BBC News. More at 10.30. A lot of you

:05:32.:05:48.

getting in touch about the conversation we were having before

:05:49.:05:53.

the news, with two mothers who have only just learned to read, because

:05:54.:05:57.

they could not read bedtime stories to their children. One tweet says,

:05:58.:06:03.

brave mums, talking about how hard it was that they could not read

:06:04.:06:05.

those books because they were illiterate. Do get in touch.

:06:06.:06:12.

use the hashtag #victorialive and If you text, you will be charged

:06:13.:06:15.

Two-time US Open winner Venus Williams has missed out

:06:16.:06:18.

on the final of the tournament after being beaten by

:06:19.:06:21.

In January Stephens was on her sofa, with a large cast

:06:22.:06:25.

on her left foot watching the Australian open on television.

:06:26.:06:27.

But yesterday she was hustling after every single ball to defeat

:06:28.:06:30.

I am super happy to be in a grand slam final. To do it here, at home,

:06:31.:06:48.

is even more special. I think this is what every player dreams about.

:06:49.:06:56.

Unfortunately, fortunately but unfortunately, I had to play Venus

:06:57.:07:02.

Williams Leeds but having four Americans in the semifinal says a

:07:03.:07:04.

lot about American tennis and where we are right

:07:05.:07:08.

Awaiting the final is Madison Keys, who crushed

:07:09.:07:10.

The pair will both be making their grand slam final debuts.

:07:11.:07:14.

The last time two Americans made the final was 15 years ago

:07:15.:07:16.

when Serena Williams beat her sister Venus.

:07:17.:07:18.

You know, these are the moments growing

:07:19.:07:22.

To be sitting here as US open finalist, it

:07:23.:07:29.

She is a close friend of mine, so to be able to play her

:07:30.:07:37.

in both of our first finals is a really special moment, especially

:07:38.:07:41.

with everything we have gone through this year.

:07:42.:07:44.

Ben Stokes reached a new career high, taking six wickets helping

:07:45.:07:47.

But England then struggled in reply - poor batting put England

:07:48.:07:55.

in trouble and Joe Root's side closed on 46 for 4.

:07:56.:08:03.

Fifa has opened disciplinary proceedings against Tottenham

:08:04.:08:04.

midfielder Dele Alli after he gestured with his middle

:08:05.:08:07.

finger during England's match against Slovakia on Monday.

:08:08.:08:10.

Television pictures showed Alli's gesture during the 2-1 World Cup

:08:11.:08:12.

The 21-year-old said it was a joke with good friend Kyle Walker.

:08:13.:08:26.

that is all from me, I will be back in 30 minutes.

:08:27.:08:30.

Hurricane scientists say they've never seen anything

:08:31.:08:31.

As Hurricane Irma hurtles through the Caribbean,

:08:32.:08:35.

with two other massive weather systems in its wake,

:08:36.:08:37.

one meteorologist described it as unparalled.

:08:38.:08:38.

This is what it looks like on the satellite.

:08:39.:08:41.

Hurricane Irma has already caused utter devastation

:08:42.:08:42.

across multiple islands, with Hurricanes Jose

:08:43.:08:44.

A Royal navy ship is now on its way to help. Ships have already stopped

:08:45.:09:07.

off to help in Anguilla, carrying engineers and marines who shored up

:09:08.:09:10.

infrastructure and repaired the airport runway. The ship will spend

:09:11.:09:15.

a day helping the British Virgin Islands, before relocating to avoid

:09:16.:09:24.

hurricane Jose. In Cuba, thousands of tourists have been moved to

:09:25.:09:29.

safety from exposed coastal resorts. In the Bahamas, people are stocking

:09:30.:09:35.

up and packing up. In Miami, preparations too.

:09:36.:09:36.

There's a state of emergency in Florida - Hurricane Irma is set

:09:37.:09:39.

These people are preparing to bunker down - while thousands of others

:09:40.:09:43.

have been clogging the roads and airports as they flee.

:09:44.:09:46.

Fergus Thomas is a humanitarian adviser and is working with the

:09:47.:09:51.

Caribbean disaster emergency management agency. Earlier he spoke

:09:52.:09:57.

to the BBC from Antigua. It has been a really split story. Mercifully, a

:09:58.:10:02.

lot of islands were untouched. This is the biggest storm that has hit

:10:03.:10:07.

the Caribbean since the beginning of storms being recorded. This is

:10:08.:10:13.

enormous. Unfortunately, as you know, some of the islands in the

:10:14.:10:17.

northern side have been really badly hit. That is Anguilla and Barbuda,

:10:18.:10:23.

and as far as we know the British Virgin Islands have also been very

:10:24.:10:27.

badly hit. There have been communication issues with those

:10:28.:10:31.

places. We are hoping to get onto the ground tomorrow, to the British

:10:32.:10:40.

Virgin Islands. The ship was in Anguilla today and delivered the

:10:41.:10:45.

first assistance. We were the first there to do an assessment. They are

:10:46.:10:48.

moving to the British Virgin Islands to get a better picture of the

:10:49.:10:54.

needs. I think we have systems up and running in terms of the

:10:55.:10:58.

assessment, and I hope we will be able to make their decisions about

:10:59.:11:00.

how we can best persist in the coming hours and dates.

:11:01.:11:05.

The UK Government has faced criticism that it has not responded

:11:06.:11:13.

quickly enough. Let's go to the Foreign Office and Matthew Thomson.

:11:14.:11:19.

What is being done to help people? Well, so far we know that Theresa

:11:20.:11:25.

May has pledged ?32 million in relief aid and currently a military

:11:26.:11:28.

task group is assembling at RAF Brize Norton. A number of C17

:11:29.:11:33.

Globemaster aircraft there are being readied, we are being told, supplied

:11:34.:11:37.

with several hundred military personnel, Royal Marines and army

:11:38.:11:41.

engineers. There will be two Puma helicopters. The first of the planes

:11:42.:11:43.

will leave this morning. We don't know it's everywhere. As you can

:11:44.:11:47.

imagine, finding a runway suitable for all of this material is quite

:11:48.:11:50.

difficult amid the widespread devastation. They will eventually be

:11:51.:11:55.

joined by the HMS Ocean, the Royal Navy flagship. It is a helicopter

:11:56.:12:00.

carrier. It has been on Nato exercises in the Mediterranean. We

:12:01.:12:02.

don't expect it will be there for another ten days, if not two weeks.

:12:03.:12:11.

As you said, there will be a join up with the Royal Fleet ship that has

:12:12.:12:14.

been there already, and is now on route to the British Virgin Islands.

:12:15.:12:18.

Earlier I spoke Carl Joseph, who's a reporter at Antigua Newsroom.

:12:19.:12:21.

Yesterday he flew he over Barbuda in a helicopter

:12:22.:12:23.

We did an overview of Barbuda and, by and large, a lot

:12:24.:12:28.

You saw large patches of water as you went, as we took that

:12:29.:12:36.

view going to the helipad in Barbuda.

:12:37.:12:43.

Also, what struck me before we even touched down was the fact

:12:44.:12:46.

There were no leaves on the trees whatsoever.

:12:47.:12:54.

The hurricane had completely ravaged not only the

:12:55.:12:57.

houses and structures but the trees on the island, so the vegetation

:12:58.:13:00.

All you saw were barks and stems, and everything just

:13:01.:13:05.

brown, so that wasn't a good sight, even

:13:06.:13:10.

before you touched down in Barbuda itself.

:13:11.:13:14.

Is there any food, any shelter, left for the people in

:13:15.:13:17.

When I went there today, as I journeyed down

:13:18.:13:24.

that main street towards the wharf...

:13:25.:13:28.

remember which year, the government had built a strong

:13:29.:13:33.

complex for fisheries, where they were supposed

:13:34.:13:35.

That is one of the main things that Barbuda does - it

:13:36.:13:46.

So they built a very strong complex to house

:13:47.:13:53.

the lobster, the fish to be exported throughout the Caribbean and the

:13:54.:13:59.

rest of the world, so a lot of people tried

:14:00.:14:03.

to make their way down to the fishers' complex.

:14:04.:14:07.

Today, when I went down there, that is where a lot

:14:08.:14:12.

of the distribution of food, water, clothes,

:14:13.:14:13.

So, if folks wanted to get stuff for their children and for

:14:14.:14:23.

their families, they would have made their way there.

:14:24.:14:28.

Most of the people were gathered there today.

:14:29.:14:31.

That is where the main sort of shelter was.

:14:32.:14:34.

I'm glad you said where the shelter is, because after the hurricane

:14:35.:14:37.

would have passed and done damage to Barbuda, if they got, like,

:14:38.:14:44.

simple drizzle or simple rain, they would get wet.

:14:45.:14:46.

With me now is Sarah Keith Lucas from the BBC weather Centre. Take us

:14:47.:15:06.

through this. We can see satellite images. That's right, it is a huge

:15:07.:15:12.

storm, about the same size as France, and it has been an extremely

:15:13.:15:16.

strong category five hurricane. In the last few hours, it has been

:15:17.:15:21.

downgraded to category four, but it is still producing winds of 155 mph,

:15:22.:15:26.

a really serious dog. You can see the size of it, and underneath, lots

:15:27.:15:31.

of small, low-lying islands dotted around. It is sitting at the moment

:15:32.:15:36.

over the Turks and Caicos Islands, bringing not just catastrophic,

:15:37.:15:41.

damaging winds, but also the heavy rainfall and that significant storm

:15:42.:15:47.

surge, which can be as high as 20 feet above sea level. The islands

:15:48.:15:52.

are very low-lying some of them, so it is the problem of severe flooding

:15:53.:15:59.

as well as winds. It is over Turks and Caicos now, but where is it

:16:00.:16:04.

heading? It is heading north west, and it has been following the focus

:16:05.:16:09.

quite well, actually. Next, it will be somewhere between Cuba and the

:16:10.:16:13.

Bahamas, so bringing those devastating winds, heavy rain and a

:16:14.:16:18.

storm surge across parts of Cuba and the Bahamas, and then pushing up

:16:19.:16:21.

towards southern Florida over the weekend. When it hits, what happens?

:16:22.:16:28.

I was talking to your colleague from the BBC weather Centre yesterday,

:16:29.:16:31.

and he said that normally when it hits the land, it slows down, but

:16:32.:16:36.

then there could be devastation of a highly populated area. There have

:16:37.:16:39.

already been evacuations across parts of southern Florida. It will

:16:40.:16:44.

weaken because the fuel source gets cut off, so it no longer has that

:16:45.:16:49.

moist, warm water it has been moving over. Once it hits land, it will

:16:50.:16:54.

weaken a little bit. It is exceptionally strong, so even if it

:16:55.:17:05.

does weaken, it will still be devastating. It looks most likely to

:17:06.:17:08.

push north across central parts of Florida, towards Georgia, and then

:17:09.:17:10.

perhaps even quite a strong storm as it hit Tennessee. The winds will

:17:11.:17:14.

start to ease as the storm moves to the north, and it will slow down a

:17:15.:17:18.

bit once it pushes its way further inland. Certainly for Florida, this

:17:19.:17:23.

could be a devastating storm. Some uncertainty about the track. It

:17:24.:17:28.

could be further east or west, but at the moment, the most likely

:17:29.:17:33.

scenario is, it will push its way north through central Florida. We

:17:34.:17:37.

are concentrating on Hurricane Irma, but there are a couple of other

:17:38.:17:44.

storms building up in the area. Hurricane Jose could hit the islands

:17:45.:17:59.

again. Hurricane Katia is moving at about 120 mph. I think it will

:18:00.:18:02.

follow fairly similar track at first. It will push north west,

:18:03.:18:11.

getting close to Antigua, by Buda as well, the areas that are just

:18:12.:18:14.

starting to clear up from Hurricane Irma will be faced with this

:18:15.:18:18.

hurricane. It probably won't make direct landfall, but whether or not

:18:19.:18:21.

it does hit the islands, it will move close by, so more strong winds

:18:22.:18:26.

and heavy rain around, really not what they need when they are

:18:27.:18:29.

starting the relief effort. Thank you ever so much for coming down to

:18:30.:18:31.

talk to us. Let's return now to our main story -

:18:32.:18:33.

that landmark report into the treatment of ethnic

:18:34.:18:36.

minorities in the justice system. It's calling for an overhaul

:18:37.:18:38.

of the way young offenders are dealt So what exactly did MP

:18:39.:18:41.

David Lammy MP's report find? But when it came to drug offences,

:18:42.:18:52.

ethnic minorities are around 240% more likely to be sent to prison

:18:53.:19:30.

compared to white offenders. Ethnic minority male prisoners

:19:31.:19:42.

are more likely to be placed for the North West of England,

:19:43.:19:44.

Patrick Williams, Senior Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University,

:19:45.:20:30.

Malcolm Richardson, Chairman of the Magistrates' Association,

:20:31.:20:32.

and Dal Babu, former Chief Superintendent

:20:33.:20:34.

with the Metropolitan Police. I want to start by speaking to you,

:20:35.:20:47.

Nazir. Clearly there are big issues of representation within the police

:20:48.:20:50.

and criminal justice system. Tell us about what you have experienced

:20:51.:20:54.

yourself. Thank you for having me on. I accept most of what David

:20:55.:21:01.

Lammy says. Let me start with diversity. There is not one chief

:21:02.:21:07.

constable from a menorah tea, and in the senior ranks, very few. There

:21:08.:21:13.

was one enquirer Commissioner out of 42 from a minority. -- minority. In

:21:14.:21:23.

the justice system, it is very few. The crown prosecution service gets

:21:24.:21:28.

this right, it has a very diverse workforce in the senior ranks, and I

:21:29.:21:34.

think that has an impact. If you have a diverse, more understanding

:21:35.:21:41.

justice system, you will have more understanding of the people who come

:21:42.:21:44.

before it. I had to get rid of a district judge a few years ago

:21:45.:21:49.

because he insisted that a person is called Patel should be called to

:21:50.:21:56.

give witness testimony at a short -- at short notice, and he said, surely

:21:57.:22:00.

she only works in a shop. And that is the sort of bias that the system

:22:01.:22:07.

has. You can tackle it through diversity and transparency. I am in

:22:08.:22:12.

favour of televising proceeding with safeguards. You can see what is

:22:13.:22:18.

happening and what might not be happening in court rooms, and you

:22:19.:22:21.

could understand the decisions being taken, and that could build trust,

:22:22.:22:25.

which is lacking. The trust deficit is one of the big issues in this

:22:26.:22:29.

report, isn't it? Patrick, do you think that more ethnic minority

:22:30.:22:37.

people would stand up and plead guilty if there was a greater

:22:38.:22:40.

representation, because they were trust they would get a fair

:22:41.:22:43.

sentence, rather than pleading not guilty on going before a jury, as

:22:44.:22:58.

David Lammy suggests? In my experience, the question of trust is

:22:59.:23:02.

very important. David Lammy talking about it is not a new question.

:23:03.:23:11.

Reports before have spoken about it. We recognise that there is a reality

:23:12.:23:17.

that young people from minorities will recognise that justice has been

:23:18.:23:21.

stolen from them. It is extremely difficult for them to get a similar

:23:22.:23:25.

experience of Justice compared to white counterparts. That is an

:23:26.:23:30.

important point. If you look at a number of reports, all of them are

:23:31.:23:40.

basically saying the same thing. It is about representation, increasing

:23:41.:23:45.

trust. So why is it not changing? Rain-mac Nazir's point is important.

:23:46.:23:49.

If you look at the number of chief constables, there is not a single

:23:50.:23:53.

one from an ethnic menorah tea. We had one in Kent, Mike Fuller, and he

:23:54.:24:01.

retired. -- if you look at the number of chief constables... Are

:24:02.:24:05.

there some coming through the ranks? We need to nail some of the myths.

:24:06.:24:10.

We were talking about it earlier, about the numbers of ethnic

:24:11.:24:14.

minorities going into the police. And it is tiny. In the new figures,

:24:15.:24:18.

a third of people who apply from menorah tees. Chief constables will

:24:19.:24:21.

say that people aren't coming through, but they said that when I

:24:22.:24:25.

joined the police 35 years ago. They said, we had a whole generation to

:24:26.:24:33.

change it, and here we are, a couple of generations on, and we haven't

:24:34.:24:35.

changed it. We have had a different approach when it comes to gender.

:24:36.:24:37.

The three most senior positions in policing are occupied by women. A

:24:38.:24:41.

quarter of the Chief constables in the country are now women. When I

:24:42.:24:45.

joined, we didn't have any minorities or women, so I think we

:24:46.:24:53.

need to look at some of the lessons that are there. What really worries

:24:54.:24:57.

me is that with this report, like all the others that we had, it will

:24:58.:25:02.

gather dust and we won't actually see any action. I'm just worried now

:25:03.:25:08.

that people will say, look, do we need another report? We just need to

:25:09.:25:13.

get on. If you just go back to the recommendations in any of the

:25:14.:25:17.

reports I've mentioned and say, right, we will implement those

:25:18.:25:19.

recommendations, we wouldn't be sitting here having this discussion.

:25:20.:25:24.

Can I make a point? Sorry to jump in, but there is something about the

:25:25.:25:29.

idea that if we increase the numbers of minority practitioners, this will

:25:30.:25:33.

solve the problem of bias within the system. If we look at the example of

:25:34.:25:38.

women who have taken up senior positions within the system, the

:25:39.:25:44.

experience of women who are offenders within the system is still

:25:45.:25:47.

really damaging. It has an impact on the woman herself and also her

:25:48.:25:53.

family. Let's hear from Malcolm, from the magistrates Association.

:25:54.:25:56.

Firstly, there is a better news story from us in terms of ethnic

:25:57.:26:11.

range. But there is not trust, as David Lammy were saying. They don't

:26:12.:26:15.

trust magistrates to be fair. I'm not sure he's necessarily saying

:26:16.:26:19.

that. He is saying there is a trust deficit where black men and women

:26:20.:26:24.

and Asian men and women who would plead guilty if they thought they

:26:25.:26:27.

would get a fair sentence are being put off and that is why they are

:26:28.:26:31.

going to the jury system. I accept that. What I don't necessarily

:26:32.:26:36.

accept is that that is because they don't see enough black and other

:26:37.:26:41.

ethnic minorities on the bench. We have to believe as a society that we

:26:42.:26:45.

can create a judicial system which delivers fair sentences irrelevant

:26:46.:26:52.

of the colour, gender, age or, frankly, the class of the person or

:26:53.:26:59.

the tribunal that is administering it. If we can achieve it with a

:27:00.:27:02.

jury, we can achieve it with the bench. We in the -- we thoroughly

:27:03.:27:06.

endorse what David says in the report. There is and enough evidence

:27:07.:27:09.

of what happens in the magistrates court. We don't know whether bias

:27:10.:27:16.

comes from the people coming before us from menorah to groups come with

:27:17.:27:20.

more previous convictions, come charged with more aggravated

:27:21.:27:25.

offences. We just don't know, and we need to know. I would like to raise

:27:26.:27:29.

a couple of issues, if I can. And I want to bring Nazir back in. There

:27:30.:27:34.

are 30 recommendations, a huge report. Talking about sealed

:27:35.:27:38.

criminal records, the idea that people could go and say before a

:27:39.:27:45.

judge, I am terribly remorseful, I have moved on and change, therefore

:27:46.:27:49.

employers potentially wouldn't know they had criminal records. And also

:27:50.:27:53.

the idea of prosecutions being deferred, so if you did some kind of

:27:54.:27:57.

community action, some drugs programme, you would get a reduced

:27:58.:28:01.

sentence. Some people watching would feel uncomfortable with that.

:28:02.:28:06.

Starting with the first one, I am in favour of ceiling where it is

:28:07.:28:09.

appropriate. You wouldn't do it where people have care of children,

:28:10.:28:14.

employment where they are working with vulnerable people. One of the

:28:15.:28:17.

issues is how to prevent reoffending to help people get on with their

:28:18.:28:20.

lives and rehabilitate. You have to give them the opportunity to get a

:28:21.:28:25.

job, and sadly, some employers turn off when they see previous

:28:26.:28:29.

convictions. Ceiling where judges think it is appropriate to deliver.

:28:30.:28:36.

-- to see all the previous convictions -- to seal the previous

:28:37.:28:44.

convictions. Sending someone for treatment rather than prosecuting

:28:45.:28:47.

could be an option. Sadly, the issue with that was that it was done with

:28:48.:28:52.

dozens, not hundreds in the past. There are treatment centres for

:28:53.:29:02.

mental health issues available. I am in favour of deferred prosecutions.

:29:03.:29:05.

It currently exists, would you believe, for very rich companies,

:29:06.:29:10.

because they can go to the serious fraud office and reach a deferred

:29:11.:29:15.

prosecution agreement with them which means they won't be prosecuted

:29:16.:29:21.

if they pay a huge sum. It won't help those starting on criminal

:29:22.:29:26.

careers, who have no previous convictions, who may have drug or

:29:27.:29:29.

mental health problems. If we can treat them, it is absolutely right

:29:30.:29:33.

to give them the chance. Deferred prosecution doesn't mean they won't

:29:34.:29:36.

be prosecuted, it means they won't be prosecuted unless they take the

:29:37.:29:40.

treatment and ultimately stop offended. Classes are very important

:29:41.:29:47.

factor, and I think we need to look at the deprivation element. In some

:29:48.:29:51.

ways, whether you are black or white is neither here nor there. If you

:29:52.:29:58.

are poor, you are more likely to be within the criminal justice system.

:29:59.:30:01.

One thing that worries me about the report is on the aspect that you can

:30:02.:30:04.

add two offenders, one black, one white, and you can't have the

:30:05.:30:11.

potential, if the recommendations are taken on board, and I'm not sure

:30:12.:30:14.

they will be, we had a lukewarm response from the Government. As

:30:15.:30:18.

Nazir said, this is about resourcing those additional services, and I

:30:19.:30:21.

don't think this Government has shown any desire to do that.

:30:22.:30:29.

I may have interpreted at Romilly, but what we need is support for

:30:30.:30:34.

those individuals. Class is fundamental. Whether you are black,

:30:35.:30:38.

white or Asian, if you are poor, you are more likely to be in prison. Can

:30:39.:30:44.

I make a point? Some of the analysis that David Lammy has undertaken

:30:45.:30:49.

clearly demonstrates that, like-for-like, black, Asian,

:30:50.:30:53.

minority ethnic individuals experienced the prison system

:30:54.:30:56.

differently. My argument is some of the work we have contributed to the

:30:57.:30:59.

review, the reality that, in London, the vast majority of young black men

:31:00.:31:05.

are constructed and involved as gang involved. They are then treated as

:31:06.:31:19.

joint enterprise. They can demonstrate that there are

:31:20.:31:21.

individual serving custodial sentences because they are black and

:31:22.:31:26.

because they are constructed as being in gangs. They are not guilty

:31:27.:31:31.

of offences. Going back to the trust issue, it's extremely difficult to

:31:32.:31:35.

engage in trust issues when we know the police and criminal justice

:31:36.:31:39.

systems target and respond to black and Asian minority people

:31:40.:31:44.

differently. It needs a seismic shift. Thank you for speaking to us.

:31:45.:31:50.

Let's get more on the earthquake, described by Mexico's President as

:31:51.:31:54.

the strongest in a century. At least five people have died. A tsunami

:31:55.:32:02.

warning has been issued. Joining us is Georgina, a journalist that lives

:32:03.:32:04.

in Mexico City and experienced the earthquake. First of all, tell us

:32:05.:32:13.

what your experience was. Well, hello everybody, it was pretty

:32:14.:32:19.

scary. It was a violent earthquake. Bigger than the one in 1995. It was

:32:20.:32:31.

late at night, so everybody was at home. Suddenly, you can feel this

:32:32.:32:42.

pool of air, which feels like when you are about to feel the

:32:43.:32:47.

earthquake, as you know in Mexico City, as we are. People started

:32:48.:32:53.

going out other houses. Just panicking scenes, but luckily for us

:32:54.:33:01.

there were no big casualties there. Tell us what the situation is like

:33:02.:33:05.

outside. Have you been able to go out and see the level of destruction

:33:06.:33:07.

and devastation that has been caused? In Mexico City, there was

:33:08.:33:16.

not that kind of devastation. It wasn't the south of the country,

:33:17.:33:31.

near the Pacific coast. Here in Mexico City, it was just the scare,

:33:32.:33:36.

the panicked scenes and people on the streets crying. It was a scary

:33:37.:33:44.

moment. It was violent. But that is all here. We are all just suffering

:33:45.:33:50.

because of the floods, the rainy days, because of the hurricane. We

:33:51.:33:56.

have three hurricanes in the Pacific. I think the water now is

:33:57.:34:05.

our problem. But not earthquakes. How frequent visitor to get

:34:06.:34:12.

earthquakes in Mexico City? -- How frequent is it to get earthquakes in

:34:13.:34:18.

massacre city? Depends. Two years ago, you could have won if a month.

:34:19.:34:28.

But now the last one was three months ago, the big one was three

:34:29.:34:32.

months ago. It was during the day, midday. So there was not a problem.

:34:33.:34:41.

We had a prevention culture and we used to make a lot of secure homes.

:34:42.:34:51.

That was not a problem. But this one was bigger. You still sound

:34:52.:34:59.

remarkably calm? Sorry? You sound very calm, even with everything you

:35:00.:35:04.

have experienced? As I said, we are used to this, since 1995, I was

:35:05.:35:10.

there when that big earthquake that destroyed a city happened. We are

:35:11.:35:17.

used to feeling big movements. As I said, we have this culture, a

:35:18.:35:24.

prevention culture. Anyway, if you come to me two hours ago, I was

:35:25.:35:30.

really scared. Now I am talking to you because I cannot sleep. The

:35:31.:35:37.

President, on the TV, says that we might have more replicas. So, there

:35:38.:35:48.

is a social media warning. We are waiting for another movement. But

:35:49.:35:55.

now we just try to sleep and forget it, and let's see what happens

:35:56.:35:58.

tomorrow. Georgina, thank you for talking to us. Georgina is a

:35:59.:36:04.

journalist that lives in Mexico City and experienced that it quick.

:36:05.:36:07.

Hurricane Irma has left a trail of destruction as it sweeps

:36:08.:36:10.

The small island of Barbuda is said to be barely habitable. Officials

:36:11.:36:24.

warn that Saint Martin is almost destroyed and the death toll is

:36:25.:36:30.

likely to rise. It is a category five hurricane, and currently

:36:31.:36:38.

heading towards Turks and Caicos. It sustained winds speeds of 180 mph.

:36:39.:36:47.

One of the islands in its path was the British Virgin Islands. Simon

:36:48.:36:50.

Cross told us what happened in the force of the storm. In our house,

:36:51.:37:00.

the major warning was when the skylight was blown off the roof. You

:37:01.:37:04.

could hear the wind blasting through the upstairs of the house, we

:37:05.:37:07.

thought maybe the roof was going to go. That was the main indicator,

:37:08.:37:12.

just to get the hell down stairs and into the basement, into the most

:37:13.:37:15.

secure part of the building. We had a metal shutters that had been

:37:16.:37:24.

secured. I had been pulling them around and had a lot of confidence

:37:25.:37:26.

they were going to protect the building. Next thing you know, they

:37:27.:37:30.

were ripped off the French doors that were protecting the basement

:37:31.:37:33.

bedroom down there. Ten minutes later, the other one went. You know,

:37:34.:37:44.

missiles from trees, debris, it can easily penetrate through there.

:37:45.:37:51.

Fortunately nothing happened and it held firm. When the eye came, it

:37:52.:37:58.

gave us time to re-evaluate what we can do in the meantime to get ready

:37:59.:38:04.

for the second wave. Myself and the father of the family quickly rushed

:38:05.:38:09.

upstairs and did our best to put some timber over the skylights, and

:38:10.:38:16.

we just about managed to do that and complete that before the second wave

:38:17.:38:22.

came, at which point we rushed back downstairs to our original position

:38:23.:38:28.

in the basement. The wind was scary enough that we ended up huddling. We

:38:29.:38:37.

still have a small window protected by metal shutters. These mahogany

:38:38.:38:46.

French doors, fortunately they manage to hold. But the wind is like

:38:47.:38:49.

nothing I have known in my life. It was absolutely crazy. The British

:38:50.:38:55.

relief effort is up and running. In the last few minutes Duncan Kennedy

:38:56.:38:59.

has been speaking to Brize Norton commando Group Captain Tim Jones,

:39:00.:39:04.

who says three flights will leave today. We are on board an RAF C17

:39:05.:39:09.

Globemaster. This is going to be the first aircraft that will be heading

:39:10.:39:17.

to the Caribbean with a -- aid package. It will take about

:39:18.:39:20.

lunchtime, heading to the Caribbean. It will take eight or nine hours to

:39:21.:39:24.

get there, delivering all kinds of aid to the region, hoping to get as

:39:25.:39:29.

far as the British Virgin Islands. We have to decide on the ground how

:39:30.:39:32.

and where the aid is going to be distributed. The man in charge of

:39:33.:39:35.

RAF Brize Norton is Group Captain Tim Jones. This is the first

:39:36.:39:41.

aircraft, what is going to be put on board and when is it going to go? We

:39:42.:39:48.

have three aircraft going today, and the C17 will be the first. We have

:39:49.:39:53.

Royal Marine is turning up as we speak. We are bringing water,

:39:54.:39:58.

medical aid, shelter, engineers. All the things we need to get basic

:39:59.:40:02.

support in place very quickly, then we can assess and see what further

:40:03.:40:05.

aid and support we can offer from there. Where are they heading to and

:40:06.:40:09.

what are they hoping to achieve? The aircraft will go to Barbados first.

:40:10.:40:13.

That is the plan. Barbados has not been affected by the weather so it

:40:14.:40:17.

is a great place for us to mount and assess what is going on in the

:40:18.:40:23.

British Virgin Islands. Our aim will be to get into the British Virgin

:40:24.:40:26.

Islands if we can, depending on the circumstances on the ground. If it

:40:27.:40:28.

is physically possible to get there, we will be there, for sure. Then to

:40:29.:40:33.

get that aid to the point of need, and to the people that needed, as

:40:34.:40:37.

soon as possible. The first of many flights, how may people are going on

:40:38.:40:42.

this? This morning we have in the region of 300 going. It is a big

:40:43.:40:46.

deployment. Very quick, bringing together, hard to Barbados to then

:40:47.:40:50.

take stock and see how we can get that aid and that support really

:40:51.:40:55.

effectively distributed. More support is needed. We are ready to

:40:56.:41:00.

provide it and ready to be there as long as needed. The British have

:41:01.:41:03.

been criticised for their response by the United Nations and others?

:41:04.:41:11.

Distance is not a constraint, the constraint is about understanding

:41:12.:41:13.

the situation on the ground. What we don't want to do is rush in with the

:41:14.:41:19.

wrong kind of support. It's important we understand the effects,

:41:20.:41:23.

where is open, where we can get into it safely. That is what we have been

:41:24.:41:26.

doing for the past 24 hours. Now we are ready to make the right

:41:27.:41:30.

judgments about where to deliver that aid and we will deliver it as

:41:31.:41:33.

quickly as possible. Thank you very much indeed. This aircraft we are

:41:34.:41:37.

standing on will be going in the next few hours, another later in the

:41:38.:41:41.

afternoon. Wall operational, they're hoping, sometime over the course of

:41:42.:41:42.

the next 24 hours. Lets talk to some people who have

:41:43.:41:50.

been affected, Greg Scott flew across with the Antiguan Prime

:41:51.:41:53.

Minister yesterday. I spoke to the Prime Minister after

:41:54.:42:09.

the flight and he was emotional about what he had seen. Did it

:42:10.:42:15.

affect you in a similar way? Yes, it was an emotional flight. We were

:42:16.:42:27.

both so floored I what we had seen. There was hope that Antigua would

:42:28.:42:31.

not be badly affected, the reality is different? We were hoping it

:42:32.:42:35.

would not be too bad. The helicopter with the police, five minutes ahead

:42:36.:42:40.

of us, the pilot came on and said that it was really bad and we shook

:42:41.:42:45.

our heads and said, that is not what we wanted to hear. The first thing

:42:46.:42:50.

that we saw was a resort that was just completely levelled. Most of

:42:51.:42:56.

the buildings were completely blown apart. We knew that we were in for a

:42:57.:42:59.

bad scene when we got over the village. Give us a sense of how

:43:00.:43:05.

large the area is and how long it took you to fly over, and what you

:43:06.:43:10.

saw. The flight is only about 20 minutes from Antigua in a

:43:11.:43:16.

helicopter. Initially, looking at the water, it was really

:43:17.:43:21.

interesting. It is usually a nice dark, rich blue colour. It had all

:43:22.:43:30.

of this silt bubbling up. It had really stood at the water, even

:43:31.:43:34.

though it is well over 100 feet deep between the islands. It was weird to

:43:35.:43:37.

see that. As we approached, the island was brown. It is 80 square

:43:38.:43:46.

miles, I think, in size. It is very flat. It is covered in scrub brush

:43:47.:43:52.

and everything. The scrub was just brown, there was no Green left. As

:43:53.:43:56.

you started flying over, you realised all of the leaves have been

:43:57.:43:59.

blown off, and that is what I have seen before with hurricanes. We

:44:00.:44:03.

started seeing the first structures and some of the shipping containers

:44:04.:44:07.

that people use, they have been rolled from places on the beach

:44:08.:44:11.

where construction had been going on on a new cottage or something, it

:44:12.:44:16.

had been rolled across the road and was another 100 metres to the other

:44:17.:44:19.

side of the road, laying on its side. We approached the village and

:44:20.:44:23.

we could start seeing the destruction, the rooftops gone,

:44:24.:44:26.

places where there used to be a house, it was just a pile of rubble

:44:27.:44:30.

on top of foundations, like a bomb went off. Water everywhere. That was

:44:31.:44:35.

another thing that was so weird to see. The ground is covered with this

:44:36.:44:43.

dark brown. It is clear, like dark coloured tea. The whole island has

:44:44.:44:53.

got water everywhere. I want to bring in Yuri, in the Bahamas. You

:44:54.:44:57.

are preparing for the storm. What information are you getting about

:44:58.:44:58.

the effect it might have? I want to send my condolences to the

:44:59.:45:10.

people in Mexico as well as those in Barbuda. My heart goes out to you.

:45:11.:45:15.

In the Bahamas, we are doing the regular, run-of-the-mill

:45:16.:45:18.

preparations for a storm. We have been stocking up on water and canned

:45:19.:45:23.

goods, things like that. People who don't have storm shutters, they are

:45:24.:45:30.

getting plywood and barricading the windows and doors, making sure that

:45:31.:45:39.

no flying debris comes through. Our south-eastern islands, we'd been

:45:40.:45:48.

evacuating those. We have brought those persons to the central island,

:45:49.:45:59.

where I am now. In one hurricane, one of the islands was deemed a

:46:00.:46:04.

disaster area because nothing was standing, and they still haven't

:46:05.:46:08.

recovered from that. Now we're dealing with a storm stronger than

:46:09.:46:18.

Hurricane Matthew. The last two days, we have been evacuating those

:46:19.:46:22.

south-eastern islands. They are the ones closest to the Turks and

:46:23.:46:28.

Caicos. We're just trying to see how many people we need to bring in. I

:46:29.:46:33.

want to bring in Barbie, who is joining us from Key West in Florida.

:46:34.:46:39.

I know you are with your husband. I read earlier today that Key West has

:46:40.:46:46.

been advised to evacuate or "They are on their own". But you staying

:46:47.:46:48.

put? A few days ago, we would have left,

:46:49.:47:02.

but the report is always changing. My husband is a fisherman, so we are

:47:03.:47:07.

aware of the weather. I have been here for a few years and been

:47:08.:47:10.

through a few hurricanes, none as bad as this, but we're keeping a

:47:11.:47:18.

watchful eye on it it looks like it will hit closer to the upper Keys.

:47:19.:47:26.

Our house is ten feet up. We have three generators summer ?2000 of ice

:47:27.:47:34.

from our fishing business. We are about a block in. The canal behind

:47:35.:47:42.

me leads to the ocean, one block away. We will keep a watchful eye.

:47:43.:47:50.

We are prepared as we can be. We have 90 mph winds here, but they are

:47:51.:47:54.

more worried about the storm surge. We will keep our fingers crossed and

:47:55.:48:00.

pray. The other day, when they ordered the evacuation, everybody

:48:01.:48:06.

hit the road, there were severe gas shortages, hotels were fully booked.

:48:07.:48:11.

Everybody is in a panic to get out and they don't yet know quite where

:48:12.:48:16.

it will go. Some people will watch you talking now and maybe thinking,

:48:17.:48:20.

if you have been told to leave, why on earth would you want to stay?

:48:21.:48:27.

Part of the reason is, we have five animals will stop that's not always

:48:28.:48:33.

easy to travel with. We live in a pretty secure house. It is ten feet

:48:34.:48:38.

up in the air. My husband, he has been here since he was four. We're

:48:39.:48:47.

not alone. The town is not full, but there are people who wouldn't leave,

:48:48.:48:51.

no matter what. Will you potentially move if you are told that, actually,

:48:52.:48:56.

there will be a direct hit or there is further danger? Yes, absolutely.

:48:57.:49:03.

Right now, it doesn't look that bad. We have been through 100 mph

:49:04.:49:13.

hurricanes before here. 2005, when Wilma came through. I want to get

:49:14.:49:21.

Greg's thoughts on this, because I am watching his face as you are

:49:22.:49:26.

talking, and of course, Greg has witnessed first-hand the devastation

:49:27.:49:33.

caused by Hurricane Irma in Barbuda. Greg, are you surprised that Barbie

:49:34.:49:37.

is going to stay? No, I have heard of a lot of people doing that. From

:49:38.:49:43.

what we have seen in Barbuda, the only structure is left standing are

:49:44.:49:48.

concrete structures. A couple of those had the typical galvanised

:49:49.:49:52.

roofing that they have here. I spoke to a person who built one of the

:49:53.:49:55.

houses that was still standing and I try to find out his methods and

:49:56.:49:59.

fibre roof stayed on when others didn't. But all the other houses and

:50:00.:50:04.

buildings were destroyed, what we thought were sturdy houses. -- YAG

:50:05.:50:14.

roof stayed on. Nothing stops these winds.

:50:15.:50:15.

The only structures that are intact are completely concrete. Thank you

:50:16.:50:26.

to speaking -- thank you for speaking to us. Stay safe there in

:50:27.:50:35.

the Florida Keys. We can speak to Captain Sam Shattuck, deputy chief

:50:36.:50:39.

of staff or the Royal Navy's Royal Fleet auxiliary. He is on the phone

:50:40.:50:43.

from Portsmouth. Captain, tell us a little bit about the preparations

:50:44.:50:46.

you are making right now and what you will be doing to help people

:50:47.:50:49.

affected by Hurricane Irma. Good morning. Obviously, we have RFA

:50:50.:51:07.

Mounts Bay in the region. She arrived yesterday, having already

:51:08.:51:10.

been deployed to the area, prepared for this mission as part of our

:51:11.:51:13.

commitment to the region. They are already carrying humanitarian aid

:51:14.:51:19.

stores and they have used some of those in Anguilla already. They are

:51:20.:51:25.

beginning to progress their work as they move to the British Virgin

:51:26.:51:32.

Islands. The headquarters at which I work is supporting the ship and

:51:33.:51:35.

liaising with other agencies required to make all that happened.

:51:36.:51:38.

What work will you be doing once you arrive? The ship has been engaged in

:51:39.:51:45.

reconnaissance, because it needs to understand the scope of the

:51:46.:51:50.

devastation and where it needs to focus its assistance in conjunction

:51:51.:51:57.

with the islands' management and governance. They are liaising with

:51:58.:52:02.

governors as they arrive and focusing on the usual sorts of

:52:03.:52:05.

things like infrastructure and making sure there is command and

:52:06.:52:09.

control for the islands. Do you have a sense of what you will be greeted

:52:10.:52:17.

with when you arrive? I think we have lost the line, which is

:52:18.:52:25.

unfortunate. That was captain Sam Shattuck from the Royal Navy. We

:52:26.:52:28.

will try to re-establish that in the next few minutes.

:52:29.:52:31.

Moving home can be stressful at the best of times -

:52:32.:52:34.

but new research suggests 250,000 private renters in England

:52:35.:52:36.

are being forced into debt because they are having

:52:37.:52:38.

The charity Shelter says private renting is "unstable and expensive"

:52:39.:52:41.

and to cope with multiple moves one in four are doing things

:52:42.:52:44.

like extending their overdraft or taking out payday loans.

:52:45.:52:46.

The housing charity is calling on the government to introduce

:52:47.:52:49.

Joining us now is Zack Polanski who rented for 11 years in London

:52:50.:52:55.

Adam Westwood, who was forced into debt when he had to move out

:52:56.:53:02.

of his run-down rented house with his family.

:53:03.:53:04.

And the chief executive for Shelter, Polly Neate.

:53:05.:53:11.

Thank you for coming in to talk to us. Zack, first of all, explain:

:53:12.:53:21.

Seven times in 11 years - it seems like an incredibly high amount. Why?

:53:22.:53:27.

I think the rented sector in London is a nightmare, as in many cities.

:53:28.:53:34.

There is a lack of council houses, and there was a lack of legislation

:53:35.:53:38.

on landlords, so they can be exploitative and they can add people

:53:39.:53:41.

living in overcrowded conditions. Not all landlord, but some.

:53:42.:53:45.

Governments for years have refused to build houses. We have had six

:53:46.:53:52.

Housing ministers since 2010. The last one, Gavin Barwell, lost his

:53:53.:53:55.

seat but was promoted to chief of staff. We have a new one but I think

:53:56.:53:59.

there is a lack of continuity and consistency, and I think people like

:54:00.:54:02.

myself are being affected by that. I am one of the lucky ones, too. I

:54:03.:54:07.

have a safety net of a supportive family and a good social network. If

:54:08.:54:11.

you have a family, all you have to change school for your kids, it must

:54:12.:54:22.

be a nightmare, and we need action. On a practical level, tell me the

:54:23.:54:24.

process. You are renting somewhere and you are given how much notice to

:54:25.:54:28.

leave? It depends on the landlord. It is incredibly destructive. It

:54:29.:54:33.

means days off work while you move, paying for a removal van. And being

:54:34.:54:37.

upgraded from your -- uprooted from your community is disruptive. As

:54:38.:54:47.

Sadiq Khan said, when he was elected as mayor of London, he said there

:54:48.:54:51.

would be a huge house-building operation, but he has not built a

:54:52.:54:55.

single one. Both Conservative and Labour are at fault here. By selling

:54:56.:55:03.

off the social housing, I think that means we are already putting too

:55:04.:55:08.

much pressure on an overinflated rental market. The Government needs

:55:09.:55:12.

to have a consistent approach. Polly, how often do you hear stories

:55:13.:55:19.

like that? Goodness! All the time. In our face-to-face services and on

:55:20.:55:22.

our phone lines, we are giving every day with the fact that the housing

:55:23.:55:26.

crisis is forcing people into poverty. If they weren't poor to

:55:27.:55:30.

begin with, it is this process of multiple moves, taking on debt that

:55:31.:55:37.

people then can't afford, and all because people are at the mercy of a

:55:38.:55:41.

market here, and there has got to be some protection for people in that

:55:42.:55:48.

situation. Do you have to do things, for example, where you have paid

:55:49.:55:52.

your deposit with one landlord, and do you get that back before you have

:55:53.:55:56.

to pay the next deposit? Or is that the problem, that you're talking

:55:57.:56:00.

about thousands of pounds in the case of London, to secure your next

:56:01.:56:05.

property? That is one problem, but there are also the moving costs that

:56:06.:56:09.

you never get back. Our survey finds that it is the sheer cost of

:56:10.:56:13.

multiple moves that is driving people into debt, into poverty, and

:56:14.:56:18.

that is why we say there must be five-year tenancies. It is

:56:19.:56:22.

absolutely essential. As Zak said, the root causes that there are not

:56:23.:56:25.

enough property is being built to rent. We are obsessed with

:56:26.:56:30.

homeownership. We have got to validate renting through our social

:56:31.:56:33.

policy and support it. Surely you are not saying there have to be

:56:34.:56:37.

five-year rents, because some people won't want it for that long - but

:56:38.:56:42.

there should be a choice? Absolutely, there should be the

:56:43.:56:46.

option, and a sufficient notice period. Would that help? Polly's

:56:47.:56:53.

organisation, Shelter, are doing wonderful work. If we don't build

:56:54.:56:56.

more houses, it will cause more problems. Buildings with rent

:56:57.:57:02.

controls just mean that it is harder to move people on. I want to bring

:57:03.:57:06.

in Adam, because he has just joined us. Adam, tell us your experience.

:57:07.:57:12.

Zak raised the issue of the problems with a family, and you have one.

:57:13.:57:18.

Yes, I have. Good morning. How difficult is it for you to be

:57:19.:57:22.

uprooted when you have children? The main problem is the school. With my

:57:23.:57:29.

daughter's education, we have to make sure that she has somewhere to

:57:30.:57:34.

be, so we have to find homes that are appropriate to schools. We have

:57:35.:57:37.

had the problem of not knowing where we were going to be and trying to

:57:38.:57:42.

find a school for her, then finding that when we had to move, we asked

:57:43.:57:47.

several miles away from her school. Now she is in sixth form, it is not

:57:48.:57:52.

so much of an issue any more. Historically, that was a big issue.

:57:53.:57:58.

Thank you, all, for speaking to us. A Government spokesman told us that

:57:59.:58:02.

they are banning letting fees for tenants to reduce the cost of

:58:03.:58:07.

moving, and working with the National Housing Federation British

:58:08.:58:09.

property Federation to get their members to offer family friendly

:58:10.:58:13.

tenancies of three years or more for purpose-built rental homes.

:58:14.:58:14.

It's our festival in a day. How are you, my lovelies?

:58:15.:58:40.

Join us for the biggest party of the summer,

:58:41.:58:42.

with your favourite Radio 2 presenters

:58:43.:58:45.

of some of the world's most exciting artists.

:58:46.:58:48.

Former England cricketer Chris Lewis talks with Chloe Tilley about how he went from being a professional sportsman to serving time for drugs smuggling.

There is the latest on Hurricane Irma's charge through the Caribbean. The programme hears from those dealing with the aftermath and those preparing for the hurricane's arrival.

Does the UK criminal justice system treat black people more harshly than white people? A panel of guests discuss.