07/09/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


07/09/2017

The Belgian Paralympian who wants to end her life talks about euthanasia, and hurricane Irma devastates the Caribbean. Plus what's your risk of being a crime victim?


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Our top story today: Hurricane Irma, one of most powerful hurricanes in

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recorded history, is continuing its part the devastation over the

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Caribbean with several islands flattened. My whole caved in. There

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were seven of us. All we could do was pray and call for help. The

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firemen came to our rescue as soon as they could of course.

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We'll talk to those affected throughout the programme.

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Also this morning - we've taken the Belgian paralympian

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with a crippling degenerative disease who wants to end her

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life to meet an anti-euthanasia campaigner.

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If you can't decide who wipes your bottom and then someone says, you

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know you could die and it would be dignified, suddenly is that the

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choice? You can't choose to have the dignity of deciding who looks after

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you but you can decide to die? You know what pain is? When you are

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totally alone and crying because of the pain.

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Watch that full conversation in about 15 minutes.

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And listen to this. # One-day...

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And a new George Michael single has been released today 8

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We'll play you some of it and get reviews from some of his fans.

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Throughout the morning the latest breaking news

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and developing stories and, as always, really

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A little later in the programme we'll be talking about the school

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which has introduced a gender neutral uniform.

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It's been introduced over concern about skirt lengths

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at the school and to accommodate some transgender pupils.

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It means effectively that girls have got to wear trousers and they cannot

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wear skirts. This comes after the announcement from do John Lewis that

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they would sell gender neutral children's clothing. One mother says

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that her daughter is a girl and she wants to wear a skirt and that is

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her gender. Please get in touch. We want to hear what you think. The

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details are on the screen. Hurricane Irma has left a trail of

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destruction in the Caribbean virtually destroying two islands and

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killing at least seven people. Officials say the French and Dutch

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territory of Saint Martin has been reduced to rubble. People on the

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island of Barbuda are to be moved away as the authorities say it is no

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longer habitable. The storm has moved past Puerto Rico knocking out

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power for more than 1 million people and is now heading to Florida. Andy

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more reports. The island of Barbuda,

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home to 1600 people, was one of the first

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places to be hit by Irma, It is estimated 95%

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of homes have been damaged. The communications

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tower was destroyed, cutting the island off

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from the outside world. The Prime Minister said the island

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was barely habitable. What I saw was heart-wrenching,

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absolutely devastating. In fact, I believe on a per capita

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basis, the extent of the destruction in Barbuda

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is unprecedented. We had containers, 40 foot

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containers, flying left and right, The story you are getting from most

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of the residents here is the eye Persons were literally tying

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themselves to their roofs In the French territory

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of Saint Martin, six Authorities said the island had

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been reduced to rubble. This is Hurricane Irma

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seen from space. It's now heading north

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of Puerto Rico, and could hit It's one of three

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hurricanes in the Atlantic. There are particular

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fears for Hurricane Jose, following close behind Irma

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and on a similar path. Officials say with most people

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homeless, Barbuda cannot If Jose does head its way,

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the island may have to be evacuated. The Red Cross said the damage in

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Barbuda was like nothing they had ever seen before.

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The first report coming out of Barbuda, after we lost communication

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last night, the first report from the Prime Minister today when he

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took his first trip, indicated 90% of property was damaged or

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destroyed. We had the release of the first set of images this evening and

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the devastation is nothing like we have ever seen before. We are

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talking about the entire country or population of Barbuda being

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significantly destroyed. We have mobilised our resources and we will

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be going over to Barbuda tomorrow to get a better picture of what

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immediate, medium and long-term needs are. From that we will start

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the relief effort. We have already been meeting with the government. We

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actually just came out of a meeting with Cabinet where we identified

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what type of resources are available and how soon we can make relief

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efforts available, from tarpaulins to shelters, which is a major

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priority, as well as some health concerns. This is what the focus is

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on in the next 24 hours. The last major hurricane we would have had

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remotely close, not at the same level just remotely close, was in

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1995. We did have significant devastation to Antigua and we did

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rebuild, but what we are seeing in Barbuda, it is something we never

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fathom that would happen. We never thought that we would have images

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where you see the entire population of Barbuda pretty much desolated

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before your eyes. This is something that is very difficult for people to

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deal with, particularly the fact that we have one fatality, and such

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a young individual. Really a lot is being dealt with in the Barbuda

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community. A spokesman from the Red Cross. We will bring you more on

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that devastation later. Annita is in the BBC

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Newsroom with a summary MPs will debate the European Union

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withdrawal bill today. The regulation will transfer thousands

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of EU laws and regulations into British law. Labour says it will

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oppose the bill in a vote next week. Meanwhile the European Union wants

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Northern Ireland to have a different Brexit deal to the rest of the UK,

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the BBC understands. Proposals due to be published later today by

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Michel Barnier are expected to suggest special exceptions to allow

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people to work, go to school and receive medical treatment on either

:07:41.:07:43.

side of the border with the Republic of Ireland.

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A leading health organisation says Britain's obesity crisis

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is being fuelled by businesses pushing unhealthy food and larger

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The Royal Society for Public Health says that shoppers are at risk

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of eating 17,000 extra calories a year from unnecessary

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It wants businesses to stop encouraging people to eat more,

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and suggests the government could reward businesses with reduced

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Universities in England could face fines if they pay their leaders more

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than the Prime Minister unless they can convince the regulator that

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their bosses are with it. Dozens of vice chancellors currently earn more

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than doubled the Prime Minister's annual salary of ?150,000.

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Universities minister Jo Johnson says urgent measures are needed to

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ensure a good deal for both students and taxpayers.

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The second largest police force in England and Wales, West Midlands

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Police, has been accused of failing to record thousands of crimes every

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year including domestic abuse and rape. The Inspectorate of

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Constabulary said the force's performance was inadequate. The

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force said they took the issue seriously and said a number of cases

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had been recorded but classified incorrectly. One in five people who

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are gay, lesbian or bisexual have experienced a hate crime in the last

:09:07.:09:11.

year according to research by the charity Stonewall. They found 80% of

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victims chose not to report the crimes to police. Ian Miller has

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more. Leon and Steve want to be able to be

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themselves, but say they can't Three weeks ago I was in a nightclub

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and this guy must have heard my voice, heard that I'm camp

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and gay, so thought he would He turned around and started saying

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some quite homophobic slurs to me, I wasn't going to let him

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ruin my night at the time, which he definitely didn't like,

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because he then turned around And from that stamp,

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I found out two days later, Compared with how things were 20

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years ago when I first came out, With gay characters all around us,

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people growing up with that, the last thing I expected

:09:56.:10:04.

was for a young man to find it offensive and think it was OK

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to hit me. New research carried out

:10:08.:10:09.

by Stonewall suggests that hate The number of lesbian,

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gay and bisexual people who experienced hate crime

:10:12.:10:17.

in the past year increased 41% of transgender people said

:10:18.:10:19.

they had suffered an incident 81% of people surveyed didn't report

:10:20.:10:28.

the offence to police. The charity is warning

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against complacency and has called on the public to work

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with the authorities It really needs police

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forces to step up. It needs the government to look

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at how they deal with hate crime. What we are asking people to do

:10:43.:10:45.

is to sign the pledge on our website that they will stand up for LGBT

:10:46.:10:49.

equality in their communities, because actually it'll take

:10:50.:10:53.

individuals in every part of Britain The government has said

:10:54.:10:55.

it is already working with police and the justice system to help

:10:56.:11:02.

ensure victims have the Facebook says it has discovered

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evidence of a Russian operation to promote divisive social and

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political messages on the social network during the US presidential

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campaign. The company said ?77,000 was spent on about 3000 adverts over

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a two year period. The adverts did not back any specific political

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figures but posted on topics including immigration, race and

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equal rights. Prince George is

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starting school today. The four-year-old is

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attending Thomas's School Fees at the school are more

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than ?17,000 a year. Prince George was taken

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to school by his father. The Duchess of Cambridge,

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who is pregnant with the couple's third child,

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is said to be suffering That's a summary of

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the latest BBC News. Thank you. Get in touch in the usual

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ways. We are talking about hate crime later. If you have been the

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victim of a hate crime, please get in touch. Sports news in just a

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moment and we will play you a little bit more of that new George Michael

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track which has been released today eight months after his death. Have a

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listen. # Hey little baby, there ain't much

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point in hanging around, yeah It is a remix of a track Fantasy

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which was supposed to be an the Listen Without Prejudice album. It

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was recorded in 1990. George Michael's sisters have posted an

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update on his official website saying they will carry on his

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musical legacy exactly as he would have wanted. You are an aficionado

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of George Michael's music. Tell us what you think of that track. Now

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the sport. We start at the US Open. Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal have

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never played each other there before and it will not be happening again

:13:39.:13:42.

this time? No, absolutely not. It was what all

:13:43.:13:47.

tennis fans had been hoping for. Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal would

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have rolled back the years when they met in the Australian Open final

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back in January, but there will be no repeat because the five-time

:13:57.:14:01.

Wimbledon champion has been knocked out of the Open after being beaten

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by Juan Martin del Potro. It is the first time the Swiss has lost in a

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Grand Slam all season. The Wimbledon champion was beaten in four sets to

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book his place, as del Potro moved into the last four and he will be

:14:15.:14:18.

meeting Rafael Nadal. Roger Federer admitted he was not really feeling

:14:19.:14:24.

his best this year. I knew it would be a tough one. I struggled

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throughout the tournament thinking too far ahead. In some ways I am

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actually happy I made the quarters. I am not that disappointed because

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it has been a good run already this year. You know, unfortunately I ran

:14:36.:14:39.

into a guy who was better on the day. It is del Potro who will take

:14:40.:14:45.

on Rafael Nadal for a place in the final. But failed adult is back in

:14:46.:14:48.

the world number one spot which he took off Andy Murray. He was

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ruthless against the 19-year-old Russian. He dropped just five games

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in the whole match. Sorry, go on. Are you going to say something or am

:14:59.:15:05.

I? Let's hear from Victoria! There is an all American line-up for the

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women's semifinals. Exactly that. You would have to go all the way

:15:13.:15:16.

back to 1981 for the last time that happened. This year Karolina

:15:17.:15:28.

Pliskova's time as number one has been that to an end. And Venus

:15:29.:15:31.

Williams will take on Sloane Stephens. Chris Evatt and Barbara

:15:32.:15:43.

Potter faced off and Austin took on Martina Navratilova.

:15:44.:15:45.

The story of the Sutton United reserve goalie eating a pie

:15:46.:15:52.

First it was look at this stroke and then it became a bit more serious.

:15:53.:16:02.

It's still going on, what's the latest? Yes. It escalated. Fans were

:16:03.:16:07.

watching and thought, hang on a minute, and it started as a joke.

:16:08.:16:12.

Wayne Shorter was Sutton United's reserve goalkeeper in this match in

:16:13.:16:16.

February. An FA Cup defeat to Arsenal. He ate pie during the day

:16:17.:16:22.

after a bookmaker odds of 8-1 that he would. He said it was just a bit

:16:23.:16:26.

of fun at the time but later resigned and has now been fined ?375

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and banned for two months by the FA for breaching their betting rules.

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It started as a joke, but didn't end that way at all. Thank you. We will

:16:37.:16:39.

have more throughout the morning. Marieke Vervoot is 38 and a top

:16:40.:16:43.

Paralympian who won several medals in London 2012 and Rio

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2016 for Belgium. She also wants to

:16:47.:16:49.

choose when she dies. She lives with a painful

:16:50.:16:53.

degenerative disease and has signed We've been following her

:16:54.:16:56.

story on this programme She's told us that as her condition

:16:57.:17:01.

continues to deterioate, she now has more bad days than good,

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and wants to end her life when But anti-euthanasia campaigners say

:17:09.:17:11.

it sends out a message that some We took disability

:17:12.:17:15.

campaigner Mik Scarlet - who also lives with chronic spinal

:17:16.:17:22.

pain - but is against Their conversation is frank

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and contains discussions about suicide which you

:17:26.:17:28.

may find upsetting. It's a really, really

:17:29.:17:36.

lovely experience. I had to quit with my top sports,

:17:37.:17:39.

and I was very scared I'm so happy that I

:17:40.:17:50.

found another sport. You see your wheelchair

:17:51.:18:03.

standing outside, and you Hello, I am Marieke Vervoort,

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I am an athlete from Belgium. I have four Olympic medals,

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including one gold in London 2012. But I have constantly battled

:18:30.:18:41.

against a progressive disease, I've been living with chronic

:18:42.:18:46.

pain for 37 years now. This will be the first time in quite

:18:47.:19:16.

a few years of campaigning around the subject of assisted dying,

:19:17.:19:21.

assisted suicide and euthanasia. That I've actually met someone

:19:22.:19:26.

who themselves is disabled and those experiencing it from the other side

:19:27.:19:28.

of the argument. I suppose my worries

:19:29.:19:31.

about euthanasia is that we don't live in a world, I think,

:19:32.:19:46.

that's kind of ready for it. Because I don't think

:19:47.:19:49.

the world understands And I don't think it's

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kind of in a position where we are all able to live

:19:53.:19:59.

as we want. So it worries me that more and more

:20:00.:20:04.

countries are getting the right to die with this kind of choice,

:20:05.:20:10.

I have the right to die as I want. I'm not saying that's a bad thing,

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I'm just saying I think it would be good if before we got that,

:20:15.:20:19.

we had the right to live as we want. I don't agree with

:20:20.:20:22.

what you're talking. You're talking about getting

:20:23.:20:33.

all things out of your life. I take all things, and I've

:20:34.:20:36.

got a big bucket list I will live, I'm going for the life,

:20:37.:20:42.

so long as the life I heard your story, obviously it's

:20:43.:20:52.

not exactly the same, You know, 14, 15, I was disabled

:20:53.:21:01.

from birth because I From the base of my hips

:21:02.:21:07.

to the base of my rib cage, So now what I've got is titanium

:21:08.:21:15.

rods that go from the top of my rib They are bolted

:21:16.:21:29.

together, so I'm solid. My nephew thinks it's

:21:30.:21:34.

fantastic that I'm like But can I ask you something,

:21:35.:21:43.

is your disease stable now? The condition I've got is not

:21:44.:21:51.

a continuous downward sort of slope. But I don't know what tomorrow

:21:52.:21:57.

will bring, if you know what I mean. I can't guarantee that today

:21:58.:22:01.

is the last day I'll be OK. Me, it's going every

:22:02.:22:07.

time worse and worse. My view, I see now,

:22:08.:22:12.

only 20% any more. One eye, one point,

:22:13.:22:18.

the other eye two points. They don't know, it's also something

:22:19.:22:21.

wrong with my brain. Also, the last years,

:22:22.:22:28.

a lot of epileptic attacks. For me, if I still have good days,

:22:29.:22:33.

then it's worth to enjoy But now it starts to have more bad

:22:34.:22:43.

days than good days, and it's getting really difficult,

:22:44.:22:57.

that's why I really, really glad Because I have my own

:22:58.:22:59.

life in my hands. When I say it's enough,

:23:00.:23:13.

I can't live in this condition, I have the right to say

:23:14.:23:18.

I want to quit now. That came off me, a lot of stress,

:23:19.:23:20.

a lot of things off me. I felt safe from that moment

:23:21.:23:33.

and I started to live again Yeah, I completely get

:23:34.:23:36.

what you're saying. Because I've also been in quite dark

:23:37.:23:42.

places quite a few times in my life. The first time it happened,

:23:43.:23:53.

I genuinely planned a suicide. I couldn't leave the house

:23:54.:23:55.

without assistance at the time. So I waited to rebuild my life

:23:56.:23:58.

enough, so that I could go But what if you kill yourself

:23:59.:24:01.

and it's not working? And you come out of it

:24:02.:24:10.

and you live like a vegetable? Without those papers,

:24:11.:24:15.

I would be thinking all the time, Euthanasia is not something that you

:24:16.:24:20.

get like going to the supermarket. You have to go to three different

:24:21.:24:34.

doctors and you have to prove that no treatment exists,

:24:35.:24:49.

and there are no medicines to make Because of those papers,

:24:50.:24:52.

I can enjoy every moment. It troubles me if we end up

:24:53.:25:03.

with a situation where people are very keen to fight

:25:04.:25:06.

for your right to have the right But people don't seem to very keen

:25:07.:25:09.

to for you to have the right I've got some new friends that

:25:10.:25:16.

I have the people that care for them taken away,

:25:17.:25:22.

that are being put into care homes, whether they want to or not, that

:25:23.:25:25.

are having all of the assistance that they have taken

:25:26.:25:28.

away from them because I don't think, when that happens,

:25:29.:25:30.

you can make an informed choice. If you can't decide who wipes your

:25:31.:25:36.

bum, and somebody says, hey, you know you could die,

:25:37.:25:40.

and it would be dignified, You can't choose to have the dignity

:25:41.:25:45.

of deciding who looks after you, You know what pain is,

:25:46.:25:53.

when you are totally alone? And you're crying because of

:25:54.:25:58.

pain, you're yelling that they hear it in

:25:59.:26:06.

the corner of the street. This is the point,

:26:07.:26:09.

that we are losing sight of the fact that, for example,

:26:10.:26:18.

if pain is a reason to die, then what does that mean

:26:19.:26:22.

for someone like me, in fact one time I had four years

:26:23.:26:31.

of solid pain that never stopped, just didn't stop at all,

:26:32.:26:34.

and during that time, yes, I won't deny it,

:26:35.:26:36.

there were times when I thought, But if I lived in a society

:26:37.:26:39.

with that law, then Because I have those

:26:40.:26:43.

papers and I can do it, everything is already ready

:26:44.:26:52.

for when the time is there. It gives me a good feeling that

:26:53.:26:55.

I can plan everything for and go I don't know when the time

:26:56.:26:59.

is, and I'm busy now with a new experiment,

:27:00.:27:10.

with the pain treatment, with a doctor that

:27:11.:27:15.

I've never met before. If it's not working,

:27:16.:27:17.

then I have to say stop. I'm again in the hospital

:27:18.:27:32.

because I felt really, really bad. I really hope you don't think in any

:27:33.:27:38.

way that I am judging We have the chance to talk

:27:39.:27:53.

and use things like this to explore our inner feelings,

:27:54.:28:02.

I think, and make I want to live and to end

:28:03.:28:05.

my life is beautiful. A month ago, I met a guy

:28:06.:28:12.

who's doing funerals. He came to my house

:28:13.:28:33.

and I arranged my funeral already. So it's really different

:28:34.:28:38.

than a normal funeral. I choose not a black box,

:28:39.:28:45.

but a red box with white flowers and also a box

:28:46.:28:51.

with all white butterflies. It's really weird, when I say it

:28:52.:29:02.

now, but for me I love it I really love the feeling

:29:03.:29:06.

that they put me in the sleep. I think that has given me the same

:29:07.:29:19.

feeling, that you will sleep I hear a lot that I

:29:20.:29:23.

inspire a lot of people. I hope that people get another

:29:24.:29:34.

vision about euthanasia and they won't see it like murder,

:29:35.:29:40.

but it can be also a good thing. I want them to toast

:29:41.:29:50.

on the good life that I had. I don't want people to cry,

:29:51.:29:56.

I want people happy. But that they are also happy that

:29:57.:30:01.

I'm not in pain any more, You can hear more from Marieke

:30:02.:30:09.

on 5Live Sport tonight at 8.30pm and it will be available to download

:30:10.:30:31.

as a podcast. If you're affected by any

:30:32.:30:35.

of the issues in this film please visit the BBC Action Line

:30:36.:30:38.

for details of where you can get help and support -

:30:39.:30:40.

bbc.co.uk/actionline. It is 9:30am. A couple of comments

:30:41.:30:54.

now from people watching that film. This email from Chris in Cheshire,

:30:55.:30:59.

every person should have the choice to live or die. It should not be

:31:00.:31:04.

ruled by others who disagree with what is OK for them. It has got to

:31:05.:31:08.

be down to the person themselves. And this email from Peter: The right

:31:09.:31:14.

to die assumes society and the state of your life. If they don't, then

:31:15.:31:19.

the premise of rights to die is outrageous, because they have no

:31:20.:31:26.

rights to give or take regarding a life. And on Twitter: An

:31:27.:31:29.

exceptionally candid and brave discussion taking place between two

:31:30.:31:34.

people on Victoria Derbyshire right now on coping with pain and the

:31:35.:31:37.

right to die. Thank you for those and please keep them coming in. Now

:31:38.:31:41.

the latest news headlines with Annita McVeigh.

:31:42.:31:45.

News is emerging of the devastating impact of Hurricane Irma

:31:46.:31:47.

on the Caribbean islands it's passed.

:31:48.:31:50.

At least nine people have been killed.

:31:51.:31:54.

Officials say the French and Dutch territory of Saint Martin has

:31:55.:31:57.

The small island of Barbuda is said to be barely habitable.

:31:58.:32:01.

The Red Cross said the impact of the storm was unparalleled.

:32:02.:32:05.

The UK takes another step towards Brexit today, as MPs debate

:32:06.:32:08.

The measures would transfer thousands of EU laws and regulations

:32:09.:32:13.

The Government has urged MPs from all parties to work with them

:32:14.:32:23.

to get the legislation through Parliament, but Labour says

:32:24.:32:25.

it will oppose the bill in a vote next week.

:32:26.:32:27.

The European Union wants Northern Ireland to have a different

:32:28.:32:30.

Brexit deal to the rest of the UK, the BBC understands.

:32:31.:32:32.

Proposals due to be published later today by the EU's chief negotiator,

:32:33.:32:35.

Michel Barnier, are expected to suggest special exceptions

:32:36.:32:37.

to allow people to work, go to school and receive medical

:32:38.:32:40.

treatment on either side of the border with

:32:41.:32:42.

Prince George is starting school today.

:32:43.:32:52.

The four-year-old is attending Thomas's School

:32:53.:32:53.

Fees at the school are more than ?17,000 a year.

:32:54.:32:56.

Prince George was taken to school by his father.

:32:57.:32:59.

The Duchess of Cambridge, who is pregnant with

:33:00.:33:01.

the couple's third child, is said to be suffering

:33:02.:33:03.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News.

:33:04.:33:06.

Roger Federer has been knocked out of the US Open

:33:07.:33:15.

by Juan Martin del Potro, which means it's the Argentine

:33:16.:33:17.

who will face Rafael Nadal in the semi-final.

:33:18.:33:21.

Fans at Flushing Meadows were hoping to watch Federer and Nadal face off

:33:22.:33:25.

for the first time in the competition.

:33:26.:33:28.

But the five-time champion, who suffered his first defeat

:33:29.:33:30.

in a Grand Slam this season, admitted he was simply

:33:31.:33:32.

In the women's draw, it's an all-American semi-final line

:33:33.:33:36.

Coco Vandeweghe ended Karolina Pliskova's reign

:33:37.:33:39.

as world number one, beating her in straight

:33:40.:33:43.

sets to set up a meeting with compatriot Madison Keys,

:33:44.:33:45.

while Venus Williams will take on Sloane Stephens.

:33:46.:33:51.

Chris Froome had his lead cut by 42 seconds in the Vuelta A Espana

:33:52.:33:55.

as Vincenzo Nibali capitalised on a gruelling final climb

:33:56.:33:57.

Froome, the four-time Tour de France winner, is aiming to win

:33:58.:34:08.

England's deciding Test match against West Indies gets under way

:34:09.:34:12.

to the side and another fast bowler, James Anderson, could become

:34:13.:34:17.

the first Englishman to take 500 Test wickets.

:34:18.:34:19.

That is all the sport. Back to you. Thank you. There is a new George

:34:20.:34:26.

Michael track out and it has been released eight months after his

:34:27.:34:29.

death. It got its first airing on Chris Evans's breakfast show this

:34:30.:34:31.

morning. We are about to play

:34:32.:34:34.

George Michael's brand-new single. Thank you, David Austin, George's

:34:35.:34:38.

manager, for sending us this. He has just typed this and sent it

:34:39.:34:44.

to us now so we know "Fantasy was originally meant to be

:34:45.:34:48.

on Listen Without Prejudice and was intended to be one

:34:49.:34:51.

of the singles from the album, but somehow it got lost

:34:52.:34:54.

in the ether, in what was going Though George did then release it

:34:55.:34:57.

later as a B-side in 1990. However, years later,

:34:58.:35:01.

just last year, when looking for a lead single for the reissue

:35:02.:35:06.

of George's Listen Without Prejudice MTV Unplugged album, and to

:35:07.:35:09.

accompany the new film, Freedom, that George had just finished

:35:10.:35:11.

working on before Christmas, Fantasy was George's

:35:12.:35:14.

first and obvious choice. So George phoned up Nile Rodgers,

:35:15.:35:18.

his good pal, in early 2016, because the two

:35:19.:35:22.

of them have always spoken the same musical language,

:35:23.:35:24.

as long as they have known each other,

:35:25.:35:25.

and Nile reworked the record." And that is what you are

:35:26.:35:28.

about to hear right now. # Little baby, I can give you

:35:29.:35:31.

all the loving that your heart # One day you say you love me

:35:32.:35:43.

that your heart desires # Hey, little baby, there ain't much

:35:44.:35:52.

point me hanging around, yeah # One day you say you will stay

:35:53.:36:08.

that your love is in my hands # But the next you're

:36:09.:36:13.

changing your plans # Ain't much point

:36:14.:36:16.

in hanging around, yeah # Because if you ain't

:36:17.:36:24.

got time for me Nile Rodgers has been posting on

:36:25.:36:42.

Twitter about his nerves before this was released. He said he had pins

:36:43.:36:47.

and needles and he would work until the report starts coming in.

:36:48.:36:55.

And in tribute to the original artist, he then tweeted:

:36:56.:37:03.

Let's find out what this new track means to his fans.

:37:04.:37:06.

Laura O'Mahoney is a fan of George Michael and danced

:37:07.:37:11.

to one of his tracks as her first wedding dance.

:37:12.:37:20.

George Michael music since he was a teenager.

:37:21.:37:25.

What do you think of it? I think it is brilliant. Y? I think it will be

:37:26.:37:33.

fun to dance to when I go out. I think it is a nice updated version

:37:34.:37:36.

of it. It sounds like the original but it is really good fun and upbeat

:37:37.:37:42.

and a great legacy as to what George Michael was all about. And what

:37:43.:37:47.

about you? I can't agree any more. I think it is fantastic. A fantastic

:37:48.:37:52.

track. Tell me about the first dance at your wedding. It was Careless

:37:53.:38:00.

Whisper, one of my favourite George Michael tracks, and I managed to

:38:01.:38:03.

persuade my husband not to be too embarrassed to dance to it and we

:38:04.:38:07.

had a great DJ singer who did it electro swing style and it was great

:38:08.:38:12.

fun. A bit of a laugh, not taking it too seriously. And also because I

:38:13.:38:17.

love George Michael, it was quite special. And apparently there was a

:38:18.:38:24.

George Michael B match your hen do as well. Yes, I thought I wasn't

:38:25.:38:32.

that much of a fan but clearly I am! At my hen do in London, I entered

:38:33.:38:35.

the room and all my friends were dressed up as George Michael with

:38:36.:38:45.

really dodgy blonde wigs, Wham plaything, and everyone was

:38:46.:38:52.

wondering who we were dressed up as. We are just showing pictures of your

:38:53.:38:56.

hen party which is quite bizarre! But good fun. It is better than just

:38:57.:39:00.

wearing tutus and carrying around obscene inflatables! I totally agree

:39:01.:39:08.

on that point! What was the first George Michael track you bought?

:39:09.:39:17.

Wake Me Up Before You Go Go. Then I was caught. I just kept buying every

:39:18.:39:21.

time more music was released. What do you think the mix of this track

:39:22.:39:31.

says about his legacy? I think it is typical George. He has always

:39:32.:39:38.

recorded music and he has always tried to renew himself and his

:39:39.:39:44.

music. He has always tried to take some of his old tracks and remake

:39:45.:39:51.

them. Everything She Wants, which was released as a single and a

:39:52.:40:00.

Re/Max, and remixed again. Almost every single was re-done over the

:40:01.:40:07.

years so it is so typical of George Michael. What are the chances of

:40:08.:40:18.

this going to number one, Laura? I would like to say the chances are

:40:19.:40:22.

very high and people will buy the track and download it in memory of

:40:23.:40:26.

him. It is quite a treat to be able to get the track after he has left

:40:27.:40:33.

us. I hope people will take it seriously and enjoy it and buy it. I

:40:34.:40:40.

certainly will do. Chris Evans read this out this morning. Just in case

:40:41.:40:46.

you missed that, Laura, this is from the management. Fantasy was

:40:47.:40:50.

originally meant to be an Listen Without Prejudice, intended to be

:40:51.:40:53.

one of the singles from that album, but it got lost on either of what

:40:54.:40:57.

was going on at that time, although it was released as a B-side in 1990,

:40:58.:41:02.

although years later, just last year, when looking for relief single

:41:03.:41:11.

for the reissue of Without Prejudice MTV Unplugged, and to celebrate the

:41:12.:41:16.

film Freedom, Fantasy was his first and obvious choice. Then he rang up

:41:17.:41:21.

Nile Rodgers in early 2016 because the two have always spoken the same

:41:22.:41:24.

musical language as long as they have known each other. And Nile

:41:25.:41:28.

Rodgers reworked the record and that is what they are hearing today. I am

:41:29.:41:34.

just looking at Twitter. So many people love it. Number one it is,

:41:35.:41:39.

says somebody. Fantasy has sent shivers down my spine and I so miss

:41:40.:41:43.

George Michael. Quite a few people tweeting Nile Rodgers to say thank

:41:44.:41:48.

you. We will see what happens. Thank you both very much.

:41:49.:42:00.

Coming up: Universities in England could face fines if they pay their

:42:01.:42:04.

leaders more than the Prime Minister. We will bring you the

:42:05.:42:09.

story. Thank you for your comments about the school which has

:42:10.:42:16.

effectively introduced a gender neutral uniform. That means that

:42:17.:42:23.

girls cannot wear skirts. Jerome says why be dictatorial? Why not

:42:24.:42:28.

give children the choice of wearing skirts, Gilles, trousers? Taking

:42:29.:42:35.

away the choice is back. This email from John: Who decided that trousers

:42:36.:42:41.

are gender neutral? And this one: Gender neutral uniform? This world

:42:42.:42:44.

is going to end. That seems apocalyptic! You are either a boy or

:42:45.:42:50.

a girl and it is that simple. And from Mike: To for somebody to be

:42:51.:42:55.

gender neutral is surely as bad as forcing somebody into agenda. Why

:42:56.:42:59.

must a girl who wants to wear a skirt be made to wear trousers?

:43:00.:43:06.

It was the most effective and stand-out slogan

:43:07.:43:10.

from the Brexit campaign - "Let's take back control".

:43:11.:43:13.

Well, later we'll start to hear more about what taking back

:43:14.:43:15.

The European Union Withdrawal Bill represents the biggest

:43:16.:43:18.

constitutional change in the UK since the 1970s as thousands of EU

:43:19.:43:21.

laws and regulations are effectively downloaded into British law.

:43:22.:43:23.

MPs will start debating it, with Labour planning to oppose it

:43:24.:43:28.

because they say it gives too much power to the government rather

:43:29.:43:31.

Once informally known as the Great Repeal Bill,

:43:32.:43:41.

the now less grandly titled European Union Withdrawal Bill

:43:42.:43:43.

faces its first big test in Parliament today.

:43:44.:43:45.

But what is it and why does it matter?

:43:46.:43:52.

Well, the idea is to do the biggest cut and paste job in parliamentary

:43:53.:43:56.

history, by moving 40 years' worth of EU law straight into UK law.

:43:57.:43:59.

Then, when the UK formally leaves the EU in 2019,

:44:00.:44:02.

Britain will be able to change those laws as it sees fit.

:44:03.:44:05.

Sounds straightforward enough, doesn't it?

:44:06.:44:06.

Well, the bill also includes controversial powers

:44:07.:44:12.

nicknamed Henry VIII clauses, after the 16th century king

:44:13.:44:16.

who introduced a Statute of Proclamations that gave him power

:44:17.:44:18.

to make laws without Parliament's consent.

:44:19.:44:23.

Critics fear these powers would allow ministers

:44:24.:44:26.

to change legislation without the scrutiny of Parliament.

:44:27.:44:30.

As a result, the opposition Labour Party have vowed

:44:31.:44:33.

They say it grants too much power to ministers to, quote,

:44:34.:44:38.

"Slash people's rights at work and reduce protections for consumers

:44:39.:44:40.

The government says it won't use the powers to make significant

:44:41.:44:50.

changes, and has warned that if the bill doesn't clear

:44:51.:44:53.

the Commons, it could create a legal vacuum when the UK leaves

:44:54.:44:55.

Since the last election, the government has a wafer thin

:44:56.:44:59.

majority, with only just enough MPs to get new laws passed.

:45:00.:45:03.

But if this bill, or one like it, isn't passed by the time the UK

:45:04.:45:06.

formally leaves the EU, Britain could find itself

:45:07.:45:08.

Let's talk to Mark Harper from the Conservatives,

:45:09.:45:17.

Stephen Gethins who's the SNP's Europe spokesperson,

:45:18.:45:22.

And in a moment Labour MP Peter Kyle, when he joins us. Good

:45:23.:45:30.

morning. Mark Harper, the former Attorney General Dominic grieve says

:45:31.:45:35.

no sovereign parliament should pass the EU withdrawal bill. Is he wrong?

:45:36.:45:40.

I'm very happy with the bill. I've looked at the bill. I think it does

:45:41.:45:46.

what's necessary. It takes all of the European legislation that's

:45:47.:45:49.

currently passed in secondary look legislation puts into British law so

:45:50.:45:54.

when we leave we get a smooth exit. It's worth saying, the legislation

:45:55.:45:58.

it's going to move was all passed into law through the same process as

:45:59.:46:02.

the secondary legislation and I didn't hear lots of people

:46:03.:46:05.

complaining about that at the time. I think it's a necessary process.

:46:06.:46:09.

The House of Lords committee looked at it and said in an ideal world you

:46:10.:46:12.

wouldn't do it like this, but they accepted because of the volume of

:46:13.:46:16.

legislation, this was necessary. They said the government should

:46:17.:46:19.

limit the powers ministers are going to have on the government has. The

:46:20.:46:23.

powers ministers have, they can't use it for example to create taxes

:46:24.:46:29.

or make retrospective legislation. It is for tweaking the legislation

:46:30.:46:35.

and of those powers. Tweaking sounds so benign. It is. What are you

:46:36.:46:40.

worried about? All reviewable by the courts. I'm astonished to hear Mark

:46:41.:46:46.

talking about nobody ever complaining. We've had years of

:46:47.:46:49.

Eurosceptics complaining about European wars do UK Government

:46:50.:46:57.

signed up to. -- European laws the UK Government signed up to. This

:46:58.:47:00.

paragraph that the House of Lords are concerned about, the Law Society

:47:01.:47:04.

of Scotland have illustrated concerns, takes power backstroke

:47:05.:47:10.

from Parliament. These Henry VIII clauses they are using, why not give

:47:11.:47:15.

control back to Parliament? Give Parliament a say. One thing that's

:47:16.:47:21.

missing... Sorry, sorry. What do you mean? Two solutions. On areas that

:47:22.:47:29.

are devolved competences, give the devolved administrations in Wales,

:47:30.:47:32.

Northern Ireland and Scotland say over those, don't restrict what they

:47:33.:47:36.

can legislate on and they can't legislate on, which this bill does.

:47:37.:47:41.

It restricts them. On the Parliamentary side, give Parliament

:47:42.:47:44.

proper scrutiny. They are restricting the days we can debate

:47:45.:47:47.

this. One thing that is astonishing, if the government had the courage of

:47:48.:47:51.

its convictions and was confident of what it was doing, it would be happy

:47:52.:47:54.

with Parliamentary scrutiny but it is not. Peter Kyle from the Labour

:47:55.:47:59.

Party, thank you for joining us. You will tell me your party is

:48:00.:48:03.

definitely not trying to block Brexit when it votes against the

:48:04.:48:08.

second reading of this bill, but that will be the perception among

:48:09.:48:12.

some people, some voters out there who voted for Brexit. I can say

:48:13.:48:17.

categorically, and I'm in a good place to say this, the party is

:48:18.:48:19.

absolutely not trying to block Brexit. I am someone who voted

:48:20.:48:24.

against Article 50 and broke the Labour whip. I think our country was

:48:25.:48:28.

fundamentally unprepared and our government was unprepared for the

:48:29.:48:34.

negotiation period. OK... I'm prepared for the legislative

:48:35.:48:37.

consequences of Brexit. Today's paragraph is proof positive that our

:48:38.:48:41.

government did not give the time or the consideration and is

:48:42.:48:44.

underprepared for the whole Brexit process that they are ramming

:48:45.:48:48.

through parliament with too little time. How are you going to convince

:48:49.:48:54.

people that this concern about Parliamentary sovereignty is not

:48:55.:48:58.

simply masquerading you trying to put hurdles in the way of the

:48:59.:49:02.

government completing Brexit? They are two separate things. Article 50

:49:03.:49:06.

and a vote for article 15 triggered the Brexit process. This is about

:49:07.:49:11.

how we do Brexit and getting Brexit right and getting a Brexit that is

:49:12.:49:14.

right for Britain. What is your solution? I wonder if it is possible

:49:15.:49:20.

to deliver a Brexit good for Britain when you see the leaks coming out of

:49:21.:49:24.

government and the shambles of the negotiation process unfolding around

:49:25.:49:30.

us. What specifically? What is it specifically Labour is suggesting?

:49:31.:49:34.

There is something like 12,000 regulations under EU law that we are

:49:35.:49:38.

going to download. You are not talking about scrutinising all those

:49:39.:49:43.

pieces... Why not? How long will it take? It should take as long as it

:49:44.:49:50.

takes. If Brexit is about Parliamentary sovereignty, we give

:49:51.:49:52.

sovereignty to Parliament. What you don't do is take Parliamentary

:49:53.:49:55.

sovereignty away. What would be wrong...? That was an enlightening

:49:56.:50:01.

answer. What it says is, if you went through every single one of those

:50:02.:50:05.

regulations, which by the way didn't have that level of scrutiny when

:50:06.:50:10.

they became law in the first place. That is what people voted for. The

:50:11.:50:13.

Labour Party were happy to do that. Then this process would never

:50:14.:50:16.

finish. The real agenda of the Labour Party is they want to kick

:50:17.:50:20.

and pushed down the road are sleeving, because many of them... We

:50:21.:50:25.

want to get it right. If we leave it in two years' time in March 2019 and

:50:26.:50:31.

have removed all this into British law, it will be a chaotic exit.

:50:32.:50:35.

Businesses, the public and people will suffer. Do you not accept Peter

:50:36.:50:39.

Kyle's point about doing it properly? It takes as long as it

:50:40.:50:44.

takes? We are taking these pieces of secondary legislation which

:50:45.:50:46.

currently rely on European legislation to be law and moving

:50:47.:50:49.

into British law. The powers that are going to ministers are to enable

:50:50.:50:53.

small changes, where you need to change the name of an institution

:50:54.:51:04.

for example. The government has been very clear that any significant

:51:05.:51:06.

changes will be done through primary legislation, through the full

:51:07.:51:08.

Parliamentary process. Do not believe it? Mark... I don't. These

:51:09.:51:13.

assurances, Mark trying to tell if it's not that bad. Dominic Grieve,

:51:14.:51:17.

former Attorney General, we sit on opposite benches, very different

:51:18.:51:20.

views but real concerns about this. This is something really important.

:51:21.:51:25.

This has a huge impact on everybody, on our environment, it opportunities

:51:26.:51:28.

for young people, on the economy, and jobs. The economy will take a

:51:29.:51:31.

massive hit from this process. It takes as long as it takes and

:51:32.:51:35.

Parliamentary scrutiny is important. I agree with

:51:36.:51:49.

Peter, his concerns about ramming this through Parliament. What's the

:51:50.:51:52.

point of having a parliament if it is not fair to scrutinise and ask

:51:53.:51:54.

the government questions? Especially on something that will affect each

:51:55.:51:57.

and everyone of us in such a devastating way is this. Peter Kyle,

:51:58.:51:59.

your labour colleague who voted to leave the EU said anyone who votes

:52:00.:52:02.

against the principle of this bill, which is what you are debating this

:52:03.:52:05.

afternoon and the next few days, is betraying the will of the British

:52:06.:52:07.

people. That is one of your colleagues. She is wrong, I'm sorry!

:52:08.:52:09.

She's wrong. She's in a tiny minority within Labour and within

:52:10.:52:13.

Parliament. On this particular point she is simply wrong. When Labour

:52:14.:52:17.

were in power, Mark and his party voted against Labour if we brought

:52:18.:52:23.

in a bill which had more than ten or 11 statutory instruments that were

:52:24.:52:27.

giving more powers to government. They repeatedly said it was a power

:52:28.:52:31.

grab. They are introducing a bill today that will have over 1000

:52:32.:52:37.

pieces of legislation, power which is round away from Parliament into

:52:38.:52:41.

government, out of the hands of civilians, out of the hands of

:52:42.:52:44.

democratic scrutiny. This bill is pernicious and wrong. I don't agree

:52:45.:52:50.

with that. It is a practical measure. The House of Lords

:52:51.:52:52.

Constitution committee said this is the only way it can be reasonably

:52:53.:52:56.

done. They said ministers' power should be restrained. There is clear

:52:57.:53:02.

legislation that talks about the limits ministers will have. I looked

:53:03.:53:05.

at the bill last night in preparation for this and am very

:53:06.:53:07.

clear there are lots of controls in there and I am content with them and

:53:08.:53:11.

will be supporting the bill on Monday. Are you not happy with the

:53:12.:53:16.

limits in there, Peter Kyle? Why don't you believe them? The limits?

:53:17.:53:21.

There are no limits in this bill. That are. This bill does not give

:53:22.:53:26.

1000 statutory instruments and 1000 different mechanisms for ministers

:53:27.:53:36.

and civil servants to take decisions that are going to affect our air

:53:37.:53:39.

quality, lousy quality, the food quality... Right across the raft of

:53:40.:53:41.

regulation for our country. It's also giving the power to overturn

:53:42.:53:43.

different pieces of legislation. This bill, for example, will give

:53:44.:53:46.

the power to ministers to leave the finally -- to finally leave the EU

:53:47.:53:50.

without coming back to Parliament for the final vote. They give power

:53:51.:53:53.

to government that could even overturn this particular piece of

:53:54.:53:58.

legislation. The power given to government by this bill is

:53:59.:54:02.

overwhelming. It is unprecedented. We need time to scrutinise and get

:54:03.:54:06.

Brexit right. I think Brexit is going wrong and we need to stop and

:54:07.:54:10.

think about it, but I'm fully behind Labour's position now, to get this

:54:11.:54:13.

bill right and get every step of the way right. Otherwise we would damage

:54:14.:54:17.

our country in the most pernicious and evangelistic way. OK. A quick

:54:18.:54:26.

final way. Theresa May said she will stay on to fight the next general

:54:27.:54:30.

election, are you happy? I want the Prime Minister to get this Brexit

:54:31.:54:33.

negotiations on. Are you happy with her planning to stay? She said

:54:34.:54:38.

before to MPs at Westminster she will stay as long as we were noted.

:54:39.:54:42.

She's doing a great job negotiating the Brexit deal. She said she will

:54:43.:54:45.

stay on to fight the next general election, would you support? I want

:54:46.:54:52.

her to get this Brexit negotiation done and then all the other

:54:53.:54:58.

challenges facing against product -- about around productivity and job

:54:59.:55:00.

creation for some she's doing a great job and I want I just don't

:55:01.:55:03.

get that done. Do you want her to stay on as she announced she will be

:55:04.:55:06.

doing to fight the next general election? I want her to stay and

:55:07.:55:10.

deliver the thing she said. What about fighting a general election?

:55:11.:55:14.

We have a five-year Parliament. I want her to get on and deliver for

:55:15.:55:19.

the British people. Are you happy... Very happy to defend and support her

:55:20.:55:23.

if she does that. What about the question I have asked you a number

:55:24.:55:27.

of times... Are you happy Theresa May has announced she is planning to

:55:28.:55:31.

stay on to fight the next general election? I'm very content to

:55:32.:55:35.

support the Prime Minister. Doing a great job... For the next general

:55:36.:55:39.

election? I'm very happy with the leader she has as leader of our

:55:40.:55:44.

party and Prime Minister. And the next general election, you to put

:55:45.:55:49.

that not? She said she will stay as long as the Parliamentary party...

:55:50.:55:52.

Since she has said that she has announced she will be staying on to

:55:53.:55:55.

fight the next general election. I'm very happy with what she's doing

:55:56.:55:58.

reading our country and happy to continue supporting her for as long

:55:59.:56:04.

as she wants to stay as Prime Minister. She wants to fight the

:56:05.:56:07.

next general election. I said as long as she wants to stay as Prime

:56:08.:56:12.

Minister. Thank you very much. Mark Harper from the Conservatives,

:56:13.:56:15.

Stephen Gethins from the SNP and Peter Kyle from the Labour Party,

:56:16.:56:16.

thank you for coming onto the programme. Some

:56:17.:56:23.

breaking news to bring you if I may. They're with me one moment. The

:56:24.:56:26.

Crown Prosecution Service says it has received a file from the police

:56:27.:56:32.

regarding allegations of historical child sexual abuse made by a man who

:56:33.:56:37.

was known as Nick, which led to operation Midland. The CPS

:56:38.:56:40.

spokesperson said on the 4th of September we received a file of

:56:41.:56:43.

evidence from Northumbria Police with allegations against one person

:56:44.:56:49.

as to perverting the course of justice and fraud. Prosecutors will

:56:50.:56:52.

consider the evidence with a view to making a charging decision in line

:56:53.:56:58.

with the code for Crown prosecutors. Thank you for your comments about

:56:59.:57:01.

right to die. This e-mail from Sandra who said, I've just been

:57:02.:57:04.

watching your very moving discussion. On the right to die. I

:57:05.:57:08.

fully support anyone who wishes to end their life through illness. I

:57:09.:57:13.

travelled with my husband Andrew to dig in attacks in December last

:57:14.:57:20.

year. He had MS for 24 years. He had no quality-of-life but he had the

:57:21.:57:23.

ability to make his final decision of taking control. -- I travelled

:57:24.:57:27.

with my husband Andrew to Dignitas. Ending his life when he wished.

:57:28.:57:33.

And Roger has e-mailed as well. Having spent a good deal of time in

:57:34.:57:38.

distress through spinal pain and frightening asthmatic attacks I can

:57:39.:57:41.

understand that some who suffered this on a permanent basis would want

:57:42.:57:46.

some peace. What worries me, says Roger, if we might reach a stage

:57:47.:57:49.

where people were so worried about the fact they were too much of a

:57:50.:57:52.

burden on others and ruining the lives of others that it would be

:57:53.:57:56.

best to put this right by ending their lives. Once we are living and

:57:57.:58:01.

breathing, life has got to be fought for. Thank you for those.

:58:02.:58:04.

Do keep your comments coming in. We will bring you the latest sport and

:58:05.:58:07.

news in a moment but first, the latest weather with

:58:08.:58:12.

Simon. Good morning. I thought I would

:58:13.:58:16.

start by showing you the latest with hurricane Irma. Still a massive

:58:17.:58:21.

category five hurricane and is currently just to the north of the

:58:22.:58:27.

Dominican Republic. You can see the eye, offshore but giving strong

:58:28.:58:30.

winds, heavy rain and a storm surge in the Dominican

:58:31.:58:31.

Republic and up towards Haiti. It will work its way towards the Turks

:58:32.:58:42.

and Caicos Islands later. That is one area we will keep a very close

:58:43.:58:46.

eye on. As it maintains its strength as a category five hurricane.

:58:47.:58:51.

Back to the UK. An area of low pressure sitting towards the

:58:52.:58:54.

north-west of the UK. That is bringing is not only some fairly

:58:55.:58:57.

strong winds across northern and western areas but some outbreaks of

:58:58.:59:01.

rain as well. That rain is going to gradually work further southwards as

:59:02.:59:06.

we go into this afternoon. Towards the south and east of England things

:59:07.:59:10.

going little drier. Quite cloudy but there will be in a few bright spots.

:59:11.:59:15.

Remaining quite wet across Scotland during this afternoon. With that

:59:16.:59:19.

breeze, feeling quite cool, temperatures only 14 or 15. Pretty

:59:20.:59:23.

wet for Northern Ireland and eventually some wet weather into

:59:24.:59:27.

north-west England, North Wales as well. Elsewhere, across England and

:59:28.:59:31.

Wales, while there could be a few showers it is mostly cloudy. Any

:59:32.:59:35.

brightness will be down towards the south and east. That is where

:59:36.:59:39.

temperatures will get to about 17-19.

:59:40.:59:41.

Through this evening and overnight, the wet weather will continue to

:59:42.:59:45.

spread further south and east. Still quite breezy conditions to take this

:59:46.:59:49.

into the early hours of Friday morning. Overnight temperatures down

:59:50.:59:54.

to about 11-13. During Friday, quite unsettled for many. A few heavy

:59:55.:59:58.

showers affecting the northern half of the UK. Further south, you can

:59:59.:00:03.

see this area of rain spreading into southern areas. Some of that could

:00:04.:00:07.

be on the heavy side. Pretty breezy for many. Temperatures around the

:00:08.:00:10.

mid to high teens, again feeling pretty cool.

:00:11.:00:15.

Into the weekend, staying cool and quite windy. Some rain around us.

:00:16.:00:19.

This is the picture on Saturday. Quite a few showers coming in.

:00:20.:00:23.

Blustery conditions throughout the day on Saturday. Temperatures around

:00:24.:00:29.

15-18. By the time we get to Sunday, this area of low pressure starts to

:00:30.:00:34.

move in. Tightening isobars, stronger winds on Sunday for all of

:00:35.:00:39.

us. With that, the weather front bringing outbreaks of rain mainly in

:00:40.:00:43.

the West but will spread further eastwards. Some brighter skies the

:00:44.:00:46.

further east you are but eventually turning cloudy and wet. That's it

:00:47.:00:47.

for me, see you later. Thank you. It is Thursday just after

:00:48.:00:58.

10am. I'm Victoria Derbyshire. Hurricane Irma has caused widespread

:00:59.:01:03.

disruption across the Caribbean, leaving at least nine people dead.

:01:04.:01:10.

Thousands were running from house to house and we had cars flying over

:01:11.:01:15.

our heads. We had containers, 40 foot containers flying left and

:01:16.:01:20.

right. We will talk to some of those affected. And one in five LGBT

:01:21.:01:24.

people have experienced hate crime or hate incidents in the last year.

:01:25.:01:29.

One in ten have been assaulted, but many of those are reluctant to

:01:30.:01:44.

report it to the police. He punched me in the face and broke my nose and

:01:45.:01:48.

I needed an operation under general anaesthetic a few weeks later. We

:01:49.:01:51.

will ask the police if they are failing the victims of hate crimes.

:01:52.:01:55.

And the incredible video of a shoplifter in Texas who managed

:01:56.:01:58.

to slip off her handcuffs, steal a police car and lead them

:01:59.:02:02.

We have video of that which we will show you in the next half an hour.

:02:03.:02:12.

It is quite extraordinary. Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

:02:13.:02:15.

with a summary of today's news. News is emerging of the devastating

:02:16.:02:18.

impact of Hurricane Irma At least nine people

:02:19.:02:23.

have been killed. Officials say the French and Dutch

:02:24.:02:26.

territory of Saint Martin has The small island of Barbuda is said

:02:27.:02:29.

to be barely habitable. The Red Cross said the impact

:02:30.:02:32.

of the storm was unparalleled. The UK takes another step

:02:33.:02:38.

towards Brexit today, as MPs debate The measures would transfer

:02:39.:02:40.

thousands of EU laws and regulations The government has urged MPs

:02:41.:02:44.

from all parties to work with them to get the legislation

:02:45.:02:52.

through Parliament, but Labour says it will oppose the bill

:02:53.:02:54.

in a vote next week. The European Union wants

:02:55.:02:59.

Northern Ireland to have a different Brexit deal to the rest of the UK,

:03:00.:03:01.

the BBC understands. Proposals due to be published later

:03:02.:03:04.

today by the EU's chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, are expected

:03:05.:03:08.

to suggest special exceptions to allow people to work,

:03:09.:03:11.

go to school and receive medical treatment on either

:03:12.:03:13.

side of the border with A leading health organisation says

:03:14.:03:15.

Britain's obesity crisis is being fuelled by businesses

:03:16.:03:23.

pushing unhealthy food and larger The Royal Society for Public Health

:03:24.:03:26.

says that shoppers are at risk of eating 17,000 extra calories

:03:27.:03:31.

a year from unnecessary It wants businesses to stop

:03:32.:03:33.

encouraging people to eat more, and suggests the government

:03:34.:03:39.

could reward businesses with reduced Universities in England could face

:03:40.:03:41.

fines if they pay their leaders more than the Prime Minister

:03:42.:03:49.

unless they can convince a regulator Dozens of vice-chancellors currently

:03:50.:03:51.

earn more than double the Prime Minister's

:03:52.:04:01.

annual salary of ?150,000. The universities minister Jo Johnson

:04:02.:04:09.

says urgent measures are needed to ensure a good deal for both students

:04:10.:04:11.

and taxpayers. One in five people who are gay,

:04:12.:04:19.

lesbian or bisexual have experienced a hate crime in the past year

:04:20.:04:22.

according to research It found more than 80 percent

:04:23.:04:24.

of victims chose not to report Stonewall has said it has launched

:04:25.:04:43.

its Come Out For Lgbt campaign to fight this.

:04:44.:04:48.

Prince George is starting school today.

:04:49.:04:50.

The four-year-old is attending Thomas's School

:04:51.:04:51.

Fees at the school are more than ?17,000 a year.

:04:52.:04:55.

Prince George was taken to school by his father.

:04:56.:04:57.

The Duchess of Cambridge, who is pregnant with

:04:58.:04:59.

the couple's third child, is said to be suffering

:05:00.:05:01.

The school's principal explained what kind of person he had George

:05:02.:05:05.

will be when he leaves primary school. I hope very much that he

:05:06.:05:08.

will be himself. The whole aim of these precious years of early

:05:09.:05:10.

education is to give children confidence in who they are. We will

:05:11.:05:13.

not try and mould him into any kind of particular person and we wouldn't

:05:14.:05:16.

do that with any of our pupils. We hope you will have the confidence to

:05:17.:05:22.

be himself with all his quirks and idiosyncrasies and characteristics.

:05:23.:05:24.

That is what we want for all of our children. That is a summary of the

:05:25.:05:31.

latest BBC News. More at 10:30am. Dan in Birmingham says Labour, the

:05:32.:05:36.

SNP and the liberals all trying to scupper Brexit. And when RMP is

:05:37.:05:39.

going to understand that we voted to leave because we don't want MPs

:05:40.:05:47.

deciding what happens? -- when our MPs going to understand? Let the

:05:48.:05:52.

cards fall wherever they fall. There was not this level of scrutiny on

:05:53.:05:57.

entry. And this one: When we see how many laws have got to be passed into

:05:58.:06:01.

UK law, it shows how much we have been ruled by the unelected

:06:02.:06:06.

omission. And this one: We can only assume that Conservative MP Mark

:06:07.:06:09.

Harper does not want Theresa May to run as per a minister in the next

:06:10.:06:16.

general election. Now she knows it. Please get in touch. If you are

:06:17.:06:21.

texting, you will be charged. Now the sport.

:06:22.:06:24.

It's barely believable but Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal

:06:25.:06:27.

have never played each other at the US Open and unfortunately

:06:28.:06:29.

for many ardent tennis fans, that's not going to change this year

:06:30.:06:32.

either because the Swiss has been knocked out in the quarter finals.

:06:33.:06:35.

Federer was beaten in four sets by Juan Martin del Potro,

:06:36.:06:38.

so it's the Argentine who will take on Nadal in the last four.

:06:39.:06:41.

It was the Wimbledon champion's first defeat of the season

:06:42.:06:43.

and he admittted he just wasn't playing at his best.

:06:44.:06:50.

I knew it was going to be a tough one. I had struggled too much

:06:51.:06:57.

throughout the tournament, you know, to think too far ahead. In some ways

:06:58.:07:01.

I'm actually happy I made the quarterfinals. I am not that

:07:02.:07:03.

disappointed because it has been a good run this year already.

:07:04.:07:08.

Unfortunately I ran into a guy who was better on the day.

:07:09.:07:11.

Nadal was ruthless against the Russian teenager Andrey Rublev

:07:12.:07:13.

as he booked his place in the semi-final.

:07:14.:07:15.

The Spaniard, who recently reclaimed the world number one spot,

:07:16.:07:17.

dropped just five games in the match.

:07:18.:07:20.

It's double misery for Karolina Pliskova,

:07:21.:07:23.

who will now lose her world number one ranking after she lost her

:07:24.:07:26.

It means the women's draw features an all-American semi-final line-up

:07:27.:07:31.

Vandeweghe will take on Madison Keys while Serena Williams plays

:07:32.:07:37.

Manu Tuilagi's hopes of appearing in England's autumn

:07:38.:07:44.

internationals were already slim but now they're over

:07:45.:07:47.

after he suffered a knee injury in Leicester's Premiership opener

:07:48.:07:50.

Tuilagi had already been told by coach Eddie Jones

:07:51.:07:57.

more chance to prove he had the right attitude to

:07:58.:08:00.

England's Test series decider against West Indies begins today.

:08:01.:08:18.

It will be the last commentary for Toby. He said it was too early to

:08:19.:08:25.

know what he would be feeling about his retirement. I am trying to wake

:08:26.:08:29.

up still. I have not been through a full inventory of how I am. I have

:08:30.:08:34.

been doing this for God knows how long. I will only know when I am

:08:35.:08:39.

commentating. Lovely to have a Test match with something riding on it.

:08:40.:08:43.

We are hoping for the West Indies revival to continue. I do. It would

:08:44.:08:50.

be lovely if they won. It would do cricket so much good. I am all for

:08:51.:08:53.

them winning. And we speaking to our correspondent Joe Wilson. That is

:08:54.:08:58.

all this book. Thank you. Welcome to the programme.

:08:59.:09:04.

Hurricane Irma has caused devastation in the Caribbean with

:09:05.:09:09.

some islands totally flattered. The Prime Minister of the small island

:09:10.:09:16.

of Barbuda says it has been left barely habitable. A toddler has been

:09:17.:09:19.

killed and 90% of buildings including schools and hospitals have

:09:20.:09:26.

been damaged. Barbuda sustained wind

:09:27.:09:34.

of up to 225 mph. As a result of that,

:09:35.:09:36.

the country's infrastructure, all of the homes are practically

:09:37.:09:38.

decimated, up to 90% In many instances, some of the homes

:09:39.:09:40.

are totally demolished. So it's a really terrible

:09:41.:09:45.

situation there. We are now trying to bring some

:09:46.:09:47.

urgent relief to the people of Barbuda, and then hopefully

:09:48.:09:50.

to start the rebuilding Prime Minister, for people

:09:51.:09:52.

that don't know Barbuda, could you just describe it

:09:53.:09:55.

a little more? I think there were 1600

:09:56.:09:57.

people living there. There wasn't really anywhere

:09:58.:09:59.

for people to go from those kind of winds and, I guess,

:10:00.:10:05.

a storm surge as well? It's an extremely flat island, only

:10:06.:10:07.

about as many as 1800 inhabitants. That's one of the issues

:10:08.:10:20.

why the devastation would have been so bad,

:10:21.:10:22.

because there are no hills and so on to serve

:10:23.:10:24.

as breakers for the wind. Clearly, the wind would have

:10:25.:10:26.

literally had a free space That is just the nature of Barbuda,

:10:27.:10:29.

a very flat island. Again, the highest point I believe

:10:30.:10:41.

is about 50 feet above sea level. Presently there is maybe

:10:42.:10:44.

three or four inches So it's a really challenging

:10:45.:10:51.

situation in Barbuda. Michael Joseph is the President

:10:52.:10:56.

of the Red Cross in Antigua and Barbuda, and explained

:10:57.:11:02.

the extent of the damage. The Prime Minister would have

:11:03.:11:09.

indicated that damage in Barbuda is like none

:11:10.:11:11.

we've ever seen before. Seeing pretty much 90% of

:11:12.:11:13.

the country demolished, in rubble. When we first lost communication

:11:14.:11:24.

with Barbuda, never did we anticipate that the next time

:11:25.:11:28.

we would be receiving any form of image or any form

:11:29.:11:31.

of communication from them would be Talking about everything

:11:32.:11:34.

being completely destroyed. Its electricity, its roads,

:11:35.:11:41.

its water, its food, its churches, There is literally nothing

:11:42.:11:45.

that currently exists I think the Prime Minister has

:11:46.:11:50.

spoken a bit earlier about the magnitude of what it

:11:51.:12:01.

would cost us in terms of rebuilding the country

:12:02.:12:05.

of Barbuda itself. From his indication,

:12:06.:12:10.

we're talking about 100 million So even if we're looking

:12:11.:12:12.

at getting Barbuda to 25%, we're talking about a significant

:12:13.:12:16.

amount of investment. If you're looking from the Red Cross

:12:17.:12:18.

perspective, just dealing with immediate needs that currently

:12:19.:12:21.

exist in Barbuda. Residents have been describing

:12:22.:12:30.

people tying themselves to their roots to try and save their lives as

:12:31.:12:39.

the hurricane struck. -- roofs. What we experienced is something you

:12:40.:12:43.

would see in a horror movie. People were literally running from house to

:12:44.:12:46.

house and we had cards flying over our heads and 40 feet container is

:12:47.:12:49.

flying left and right. At least nine people are known

:12:50.:13:48.

to have died across the region. More than a million

:13:49.:13:51.

people have been cut off from electricity in Puerto Rico

:13:52.:13:53.

and the storm is now Let's talk to Brieaunna Curry

:13:54.:13:55.

who is in Orlando in Florida And on the line is Erhan Sahin,

:13:56.:13:59.

a British tourist Cuba is due to be hit by the storm

:14:00.:14:09.

and Erhan is hoping to get out And Ummi Krishman Director

:14:10.:14:15.

of the Emergency Health Unit at Save the Children,

:14:16.:14:18.

who's deployed a specialist team to Doctor, tell us about the help you

:14:19.:14:29.

have been giving. We know that this is a monster storm with catastrophic

:14:30.:14:34.

impact. What we don't know is how long the nightmare will last. We are

:14:35.:14:39.

not taking any chances. Save the Children works in all these

:14:40.:14:43.

countries, especially Haiti and Dominican Republic, where we started

:14:44.:14:47.

preparing the minute the storm started brewing. That is why we have

:14:48.:14:52.

a specialist team from an emergency health unit. They will be responding

:14:53.:15:00.

very quickly, starting with children and their medical and health needs,

:15:01.:15:04.

and going onto psychosocial and mental health needs. We are talking

:15:05.:15:08.

about a region with a history of cyclones. I was in last year

:15:09.:15:15.

following Hurricane Matthew. There were two problems. One was the

:15:16.:15:19.

impact of one of the worst storms to hit Haiti in 50 years, Matthew. The

:15:20.:15:24.

second was the secondary impact of the hurricane, which was the cholera

:15:25.:15:28.

outbreak. And the third one was that children had been going through

:15:29.:15:32.

similar storms and they had been emotionally hit very badly. Our

:15:33.:15:35.

priority will be to protect children, take care of them, says

:15:36.:15:39.

their medical and health needs, emotional well-being, as well as

:15:40.:15:43.

responding to survival needs. It is a big, catastrophic hurricane.

:15:44.:15:49.

Julian, specialising in tropical prediction that the Met office. Can

:15:50.:15:55.

you talk through the movements of hurricane Omar. A hurricane,

:15:56.:16:03.

category five. Thankfully the eye of Hurricane Irma, where the strongest

:16:04.:16:06.

winds, are keeping offshore at moment. It kept offshore at Porto

:16:07.:16:13.

Rico. It is keeping off the shore of the Dominican Republic and Haiti,

:16:14.:16:16.

but there is a possibility it could come very close to the Turks and

:16:17.:16:21.

Caicos Islands and across the Bahamas and then into Cuba over the

:16:22.:16:26.

next two lap or three days. And what about Florida? Yes, Florida seems to

:16:27.:16:31.

be in its path as well. What we expected the continued westward

:16:32.:16:34.

movement would happen through to about Saturday. And once it gets

:16:35.:16:40.

close to Cuba, it is likely to take a sharp right turn, which means it

:16:41.:16:43.

could make landfall directly over the southern tip of Florida. There

:16:44.:16:48.

is a chance it could pass just east of Florida and run up the east coast

:16:49.:16:53.

of Florida and into Georgia and the Carolinas. Whatever happens, Florida

:16:54.:16:58.

will be impacted and other parts of the south-eastern USA as well. Can

:16:59.:17:02.

you explain why the winds continue at such a pace? Is it to do with the

:17:03.:17:08.

size of the landmass? Small territories, small pieces of land

:17:09.:17:12.

don't really slow down the storm? That is right. The sea temperatures

:17:13.:17:17.

in that region are slightly above average, a degree or 1.5 degrees

:17:18.:17:21.

above average, fuelling the really strong winds in this hurricane.

:17:22.:17:29.

Small islands like Barbuda which was passed over yesterday have no effect

:17:30.:17:33.

on the intensity at all. Larger islands, such as Porto Rico may do,

:17:34.:17:39.

but the eye is keeping offshore, so the amount of weakening over the

:17:40.:17:42.

next two days, we do expect some weakening but it might be relatively

:17:43.:17:45.

minimal. By the time the Hurricane gets to Florida, it still may be a

:17:46.:17:56.

category four hurricane. Brieaunna, how are you preparing in this case

:17:57.:18:01.

comes to your area? I mean kind of the same way everyone else is trying

:18:02.:18:07.

to. Making sure food and water, and I have shelter for my dog and that

:18:08.:18:11.

all my friends are safe. Just yesterday I try to go to the store

:18:12.:18:15.

to pick up some supplies like water, making trips to the gas station to

:18:16.:18:20.

get gasoline. Even though the storm is not set to hit as for a few days,

:18:21.:18:24.

everything is selling out, from coast to coast. My parents live on

:18:25.:18:28.

the Tampa side of Florida and everything there is sold out.

:18:29.:18:31.

Everything upwards north of Jacksonville is getting sold out and

:18:32.:18:35.

we are starting to get some evacuees from Miami down here in Orlando, who

:18:36.:18:43.

will be going further north. We are just hunkering down and trying to

:18:44.:18:48.

get supplies, if we can find them. Sorry to interrupt... There is no

:18:49.:18:54.

question for you but to stay put. You're not going to try and get out

:18:55.:19:01.

of the area? Well, I mean... We're in Orlando, about an hour and a half

:19:02.:19:07.

away from the coast, a little more inland. We are little further up in

:19:08.:19:12.

Florida, so right now we're kind of like sitting ducks. Our governor has

:19:13.:19:16.

talked a lot about the evacuation plans for Miami. They are starting

:19:17.:19:23.

to introduce them for the rest of Florida, but outside, north of

:19:24.:19:26.

Miami, we don't know what to anticipate. We don't know if we need

:19:27.:19:32.

to evacuate, we just need to know we need to prepare our houses, block --

:19:33.:19:39.

blockade our windows and put sandbags up. When the storm gets

:19:40.:19:42.

close to the southern tip of Florida, we will know what we need

:19:43.:19:46.

to do up here, as far as evacuation goes. Let's talk to our friend in

:19:47.:19:52.

Cuba, a British holiday-maker. Cuba is due to be hit as well. How long

:19:53.:19:58.

are you due to stay there for? Well, we're staying here until Thursday...

:19:59.:20:08.

INAUDIBLE A few days ago I was watching the

:20:09.:20:16.

news. INAUDIBLE They let it slip there was a

:20:17.:20:23.

hurricane hitting us. When I could speak... There only to members of

:20:24.:20:30.

staff left on the complex. They said when the storm gets worse, lock

:20:31.:20:33.

yourself in your room. We have tried calling the Thomas Cook rets but no

:20:34.:20:39.

one picks up the phone. I am picking up every other word you are saying

:20:40.:20:42.

but not all of it. I want to ask you, would you like to get out of

:20:43.:20:48.

Cuba and come home before you were due to next Thursday? We are willing

:20:49.:20:55.

to pay our way out. The British Embassy told us to contact Thomas

:20:56.:21:01.

Cook and Thomas Cook and one is picking up the phone, the line is

:21:02.:21:05.

just ringing dead. We were guaranteed when we booked this

:21:06.:21:09.

holiday that there would be emergency contact, 24 hours a day,

:21:10.:21:12.

but nobody is picking up the phone. We just want to get off this island.

:21:13.:21:18.

We have Canadian citizens who will be evacuated in three hours' time.

:21:19.:21:23.

They have a plain landing at the airport, evacuating them to Canada.

:21:24.:21:31.

We don't mind paying for it. There are 70-80 tourists stranded. We just

:21:32.:21:39.

want to get out. There are children and we don't know what to do. You

:21:40.:21:45.

sound really frustrated. It is, because we have no information.

:21:46.:21:49.

Nobody is giving us any information. You only have one security guard

:21:50.:21:54.

standing on the front doors and a cleaner. That is all we have got.

:21:55.:22:01.

OK. I hope you get through to someone. Thank you so much for

:22:02.:22:05.

talking to us. A British tourist on holiday in Cuba, who wants to leave,

:22:06.:22:12.

frankly, before the storm hits. Thank you to everybody for coming on

:22:13.:22:14.

the programme, thank you. Have a look at this incredible

:22:15.:22:23.

moment when a woman who has been arrested in Texas for shoplifting

:22:24.:22:26.

slips off her handcuffs and steals a police car.

:22:27.:22:51.

Wow was not how bold was that woman? Or stupid, one or the other.

:22:52.:23:59.

Goodness me! Right, we are going to talk about the possibility of you

:24:00.:24:03.

being a victim of crime in this country and whether your fear of

:24:04.:24:05.

crime actually matches up to the reality. The BBC has developed a new

:24:06.:24:17.

tool to find out. This is about you and me and everyone else in the

:24:18.:24:20.

country. It is not thinking about that film or police officers being

:24:21.:24:24.

victims of crime, it's about ordinary people. This is really

:24:25.:24:27.

simple, a tool on a website that you can go to this morning, I tweeted a

:24:28.:24:32.

link as well, that takes the National crime data from the crime

:24:33.:24:35.

survey of England and Wales, a big rolling survey which captures real

:24:36.:24:40.

experiences, and you put in your personal data. We don't capture that

:24:41.:24:45.

data. Once that data is in, it gives you effectively an estimation of

:24:46.:24:48.

your risk of being a victim of crime. The way it is able to do

:24:49.:24:54.

that, it looks at people like you, in areas like yours and what has

:24:55.:24:57.

happened to them over the last three or so years and put those two things

:24:58.:25:02.

together with data on deprivation. Once you've got that, it gives you

:25:03.:25:06.

an estimation of what's going on. OK. So we have created three

:25:07.:25:10.

fictional people just to show how this works. It is not scientific but

:25:11.:25:15.

it gives people an idea. This is Andy, a 22-year-old student. There

:25:16.:25:22.

he is. He happens to be living in private rented accommodation in a

:25:23.:25:25.

nice street in Maidenhead, which as you all know is where the Prime

:25:26.:25:33.

Minister's constituency is. It is in the top 20% of the wealthiest areas.

:25:34.:25:38.

What did the stats say about Andy? Andy is living in a nice area, nice

:25:39.:25:43.

neighbourhood, I would be secured and all those things. He is three

:25:44.:25:48.

and half times more likely than the average person in England to be a

:25:49.:25:54.

victim of robbery. OK, that's interesting, why? It's nice in

:25:55.:25:59.

Maidenhead, isn't it? It is. It all comes down to his age. He is young

:26:00.:26:04.

and the young are more likely to be victims of crime. If you think about

:26:05.:26:08.

it, I'm always badgering my son about locking up his bike. Lock up

:26:09.:26:14.

your bike, those kinds of things. Sometimes kids forget about these

:26:15.:26:17.

things and they have disposable goods, which are easy to steal.

:26:18.:26:20.

That's one of the reasons young people are more likely to be a

:26:21.:26:24.

victim of crime. And Emma, lives in Gateshead in Tyne Wear. 61, again

:26:25.:26:29.

not scientific, fictional people. She is 61, she works and owns her

:26:30.:26:35.

own home. What does... What is it called? Crime calculator. What does

:26:36.:26:42.

it say about her? It says the risk of someone like Emma being a victim

:26:43.:26:48.

of robbery is 0.3%. That is massively below Andy in Maidenhead.

:26:49.:26:55.

Hugely below the national average. Yet the interesting thing, of

:26:56.:26:59.

course, is most older people, people of her generation, would be more

:27:00.:27:03.

likely to think they are victim of crime but in actual fact Emma,

:27:04.:27:08.

living in a poorer area, in a poorer neighbourhood is less likely to be a

:27:09.:27:11.

victim of robbery. Interesting. Let's have a look at the final

:27:12.:27:15.

example, our fictional character is Claire. She is 45, she hasn't got a

:27:16.:27:20.

job at the moment and lives in Saltash in Cornwall in social

:27:21.:27:26.

housing. We fed her details into the crime calculator and what came out?

:27:27.:27:28.

This is where it gets interesting around social deprivation. Because

:27:29.:27:38.

she is poorer, in a poorer area, those are contributing factors to

:27:39.:27:44.

her being the victim of crime. She's more likely to be a victim of

:27:45.:27:48.

break-ins, robbery, potentially violent as well. So in essence, what

:27:49.:27:54.

we see in the data is gender and age do matter. If you are a younger man,

:27:55.:27:57.

you are more likely to be a victim of crime. If you are an older woman,

:27:58.:28:01.

or the older you get is a woman, the less likely you are to be a victim

:28:02.:28:05.

of crime. But in particular circumstances, Claire is a good

:28:06.:28:08.

example of this, your economic conditions can affect how likely you

:28:09.:28:12.

are to be a victim of crime. There are other factors we can't quite

:28:13.:28:15.

capture, this is a very simple tool. But what we wanted to people,

:28:16.:28:27.

myself, colleagues, we go on air talking about crime rate up and down

:28:28.:28:29.

across the nation. People have a perception of what that means, but

:28:30.:28:32.

in reality that is only part of the story. If you look at this tool will

:28:33.:28:35.

give you a better sense of what may happen to you, it may not happen,

:28:36.:28:38.

but it will give you greater sense. You need to take the two things into

:28:39.:28:41.

consideration. One thing I would recommend is put younger versions of

:28:42.:28:47.

yourself into the tall, change the data and the profiles and think

:28:48.:28:50.

about why you're crime profile may have changed over the years. Very

:28:51.:28:51.

interesting, thank you. Let's talk to Jane Wood -

:28:52.:28:53.

she's a Forensic Psychologist from the University of Kent -

:28:54.:28:56.

she's an expert in the way Good morning. Overall, we are told

:28:57.:29:04.

crime has been coming down for about 20 years, broadly speaking. What has

:29:05.:29:09.

happened with our perception of crime? The perception of crime and

:29:10.:29:14.

the fear of crime that people feel is kind of fed by a number of

:29:15.:29:19.

different factors. It is fed by the immediate neighbourhood, so if you

:29:20.:29:23.

for instants perceive your neighbourhood is neglected, poor

:29:24.:29:28.

street lighting, there is vandalism, youth gangs on the street, you're

:29:29.:29:31.

likely to perceive that you are more likely to become a victim of crime.

:29:32.:29:38.

It is also fed by our ability to defend ourselves. So this is one

:29:39.:29:42.

explanation as to why the elderly feel more vulnerable. If elderly

:29:43.:29:48.

people and females tend to feel they appear to be more vulnerable, that

:29:49.:29:52.

they are more vulnerable and less able to defend themselves if they

:29:53.:29:55.

were to be attacked, and so they perceive that their chances of being

:29:56.:30:00.

a victim of crime are higher and therefore they fear crime more. But

:30:01.:30:05.

it may not be the reality. No, no. Statistics do not bear that out, it

:30:06.:30:10.

is not the reality. The reality is most likely victims of crime are

:30:11.:30:13.

going to be young men under the age of 20. White and a final thought,

:30:14.:30:22.

there is a difference between the way men and women perceive crime or

:30:23.:30:25.

have a fear of crime. There is. The research shows men tend to fear

:30:26.:30:28.

being victims of assault or robbery and women tend to fear being victims

:30:29.:30:34.

of sexual assault. And of course, for women, when they think about

:30:35.:30:39.

things like sexual assault, this has potentially life changing

:30:40.:30:41.

consequences for them. So it becomes a bigger reality for them, a bigger

:30:42.:30:45.

worry. Thank you very much for coming on the programme. Staying

:30:46.:30:51.

with crime statistics, one in five people who are gay, lesbian or

:30:52.:30:56.

bisexual have experienced a hate crime in the last year.

:30:57.:31:03.

That's a 78 percent rise compared to four years ago.

:31:04.:31:06.

He stamped on my hand, which was on the side of the staircase.

:31:07.:31:10.

Before I knew it, there was blood everywhere.

:31:11.:31:28.

Three weeks ago I was in a nightclub with my friends.

:31:29.:31:34.

And whilst I was going up the stairs there was a group

:31:35.:31:37.

From, I suppose, hearing my voice, one of the guys

:31:38.:31:42.

At that time he turned around and started saying some quite

:31:43.:31:46.

derogatory homophobic comments which, at the time, I brushed off

:31:47.:31:49.

because I just felt too confident in myself.

:31:50.:31:56.

From that, I suppose he got a little bit riled that he wasn't

:31:57.:31:59.

as intimidating towards me as what he probably wanted

:32:00.:32:01.

So he stamped on my hand, which was on the handrail

:32:02.:32:06.

You could see a heel mark where he had stamped on my hand.

:32:07.:32:13.

Just before I met Leon, just over 12 months ago,

:32:14.:32:23.

I was having a drink in a gay bar in Birmingham, having a kiss

:32:24.:32:27.

But there were some straight people in the bar that didn't like that.

:32:28.:32:32.

Before we knew it, they jumped up and one of them was coming

:32:33.:32:35.

Punched me in the face and broke my nose.

:32:36.:32:39.

I ended up having to have an operation under general

:32:40.:32:41.

anaesthetic a couple of weeks later to try to put it right again.

:32:42.:33:01.

For people who are transgender, the hate crime figure

:33:02.:33:03.

80% of victims chose not to report the crime to the police

:33:04.:33:07.

and more than three in five gay men say they don't feel comfortable

:33:08.:33:10.

walking down the street while holding their partner's hand.

:33:11.:33:14.

Kiran Wood is a 17-year-old transgender student

:33:15.:33:16.

She and her wife Becky were attacked on a night out in Croydon last year.

:33:17.:33:24.

And David Tucker is from the National College of Policing.

:33:25.:33:29.

Welcome to you all. Thank you for coming on the programme. Alex, you

:33:30.:33:34.

are out with Becky when you were attacked. Tell the audience what

:33:35.:33:39.

happened. We went out. We don't usually go out. We were with our

:33:40.:33:43.

friends and we were approached by a gentleman who seemed quite friendly.

:33:44.:33:48.

I think it was fuelled by drink, really. Everything was fine until

:33:49.:33:57.

two men in particular are joined together and we got punched in the

:33:58.:34:01.

face multiple times. I got my head slammed into a lamp post. We only

:34:02.:34:11.

reported it because there were police right there. Why did those

:34:12.:34:15.

men do that to you? Just because we were gay. They said derogatory

:34:16.:34:19.

remarks as well. It was actually our friends who outwardly gay and

:34:20.:34:23.

kissing in public which drew their attention. I guess we got the brunt

:34:24.:34:31.

of it. I really horrific, violent attack. What impact as it had on you

:34:32.:34:37.

both? We don't go out much. We have moved out of the area. We have a son

:34:38.:34:41.

and we don't want to be in that area. I think London crime is much

:34:42.:34:46.

higher. Even though it is more accepted in London, I think. I am

:34:47.:34:51.

actually shocked that one in five people were attacked in the last

:34:52.:34:56.

year. And not many reported it. I am not that surprised because the

:34:57.:35:00.

police that we had did not really support us. We didn't have a proper

:35:01.:35:04.

case person who was on our case. When we went to court, it was all

:35:05.:35:10.

very... It wasn't actually dealt with properly because the police

:35:11.:35:13.

were not actually there. And this was on a High Street and there were

:35:14.:35:17.

no CCTV cameras whatsoever. One person was found guilty and one not

:35:18.:35:22.

guilty. Specifically, what is your complaint about the police? The

:35:23.:35:29.

guilty charge was when it was literally taken to the judge and he

:35:30.:35:32.

decided guilty. He wasn't there. He had fled the country and there is a

:35:33.:35:38.

warrant out for his arrest. The second guy got not guilty because he

:35:39.:35:41.

asked to go to Crown Prosecution Service have a jury. What is your

:35:42.:35:47.

complaint about the police specifically because I have a

:35:48.:35:49.

representative from the college of policing right here and he needs to

:35:50.:35:53.

hear it. On the second court date when it had gone to the jury and he

:35:54.:35:58.

had to stand up and say what happened, the police officer who

:35:59.:36:00.

spoke up to us in the first instance was also there on the day and she

:36:01.:36:04.

said I have not even looked at your case file in the eight months that

:36:05.:36:11.

have gone by. And you experience to hate incident because you are

:36:12.:36:16.

transgender. What happened? I was in Paddington and I went to go to the

:36:17.:36:19.

toilet and a toilet attendant in their challenged me when I went into

:36:20.:36:24.

the toilet. They said it was not the female toilets and I made it clear

:36:25.:36:28.

that my gender identity is mail so I was using the toilet that matched my

:36:29.:36:33.

gender identity. He continued to challenge me. Being confident in

:36:34.:36:38.

myself, I went into the toilet and just went to go to the toilet. When

:36:39.:36:44.

I came out, he was looking at me and smirking, and he followed me very

:36:45.:36:49.

closely behind as I left the toilet. He caused me to have a panic attack.

:36:50.:36:55.

Really? The impact was that great? Why do you think that was? Yes. I

:36:56.:37:00.

was wearing this T-shirt. It says some people are trans, get over it.

:37:01.:37:09.

I think because I am quite open about my identity and who I am and

:37:10.:37:14.

some people are just not OK with that, I guess. David Tucker,

:37:15.:37:26.

National College Of Policing representative, thank you for coming

:37:27.:37:31.

on. This experience and Alex's experience and the fact people don't

:37:32.:37:34.

report hate crimes partly because of a lack of faith in the police. How

:37:35.:37:40.

do you respond? I have been involved in policing around dealing with hate

:37:41.:37:45.

crime and a whole range of things since 1998, 1999, and I launched an

:37:46.:37:50.

inquiry report. What we have seen is a significant change in the attitude

:37:51.:37:56.

of police towards all forms of hate crime including LGBT hate crime. But

:37:57.:38:00.

not enough. I think that is a fair criticism. We have very strong

:38:01.:38:06.

training. The college sets the standards and the guidance that we

:38:07.:38:09.

have a good operational manual for the officers to use. And what we

:38:10.:38:14.

have seen over the years is an increasing amount of reporting and

:38:15.:38:17.

the Office for National Statistics say they don't think the amount of

:38:18.:38:20.

offending has gone up, that the attitude of the police has improved

:38:21.:38:23.

and the way in which the police are recording incidents has improved,

:38:24.:38:27.

and there is an increasing confidence among people to come

:38:28.:38:29.

forward and tell the police about these awful incident. Your eyebrows

:38:30.:38:38.

raising as he says that! I am part of a charity called Mermaids that

:38:39.:38:43.

helps trans-young people, and a lot of what they have talked about in

:38:44.:38:48.

terms of police recording hate incidents as hate incident is not

:38:49.:38:52.

happening and the police are not very good at recording hate

:38:53.:38:56.

incidents. Often they are coded as crimes are not specifically hate

:38:57.:39:00.

crimes. The policy is very clear around that. It comes from the

:39:01.:39:03.

Stephen Lawrence inquiry report. If anybody says that an incident is

:39:04.:39:08.

motivated by hate, then it will be recorded in that way. The reason

:39:09.:39:11.

that policy position was adopted was because there was a fear that police

:39:12.:39:17.

were trying to cut the statistics. We are very clear that we don't want

:39:18.:39:22.

that to happen. We want to know what the experiences of people around

:39:23.:39:24.

crime and what happens when hate incident happened because it is

:39:25.:39:27.

really important that we support people as best we possibly can. I

:39:28.:39:36.

know Alex's experience was not that. But we would absolutely encourage

:39:37.:39:39.

officers to support victims of crime through the criminal justice

:39:40.:39:44.

process. And then try to divert, signpost people into longer-term

:39:45.:39:47.

support when they need that. Did you go to the police? Because of my

:39:48.:39:52.

anxiety and the fact I had had a panic attack, I called my mum, who

:39:53.:39:56.

called British Transport Police, who were actually really good. Because

:39:57.:40:01.

of the situation, we ended up meeting them at my local is dating

:40:02.:40:04.

and talking to them then and reporting everything. -- my local

:40:05.:40:10.

station. There were very good at recording everything properly and I

:40:11.:40:13.

got a letter through with the help I could get if I needed extra help,

:40:14.:40:20.

which was good. It didn't go further because it didn't reach the criminal

:40:21.:40:25.

threshold. David Tucker, are you saying that it is vital that people

:40:26.:40:33.

report such incidents so that the police get a much better idea of

:40:34.:40:39.

what is going on and are actually able to investigate? Exactly the

:40:40.:40:43.

point. There is almost a vicious circle here. If the police are not

:40:44.:40:47.

told about things, we can't respond to it. So the problem is that we

:40:48.:40:51.

have about a lack of understanding and a lack of appreciation of the

:40:52.:40:57.

full crime picture, continues. We want to hear from people about the

:40:58.:41:01.

hate crime experiences so we can respond in the right way. Thank you

:41:02.:41:06.

very much, everybody. Thank you for coming on the programme and we wish

:41:07.:41:11.

you all the best. It is Prince George's first day at school today.

:41:12.:41:14.

I know you want to hear more about this there we are about to tell you

:41:15.:41:21.

more. He is four and he is attending Thomas's Battersea, ?18,000 a year,

:41:22.:41:24.

and it is in south-west London. His mother was not with him to drop him

:41:25.:41:28.

off because she has very bad morning sickness because she is pregnant

:41:29.:41:32.

with her third child. The head of the school, Ben Thomas, has been

:41:33.:41:35.

speaking this morning about his hopes for Prince George's future. I

:41:36.:41:40.

hope very much that he will be himself. The whole aim of these

:41:41.:41:44.

precious years of early education is to give children the confidence in

:41:45.:41:48.

who they are. We are not trying to mould him into any particular person

:41:49.:41:52.

and we wouldn't do that with any of our pupils. I hope you will have the

:41:53.:41:55.

confidence to be himself, with all his quirks and idiosyncrasies and

:41:56.:42:00.

characteristics, which is what I want for all of our children. In his

:42:01.:42:05.

first year, talk through a few things that he will experience here.

:42:06.:42:09.

What sort of things will he get up to? It is an incredibly exciting

:42:10.:42:13.

time. Up and down the country there are children starting school at this

:42:14.:42:17.

time. Just on the way here I saw children with their new school shoes

:42:18.:42:20.

having pictures taken on the doorstep. Children throughout the

:42:21.:42:25.

country are starting school and we will be trying to do the same for

:42:26.:42:28.

our pupils as well as those pupils as well. Our royal correspondent

:42:29.:42:32.

Sarah Campbell as they are now. No doubting that Prince George looks

:42:33.:42:35.

very cute and because he is the future King of England he needs

:42:36.:42:40.

cameras there when he first goes to school. A nightmare for him. It is a

:42:41.:42:46.

rite of passage for every young child but these pictures will be

:42:47.:42:50.

beamed around the world. The first day of school is a big one. Every

:42:51.:42:54.

parent will recognise that look, slightly nervous. He did a pretty

:42:55.:42:58.

good royal handshake. That is ahead of the school. It is Thomas's

:42:59.:43:03.

Battersea, half an hour from Kensington Palace, so further away

:43:04.:43:06.

than the school where William and Harry went, just round the corner

:43:07.:43:10.

from Kensington Palace. ?18,000 a year in school fees. A mixed school,

:43:11.:43:17.

girls and boys, 560 pupils. We found out today that he will be known to

:43:18.:43:21.

his classmates as George Cambridge. And Kate is not very well so she is

:43:22.:43:25.

not there. Fair enough. And that is an indication of how not very well

:43:26.:43:29.

she is because she would obviously have wanted to be there today. The

:43:30.:43:33.

third pregnancy was announced on Monday. Kensington Palace announced

:43:34.:43:37.

that she visibly too unwell to accompany George. We understand in

:43:38.:43:43.

the future that is regularly as possible William or Catherine will

:43:44.:43:44.

drop him off as school. Thank you. Just over a year ago,

:43:45.:43:51.

last June, 52% of the country voted to leave the EU

:43:52.:43:57.

and many of those who backed Brexit saying they wanted

:43:58.:44:01.

to take back control. That's going to mean thousands of EU

:44:02.:44:03.

laws and regulations But with MPs as divided

:44:04.:44:05.

as the country, it's probably not MPs start debating the EU

:44:06.:44:09.

Withdrawal Bill later today. Once informally known

:44:10.:44:15.

as the Great Repeal Bill, the now less grandly titled

:44:16.:44:17.

European Union Withdrawal Bill faces its first big test

:44:18.:44:19.

in Parliament today. But what is it and why

:44:20.:44:21.

does it matter? Well, the idea is to do the biggest

:44:22.:44:23.

cut and paste job in Parliamentary history, by moving 40 years' worth

:44:24.:44:27.

of EU law straight into UK law. Then when the UK formally

:44:28.:44:33.

leaves the EU in 2019, Britain will be able to change those

:44:34.:44:36.

laws as it sees fit. Sounds straightforward

:44:37.:44:38.

enough, doesn't it? Well, the bill also includes

:44:39.:44:39.

controversial powers nicknamed Henry VIII clauses,

:44:40.:44:45.

after the 16th century king who introduced a Statute

:44:46.:44:48.

of Proclamations that gave him power to make laws without

:44:49.:44:51.

Parliament's consent. Critics fear these powers

:44:52.:44:55.

would allow ministers to change legislation

:44:56.:44:58.

without the scrutiny of Parliament. As a result, the opposition

:44:59.:45:03.

Labour Party have vowed They say it grants too much power

:45:04.:45:05.

to ministers to, quote, "Slash people's rights at work

:45:06.:45:09.

and reduce protections for consumers The government says it won't use

:45:10.:45:11.

the powers to make significant changes, and has warned that

:45:12.:45:20.

if the bill doesn't clear the Commons, it could create a legal

:45:21.:45:22.

vacuum when the UK leaves Since the last election,

:45:23.:45:25.

the government has a wafer thin majority, with only just enough MPs

:45:26.:45:31.

to get new laws passed. But if this bill, or one like it,

:45:32.:45:34.

isn't passed by the time the UK formally leaves the EU,

:45:35.:45:38.

Britain could find itself Our political guru Norman Smith

:45:39.:45:40.

is in Westminster. What will happen today, tomorrow,

:45:41.:45:56.

Monday? We get the start of an almighty great row that is probably

:45:57.:46:02.

going to go on for, I'm afraid, months, with endless very technical

:46:03.:46:09.

difficult arguments, legal spats. It will be a Parliamentary War of

:46:10.:46:13.

attrition, which I'm afraid will dominate life here for an awfully

:46:14.:46:20.

long time to come. That said, it does matter, because this bill is

:46:21.:46:25.

really the sort of gangplank to Brexit. This is how we get out of

:46:26.:46:33.

the EU, because it repeals the 1972 European Communities Act, which took

:46:34.:46:36.

us in in the first place. If we don't pass this, we won't be going

:46:37.:46:40.

anywhere. It matters hugely and because of that it is an almighty

:46:41.:46:44.

great big beast of the bill and that gives critics of Mrs May's approach

:46:45.:46:52.

to Brexit all sorts of opportunities to table an amendment saying, we

:46:53.:46:56.

should stay in the single market, we should stay in the customs union,

:46:57.:47:01.

MPs must have a vote before a final deal is signed off. In other words

:47:02.:47:07.

it gives Mrs May's opponents, opponents to Brexit, huge

:47:08.:47:09.

opportunities to cause trouble and may be to change Mrs May's approach

:47:10.:47:15.

to Brexit, some say even to potentially derail Brexit. So it

:47:16.:47:28.

will be bruising, it's going to be acrimonious, there will be late

:47:29.:47:30.

nights sit ins but it matters big-time because it really good

:47:31.:47:32.

shape our approach to leaving the EU. Thank you.

:47:33.:47:33.

Reko Smith is a student who wants the UK to get on with leaving,

:47:34.:47:38.

Abby King, a European Studies student who thinks we were wrong

:47:39.:47:40.

to leave, and Linda Burbridge, who voted leave but thinks some

:47:41.:47:43.

politicians are trying to block brexit.

:47:44.:47:44.

In our Leeds studio is Mike Ward, who's considering leaving

:47:45.:47:47.

Seriously, Mike? Yes, it's certainly a possibility. My wife has lived and

:47:48.:47:55.

worked and paid tax here for 32 years. There is no guarantee she's

:47:56.:48:01.

going to be able to stay. Where is your wife from? Rishi is from

:48:02.:48:10.

Germany originally, Berlin. OK. -- she is from Germany, originally,

:48:11.:48:15.

Berlin. If she is not able to stay or other circumstances... It is a

:48:16.:48:18.

real possibility and we are considering it. What do you say to

:48:19.:48:23.

that? The government have been clear, they have said immigrants

:48:24.:48:26.

from the EU who are already here have the right to remain here. No,

:48:27.:48:31.

they haven't said that. They are discussing it at the moment but

:48:32.:48:35.

until they reach an agreement and sign it with the EU, there are no

:48:36.:48:40.

guarantees for anybody. They have said that. They haven't. My wife

:48:41.:48:46.

applied for permanent residency and spent many months in a very

:48:47.:48:52.

laborious procedure trying to get hold of this piece of paper.

:48:53.:48:57.

Solicitors, lots of money, complaints, letters to the MP and so

:48:58.:49:01.

on, got it in the end. Week heard a week later after she got this piece

:49:02.:49:04.

of paper that the government is going to abolish permanent

:49:05.:49:08.

residency, so everyone who has permanent residency is back to

:49:09.:49:11.

square one and will have to apply for settlement now. I suppose this

:49:12.:49:15.

relates to the bill we have just been hearing about. Broadly

:49:16.:49:19.

speaking, how do you think Brexit is going? There is a lot of uncertainty

:49:20.:49:23.

around this bill that I've been hearing, but to be honest I support

:49:24.:49:27.

this bill. If we don't support this bill, we are going nowhere with

:49:28.:49:31.

Brexit. In terms of what the ministers have been saying, saying

:49:32.:49:41.

there will be maybe possibly a transitional arrangement or a period

:49:42.:49:43.

after we leave the EU, Philip Hammond the Chancellor said that and

:49:44.:49:46.

supported by Liam Fox, I think that also needs to happen if there is

:49:47.:49:49.

loads of legislation that need to be passed into UK law, transition and

:49:50.:49:54.

with immigration systems. I feel like the government has taken a hard

:49:55.:49:58.

Brexit. I'm OK at the minute, but we will see how it goes with this vote.

:49:59.:50:03.

How do you think it's going? Personally I think it is a bit of a

:50:04.:50:07.

shambles at the moment. I'm a member of the Labour Party, so I am against

:50:08.:50:12.

the repeal bill. I don't really think that the government is doing a

:50:13.:50:16.

very good job of Brexit. There was a poll earlier this week on the daily

:50:17.:50:20.

politics show, going out on the street and seeing what people

:50:21.:50:23.

thought and it was very close, if not a win for the No Campaign, as

:50:24.:50:27.

in, the government isn't doing a good job on Brexit. I think it is

:50:28.:50:31.

such a complex process. I studied the youth for three years and there

:50:32.:50:36.

is no, the government doesn't seem to have an idea on what it wants to

:50:37.:50:40.

achieve with Brexit. If it wants a system like Norway or anything like

:50:41.:50:44.

that. I just think their aims are not clear. It wants to limit

:50:45.:50:49.

immigration, that is clear. Yes. And it wants to do bilateral trade deals

:50:50.:50:53.

when we leave, that is clear? Kiosks, but there's a lot more to

:50:54.:50:58.

the EU than that. With the repeal Bill, 12,000 wars they are trying to

:50:59.:51:04.

translate into domestic law. -- 12,000 wars. That could be

:51:05.:51:07.

relatively straightforward, if people vote for it, which they're

:51:08.:51:13.

likely to. Will tell. How do you think it's going? At the moment I

:51:14.:51:19.

think it is early days, because they are just going to start debating

:51:20.:51:24.

this latest bill. I agree with Reko, I think at the moment they are doing

:51:25.:51:30.

OK. It will take time, it is complex as Abby says. Do you think there is

:51:31.:51:37.

time to get it sorted by March 2019? Had to say, I have no idea because I

:51:38.:51:41.

don't know everything involved. I think if they get their skates on

:51:42.:51:44.

and get this vote through next week and start really working on it, I

:51:45.:51:49.

think it's the first good step, to vote for this bill, so they can

:51:50.:51:53.

start the hard work in parliament of looking at the amendments on

:51:54.:51:56.

different things they will need to do for each item. It's a good start.

:51:57.:52:01.

We will see why happens, thank you all for coming on.

:52:02.:52:04.

Lots of you getting in touch this morning about our conversation at

:52:05.:52:11.

the start of the programme between 38-year-old Belgian Paralympian

:52:12.:52:13.

Marieke Vervoot who has signed euthanasia papers and an

:52:14.:52:18.

anti-euthanasia campaigner. Here is a short extract. Hello, I am Marieke

:52:19.:52:24.

Vervoot, I'm an athlete from Belgium. I have four Olympic medals,

:52:25.:52:32.

including one gold medal in London 2012.

:52:33.:52:44.

I've been living with chronic pain for 37 years now. This will be the

:52:45.:52:51.

first time in quite a few years of campaigning around the subject of

:52:52.:52:57.

assisted dying, euthanasia, where I have met some on themselves who is

:52:58.:53:00.

disabled and experiencing it from the other side of the argument.

:53:01.:53:08.

I suppose my worries about euthanasia is that we don't live in

:53:09.:53:15.

a world, I think, that's kind of ready for it. I don't think the

:53:16.:53:19.

world understands what being disabled or ill means and I don't

:53:20.:53:24.

think it's kind of in a position where we are all able to live as B1.

:53:25.:53:30.

I think totally different about it. For me, now, it starts to have more

:53:31.:53:39.

that says that on good days and it's getting really difficult. That's why

:53:40.:53:45.

I'm really, really glad that I signed my euthanasia papers. When I

:53:46.:53:50.

say it's enough, I can't live in this condition, I have the right to

:53:51.:53:56.

say I want to quit now. I have so many friends that are having the

:53:57.:53:59.

people that care for them taken away, that are being put into care

:54:00.:54:04.

homes whether they want to or not. I don't think when that happens you

:54:05.:54:10.

can make an informed choice. When you know what pain is, when you are

:54:11.:54:15.

totally alone and you are crying because of pain, yelling so loud

:54:16.:54:22.

they hear it at the corner of the street. Is that right? Yeah. I have

:54:23.:54:27.

a fantastic ride. I had four years of solid pain that never stopped. If

:54:28.:54:34.

I lived in a society with that for, I would have stopped. I don't want

:54:35.:54:41.

to die like an animal. I want to end like Marieke

:54:42.:54:48.

I arranged my funeral already, so I don't want people to cry, that they

:54:49.:54:56.

are also happy that I am not in pain any more. That I can rest in peace.

:54:57.:55:05.

Let me read you an e-mail from Louise, not a real name. She says,

:55:06.:55:10.

people who have never had ongoing pain and... What you see is darkness

:55:11.:55:21.

again and again. Even if you get two our street it just breaks you, it's

:55:22.:55:25.

not living, it's just existing, it's no way to live. When you reach the

:55:26.:55:29.

void at the end of your dark abyss you feel nothing at all. You just

:55:30.:55:34.

don't want to be any more. I have been their four times, yet done

:55:35.:55:37.

nothing yet. Another viewer says, I have epilepsy

:55:38.:55:40.

and a few other medical conditions I think it is the last breed a person

:55:41.:55:45.

can have, to choose how to end your life on your terms and no one

:55:46.:55:47.

else's. Thank you. University bosses -

:55:48.:55:51.

officially called vice-chancellors - In many cases far, far more

:55:52.:55:53.

than the Prime Minister. Dozens of university heads

:55:54.:55:57.

earn ?300,000 or more - For that they're meant

:55:58.:55:59.

to provide leadership, secure the budget and carry

:56:00.:56:04.

out ceremonial duties. They're trying to curb

:56:05.:56:06.

their spiralling pay by asking universities to justify any salary

:56:07.:56:14.

over ?150,000 a year. Joining me now is our Reality Check

:56:15.:56:18.

correspondent Chris Morris, who's Give us some of the specifics of

:56:19.:56:26.

what these vice chancellors are on? They earn a lot of money, no

:56:27.:56:29.

question. They run big businesses and earn a lot of money, more than

:56:30.:56:35.

50 earns more than ?300,000 a year. The Word spiralling attracted our

:56:36.:56:38.

interest. Have they been spiralling? A survey has been done since 2009-10

:56:39.:56:45.

and over that an average Vice Chancellor salaries have gone up

:56:46.:56:50.

13%. In the same period, the average weekly UK wage has gone up by 13%.

:56:51.:56:57.

So it is hardly spiralling. There are examples, Vice Chancellor of the

:56:58.:57:00.

University of Bath, her salary went up 11% last year to ?451,000. But

:57:01.:57:06.

the overall average is not really spiralling. It does feel like the

:57:07.:57:09.

government are perhaps looking at them as quite a convenient target,

:57:10.:57:13.

at a time when they are under pressure on things like tuition

:57:14.:57:16.

fees. They are calling for restraint. What might they do if

:57:17.:57:20.

there is not restraint? There is a suggestion that the new authority

:57:21.:57:28.

which will regulate students and universities could even potentially

:57:29.:57:30.

impose fines on them. But the amount of money we were talking about here

:57:31.:57:35.

is relatively small. If you say cut every Vice Chancellor salary by

:57:36.:57:38.

100,000, you might save ?10 million... Tuition fees as a whole

:57:39.:57:44.

bring in ?11 billion. Students know that from this year they will have

:57:45.:57:48.

interest rates on those fees of 6.1%. That is what most people are

:57:49.:57:57.

howling about. People worry they are becoming unaffordable interest rates

:57:58.:58:01.

on tuition fees. There is a sense of attention being deflected onto Vice

:58:02.:58:04.

Chancellor salaries. They are high that they have always been high.

:58:05.:58:08.

Thank you very much, Chris. Chris Morris is our reality check

:58:09.:58:11.

correspondent. Chloe's presenting

:58:12.:58:12.

the programme tomorrow - and she'll talk to the former

:58:13.:58:14.

England cricketer who served six-and-a-half years

:58:15.:58:16.

for drug smuggling. Thanks for watching today. Have a

:58:17.:58:18.

good day. Immense congratulations to you.

:58:19.:58:32.

You are the final 12. But at the same time,

:58:33.:58:35.

you are now nothing. An elite group,

:58:36.:58:37.

including scientists,

:58:38.:58:40.

The Belgian Paralympian who wants to end her life talks about euthanasia.

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