06/09/2017 Victoria Derbyshire


06/09/2017

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Hello, it's Wednesday, it's 9am, I'm Chloe Tilley.

:00:00.:00:09.

The Government is looking at ways to reduce the number of low skilled EU

:00:10.:00:23.

migrants after Brexit. According to a leaked Home Office leaked

:00:24.:00:28.

document. We want companies to do more to

:00:29.:00:33.

improve skills of those who leave our colleges. We are not closing the

:00:34.:00:38.

door on all future immigration, but it has to be managed properly.

:00:39.:00:44.

Bosses faced being told they could be taxed if they keep taking on

:00:45.:00:50.

unskilled EU migrants and should put British workers first.

:00:51.:00:53.

As thousands of nurses prepare to lobby Parliament over their pay,

:00:54.:00:56.

some of them tell us why they can't afford to live on what they get.

:00:57.:01:01.

I'm Michael. I'm a nurse. I'm ?400 a month worse off under the pay cap.

:01:02.:01:11.

We report on a scheme in Glasgow to help refugees who previously worked

:01:12.:01:24.

as doctors join the NHS. Lots of colleagues who are doctors living

:01:25.:01:26.

here and they are working other jobs. Some of them are even taxi

:01:27.:01:34.

drivers which has let down hope for a lot of people and when you hear

:01:35.:01:39.

about this, it has given us a lot of hope.

:01:40.:01:47.

Hello. Welcome to the programme.

:01:48.:01:50.

We're also talking about endometriosis this morning,

:01:51.:01:56.

an incurable condition affecting women which causes extreme pain

:01:57.:01:58.

Under new NHS guidelines should improve the treatment people get,

:01:59.:02:10.

Do get in touch if it's something you've suffered from.

:02:11.:02:13.

Use the hashtag Victoria LIVE and if you text, you will be charged

:02:14.:02:16.

A leaked Home Office document has set out plans for how

:02:17.:02:21.

the UK immigration system could work after Brexit.

:02:22.:02:25.

The paper, which has been published by the Guardian newspaper,

:02:26.:02:27.

considers how the Government could dramatically reduce the number

:02:28.:02:30.

It also proposes time limits on how long EU nationals

:02:31.:02:35.

The BBC understands the document - which was produced last month -

:02:36.:02:40.

Our Political Guru Norman Smith is in Westminster this morning.

:02:41.:02:48.

Norman, tell us more about what's in the leaked document? Well, there are

:02:49.:02:54.

two sort of big thoughts in this document. One is the desire for a

:02:55.:03:01.

concerted climb-down on unskilled EU migration into the UK and the second

:03:02.:03:06.

is to put British workers first. To give them priority. Now, how would

:03:07.:03:11.

this work out? Well the Government is suggesting you could say to

:03:12.:03:15.

unskilled EU workers coming to Britain, you can only stay for two

:03:16.:03:19.

years, you would have to get a certain salary level. You couldn't

:03:20.:03:22.

come here and look for a job, you would have to have a job to come to

:03:23.:03:26.

and the Government is also thinking about just imposing a blanket cap on

:03:27.:03:31.

the number of unskilled workers from the EU who can come here. So they

:03:32.:03:35.

would say well, you can have X thousands, but no more than that. As

:03:36.:03:40.

for business, they will be under an obligation to try and recruit local

:03:41.:03:45.

British workers first and they will have to pass a test to show that

:03:46.:03:51.

they have gone out and tried to recruit British workers and if then

:03:52.:03:56.

they still want to recruit people from the EU, they could face a

:03:57.:04:02.

charge, a tax, and that money would go to train up British workers. So,

:04:03.:04:08.

it's a very, very big change from what the current sort of freedom of

:04:09.:04:13.

movement regime and while it's not definite Government policy, I think,

:04:14.:04:17.

we do get a clear insight into the strategy the Government is hoping to

:04:18.:04:22.

unveil once we finally get the immigration plans unveiled in the

:04:23.:04:26.

autumn. How is it being received, Norman? Well, business, I think, is

:04:27.:04:31.

already deeply alarmed and the reason for that is they say look,

:04:32.:04:36.

there simply aren't the indigenous British workers out there to take up

:04:37.:04:40.

all the unskilled jobs because unemployment is down at around 4.5%.

:04:41.:04:43.

That's nearly full employment. So they say look, we have got to go out

:04:44.:04:49.

to Europe to bring in those unskilled workers otherwise we can't

:04:50.:04:52.

meet customer demand and we can't grow our businesses. The response

:04:53.:04:58.

from ministers has been to say look, immigration was at the heart of the

:04:59.:05:00.

referendum campaign. There is no getting away from it and this

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morning the Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon was saying he would

:05:05.:05:08.

make no apology for bearing down on immigration. Let's be clear, freedom

:05:09.:05:12.

of movement has to end. It has to end because legally we're living the

:05:13.:05:16.

European Union, that's what people voted for last year and freedom of

:05:17.:05:19.

movement is part of membership. So that has to finish. We don't want to

:05:20.:05:24.

shut the down on I will gration, but equally the public want to see

:05:25.:05:27.

immigration continue to come down. It's falling at the moment. We've

:05:28.:05:31.

always said we want to get it manageable, down from hundreds of

:05:32.:05:35.

thousands a year, down to tens of thousands a year to reduce the

:05:36.:05:39.

pressure on public services. So we will set out the proposals as to who

:05:40.:05:44.

can come here from the rest of the European Union, how long they can

:05:45.:05:48.

work here and what their varied will be and it will be set out by the

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Home Secretary later this year. Chloe this is going to provoke a

:05:54.:05:58.

huge row, debate, call it what you will over the road in Westminster

:05:59.:06:00.

including in the Conservative Party. When you talk to different ministers

:06:01.:06:06.

they say, "Well, I don't want any reduction in EU migrants in my

:06:07.:06:09.

particular field." No one really wants to see fewer NHS workers from

:06:10.:06:14.

the EU or fewer care workers. No one really wants to see fewer farm

:06:15.:06:19.

workers coming to work in fruit farms. No one wants to see fewer

:06:20.:06:22.

construction workers. The difficulty is working out who are the unskilled

:06:23.:06:26.

EU workers that the Government now wants to keep out. Norman, thank you

:06:27.:06:29.

very much. Annita is in the BBC

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Newsroom with a summary Islands in the Caribbean

:06:32.:06:33.

are making last-minute preparations for Hurricane Irma,

:06:34.:06:41.

one of the most powerful Atlantic storms on record

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with officials warning of its "potentially

:06:44.:06:45.

catastrophic" effects. It's already lashing the British

:06:46.:06:46.

territory of Anguilla where residents say the powerful

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waves and high winds have been Latest reports say the eye

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of the hurricane is passing over Our correspondent

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Sarah Corker reports. This is the eye of

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the storm from space. Dramatic images from Nasa

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capture the sheer scale The category five storm

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is on a collision course Popular holiday destinations

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like Antigua and Saint Martin are preparing for life-threatening

:07:14.:07:19.

winds and torrential rains. Storm surges of up to 12-feet

:07:20.:07:21.

are forecast and overnight some Irma's path may change but at

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the moment it looks set to head towards the British Virgin Islands,

:07:25.:07:37.

Puerto Rico, Cuba and by People are securing their homes and

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stocking up on essentials. The dough minutical republic the

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rains have already arrived. The tourist like, like its neighbour,

:07:53.:07:57.

Haiti issued hurricane warnings. And in Florida, a state of emergency has

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been declared. The torm is massive and the storm surge will go for

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miles and miles. Right now Irma is travelling at 15mph and the track

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has it forecasted to move just south of the Florida quays on a westerly

:08:12.:08:16.

path with a slight north-west turn. It is important that all Floridans

:08:17.:08:23.

keep an eye on this storm. Do not sit and wait to prepare, get

:08:24.:08:32.

prepared now. The storm's track may change.

:08:33.:08:37.

This monster hurricane comes on the heels of Harvey, which struck

:08:38.:08:40.

This But Irma is a bigger storm and potentially more dangerous. In

:08:41.:08:52.

Miami, they are preparing for the worst. This is not a storm to be

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taken lightly. This is probably the worst one since we moved here in

:08:59.:09:06.

2003. I have lived through Hurricane Andrew and Hurricane Katrina and

:09:07.:09:12.

Hurricane Wilma. A research plane filmed these pictures from inside

:09:13.:09:15.

the hurricane to predict its route and now millions of people across

:09:16.:09:19.

the Caribbean are preparing for this potentially catastrophic storm.

:09:20.:09:23.

A 14-year-old boy has died after a double

:09:24.:09:25.

Corey Junior Davis and another boy, who's 17, were found with gunshot

:09:26.:09:36.

injuries in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon.

:09:37.:09:37.

The second victim is said to have "life-changing injuries".

:09:38.:09:39.

Police have launched a murder investigation.

:09:40.:09:44.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said that North Korea's nuclear

:09:45.:09:46.

and missile programme are a "flagrant violation"

:09:47.:09:48.

Speaking after talks with his South Korean counterpart

:09:49.:09:51.

in the Russia city of Vladivostok, Mr Putin also called for talks

:09:52.:09:54.

to try to resolve the crisis, warning that no resolution would be

:09:55.:09:57.

possible with just sanctions and pressure alone.

:09:58.:10:04.

The de-facto leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, has claimed

:10:05.:10:08.

that the crisis in Rakhine state is being distorted by

:10:09.:10:10.

Myanmar is currently under intense diplomatic pressure to end

:10:11.:10:14.

the violence its security forces are reportedly inflicting

:10:15.:10:16.

Nearly 150,000 people have fled into neighbouring Bangladesh.

:10:17.:10:28.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 9.30am.

:10:29.:10:34.

Get in touch with us throughout the morning -

:10:35.:10:37.

use the hashtag Victoria LIVE and If you text, you will be charged

:10:38.:10:40.

use the hashtag Victoria LIVE and if you text, you will be charged

:10:41.:10:43.

He only made his debut for Wales at the weekend and already he's

:10:44.:10:55.

turning into a real star in the side, isn't he?

:10:56.:11:03.

E-Ben Woodburn could well become the next big star. He is thought of

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highly by his club manager, Jurgen Klopp. His international manager

:11:12.:11:16.

decided to bring him in for Wales at the age of 17. He had a real effect.

:11:17.:11:23.

He scored a winner on his debut and in last night's qualifier, well he

:11:24.:11:29.

made another impact off the bench. The Liverpool man, showed no fear so

:11:30.:11:34.

far in a Welsh shirt. He has defied his age. Good wide play from him to

:11:35.:11:39.

set up the opening goal. It was a Man of the Match performance from

:11:40.:11:45.

Woodburn. So we could be looking at another Ryan Giggs or Gareth Bale,

:11:46.:11:49.

Aaron Ramsey getting another goal to put a seal on the result, but it was

:11:50.:11:53.

a very important win for Wales because that result coupled with

:11:54.:11:55.

defeat for the Republic of Ireland in their game with Serbia means that

:11:56.:11:59.

Wales have moved into second spot in Group D. That gives them a good

:12:00.:12:04.

chance of a play-off spot with a couple of qualifying games left.

:12:05.:12:09.

Wales and Ireland will face each other in a final qualifier in a

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month's time. That could be a winner takes all decider.

:12:14.:12:15.

Now, the England women's manager Mark Sampson has been responding

:12:16.:12:21.

Yes. There has been a bit of a storm at the FA over this. The former

:12:22.:12:33.

striker alleged an atmosphere of bullying and discrimination. She

:12:34.:12:40.

said that had been created by Sam son and included allegations of

:12:41.:12:44.

racially insensitive language and Sam son has been cleared by a FA and

:12:45.:12:47.

independent investigation and yesterday he chose to speak about

:12:48.:12:52.

the issue. He said his conscience was clear responding to the claim

:12:53.:12:57.

that he joked that he didn't want her Nigerian family to bring ebola

:12:58.:13:01.

to an England game. This is what he had to say. I have heard the

:13:02.:13:06.

specifics of the allegation and at the time we released a statement to

:13:07.:13:11.

be very clear that I didn't say that and I'm very disappointed the

:13:12.:13:14.

allegation has come out and I understand it. All I can say is I

:13:15.:13:20.

didn't say that with any of my communication, my intention clearly

:13:21.:13:24.

is to support the players, give them confidence and give them every

:13:25.:13:26.

chance to be successful on the field.

:13:27.:13:36.

She has claimed she e-mailed Sam son and he hasn't responded. We will see

:13:37.:13:42.

if the FA chooses to look at this further.

:13:43.:13:46.

Football will lose one of its greatest commentators

:13:47.:13:50.

at the end of this season - John Motson.

:13:51.:13:55.

We will hear and see less of John Motson. He is deciding to hang up

:13:56.:14:04.

the microphone after 50 years. He covered ten World Cups, ten euros,

:14:05.:14:08.

29 FA Cup Finals and more than 200 England games. He is at the age of

:14:09.:14:12.

72. He says he wants to stay within football and commentary. He won't be

:14:13.:14:16.

retiring from everything, but we won't have him describing a goal or

:14:17.:14:20.

two on a Saturday night and that will be a brand-new feeling for many

:14:21.:14:24.

of the football fans up and down the country. Hugh, thank you. I'll catch

:14:25.:14:28.

up with you later on. Hundreds of nurses are expected

:14:29.:14:32.

to gather in Central London later to demand a pay rise

:14:33.:14:35.

from the Government It comes as the Scottish government

:14:36.:14:36.

announce the pay cap in Scotland will be lifted and after hints

:14:37.:14:41.

from ministers that things could be Tell me how your life has been

:14:42.:15:04.

affected by the pay cap? I worry a lot more about money than I used to.

:15:05.:15:09.

Money is a lot tighter at the end of the month, there is less money left.

:15:10.:15:15.

So that means maybe you don't have a holiday that year or you shop for a

:15:16.:15:22.

cheaper brand in the supermarket. But it's also about how we feel

:15:23.:15:26.

under valued. So it's about yes, about money, but it's also every

:15:27.:15:31.

time the pay cap stays in place and every time we are told there is no

:15:32.:15:35.

money, it is a slap in the face for hard-working nurses and health care

:15:36.:15:41.

assistants, midwives, doctors, operating department practitioners,

:15:42.:15:42.

radiographers, everybody that works in the NHS and it is not, some of

:15:43.:15:46.

the lower paid staff that are really suffering. So health care assistants

:15:47.:15:51.

who are on band two, admin staff who are band ones, band twos, band

:15:52.:15:55.

threes which are the lower pay scales because they have had their

:15:56.:16:00.

pay frozen in the same way. It isn't just nurses that are suffering, it

:16:01.:16:01.

is staff across the NHS. Emma Louise, you are in Glasgow, so

:16:02.:16:16.

you will benefit from the cap is being lifted in Scotland. But that

:16:17.:16:20.

does not mean I will not keep fighting for it to be lifted across

:16:21.:16:24.

the UK. As well as that, I am a student, but I have benefited from

:16:25.:16:30.

the bursary appear, and I would love to see it being overturned down

:16:31.:16:35.

south, because I can see the number of nurses decreasing rapidly without

:16:36.:16:39.

that bursary in place. On top of that, Michael is right when he says

:16:40.:16:42.

it is about being undervalued, because we are out there saving your

:16:43.:16:50.

family's life, and it is about the same respect been coming back to us.

:16:51.:16:56.

I know that you used to be a nurse yourself - is the pay capped their?

:16:57.:17:02.

I worked under the bank, but I worked under the cap and a pay

:17:03.:17:07.

freeze from 2010-15, so I have done five years and I know how tough it

:17:08.:17:12.

is. Nurses don't go into the profession to become wealthy or to

:17:13.:17:19.

earn huge wages. It is about the recognition of how hard nurses have

:17:20.:17:24.

worked, and about the whole public sector and what it says to people

:17:25.:17:28.

when we say, we can't afford to give you a pay rise. But it is your

:17:29.:17:32.

Government that has enforced that. I am one of many colleagues trying to

:17:33.:17:36.

influence the Government to lift the pay cut. I am sponsoring an event

:17:37.:17:40.

with the RCN to raise awareness amongst MPs not just about the pay

:17:41.:17:44.

rise but to showcase what nurses really do, because I think there is

:17:45.:17:47.

a lack of understanding about how the role has changed and the crucial

:17:48.:17:56.

work that nurses do, both in hospitals and the community, and

:17:57.:17:58.

what a difference they make to the NHS. Sam, introduce yourself,

:17:59.:18:05.

please. I am the Executive Director of a free-market think tank. After

:18:06.:18:10.

the crisis, public sector wages rose as private sector wages collapsed,

:18:11.:18:13.

so the gap between the public and private sectors became large. The

:18:14.:18:18.

purpose of the pay freeze was to close that gap so that

:18:19.:18:24.

private-sector ways these -- wages and public sector could go back to

:18:25.:18:28.

the pre-crisis point. So you back the pay cap? Correct. It is probably

:18:29.:18:33.

time to think about getting rid of it, and I think there probably isn't

:18:34.:18:38.

a case for having a cap on all Government workers. It is a little

:18:39.:18:42.

strange to say that nurses should be treated the same way as tax

:18:43.:18:46.

collectors, for example. But we also need to remember that private-sector

:18:47.:18:49.

wages have been very sluggish and are still not much higher than they

:18:50.:18:53.

were ten years ago. When we talk about stuff like this, we need to

:18:54.:18:57.

remember that the private sector, which pays for this, is also

:18:58.:19:00.

suffering and has had a difficult time, but it may be time to review

:19:01.:19:05.

this and look at alternatives. Lorraine, I want to bring you in at

:19:06.:19:10.

this point, if I made. Do you think that nurses, firefighters, police

:19:11.:19:13.

officers are special cases and should have the cap removed? Very

:19:14.:19:19.

much so. I think front line emergency services are needed, and

:19:20.:19:24.

the skills that they have taken years to get... They also have to

:19:25.:19:30.

keep continual development to keep their accreditation, and I think

:19:31.:19:34.

that they should be treated specially in terms of the private

:19:35.:19:40.

sector. Sam said it is tough for people in the private sector, and

:19:41.:19:43.

many people watching the programme will say, I haven't had a pay rise

:19:44.:19:46.

for many years, and I know that has been the case for you as well. I

:19:47.:19:53.

left the private sector. I work for a telecoms company for 31 years. For

:19:54.:20:01.

the last few years, since 2008, we didn't have a pay award at all. We

:20:02.:20:09.

have had bonuses cut, but no pay award, which has an effect on our

:20:10.:20:16.

pension payments. Our pension will be a lot less when we retire. Yes, I

:20:17.:20:26.

do see that our pay award is based on performance, not just

:20:27.:20:29.

individually but on the company's performance, and in some instances,

:20:30.:20:35.

yes, you can use that yardstick, but in front line emergency services,

:20:36.:20:39.

like fire, police, etc, you need to be able to pay them a living wage,

:20:40.:20:44.

especially in areas like London, where the cost of living is very

:20:45.:20:50.

high. And also, we have got to keep and attract key personnel in the

:20:51.:20:55.

industry. If not, you get a situation like the one I have in

:20:56.:20:59.

Luton, where we have to recruit internationally. They do brilliant

:21:00.:21:07.

work in terms of looking after our pregnant women in the local hospital

:21:08.:21:11.

here, but we have to look externally to get the skills to bring in, which

:21:12.:21:16.

is ludicrous. I want to bring saffron into the

:21:17.:21:24.

conversation. I am an adviser at NHS providers, and we represent hospital

:21:25.:21:29.

and ambulance trusts in England. How much will it cost to lift the pay

:21:30.:21:39.

cap? The Institute of fiscal studies says it would cost ?1 billion per

:21:40.:21:42.

year. It is a substantial amount of money. But I would say that we

:21:43.:21:48.

called for an end to the pay cap last year, and we were amongst the

:21:49.:21:52.

first to do so, because we know it is critical that we not only recruit

:21:53.:21:57.

new staff into the NHS so we can maintain safe services but that we

:21:58.:22:01.

also retain those staff that R.N. There. We know there is huge

:22:02.:22:05.

pressure on the front line at the moment, and it is impacting on

:22:06.:22:08.

morale, and pay is one of those elements that we can see boosting

:22:09.:22:12.

morale. It is absolutely fundamental. Let's talk about the

:22:13.:22:17.

realities: Theresa May has said there was no magic money tree, so

:22:18.:22:20.

where does this ?1 billion a year come from? Across the public sector,

:22:21.:22:28.

if we lifted the cap, it would cost ?9 billion. I think there is

:22:29.:22:33.

sympathy from the public sector workers from the first few years --

:22:34.:22:41.

for the first few years, but that is waning. We still have a deficit that

:22:42.:22:45.

is costing ?46 billion a year, and if we just increase public sector

:22:46.:22:49.

spending, the interest payments will go up, and that is money we could

:22:50.:22:53.

spend on front line services. It is not just as simple as spending more

:22:54.:22:57.

money. We either raise taxes, which will hit those people getting the

:22:58.:23:01.

pay rise, or we make tough decisions. The money would have to

:23:02.:23:04.

come from another department or another policy, and that is the

:23:05.:23:11.

tough decision Government has to make. It is not easy. That is an

:23:12.:23:14.

important point. The other one is, if we found that we had ?9 billion

:23:15.:23:18.

to spend, would it necessarily be best spent on wages? Yes, in some

:23:19.:23:29.

cases, no in others. It is not clear that the money should always go to

:23:30.:23:34.

wages. The way the debate is focused, it seems as if it is the

:23:35.:23:37.

only thing the Government should spend money on. I think it is

:23:38.:23:44.

fundamental that we look at what the NHS's biggest asset is - its

:23:45.:23:47.

workforce. We need to invest in that. We need to do that so that

:23:48.:23:52.

services can transform. You can't transform services without the staff

:23:53.:23:56.

to do it. It fundamentally has to be new money. The ?8 billion that the

:23:57.:24:01.

Conservatives put in their manifesto for the NHS over the course of the

:24:02.:24:05.

next parliament, that will go on tackling demand, on keeping services

:24:06.:24:09.

going. We need to see new money for this pay cap, not money taken up

:24:10.:24:17.

elsewhere. So it is taxes? It is for politicians to decide how they raise

:24:18.:24:21.

that money. It is for the service to deliver the service. Politicians

:24:22.:24:24.

decide how much they will spend on the NHS, which we know is held dear

:24:25.:24:29.

in everyone's hearts. You have been listening patiently and I know you a

:24:30.:24:34.

dental nurse, and your mum is a nurse as well. Just explain to

:24:35.:24:38.

people watching how your life has been affected by the pay cap, and

:24:39.:24:42.

respond to what other people had been saying. Basically, we had to go

:24:43.:24:46.

to food banks. We would be scraping around for food. She couldn't afford

:24:47.:24:53.

her NMC registration most years, and that is about ?120 a year that

:24:54.:24:56.

nurses have to pay to remain qualified and to keep their jobs.

:24:57.:25:00.

She couldn't afford that, so she had to go to a charitable organisation.

:25:01.:25:09.

To her, that was quite embarrassing and hurt deeply, because she would

:25:10.:25:15.

be working 50 hours a week and would have hardly anything to show. People

:25:16.:25:19.

find it staggering. You say your mum had to go to a food bank even though

:25:20.:25:26.

she was working full time as a nurse? That's right, full-time hours

:25:27.:25:31.

and extra hours on top. She would have hardly anything to show for it.

:25:32.:25:34.

She had to get help with bills as well. I try to get a job when I was

:25:35.:25:40.

13 just so I could help her. It is a difficult situation which thousands

:25:41.:25:44.

of families are in right now. So, what is the answer? We're talking

:25:45.:25:50.

about the reality of lifting the pay cap being that this ?8 billion has

:25:51.:25:56.

to be found. Higher taxes or taking money from elsewhere - what is the

:25:57.:26:00.

best option? I think taking it from elsewhere. Everyone has taxes,

:26:01.:26:04.

including everyone in the public sector, who would have to pay more.

:26:05.:26:08.

They wouldn't benefit from that. I think they need to look elsewhere

:26:09.:26:13.

for this money. Everyone should benefit and not have more taken away

:26:14.:26:18.

from them. Marina has just rushed into the studio. Thanks so much for

:26:19.:26:23.

dashing in to see us. You are a student nurse? Just about to

:26:24.:26:28.

qualify, yes. I will start work in a few months. How do you feel right

:26:29.:26:32.

now? Michael was speaking at the beginning of the programme, saying

:26:33.:26:37.

how undervalued he feels at a nurse. How do you feel as you approach this

:26:38.:26:44.

new era in your life? I agree, it is a sad time. I started nursing

:26:45.:26:50.

because I have a passion for caring people, and it is a sad time to

:26:51.:26:54.

almost be a baby nurse, embarking the career in a climate where it is

:26:55.:26:59.

clear that the Government just doesn't care. We want to care for

:27:00.:27:03.

people, and we can't even care for ourselves and our families. I'm

:27:04.:27:09.

starting my career on pay that has been cut for the last few years and

:27:10.:27:14.

will not be going up to match the cost of living any time soon under

:27:15.:27:21.

the current plans. Yeah, it is a really difficult... Speak to Maria.

:27:22.:27:25.

She is a Conservative MP and used to be a nurse. Maria, speak to Marina -

:27:26.:27:30.

she says your Government doesn't care. The Government does care. They

:27:31.:27:36.

are in a difficult situation. If they simply spend more public money,

:27:37.:27:41.

we will all pay that and we will all lose that ?46 billion we're paying

:27:42.:27:45.

on interest rates. If you don't pay the balance on your credit card, you

:27:46.:27:49.

have to pay that interest when you could be spending it on your family.

:27:50.:27:54.

The Government, it is just a big credit card, and if we simply

:27:55.:27:57.

increase our spending, the money has to be paid back at some point. I get

:27:58.:28:01.

it, because I still do bank shifts at my old hospital. The NHS staff

:28:02.:28:08.

don't feel cared for. There are ways of doing this without simply lifting

:28:09.:28:12.

the cap across the whole sector. If we focused on the lowest bands,

:28:13.:28:18.

which are most nurses... What money are you talking about that people

:28:19.:28:26.

would earn? It would be significantly less than ?9 billion.

:28:27.:28:32.

Michael, do you know? Someone at the top of the increment would be on

:28:33.:28:39.

about ?41,000. Band one, a member of the security staff, a catering

:28:40.:28:43.

assistant, I think it is about 15,000, though I couldn't say for

:28:44.:28:50.

sure. The gender -- agenda for change pay scales are online and you

:28:51.:28:54.

can look at them. What you said about the magic money tree... I

:28:55.:28:59.

raised that, to be fair. Somebody raised it. In the papers just this

:29:00.:29:07.

week, there was a big headline of ?400,000 spent on ferrying

:29:08.:29:09.

briefcases around London by ministers. There is money out there,

:29:10.:29:13.

but it is about where it is being spent. There was another big

:29:14.:29:16.

headline a few weeks ago - Jeremy Hunt was getting a new ?40,000

:29:17.:29:22.

bathroom in his new offices at the Department of Health. I don't know

:29:23.:29:25.

if that is true, but there seem to be sums of money available that

:29:26.:29:28.

perhaps are not going where they should be. No one is a bigger critic

:29:29.:29:34.

of Government West than I am, but those are very small sums compared

:29:35.:29:38.

to what we're talking about. I think Maria's approaches the right one: On

:29:39.:29:47.

lower paid workers. We need to remember that job security is

:29:48.:29:50.

stronger in the public sector than in the private sector. Pensions are

:29:51.:29:53.

still better in the public sector than in the private. Those things

:29:54.:29:57.

come into it as well. I'm not completely convinced that if we had

:29:58.:30:01.

?9 billion to spend, the best thing would be to raise public sector

:30:02.:30:08.

workers' wages, rather than for example changing the welfare freeze.

:30:09.:30:12.

People who rely on welfare have much more dependency on food banks and

:30:13.:30:16.

people in that position have suffered as well. The point is, if

:30:17.:30:19.

we have this kind of money to spend, it is not clear it should be going

:30:20.:30:25.

on public sector wages. I think the point about security in the public

:30:26.:30:30.

sector, with the current climate, is null and void, because people are

:30:31.:30:34.

leaving. They may have job security, but if they haven't got enough

:30:35.:30:36.

security to raise their families and care for themselves, then, yeah, it

:30:37.:30:39.

is kind pointless. We are talking about Agenda for

:30:40.:30:51.

Change. Those people on the bands up to ?40,000. I think it is really

:30:52.:30:54.

important that we're clear what we're talking about. One of the

:30:55.:30:57.

things that's critical in this debate is that we make sure that the

:30:58.:31:02.

pay review body, which is the kind of the organisation that will look

:31:03.:31:07.

at pay is given a free hand to decide what the best level of pay

:31:08.:31:12.

increase is. That should be a fully independent body that looks at that.

:31:13.:31:15.

So that we actually know what needs to be spent to make sure that we

:31:16.:31:20.

have the staff we need in place to deliver a safe service. So the

:31:21.:31:25.

starting salary for a new nurse is about ?22,000 which works out about

:31:26.:31:32.

?13 an hour. To put that into context, McDon't amds workers have

:31:33.:31:36.

gone on strike for a ?10 an hour pay increase. We really do need to look

:31:37.:31:41.

at what we're paying highly skilled, highly trained people that are doing

:31:42.:31:45.

an amazing job and are doing it harder and harder all the time.

:31:46.:31:49.

Jeremy Hunt regularly says the NHS is doing more work than its ever

:31:50.:31:54.

done before. We can testify to that. But generally if you work in a

:31:55.:31:58.

business and your business is doing more and more work and doing better

:31:59.:32:02.

and better, you reward your staff and you recognise that your staff

:32:03.:32:05.

are working really hard. Lots of people getting in touch with us on

:32:06.:32:09.

the hashtag Victoria live. David says, "Low wages in whatever sector

:32:10.:32:13.

are wrong. The only beneficiaries are employers and the rest struggle

:32:14.:32:18.

to make ends meet." This one, Maria, it is a tweet from Rachel, "When was

:32:19.:32:22.

the last pay cap for MPs and how much could be saved if we capped

:32:23.:32:27.

their pay for seven years?" A tweet from Stewart saying, "The pay cap on

:32:28.:32:32.

nurses is about choice, they can find money for what the Government

:32:33.:32:38.

wants, but not for nurses." It is about choices and I'm trying to

:32:39.:32:43.

raise the issue of nurses' pay, it isn't about the pay cap, it is about

:32:44.:32:50.

nurses pay across-the-board. Nurses are taking on more and more roles

:32:51.:32:53.

and the nursing profession feels under valued so the pay freeze and

:32:54.:32:58.

the pay cap is one issue, but we need to look across-the-board at the

:32:59.:33:01.

pay structure for nursing in the long-term. Briefly, if you would. It

:33:02.:33:07.

is worth saying that the NHS isn't kind of set in stone on this issue.

:33:08.:33:12.

They are really developing changing working inowe vaitively and bringing

:33:13.:33:18.

in new roles so they can work more productively, it isn't about

:33:19.:33:20.

something that isn't changing with the times. The NHS workforce is

:33:21.:33:23.

often at the cutting edge of different ways of working and

:33:24.:33:26.

different ways of delivering service, it is worth remembering

:33:27.:33:31.

that we're not just asking for the pay cap to be lifted so that we can

:33:32.:33:36.

support what's there, it's about supporting change as well which is

:33:37.:33:40.

needed. Thank you all so much. Sorry, we're out of time, but thank

:33:41.:33:44.

you for all of you giving up your time to speak to us this morning.

:33:45.:33:47.

We invited the government to join our debate but they said

:33:48.:33:50.

In a statement the Department of Health said:

:33:51.:33:53.

"As the Secretary of State has made clear,

:33:54.:33:55.

Ministers are well aware of the pressures on frontline NHS

:33:56.:33:57.

staff, including nurses, who do a fantastic job.

:33:58.:33:59.

The support and welfare of NHS staff is a top priority,

:34:00.:34:02.

and the government is committed to ensuring they can continue

:34:03.:34:04.

We are helping the NHS to make sure it has the right staff,

:34:05.:34:11.

in the right place, at the right time to provide safe care -

:34:12.:34:14.

that's why there are over 31,100 more professionally qualified

:34:15.:34:16.

clinical staff, including over 11,600 more doctors,

:34:17.:34:18.

and almost 12,000 more nurses on our wards since May 2010."

:34:19.:34:31.

Still to come: How a ground-breaking scheme in Glasgow is helping

:34:32.:34:33.

refugees who previously worked as doctors, join the NHS.

:34:34.:34:41.

We'll be speaking to the descendant of the last King of Myanmar,

:34:42.:34:45.

exiled by the British in 1885, a new documentary on the country's

:34:46.:34:48.

Royal family and how their descendents continue to live

:34:49.:34:53.

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom with a summary of today's news.

:34:54.:35:07.

A leaked Home Office document has set out plans for how

:35:08.:35:10.

the UK immigration system could work after Brexit.

:35:11.:35:14.

The paper, which has been published by the Guardian newspaper,

:35:15.:35:17.

considers how the Government could dramatically reduce the number

:35:18.:35:19.

It also proposes time limits on how long EU nationals

:35:20.:35:22.

The BBC understands the document, which was produced last month,

:35:23.:35:28.

Winds from Hurricane Irma have begun lashing islands in the Caribbean -

:35:29.:35:36.

where people have been told to evacuate their homes.

:35:37.:35:39.

Officials are warning of the "potentially catastrophic"

:35:40.:35:40.

effects of the Category Five hurricane which has already

:35:41.:35:42.

It's starting to hit the Leeward Islands and will move

:35:43.:35:48.

on towards Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

:35:49.:35:50.

It's projected to reach the US state of Florida on Saturday.

:35:51.:35:56.

A 14-year-old boy has died after a double

:35:57.:35:58.

Corey Junior Davis and another boy, who is 17,were found with gunshot

:35:59.:36:03.

injuries in Forest Gate on Monday afternoon.

:36:04.:36:07.

The second victim is said to have "life-changing injuries".

:36:08.:36:10.

Police have launched a murder investigation.

:36:11.:36:12.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said that North Korea's nuclear

:36:13.:36:19.

and missile programme are a "flagrant violation"

:36:20.:36:20.

Speaking after talks with his South Korean counterpart

:36:21.:36:27.

in the Russia city of Vladivostok, Mr Putin also called for talks

:36:28.:36:30.

to try to resolve the crisis, warning that no resolution would be

:36:31.:36:33.

possible with just sanctions and pressure alone.

:36:34.:36:39.

That's a summary of the latest BBC News - more at 10am.

:36:40.:36:47.

17-year-old Ben Woodburn came off the bench and put in a Man

:36:48.:36:54.

of the Match performance to help Wales to a 2-0 win over Moldova.

:36:55.:36:57.

He set-up the opening goal for Hal Robson Kanu.

:36:58.:36:59.

Aaron Ramsey got the second in the closing moments.

:37:00.:37:01.

That win coupled with defeat for the Republic of Ireland at home

:37:02.:37:04.

to Serbia, means Wales go into the play off spot

:37:05.:37:06.

in Group D with two qualifiers remaining -

:37:07.:37:08.

the sides do meet in the final group game.

:37:09.:37:11.

At the age of 37, Venus Williams is into another Grand Slam semi-final.

:37:12.:37:16.

She beat Petra Kvitova in a thrilling final set tie-break

:37:17.:37:20.

to reach the last four at the US Open.

:37:21.:37:22.

She'll face fellow American Sloane Stephens next.

:37:23.:37:27.

Chris Froome doubled his lead yesterday. He won the 16th stage

:37:28.:37:35.

time trial to extend his lead to one minute and 58 seconds with five

:37:36.:37:38.

stages to go. That's all the sport for now. We

:37:39.:37:39.

will be back with more after 10am. Doctors who've travelled to Scotland

:37:40.:37:45.

as refugees are being given the chance to start working

:37:46.:37:47.

for the NHS. A new training programme gives

:37:48.:37:49.

qualified doctors training, language support and mentoring,

:37:50.:37:51.

with the aim of helping them to register with

:37:52.:37:53.

the General Medical Council The scheme is being funded

:37:54.:37:55.

by the Scottish Government I always say to people that

:37:56.:37:59.

I imagine taking out someone's appendix in Peshwar is not that

:38:00.:38:12.

different to taking out someone's People arriving in the UK

:38:13.:38:15.

and seeking asylum have been dispersed to Glasgow

:38:16.:38:24.

for the last 17 years. Proportionately, it's got the second

:38:25.:38:27.

highest population of asylum seekers And recently a lot of the people

:38:28.:38:29.

arriving are highly qualified. I wish that one day this country

:38:30.:38:41.

will be proud of me. So, Glasgow, hello,

:38:42.:39:01.

how are you doing? Monday,

:39:02.:39:03.

he seems confused. We would like you to do

:39:04.:39:07.

an assessment of him. First, you can see

:39:08.:39:10.

his airway's open. A class of doctors relearning

:39:11.:39:16.

bits of their trade This exercise is situational

:39:17.:39:18.

judgment and as part of a programme funded by the Scottish Government

:39:19.:39:23.

that gives refugee doctors the skills to get their UK medical

:39:24.:39:27.

registration approved, At the moment, these doctors are not

:39:28.:39:29.

allowed to practice. Is it frustrating, not being able

:39:30.:39:35.

to do what you're qualified for? You want to do it,

:39:36.:39:46.

but your hand is cut. How qualified where

:39:47.:39:59.

you back at home? I'm a qualified medical doctor,

:40:00.:40:00.

I passed all my exams, licensed. It's hard to start again from zero,

:40:01.:40:05.

because I already did everything. How do you make sure they've got

:40:06.:40:14.

the right qualification? NHS Education for Scotland does that

:40:15.:40:17.

bit of the programme, and they check out the qualifications

:40:18.:40:21.

they bring with them. It's a bit difficult sometimes,

:40:22.:40:24.

because the institutions that people have studied are perhaps no longer

:40:25.:40:27.

there, but the process of becoming a doctor,

:40:28.:40:29.

retraining as a doctor, is so complex that there

:40:30.:40:31.

is no way that anyone who is not a doctor would get

:40:32.:40:33.

through the clinical exams. And then once you give them fluid,

:40:34.:40:39.

it's a diuretic, so you kind of go on the injuries that they've

:40:40.:40:43.

got, plus the physical, What things is Pat saying that

:40:44.:40:45.

are different, that things are done differently here to how you may have

:40:46.:40:52.

learned them before? In my country, the system

:40:53.:40:57.

is British, the medical system, But the nice thing is that he speaks

:40:58.:40:59.

simple English-language. I would imagine when you're

:41:00.:41:05.

learning English, local When you're actually

:41:06.:41:11.

speaking to patients, sometimes they're not quite as clear

:41:12.:41:15.

as you and I. For example, yesterday someone

:41:16.:41:19.

told me I have a headache, And people say I had a couple

:41:20.:41:21.

of beers, and they don't mean two. I don't think there's any difference

:41:22.:41:33.

in the actual clinical skills. I think where there has

:41:34.:41:36.

been a huge difference is attitudes to patients,

:41:37.:41:41.

and attitudes to how And we had one surgeon

:41:42.:41:43.

who didn't really seem to be in engaging in the class,

:41:44.:41:50.

and when I asked him, he looked slightly puzzled,

:41:51.:41:52.

and he said well, I'm a surgeon, and I said, yes, and he said well,

:41:53.:41:55.

when I get my patients, they're asleep, I never have

:41:56.:41:58.

to talk to them. So it's getting them to understand

:41:59.:42:00.

that the NHS is very different. This man used to be

:42:01.:42:03.

a doctor in the Iraqi army. He came to Scotland to study,

:42:04.:42:07.

but his life was threatened in Iraq, It's quite confusing sometimes

:42:08.:42:10.

because we know medical terms. If you tell them something

:42:11.:42:17.

that is informal, it might not sound right

:42:18.:42:20.

or the patient may not I learned to say how

:42:21.:42:23.

are the waterworks down there? Before refugees can even

:42:24.:42:32.

take their medical exams, they have to speak really good

:42:33.:42:43.

English. Now that means taking

:42:44.:42:48.

an English test, called IELTS, Now that's a test that even some

:42:49.:42:50.

American and Australian doctors You can tell from the kind of words

:42:51.:42:56.

being discussed in here, and the ideas, that this is a really

:42:57.:43:17.

high level of English. It would be double R

:43:18.:43:26.

if I were using it, so I incurred... The programme also arranges

:43:27.:43:30.

placements with GPs or hospitals, all pushing towards passing

:43:31.:43:32.

their medical exams. Have you been out of the medical

:43:33.:43:40.

profession for some time? Yes, the sometime, maybe

:43:41.:43:43.

four or five years. We have clients from every

:43:44.:43:47.

conceivable area of work, and many of them find it

:43:48.:43:49.

so difficult to get back into the jobs that they've done,

:43:50.:43:52.

that they end up taking jobs for which they are

:43:53.:43:55.

way over qualified. And I think underemployment

:43:56.:44:07.

in the refugee population If someone is a qualified

:44:08.:44:09.

accountant, and they are working pushing trolleys in Tesco's,

:44:10.:44:14.

now there is an argument that they are actually taking a job

:44:15.:44:16.

from a poorly qualified person Lots of colleagues, or people

:44:17.:44:19.

who are doctors living here, Some of them are even taxi drivers

:44:20.:44:22.

which has let down hope for a lot of people,

:44:23.:44:29.

and this has given us a lot of hope. Fatimah was a surgeon

:44:30.:44:33.

in the Middle East. She treated anti-government

:44:34.:44:43.

protesters, and in the end her care for them meant she too was a target

:44:44.:44:46.

for the government If I would say yes, then

:44:47.:44:48.

where is my promise in medical graduation that we would treat

:44:49.:44:57.

people equally and we will try to do whatever

:44:58.:45:02.

is possible to help people? There are 38 people

:45:03.:45:05.

on the programme at the moment. Asylum seekers are allowed

:45:06.:45:15.

on as well as those who have been It is funded by ?160,000

:45:16.:45:18.

of Scottish Government money, and as part of the deal doctors

:45:19.:45:25.

commit to working for NHS Scotland. I've been a doctor or a medical

:45:26.:45:33.

student since I was 17. Being a doctor becomes a very

:45:34.:45:35.

central part of your identity, you know, it's kind of who you are,

:45:36.:45:38.

so I can understand how difficult it must be for a refugee doctors

:45:39.:45:42.

where that part of their identity So you're part of this international

:45:43.:45:45.

community of people. When I used to work

:45:46.:45:48.

in the hospital in my country, and we would discuss with friends,

:45:49.:45:53.

and come up with a certain difficult or rare disease,

:45:54.:45:56.

and I cannot explain. As well as getting people back

:45:57.:45:59.

to their careers as doctors being the right thing to do

:46:00.:46:08.

from a humanitarian standpoint, it's also the right thing to do

:46:09.:46:13.

financially because it would be a hugely wasted resource if people

:46:14.:46:16.

had already gone through very expensive medical training were not

:46:17.:46:19.

used as doctors. And medicine isn't a job

:46:20.:46:28.

for any of these women and men, it's a vocation,

:46:29.:46:30.

they want to practice medicine. Hopefully that I will pass

:46:31.:46:32.

all exams, and first of all it is the language exam,

:46:33.:46:36.

and to practice medicine again. And I wish that one day this country

:46:37.:46:39.

will be proud of me. That report from Glasgow. If you

:46:40.:46:54.

want to watch it or share it, you can go to our programme page.

:46:55.:46:57.

Is the Government is planning a dramatic crackdown on EU migrant

:46:58.:47:07.

labour after Brexit? We'll have the details.

:47:08.:47:10.

Our next guest is the great-grandchild of Thibaw -

:47:11.:47:12.

the last King of Myanmar - who was overthrown by the British

:47:13.:47:15.

He's in the UK for the very first time since Myanmar -

:47:16.:47:20.

also known as Burma - gained independence

:47:21.:47:23.

from Britain, for the screening of a new documentary.

:47:24.:47:25.

It's about the history of the country's Royal family

:47:26.:47:27.

and how their descendents continue to live there in also

:47:28.:47:30.

The film coincides with another crisis in Myanmar's troubled history

:47:31.:47:35.

- the exodus of more than a hundred thousand of the country's

:47:36.:47:41.

Rohingya Muslims who have fled the country after suffering violence

:47:42.:47:44.

Rohingya Muslims who have fled the country after suffering violence

:47:45.:47:48.

Life is a very complicated matter. It is a surprise to some of them

:47:49.:48:08.

that we are still alive. We are born with a history. We have to accept. I

:48:09.:48:25.

am the great-grandson of King Thibaw. We have a responsibility,

:48:26.:48:29.

because that blood is running in our body. Princess Margaret, she likes

:48:30.:48:38.

the free life, no? I like her. We lost our identity.

:48:39.:48:48.

The incredible twists and turns their lives to, stranger than any

:48:49.:48:53.

work of fiction. Let's talk now with the film's

:48:54.:49:18.

director Alex Bescoby and its subject, great-grandson

:49:19.:49:23.

of the former king, U Soe Win. Thank you both for coming in. Alex,

:49:24.:49:32.

I want to ask you first of all why you wanted to make this film. Good

:49:33.:49:37.

question. It is bizarre to be sat here with U Soe Win in London. Three

:49:38.:49:42.

years ago we first met, and the story started to unfold of what

:49:43.:49:47.

happened to his great-grandfather. And how his family vanished from

:49:48.:49:53.

history. I had been studying Burmese history, and I had wanted to tell a

:49:54.:49:57.

particular story, the story of Britain in Burma. Many people in

:49:58.:50:02.

this country really have no idea about our shared history of what an

:50:03.:50:05.

impact we had on this country. And I think a lot of what is happening in

:50:06.:50:15.

modern Myanmar you can trace to its past, obviously. We started making

:50:16.:50:18.

this film three years ago together, and we have ended up here in London,

:50:19.:50:23.

showing him the city that I live in. Tell us why you wanted to take part.

:50:24.:50:28.

I know when I was watching the film yesterday, you said in it, I was

:50:29.:50:32.

surprised that you wanted to take part. What was the appeal for you?

:50:33.:50:37.

From the very beginning, we were not much interested. Especially since we

:50:38.:50:45.

lost our royalty. But in 2014, when we met this gentleman and also his

:50:46.:50:57.

colleague, they wanted to show our lost families. And then we decided

:50:58.:51:04.

to talk to them, because before, we didn't want to talk about this. I am

:51:05.:51:12.

very surprised I am here in London. And you didn't want to talk about it

:51:13.:51:16.

because it was a painful part of your family history? Our family lost

:51:17.:51:28.

everything. When my great-grandfather was 85, only to

:51:29.:51:32.

make daughters, very young, the first and second Princess, and the

:51:33.:51:37.

third Princess was in her mother's boom, in a very late stage, and she

:51:38.:51:46.

was born in madrasahs. -- in her mother's womb. They had objectives

:51:47.:52:08.

we couldn't quite see. They only found us because we are lost.

:52:09.:52:13.

Sometimes we don't know we are lost because we have been forgotten for

:52:14.:52:18.

many years. You a forgotten, and people will find that fascinating to

:52:19.:52:21.

watch this. Many people who watch this programme will not be familiar

:52:22.:52:26.

with Myanmar's history. They may recognise the name Aung San Suu Kyi,

:52:27.:52:29.

whom I know you have met. Before we talk about that, how were you

:52:30.:52:35.

treated in your country? -- how are you treated in your country? Are you

:52:36.:52:40.

given special status or are people unaware? We are just commoners. At

:52:41.:52:46.

the same time, they have respect. The majority of us are Buddhists,

:52:47.:52:54.

and the Kings, our ancestors, they were very staunch protectors of the

:52:55.:53:04.

religion. In this city, everyone is busy, but in remote areas, they

:53:05.:53:11.

still remember this attachment. When we first met, I was looking for him,

:53:12.:53:18.

was sat next to her matter table, and figured it out afterwards. It

:53:19.:53:25.

was that unknown, really. It has been wonderful to go through this

:53:26.:53:29.

three-year journey with U Soe Win, because a lot of it we have been

:53:30.:53:32.

finding out together. We visited India together to see the tomb of

:53:33.:53:37.

his great-grandfather, still in exile, whether British said Tim. And

:53:38.:53:42.

we have been sort of finding out more and more about the hidden

:53:43.:53:45.

history of this story. I think it is important to get it out there,

:53:46.:53:50.

because it is a story that's really important in Myanmar, but also the

:53:51.:53:53.

British people to understand as well. As I say, you have met Aung

:53:54.:53:59.

San Suu Kyi. Many people will be familiar, she was under house arrest

:54:00.:54:04.

for many years in Myanmar. What is she like as a person and for you to

:54:05.:54:11.

meet her? We have a personal attachment, I think. Why an I was

:54:12.:54:17.

serving in the foreign service, she was under house arrest. She was

:54:18.:54:27.

meeting a UN representative, and during the meetings, I was in charge

:54:28.:54:34.

of protocol matters. I met her at the state guesthouse, welcomed them,

:54:35.:54:41.

introduced the guests. I don't remember how many times we did that,

:54:42.:54:47.

but on one occasion, while we were walking, she asked me, from where

:54:48.:54:56.

IQ? I said, I'm from the Foreign Ministry, but I didn't stop there. I

:54:57.:55:05.

said I am the nephew of a Prince that she knew personally. She

:55:06.:55:09.

changed, she was smiling, and from then on, when we met,... We look

:55:10.:55:18.

today at what is happening in your country, in Myanmar, a huge crisis

:55:19.:55:25.

there right now. Second man has -- Aung San Suu Kyi has responded today

:55:26.:55:37.

to the Muslims moving over the border to Bangladesh. We're very

:55:38.:55:40.

sorry about that. At the same we would like to express that we are a

:55:41.:55:43.

peace-loving country. We all believe that this matter should be

:55:44.:55:59.

brought to an end as soon as possible. Do you hope for a quick

:56:00.:56:10.

end to it? Do you think there will be? Yes. Aung San Suu Kyi has the

:56:11.:56:21.

confidence of the international community, so we all believe. It is

:56:22.:56:28.

heartbreaking to see. We have been working and living and travelling

:56:29.:56:32.

around Myanmar for ten years, making this film for three years, and in

:56:33.:56:36.

that time, I have seen thousands of incidences of kindness and

:56:37.:56:41.

generosity, and I hope some of that comes across in this film. It's not

:56:42.:56:45.

the Myanmar we want to know will stop and I think it is coincidental

:56:46.:56:52.

that when we were making this film, we had the first credible election

:56:53.:56:55.

in 50 years, and we film someone voting for the first time. We were

:56:56.:56:59.

on the streets. And it is an unimaginable sense of hope for a

:57:00.:57:04.

better future. And I think we both hope that Myanmar is still on the

:57:05.:57:09.

right track, but there are a lot of challenges. Tell people where they

:57:10.:57:15.

can see the film. That is why we're here. The Premier is on Saturday at

:57:16.:57:19.

the British library. Sold out a month ago, which is great. But we're

:57:20.:57:23.

hoping for a UK broadcast after the premiere, and we will take it on

:57:24.:57:29.

tour next year because it is 70th anniversary of Myanmar's

:57:30.:57:33.

independence from the UK. Thank you for coming in. I hope you enjoy your

:57:34.:57:37.

trip to London. Get him to show you all the good sites.

:57:38.:57:39.

Let's get the latest weather. Hurricane Irma has moved to here so

:57:40.:57:59.

far. You can see the size and extent of the storm, with a well-defined

:58:00.:58:04.

eye. It has been producing winds of 185 mph. Gusts over 200 mph. The

:58:05.:58:11.

winds will be catastrophic from this hurricane. As well as heavy rainfall

:58:12.:58:17.

and a significant storm surge too. It will move across parts of the

:58:18.:58:21.

Virgin Islands, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, before heading

:58:22.:58:25.

towards Cuba and eventually Florida by the time we get to the weekend.

:58:26.:58:30.

There could be a storm surge of up to 15 feet, potentially catastrophic

:58:31.:58:37.

impact from Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean. Closer to home, a much

:58:38.:58:40.

quieter picture on this side of the Atlantic. A bright and breezy day.

:58:41.:58:46.

Seems like this one, taken near Peterborough. And that is how it

:58:47.:58:49.

stays through the day - bright, breezy, and for most of us, a dry

:58:50.:58:56.

day. A few showers packing into the north and west. Scattered showers

:58:57.:59:00.

across north-west Scotland, one or two back for Ireland, some for

:59:01.:59:03.

north-west England and Wales. Elsewhere, likely to stay dry and

:59:04.:59:07.

bright. A bit of a breeze from the west, and it feels fresh and less

:59:08.:59:11.

humid than in recent days. In the afternoon, some of those showers

:59:12.:59:14.

affect northern and western Scotland. Some sunshine in between.

:59:15.:59:20.

Eastern Scotland will feel quite pleasant, 17 Celsius in Aberdeen.

:59:21.:59:23.

That could be a passing shower in parts of Northern Ireland, but

:59:24.:59:27.

mostly drive through the afternoon. A few isolated showers for Cumbria

:59:28.:59:35.

and Lancashire. Across England and Wales, a lot of dry weather. Some

:59:36.:59:43.

clout, but it shouldn't spoil the sunshine too much. Most of us will

:59:44.:59:49.

be dry into the evening hours. And with clear skies and light winds, it

:59:50.:59:54.

will be quite chilly once again. Later in the night, more cloud

:59:55.:59:59.

arriving from the West, bringing the north-west some rain. Tomorrow, not

:00:00.:00:02.

quite as chilly as it was first thing this morning. Through the day,

:00:03.:00:09.

things start to change because we see wet and windy weather arriving

:00:10.:00:14.

from the north-west. From Scotland's -- for Scotland and Northern

:00:15.:00:18.

Ireland, a wet and blustery day. Further south-east across the UK,

:00:19.:00:28.

you are more likely to say stay dry. With the arrival of this area of low

:00:29.:00:31.

pressure, it marks a change to something more unsettled to end the

:00:32.:00:35.

week. As we move into Friday morning, the low pressure sits to

:00:36.:00:38.

the north of the UK, and we will see the wind rotating around that low

:00:39.:00:41.

pressure, bringing plenty of blustery showers and more persistent

:00:42.:00:47.

rainfall to southern counties of England. It will be cooler, 14-18dC.

:00:48.:00:54.

Low pressure stays into the weekend. Sunshine and showers on Saturday,

:00:55.:00:57.

but things could turn increasingly wet and windy on Sunday.

:00:58.:01:07.

Hello, it's Wednesday, it's 10am, I'm Chloe Tiley.

:01:08.:01:16.

The Government is looking at ways to dramatically reduce the number of

:01:17.:01:22.

low skilled EU migrants after Brexit according to a leaked Home Office

:01:23.:01:24.

document. We want British companies to do more

:01:25.:01:28.

to train up British workers to do more to improve skills of those

:01:29.:01:32.

who leave our colleges. So there is always

:01:33.:01:34.

a balance to be struck. We're not closing the door

:01:35.:01:36.

on all future immigration, Company bosses being faced by being

:01:37.:01:43.

told put British workers fired or you will be taxed if you keep on

:01:44.:01:45.

hiring unskilled EU workers. But critics say such a plan would be

:01:46.:01:47.

disastrous for business. We look at the new NHS guidelines

:01:48.:01:50.

on how to treat endometriosis - an incurable condition affecting 10%

:01:51.:01:54.

of women which causes extreme pain Do get in touch if it's something

:01:55.:01:57.

you've suffered from. And we'll have the latest on one

:01:58.:02:01.

of the strongest storms ever recorded in the Atlantic -

:02:02.:02:04.

Hurricane Irma is the size of Texas - and it's about to barrel

:02:05.:02:07.

through the Caribbean. The advice has been if you're

:02:08.:02:13.

in a flood prone area, get out. Like no two-ways about it

:02:14.:02:18.

and obviously those big storm Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

:02:19.:02:20.

with a summary of today's news. A leaked Home Office document has

:02:21.:02:35.

set out plans for how the UK immigration system

:02:36.:02:41.

could work after Brexit. The paper,

:02:42.:02:43.

which has been published by the Guardian newspaper,

:02:44.:02:44.

considers how the Government could dramatically reduce the number

:02:45.:02:46.

of low-skilled EU migrants. It also proposes time limits

:02:47.:02:49.

on how long EU nationals The BBC understands the document,

:02:50.:02:51.

which was produced last month, Winds from Hurricane Irma have begun

:02:52.:02:55.

lashing islands in the Caribbean - where people have been told

:02:56.:03:04.

to evacuate their homes. Officials are warning

:03:05.:03:07.

of the "potentially catastrophic" effects of the Category Five

:03:08.:03:08.

hurricane which has already It's starting to hit

:03:09.:03:11.

the Leeward Islands and will move on towards Puerto Rico

:03:12.:03:18.

and the Dominican Republic. It's projected to reach the US state

:03:19.:03:20.

of Florida on Saturday. A 14-year-old boy has

:03:21.:03:27.

died after a double Corey Junior Davis and another boy,

:03:28.:03:29.

who is 17,were found with gunshot Corey Junior Davis and another boy,

:03:30.:03:36.

who is 17, were found with gunshot injuries in Forest Gate

:03:37.:03:39.

on Monday afternoon. The second victim is said to have

:03:40.:03:41.

"life-changing injuries". Police have launched

:03:42.:03:43.

a murder investigation. Russian President Vladimir Putin has

:03:44.:03:44.

said that North Korea's nuclear and missile programme

:03:45.:03:51.

are a "flagrant violation" Speaking after talks

:03:52.:03:54.

with his South Korean counterpart in the Russia city of Vladivostok,

:03:55.:03:58.

Mr Putin also called for talks to try to resolve the crisis,

:03:59.:04:01.

warning that no resolution would be possible with just sanctions

:04:02.:04:04.

and pressure alone. The de facto leader of Myanmar,

:04:05.:04:10.

Aung San Suu Kyi, has claimed that the crisis in Rakhine state

:04:11.:04:14.

is being distorted by Myanmar is currently under intense

:04:15.:04:16.

diplomatic pressure to end the violence its security forces

:04:17.:04:21.

are reportedly inflicting Nearly 150,000 people have fled

:04:22.:04:23.

into neighbouring Bangladesh. That's a summary of the latest BBC

:04:24.:04:33.

News - more at 10.30am. Thank you. Message are coming in. My

:04:34.:04:39.

tablet is not updating. Wales are still on track to qualify

:04:40.:04:50.

for next year's World Cup It was another great night

:04:51.:04:55.

for 17-year-old Ben Woodburn, who set up Kal Robson-Kanu 10

:04:56.:05:00.

minutes from time. Woodburn scored the winner

:05:01.:05:02.

against Austria at the weekend, And in injury time, Aaron Ramsey

:05:03.:05:04.

sealed the win that leaves them We have to make sure we got these

:05:05.:05:19.

wins no matter. We always talk about performance. It has come down to the

:05:20.:05:22.

crunch time and it's all about results now. Yeah, obviously two

:05:23.:05:27.

wins out of two. We haven't done that in a long time. It is great

:05:28.:05:31.

that we have the winning mentality back and hopefully it is a snowball

:05:32.:05:33.

effect for next time. It means Wales leapfrog the Republic

:05:34.:05:36.

of Ireland after they were beaten Former Manchester City player

:05:37.:05:38.

Aleksander Kolarov scored The England women's

:05:39.:05:42.

coach Mark Sampson has responded to allegations

:05:43.:05:49.

from former striker Eni Aluko that he had created

:05:50.:05:51.

an atmosphere of "bullying and discrimination" and used

:05:52.:05:53.

racially insensitive language. Sampson was cleared by both an FA

:05:54.:05:56.

and an independent investigation He denies Aluko's claim that he'd

:05:57.:05:59.

joked he didn't want her Nigerian family to bring Ebola

:06:00.:06:04.

to an England game. I've heard the specifics

:06:05.:06:14.

of the allegation and at the time we released a statement

:06:15.:06:22.

and to be very clear I'm very disappointed

:06:23.:06:24.

the allegation's come out but I understand it and all I can

:06:25.:06:27.

say is I didn't say that to Eni. With any of my communication, my

:06:28.:06:31.

intention is to support the players, give them confidence and give them

:06:32.:06:34.

chance to be successful At the age of 37, Venus Williams

:06:35.:06:37.

is two wins away from another grand She beat Petra Kvitova

:06:38.:06:42.

in a real thriller to reach It took over two and a half hours

:06:43.:06:47.

and the deciding set Kvitova only returned to the tour

:06:48.:06:52.

three months ago after the knife attack that damaged her playing hand

:06:53.:06:56.

and Williams said it felt This match means a lot to me. I have

:06:57.:07:11.

been playing at home and of course, it being a major and it means a lot

:07:12.:07:15.

to her coming back and being able to compete in this major and to prove,

:07:16.:07:20.

you know, obhave you beensly to herself that she could defeat

:07:21.:07:23.

anything no matter what is thrown at her. It was amazing to see her shine

:07:24.:07:26.

today. Chris Froome heads into

:07:27.:07:28.

another day in the hills on the Tour of Spain

:07:29.:07:31.

today and he's nearly two Froome won his fourth Tour de France

:07:32.:07:33.

in July, but he's never He dominated yesterday's time trial

:07:34.:07:39.

to almost double his lead And before I go, there's time to let

:07:40.:07:44.

you know that the BBC Get Inspired Unsung Hero Award

:07:45.:07:51.

is open for nominations. It's designed to recognise those

:07:52.:07:53.

who devote their free time to help people in grass-roots

:07:54.:07:56.

activity and sports and it's You can find everything you need

:07:57.:07:58.

to know at: bbc.co.uk/unsunghero That's all the sport for now. I will

:07:59.:08:10.

be back with more later on. Thanks, Hugh.

:08:11.:08:20.

The Government is looking at ways to dramatically reduce the number

:08:21.:08:22.

of low-skilled EU migrants after Brexit according to a leaked

:08:23.:08:25.

The document, which is NOT official government policy,

:08:26.:08:28.

suggests capping visas for unskilled labourers at two years.

:08:29.:08:30.

Let's speak to our political guru, Norman Smith,

:08:31.:08:32.

What's in the leaked document? Big thought number one is the Government

:08:33.:08:37.

wants a concerted clamp-down on the number of unskilled EU migrants

:08:38.:08:41.

coming into the UK and big thought number two is they want to

:08:42.:08:45.

pressurise companies to have a British workers first policy. Now,

:08:46.:08:49.

in detail, what that means is they are going to suggest that if

:08:50.:08:53.

unskilled EU workers want to come to Britain, they will only be able to

:08:54.:08:57.

stay for two years. They'll have to be earning a certain salary and they

:08:58.:09:00.

can't just come here and look for work, they will have to have a job

:09:01.:09:04.

already lined up and the Government is looking at the possibility of

:09:05.:09:08.

just putting a cap, a limit on the number of unskilled EU migrants who

:09:09.:09:12.

can come here. So there will be X number and once you reach that

:09:13.:09:16.

number, back, the door is closed. In terms of business, business will be

:09:17.:09:21.

under huge pressure to recruit British workers. They may have to

:09:22.:09:26.

under go a sort of test to make sure that they have gone out and tried to

:09:27.:09:31.

recruit British workers and if they then skill want to recruit unskilled

:09:32.:09:35.

EU migrants they could be taxed with the money going to a sort of

:09:36.:09:39.

training levy to help improve the skills of British workers. This is a

:09:40.:09:42.

draft document. It's not signed, sealed and delivered. It's not all

:09:43.:09:48.

been agreed, but when you listen to ministers, listen to the Defence

:09:49.:09:51.

Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon this morning, they are hardly distancing

:09:52.:09:55.

themselves from the contents of this document.

:09:56.:09:58.

We want more British companies to invest in the British workforce.

:09:59.:10:12.

To make sure we have a better skilled workforce for them to dau

:10:13.:10:17.

on. The public want immigration to come

:10:18.:10:18.

down to sustainable levels. We made that clear in every

:10:19.:10:30.

manifesto. So there is a balance to be struck here.

:10:31.:10:31.

The Home Secretary will set out proposals later this year.

:10:32.:10:37.

When will this kick in? There will be a two year transition phase after

:10:38.:10:43.

we leave the EU, after March 2019 when not much will change. If you

:10:44.:10:47.

are an EU national and want to come to Britain during the transition

:10:48.:10:51.

phase for more than six months, you'll have to get the approval of

:10:52.:10:54.

the Home Office and you'll have to have a sort of ID card, a biometric

:10:55.:11:00.

passport to show you're OK to be in this country. Norman, thank you for

:11:01.:11:03.

clarifying that for us. Let's get some more

:11:04.:11:07.

analysis on this story now. Joining me in the studio

:11:08.:11:09.

is the Conservative MP for Dover, Marley Morris from

:11:10.:11:13.

the IPPR think tank, Alp Mehmet is Vice-Chair

:11:14.:11:16.

of the Migration Watch think-tank. We are also joined down

:11:17.:11:22.

the line form Westminster by the co-leader of the Green Party,

:11:23.:11:24.

Caroline Lucas. Thank you all for speaking to us

:11:25.:11:31.

this morning. You broadly welcome this leaked document? I do, yes. I

:11:32.:11:37.

hope that it remains substantially as it is that it doesn't go through

:11:38.:11:41.

any sort of change so it is watered down. If you want to bring numbers

:11:42.:11:48.

down frankly from the EU in the way that I think people voted for then

:11:49.:11:54.

this strikes me as a sensible balanced and reasonable way of going

:11:55.:12:00.

about it. Focussing on the higher skilled and indeed, making sure that

:12:01.:12:05.

we don't bring people in simply because they're cheaper or they are

:12:06.:12:08.

there and prepared to take up the jobs. So yeah, it is the right way

:12:09.:12:15.

and will potentially lead up to 100,000 fewer people coming in over

:12:16.:12:18.

the numbers that we've had in recent years. I can see Marly wincing.

:12:19.:12:25.

There is no detail yet about what this future system for immigration

:12:26.:12:27.

will be and that document doesn't explain that. What it really sets

:12:28.:12:31.

out is what the transition measures will be and the concern there is

:12:32.:12:34.

there is a contradiction between what the transition will be agreed

:12:35.:12:38.

between the EU and the UK for the years after Brexit and what this

:12:39.:12:42.

document says about EU migrants because what we are saying in the

:12:43.:12:45.

transition there won't be freedom of moment and that may go down very

:12:46.:12:50.

badly with EU leaders, you know, across the 27.

:12:51.:12:55.

Well, freedom of movement is going to end. That goes without saying

:12:56.:12:59.

because that's what will happen when we come out of the EU. And once

:13:00.:13:04.

freedom of movement ends then you have got to have some sort of system

:13:05.:13:10.

to control people coming in and this is a perfectly reasonable system. If

:13:11.:13:13.

only because we have been doing it for many, many years for those

:13:14.:13:17.

coming from outside the EU anyway. So it's nothing new. Perfectly

:13:18.:13:21.

reasonable system, Caroline Lucas? Absolutely not. This suggested paper

:13:22.:13:27.

is economically illiterate. It will harm our economy. I think it's

:13:28.:13:30.

cruel. It's going to separate families and I think it's also

:13:31.:13:35.

backward looking. I think it will deny future generations the right

:13:36.:13:40.

that all of us had to study and to work and to live and live in 27

:13:41.:13:47.

other member states. Do you want to come in, Charlie on this? It seems

:13:48.:13:50.

to me the referendum was a clear instruction by the British people to

:13:51.:13:56.

take back control of our borders and to end uncontrolled EU immigration

:13:57.:13:59.

and that's what this Government is doing. Everyone accepts that we want

:14:00.:14:03.

to have the brightest and the best from across the world. That's not

:14:04.:14:07.

the issue. The public concern centres on low skilled migrants,

:14:08.:14:12.

British businesses, not investing in their employees, but seeking to

:14:13.:14:16.

bring in low skilled migrants as a way to avoid that kind of

:14:17.:14:20.

investment. Some people say the EU referendum was about whether you

:14:21.:14:23.

wanted to stay in the Union, not about immigration. There was no

:14:24.:14:26.

question on that ballot paper that was about immigration. Your

:14:27.:14:30.

constituentsy in Dover is a constituency that's been affected a

:14:31.:14:34.

lot by migration and benefited a lot as well? It is important to realise

:14:35.:14:39.

that the change that we have in recent years in 1997 when Labour

:14:40.:14:43.

were first elected net migration was 48,000. In 2015, it reached 333,000.

:14:44.:14:49.

People are deeply concerned. They want a rebalancing. They want

:14:50.:14:53.

control of our borders and that is very clearly what the Home Office

:14:54.:14:57.

are rightly looking at doing. People didn't vote in the referendum to

:14:58.:15:02.

have nursing shortages. People didn't vote to have crops rotting in

:15:03.:15:06.

the fields because that's what will happen if we don't have people

:15:07.:15:10.

coming in from the EU to help the crop pickers. You know, so

:15:11.:15:14.

essentially I think what we're seeing here is an ideological

:15:15.:15:18.

approach, this idea that the referendum and Brexit has to be

:15:19.:15:21.

migration first even if that means damaging our economy. Even if that

:15:22.:15:25.

means our own businesses are saying they are going to suffer. The Office

:15:26.:15:29.

for Budget Responsibility are saying this could lead to a ?6 billion hole

:15:30.:15:34.

in the economy. Not only is it economically foolish, but it will

:15:35.:15:37.

harm our businesses and harm our societies, families not being able

:15:38.:15:40.

to come together. If you happen to have a child over 18, they are not

:15:41.:15:44.

allowed to join us anymore. That's not the kind of country that most

:15:45.:15:45.

people want to live in. This system is intended for the time

:15:46.:15:57.

after we leave. In terms of the sort of arrangements we have two bring

:15:58.:16:00.

people in perhaps the do seasonal agricultural work or other jobs,

:16:01.:16:06.

what will stop will be that automatic right to come in by

:16:07.:16:08.

exercising treaty rights and effectively staying here for as long

:16:09.:16:13.

as you like. That will stop. There's nothing wrong with that. Won't this

:16:14.:16:18.

cause a problem for businesses? Norman Smith mentioned earlier that

:16:19.:16:23.

if you are in Boston in Lincolnshire or parts of Kent, where fruit

:16:24.:16:26.

picking is a huge industry, and they can't get enough local workers to

:16:27.:16:33.

fill positions, will businesses have to recruit locally and when they

:16:34.:16:40.

can't recruit -- and when they can't, they have to recruit from the

:16:41.:16:47.

EU? Know, frankly. That is not the way it's going to happen. We had a

:16:48.:16:53.

seasonal agricultural workers scheme for many years and I don't see any

:16:54.:16:56.

reason why we shouldn't have something like that again. Nurses

:16:57.:16:59.

and all the other sort of people that we need at the moment, there is

:17:00.:17:04.

no reason why they shouldn't continue to come in. And frankly, we

:17:05.:17:10.

should now start thinking for three, four years hence and start preparing

:17:11.:17:17.

now. You can't wait for three years until the whole transitional phase

:17:18.:17:21.

ends and then think about how we will replace workers. The document

:17:22.:17:24.

fails to recognise that there are some sectors of the economy that are

:17:25.:17:29.

really relying on EU workers. Something like 11% in some sectors.

:17:30.:17:35.

Food processing, for instance, hospitality, the proportions are

:17:36.:17:39.

much higher. In food processing, we're talking about a third of

:17:40.:17:42.

workers being EU migrants. That is not just a question of transition

:17:43.:17:47.

but of having to manage how you have a proper workforce for that sector

:17:48.:17:51.

and the long-term. No one is saying that we shouldn't have a system that

:17:52.:17:56.

enables migrants to come to Britain to work where they are highly

:17:57.:18:00.

skilled, where it is seasonal or they are required. Why is it wrong

:18:01.:18:06.

to insist that the children of our land have a chance? It is important

:18:07.:18:11.

to enable people from Britain to get on, do well, and we get business to

:18:12.:18:17.

invest in skills and not simply seek to avoid having to invest by

:18:18.:18:21.

bringing in low skilled people, as they have done for too long. Thank

:18:22.:18:26.

you, all of you, for joining us, and Caroline Lucas as well. I'm sure the

:18:27.:18:29.

discussion will continue over the next months and years.

:18:30.:18:36.

Still to come: The final whistle for John Watson as he prepares to call

:18:37.:18:40.

time on his 50 years at the BBC. It's a disease that affects 1 in 10

:18:41.:18:42.

women of reproductive age. Yet on average it takes

:18:43.:18:45.

seven and a half years The condition costs the UK roughly

:18:46.:18:47.

?8.2 billion a year. Endometriosis is an incurable

:18:48.:18:56.

condition, where tissue that behaves like the lining of the womb is found

:18:57.:18:59.

in other parts of the body, Today, new guidelines have been

:19:00.:19:03.

published for the NHS, which aim to reduce delays

:19:04.:19:11.

in diagnosis and save women years But a leading charity says

:19:12.:19:14.

the guidelines will only make a difference if they're backed up

:19:15.:19:20.

with extra financial support. Let's speak to Amelia Davies -

:19:21.:19:23.

she's 18 and started getting symptoms of endometriosis

:19:24.:19:27.

at the age of just 12. Helen McLaughlin is here too -

:19:28.:19:29.

she's 32 and was diagnosed And Lakshmi Livingstone -

:19:30.:19:42.

who waited seven years for any treatment when her

:19:43.:19:45.

symptoms became severe. Emma Cox runs the charity

:19:46.:19:47.

Endometriosis UK - she's calling for the NHS to make

:19:48.:19:49.

sure the new guidelines And Andrew Home is a professor

:19:50.:19:52.

of gynaecology and is on the group of experts that helped draw up

:19:53.:19:56.

the new guidelines from the National Institute of Health

:19:57.:19:58.

and Care Excellence. Thank you, all, for coming in to

:19:59.:20:08.

talk to us. I think many people at home will have heard of

:20:09.:20:14.

endometriosis but they won't know how severe it can be for many

:20:15.:20:24.

people. Amelia, tell me, first of all, you were just... Sorry! You

:20:25.:20:28.

were 12 when you got symptoms first and you were diagnosed at 14. My

:20:29.:20:34.

first period was at 12 and I was experiencing pelvic pain before that

:20:35.:20:39.

age. It wasn't until I was 14 and got pain some excruciating that I

:20:40.:20:43.

couldn't attend school any more that we pushed for the initial scans

:20:44.:20:48.

which showed up an ovarian cyst, which led to my operation, which

:20:49.:20:57.

allowed the diagnosis of endometrial asses. Unlike some people, I was

:20:58.:21:01.

diagnosed quite quickly, but I was very lucky to have the cyst, because

:21:02.:21:08.

it led to the diagnosis. It sped up the process? Yes, I consider myself

:21:09.:21:11.

lucky, but unfortunately other people as fortunate. I was diagnosed

:21:12.:21:20.

in 2011. My symptoms started when I was 16, because I had a period every

:21:21.:21:23.

other week, but I was put on the pill. It was 2011 that I was

:21:24.:21:37.

misdiagnosed, and it was only because I wrote letters and kept

:21:38.:21:44.

diaries that I was able to get a diagnostic laparoscopy. What does it

:21:45.:21:53.

do to you? The physical aspect is one thing, but the mental aspect is

:21:54.:21:56.

exhausting. You are fighting every day to get through your painkillers.

:21:57.:22:02.

I was on 25 painkillers a day just to try and manage the symptoms. So

:22:03.:22:07.

you have that as well as going to consultants and making them believe

:22:08.:22:12.

you. It comes down to having to think about what you well, because

:22:13.:22:16.

you get bloating. Leggings, I couldn't wear jeans. I had to have

:22:17.:22:22.

physio to work on my muscles. It comes down to every aspect of your

:22:23.:22:27.

daily life. And I know that you, Amelia, alluded to the dreadful time

:22:28.:22:34.

you have had. Lakshmi, explain some of your story, if you would. I

:22:35.:22:39.

recently discovered I probably had symptoms from about the age of eight

:22:40.:22:44.

or nine, which was mostly sleep problems. Hormonal changes can cause

:22:45.:22:49.

problems with sleep, but my periods were incredibly painful. I started

:22:50.:22:54.

when I was 11. I didn't know that that wasn't normal, so I lived most

:22:55.:22:58.

of my life just thinking that those sort of pain levels were normal and

:22:59.:23:01.

acceptable. It was only when I started getting extreme bowel pain

:23:02.:23:11.

around 2009 that I finally thought, hang on, this is weird. It still

:23:12.:23:15.

took another six months for me to go to the doctor with it. My GP was

:23:16.:23:19.

fabulous. As soon as I mentioned my symptoms, he said, I am referring

:23:20.:23:23.

you to an endometriosis specialist. From there, I didn't have a

:23:24.:23:30.

diagnostic laparoscopy until to make years ago, at which point I was

:23:31.:23:34.

given the full diagnosis of how widespread my disease is. I was

:23:35.:23:38.

reading, you were told when you went to an endometrial is his clinic that

:23:39.:23:42.

you should stop eating meat and you were sent away. It was wheat. I was

:23:43.:23:51.

told to change my diet. I was given an MRI at that time. It wasn't until

:23:52.:23:57.

2014 that I realised that you cannot diagnose endometriosis with doing a

:23:58.:24:04.

laparoscopy, keyhole surgery. Going through your tummy, isn't it?

:24:05.:24:08.

Exactly, so that finally happened in 2015, and that is when I discovered

:24:09.:24:14.

it is not just in my uterus but has spread outside into my general

:24:15.:24:18.

pelvic area. Emma, I want to bring you in. How common are the stories

:24:19.:24:22.

we are heaving? Sadly, very common. There are some great examples -- we

:24:23.:24:30.

are hearing. There are some great examples of GPs getting a diagnosis

:24:31.:24:38.

early. It is caused by cells being in the wrong place, and in different

:24:39.:24:41.

women, there will be different symptoms. Sadly, the isn't enough

:24:42.:24:45.

awareness. It is about periods, and often people talk about it. A lot of

:24:46.:24:48.

women get told when they are young just to get on with it and that it

:24:49.:24:53.

is part of being a woman. Is a cultural, that no one wants to talk

:24:54.:24:59.

about it? There is some evidence that it is genetic, so you get a

:25:00.:25:04.

double whammy. You are told it hurts, love, just get on with it.

:25:05.:25:09.

Your mother might say, we have bad periods in our family. That is what

:25:10.:25:13.

is like. It is a hidden disease, there is no measure of it, and you

:25:14.:25:17.

can't show anybody what your pain is. So, it is really hard for

:25:18.:25:23.

people, and for whatever reason as a society we have not taken it

:25:24.:25:27.

seriously enough. We have this e-mail from money. If you have a

:25:28.:25:32.

similar story, do get in touch. I have stage for endometriosis and it

:25:33.:25:36.

has had a huge impact in my life. I was rushed to hospital and had

:25:37.:25:39.

emergency surgery. The doctors thought I had appendicitis. I was in

:25:40.:25:45.

intensive care for ten days. Due to the damage caused, I have cysts,

:25:46.:25:50.

fibroids, damaged fallopian tubes and I am definitely unable to have

:25:51.:25:55.

children. I am frustrated, sad and angry that if this disease affected

:25:56.:25:59.

men, there would be more awareness, research and money put behind the

:26:00.:26:02.

treatment. Would you agree with that, Andrew? Sadly, this is the

:26:03.:26:10.

problem. I think endometriosis is suffered because it only affects

:26:11.:26:15.

women. There has been a bit of a gender bias in terms of investment,

:26:16.:26:20.

research funding. I think these guidelines, and hopefully the

:26:21.:26:25.

awareness raised by them, will encourage increased Government

:26:26.:26:27.

funding, not only into research but into developing the infrastructure

:26:28.:26:32.

we have already to try to better manage women with endometriosis. A

:26:33.:26:39.

seven year diagnosis sounds insane, I'm sure, to many people watching.

:26:40.:26:45.

Do you think the medical profession takes this disease seriously enough?

:26:46.:26:49.

It would be unfair to say they didn't, but I think we could do

:26:50.:26:55.

better. I think we could do better educating from medical school

:26:56.:26:58.

onward, so that people are very much aware of it. As everyone here has

:26:59.:27:01.

highlighted, the big problem is that we don't have a simple test to

:27:02.:27:06.

diagnose it. There is not a blood test or you're in test. It has to be

:27:07.:27:22.

diagnosed by keyhole surgery. Do you think it is taken seriously as a

:27:23.:27:30.

condition? Personally, I believe that you can't point your finger and

:27:31.:27:35.

say, it is your fault it takes so long to diagnose it. It is a case of

:27:36.:27:40.

being educated. GPs and specialist, it is not essentially their fault

:27:41.:27:43.

that there's not enough research into it, so they don't know enough

:27:44.:27:51.

about it. Because of my age, and I started going to specialist

:27:52.:27:55.

appointments from the age of 14, and although I probably know more about

:27:56.:27:58.

this condition and my own body than anybody else, yet, I believe that

:27:59.:28:06.

sometimes it is as if people just speak to my parents about it. It

:28:07.:28:11.

needs to be taken a bit more seriously, because as a young woman,

:28:12.:28:16.

and like everyone else who has this condition, you want to take charge

:28:17.:28:19.

of your own body, to be able to actively step forward and say, look,

:28:20.:28:23.

something is wrong with me. You need to change this. I can't live my

:28:24.:28:28.

day-to-day life like this. Sometimes something simple like getting up and

:28:29.:28:34.

having a shower, you can't even get up and do it. It's ridiculous.

:28:35.:28:40.

Support groups have great information on their website. If

:28:41.:28:43.

anyone is trying to get information to make yourself more knowledgeable

:28:44.:28:48.

to go to your GP, you can then have discussions with them. I run the

:28:49.:28:57.

London group. It is a great way to empower yourself through knowledge.

:28:58.:29:00.

Do you think these guidelines will change anything? I hope so. From

:29:01.:29:09.

what I understand, Emma 's probably best answer... From a patient

:29:10.:29:13.

perspective, do you have more faith it will be taken? If you have

:29:14.:29:18.

someone who is not listening, you can take them with you, do your bit

:29:19.:29:22.

of caring and sharing, share your knowledge with this person. They

:29:23.:29:25.

might read it at night time and they might share it with someone the next

:29:26.:29:29.

day. It is all about education. I think there was an opportunity to

:29:30.:29:34.

make a difference. We could make it easy for GPs by giving them simple

:29:35.:29:43.

toolkits. The Royal College could be developing specialist training,

:29:44.:29:47.

which it is. We don't teach menstrual health in schools, so

:29:48.:29:49.

people don't know what to look out for. I would like to say that the

:29:50.:29:56.

guidelines at the moment are only for England. There was huge

:29:57.:30:00.

variation in service across England and across the UK, so we also need

:30:01.:30:04.

to see the other nations in the UK taking up these guidelines as well.

:30:05.:30:09.

In Northern Ireland, I know people who have been waiting over two years

:30:10.:30:15.

to get a laparoscopy done. That's not because of any reason other than

:30:16.:30:19.

that there are not enough slots allowed because the NHS hasn't yet

:30:20.:30:22.

taken this seriously and allowed enough time to deal with the women

:30:23.:30:27.

who need to be seen. Thank you, all, for coming in. I am grateful to you

:30:28.:30:28.

for coming in. A warning from school

:30:29.:30:31.

leaders that poor language and behaviour mean an increasing

:30:32.:30:38.

number of children are not ready to take part in classroom activities

:30:39.:30:40.

when they start school. As Hurricane Irma, one

:30:41.:30:43.

of the strongest storms ever recorded in the Atlantic,

:30:44.:30:45.

heads for the Caribbean we'll have an update

:30:46.:30:47.

on preparations from Antigua. With the news, here's Annita

:30:48.:30:51.

in the BBC Newsroom. A leaked Home Office document has

:30:52.:30:56.

set out plans for how the UK immigration system

:30:57.:30:59.

could work after Brexit. The paper, which has been published

:31:00.:31:01.

by the Guardian newspaper, considers how the Government

:31:02.:31:05.

could dramatically reduce the number It also proposes time limits

:31:06.:31:07.

on how long EU nationals The BBC understands the document,

:31:08.:31:12.

which was produced last month, Winds from Hurricane Irma have begun

:31:13.:31:16.

lashing islands in the Caribbean - where people have been told

:31:17.:31:25.

to evacuate their homes. Officials are warning

:31:26.:31:27.

of the "potentially catastrophic" effects of the Category Five

:31:28.:31:31.

hurricane which has already It's starting to hit

:31:32.:31:34.

the Leeward Islands and will move on towards Puerto Rico

:31:35.:31:39.

and the Dominican Republic. It's projected to reach the US state

:31:40.:31:41.

of Florida on Saturday. A boy has died after a shooting in

:31:42.:31:57.

East London. Corey Junior Davis and another boy,

:31:58.:32:04.

who is 17, were found with gunshot injuries in Forest Gate

:32:05.:32:07.

on Monday afternoon. The second victim is said to have

:32:08.:32:09.

"life-changing injuries". Police have launched

:32:10.:32:11.

a murder investigation. The de facto leader of Myanmar,

:32:12.:32:13.

Aung San Suu Kyi, has claimed that the crisis in Rakhine state

:32:14.:32:17.

is being distorted by Myanmar is currently under intense

:32:18.:32:19.

diplomatic pressure to end the violence its security forces

:32:20.:32:22.

are reportedly inflicting Nearly 150,000 people have fled

:32:23.:32:24.

into neighbouring Bangladesh. That's a summary of the latest news,

:32:25.:32:32.

join me for BBC Newsroom 17-year-old Ben Woodburn came off

:32:33.:32:34.

the bench and put in a Man of the Match performance to help

:32:35.:32:48.

Wales to a 2-0 win over Moldova. He set-up the opening goal

:32:49.:32:51.

for Hal Robson Kanu. Aaron Ramsey got the second

:32:52.:32:53.

in the closing moments. That win, coupled with defeat

:32:54.:33:00.

for the Republic of Ireland at home to Serbia, means Wales go

:33:01.:33:03.

into the play-off spot in Group D The sides meet in

:33:04.:33:06.

the final group game. At the age of 37, Venus Williams is

:33:07.:33:11.

into another Grand Slam semi-final. She beat Petra Kvitova

:33:12.:33:14.

in a thrilling final set tiebreak to reach the last four at the

:33:15.:33:18.

US Open. She will face fellow

:33:19.:33:26.

American Sloane Stephens next. Chris Froome virtually

:33:27.:33:28.

doubled his lead at the Vuelta He won the 16th stage time trial

:33:29.:33:30.

to extend his lead over Vincenzo Neebali to one minute

:33:31.:33:34.

and 58 seconds with That's all the sport for now. I will

:33:35.:33:42.

be back with more on BBC News after 11am.

:33:43.:33:46.

A 14-year-old boy who was gunned down in an east London

:33:47.:33:49.

What happened? The details on this incident are scant, but the police

:33:50.:34:00.

launched a murder investigation. He died in hospital around 10pm last

:34:01.:34:04.

night. Apparently he, this was a double shooting. It happened on

:34:05.:34:09.

Monday afternoon. He was injured as was a 17-year-old who has got what

:34:10.:34:15.

police are describing as life changing injuries and he remains in

:34:16.:34:19.

hospital in a stable condition. No arrests have been made yet, but

:34:20.:34:23.

police are appealing for help. And what have the police said? What do

:34:24.:34:27.

they know? I know there is a fear of retaliation? The borough commander

:34:28.:34:33.

said there is a serious fear of retaliation and therefore, what they

:34:34.:34:40.

have done is they have put a number of armed and plained clothed police

:34:41.:34:44.

officers in the area and they have increased stop and search incidents

:34:45.:34:46.

for weapons and anything else that's going on in the area and to reassure

:34:47.:34:55.

residents as well. They are only too aware this incident comes after a

:34:56.:34:59.

spate of violent firearm discharges that have been blighting their

:35:00.:35:01.

communities and seriously injuring their young men. So far there has

:35:02.:35:07.

been a number of gun incidents in and around the Newham area. There

:35:08.:35:13.

was one even at the end of July that had been taking place in less than

:35:14.:35:18.

24 hours where two men were injured. But the concern with this particular

:35:19.:35:21.

incident is the violent nature under which it went and the age of the

:35:22.:35:25.

victim because he was only 14. Thank you.

:35:26.:35:29.

School leaders are warning that increasing numbers of children

:35:30.:35:31.

are not ready to take part in classroom activities

:35:32.:35:33.

Some are lacking basic communication skills.

:35:34.:35:42.

A survey carried out by the association for school

:35:43.:35:44.

leaders, NAHT, and the Family and Childcare Trust,

:35:45.:35:49.

found 86% of headteachers were concerned that children

:35:50.:35:51.

being ready for school is worse now than five years ago.

:35:52.:35:56.

Joining us now, Andy Mellor, Headteacher of St Nicholas Church

:35:57.:35:58.

of England Primary School, is concerned at the lack of services

:35:59.:36:01.

available to support families and children in need of extra help

:36:02.:36:03.

Lynn Knapp, Headteacher of Windmill Primary School thinks

:36:04.:36:06.

children using phones and gadgets isn't helping with

:36:07.:36:08.

Parent John Adams in concerned at the social skills

:36:09.:36:16.

He is joined by his four-year-old daughter Izzy who will start

:36:17.:36:23.

Hi Izzy. A lovely wave. Thank you very much. I want to ask first of

:36:24.:36:33.

all,anedy, when we say children aren't ready for school. We're

:36:34.:36:39.

talking about four-year-olds. Children who have just turned four.

:36:40.:36:42.

So what is it that they are not ready for? When children enter

:36:43.:36:45.

school we need to be making sure that we hit the ground running with

:36:46.:36:48.

them. They have got seven years in primary school. And we need to make

:36:49.:36:51.

the most of that time in primary school. Basic skills such as being

:36:52.:36:58.

able to take your coat off, basic things like having a conversation

:36:59.:37:04.

with another child. All the early literacy skills. I mean we do an

:37:05.:37:08.

audit with our families just to make sure that we know what we are

:37:09.:37:12.

getting in terms of the needs of these children. Basic literacy and

:37:13.:37:17.

basic understanding of what a book is, how to follow through the plot

:37:18.:37:22.

line if you like in a picture book. All those sorts of basic skills,

:37:23.:37:26.

particularly speech and language skills. We are seeing, our members

:37:27.:37:32.

are seeing, across the country, deceasing and us having to do more

:37:33.:37:36.

work in reception to actually make good that and then, of course, the

:37:37.:37:40.

work that we have got planned for foundation stage and beyond that

:37:41.:37:43.

into the National Curriculum, there is that to do as well. So, it's

:37:44.:37:47.

actually increasing the workload if you like for the staff in reception

:37:48.:37:52.

when these children really should be accessing the curriculum that we've

:37:53.:37:56.

got planned for them from day one. Lyn, are you finding similar things?

:37:57.:37:59.

Children don't recognise a book and can't hold a conversation with

:38:00.:38:02.

another child? Yes, we do see that with some children coming in. It is

:38:03.:38:06.

a broad picture. We have children coming in very ready for school.

:38:07.:38:09.

Other children coming in with very little language and I think it is

:38:10.:38:13.

that deficit of language which can be a real inhibitor for them

:38:14.:38:17.

starting to access education. You are saying this is down to, what

:38:18.:38:24.

lazy parenting, shoving a tablet or phone in front of a four-year-old

:38:25.:38:28.

and not having a conversation? Not necessarily lazy parenting. Parents

:38:29.:38:35.

are under pressure with both parents working particularly in Oxford, on

:38:36.:38:38.

the whole two parents are working. Yes, do I think children are given a

:38:39.:38:43.

tablet, a phone and in the last five years, those things weren't

:38:44.:38:47.

available. Children didn't have that easy access to smartphones, smart

:38:48.:38:51.

technology and I think it has opened up a whole new way of if you like

:38:52.:38:59.

keeping children occupied. It is a very isolating type activity then

:39:00.:39:02.

they are not conversing with other children in the home and that

:39:03.:39:08.

vocabulary and language just by being in conversation and talking to

:39:09.:39:12.

each other isn't happening. John, I know you have got an older daughter.

:39:13.:39:18.

Is she eight? Have you noticed that? That's the beginning of the iPad

:39:19.:39:22.

generation. My eldest is eight and she started playing with an iPad

:39:23.:39:26.

when she was two. Do you recognise what you are hearing from Lyn? Oh,

:39:27.:39:29.

absolutely. It is very interesting that we are at the end of the school

:39:30.:39:35.

summer. Izzy is saying hello. It is interesting that we are just at the

:39:36.:39:38.

end of the school summer holidays now. I have noticed a marked

:39:39.:39:43.

difference with my children. The battle for screen time used to be

:39:44.:39:46.

keeping your children away from cartoons. Now, partly because of

:39:47.:39:53.

the, the developments in technology, but also partly I think because, my

:39:54.:39:58.

other daughter is getting older, what they are trying to do with

:39:59.:40:02.

technology is different, it is not just car teens, it is apps, cartoons

:40:03.:40:06.

and YouTube videos as well as TV. One of the common battles that we

:40:07.:40:10.

have as parents is we do our best to tell our children not to watch TV,

:40:11.:40:14.

you turn your back for a minute, they are playing with an iPad or

:40:15.:40:18.

they have managed to get your phone or something. There is this constant

:40:19.:40:22.

battle to keep your kids away from screens. I do notice if my children,

:40:23.:40:30.

I really, really dislike children having excessive screen time so I

:40:31.:40:34.

limit it as much as I can, but if it has been a rainy day and the kids

:40:35.:40:40.

have a lot of screen time I notice a marked difference in their

:40:41.:40:43.

behaviour. Worse behaviour? They are not burning off energy. They are not

:40:44.:40:49.

really thinking so when the screens get switched off, I do notice they

:40:50.:40:59.

are much more excitable. They are bouncing off the walls, basically,

:41:00.:41:02.

we have experienced that on a rainy day. Do you think parents are being

:41:03.:41:06.

lazy? We can all say no, you can't have a tablet in the car. We will

:41:07.:41:10.

discuss as we are driving along or walking to the bus or whatever it

:41:11.:41:15.

maybe. Is this laziness? That's not what our survey is telling us. Our

:41:16.:41:22.

survey tells us that this coincides with a major change in the funding

:41:23.:41:26.

of things like children's centres. We lost a lot of those services for

:41:27.:41:31.

families in parts of the country, very similar to Blackpool, where you

:41:32.:41:35.

know, they need that level of support and that got cut with the

:41:36.:41:39.

first round of funding cuts to local authorities. Schools did their best

:41:40.:41:45.

to make that good and similarly, we have a family support worker in

:41:46.:41:48.

school. We didn't have a family support worker five years ago, but

:41:49.:41:53.

that's to meet a need, the needs of our family and our families in

:41:54.:41:57.

school. If we're now finding that, you know, the cuts to school budgets

:41:58.:42:01.

are now affecting the ability of schools to be able to fund family

:42:02.:42:06.

support workers. So we haven't just lost children's centres and all the

:42:07.:42:09.

wrap around care that went on before they came to school and supported

:42:10.:42:13.

families, we are now having that infrastructure that we have built in

:42:14.:42:16.

schools taken away because of the funding cuts to schools and speech

:42:17.:42:20.

and language is huge. You know, it comes through loud and clear in the

:42:21.:42:24.

survey. We've had to cut ?20,000 worth of speech and language therapy

:42:25.:42:28.

that we put in place to make good the cuts to the local authority.

:42:29.:42:32.

Now, we can't afford to do that anymore. We haven't got the money in

:42:33.:42:35.

the budget to do that. The only answer to address all of this is to

:42:36.:42:39.

put that support back in in the early years and support early years

:42:40.:42:43.

settings and schools with this. Andy, thank you. We have to ask Izzy

:42:44.:42:48.

if she is excited about school. Izzy, are you looking forward to

:42:49.:42:52.

starting school next week? Yes. What is it that you like best? Is it

:42:53.:42:57.

reading? Is it numbers? What is it, darling? Numbers. Numbers. She has

:42:58.:43:06.

just dived into a book while we have been on air though. Good girl. She

:43:07.:43:12.

has been drilled well by her father. Izzy, thank you for sitting so

:43:13.:43:13.

beautifully. Bye Izzy. Hurricane Irma has strengthened

:43:14.:43:18.

to a Category Five storm - the highest possible level and has

:43:19.:43:21.

in its path a string of Caribbean islands, Puerto Rico,

:43:22.:43:24.

Haiti, Cuba and then Florida. The National Hurricane Centre

:43:25.:43:32.

in Miami is recording sustained winds of nearly 300

:43:33.:43:41.

kilometres, more than 186mph. A state of emergency has been

:43:42.:43:43.

declared in Florida, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin

:43:44.:43:45.

Islands. I spoke with Gemma Handy,

:43:46.:43:52.

a journalist and resident of Antigua and Angel

:43:53.:43:56.

Adames-Corraliza, a tropical meteorologist with family

:43:57.:43:57.

in Puerto Rico who told me about the impact hurricane Irma has

:43:58.:44:00.

already been having. The winds are # 5 to 90mph. We can

:44:01.:44:11.

expect them to pick up to 150mph and hopefully they should start to

:44:12.:44:15.

lessen around 5am or 6am which is a couple of hours from now. We are

:44:16.:44:19.

getting reports that several roofs have sadly been blown off including

:44:20.:44:24.

an entire apartment building roof in one area of Antigua. Biggest cause

:44:25.:44:28.

of concern right now is we seem to have lost contact with our sister

:44:29.:44:34.

island. They are getting the full force of this right now. They are in

:44:35.:44:38.

the eye. That should be coming to a close soon and then they are going

:44:39.:44:43.

to get the 185mph winds happening again shortly. We will be grateful

:44:44.:44:50.

when we get news back. What's been the advice to people who are in

:44:51.:44:54.

Antigua? Are you sitting in your home, your office right now? No,

:44:55.:44:58.

we're broadcasting live from the local radio station. We have stuck

:44:59.:45:03.

two stations together. We have been broadcasting live for 12-and-a-half

:45:04.:45:06.

hours and taking calls from the public trying to reassure people and

:45:07.:45:12.

giving them constant weather updates from local metolgists and from our

:45:13.:45:16.

expert in Florida as well. Are people told to go to shelters or

:45:17.:45:20.

stay in their home, what's the advice been? If you are in a flood

:45:21.:45:24.

prone area, get out. Like no two-ways about it. And obviously

:45:25.:45:30.

those big storm surges are dramatic and I mean there has been strong

:45:31.:45:33.

encouragement, but people generally know because people are used to

:45:34.:45:38.

being in a hurricane area here, most people have gone to shelters. There

:45:39.:45:45.

is 43 across the islands and 42 in Antigua and 200 people are in some

:45:46.:45:49.

which for Antigua is unprecedented. I want to bring you in. You are a

:45:50.:45:54.

tropical meteorologist. I know you are in Seattle, but you have got

:45:55.:45:58.

family in Puerto Rico, who are concerned right now?

:45:59.:46:02.

What have they told you about the preparations

:46:03.:46:06.

When I talked to my family, friends and other

:46:07.:46:09.

people today, people are

:46:10.:46:10.

Hurricane Irma is pretty much unprecedented when it comes to

:46:11.:46:17.

There has been a bit of a freak out this

:46:18.:46:25.

morning, but that has been helpful in a sense because it has brought

:46:26.:46:28.

people to realise that they really have to get ready for this

:46:29.:46:31.

People have been putting storm shutters on their houses,

:46:32.:46:34.

Pretty much all the wooden panels have been sold out

:46:35.:46:38.

People have stocked up on supplies to the point that there

:46:39.:46:42.

is a shortage of food in supermarkets.

:46:43.:46:46.

People are heading to their homes, not going out on the

:46:47.:46:48.

People in flood prone areas are advised to go to shelter.

:46:49.:46:54.

I suspect that a lot of people will do

:46:55.:46:56.

At this point, in the middle of the night, in Puerto Rico, I

:46:57.:47:04.

suspect that people are waiting to see what is happening tomorrow

:47:05.:47:07.

People following the news in the last week will be familiar with

:47:08.:47:12.

Hurricane Harvey, but this is bigger, isn't it?

:47:13.:47:19.

It is a different situation from Harvey.

:47:20.:47:21.

Harvey was not a category five hurricane but a

:47:22.:47:23.

The big impact from Harvey was the fact that it slowed

:47:24.:47:30.

down and stayed stationary over Texas.

:47:31.:47:33.

Hurricane Irma is a different situation, in which we have a bigger

:47:34.:47:39.

size of storm with much stronger winds, and it is moving more

:47:40.:47:50.

quickly, so when it comes to impact, the impacts from Hurricane Irma

:47:51.:47:53.

But you will also possibly have a surge, and wind damage,

:47:54.:47:56.

especially for the areas directly in the part of the hurricane.

:47:57.:48:04.

People are using words like catastrophic -

:48:05.:48:08.

explain a storm surge and the impact it could have.

:48:09.:48:10.

It is a rise in the average sea level.

:48:11.:48:25.

Usually, at the beach, the ocean is at a certain distance from the shore

:48:26.:48:30.

and the houses and so on, but when you have a hurricane coming in, the

:48:31.:48:34.

wind tends to cause the water to rise. The number of feet you see

:48:35.:48:43.

forecasters is the number of feet above the average water level that

:48:44.:48:51.

we will see. This doesn't count waves, which will occur on top of

:48:52.:48:57.

that. Gemma, do you get a sense that people are worried about this like

:48:58.:49:01.

no other hurricane, that this is unprecedented? Yes, pretty much. As

:49:02.:49:06.

I say, people here are generally used to being in a hurricane area,

:49:07.:49:09.

but there is definitely a sense that this is like nothing they have ever

:49:10.:49:16.

experienced, and people have been comparing it to Hurricane Lewis. It

:49:17.:49:21.

is certainly dramatic. People here tend to take things in their stride

:49:22.:49:27.

quite well, so some people are calling in a little panicky, others

:49:28.:49:32.

are more gung ho about it. Some people have even been sharing

:49:33.:49:36.

light-hearted stories, so it is a mixture. You seem pretty relaxed.

:49:37.:49:40.

Give us a sense of what is going outside, for people who haven't

:49:41.:49:45.

experienced a hurricane. Can you hear building is moving? We're lucky

:49:46.:49:51.

because we are in a bit of a bunker at the station. It is a very sturdy,

:49:52.:49:56.

concrete building, and we are on a bit of a hill as well. Other people

:49:57.:50:00.

have reported their building physically shaking, saying they feel

:50:01.:50:04.

like the roof is coming off, very dramatic conditions. We feel a

:50:05.:50:08.

little sheltered from it here, and we are trying hard to keep other

:50:09.:50:12.

people come, so that is helping keep us come too. Angel, tell us what the

:50:13.:50:17.

path will be for Hurricane Irma over the next few hours. As a

:50:18.:50:22.

meteorologist, explain what that path will be. Right now, the

:50:23.:50:27.

hurricane has made up turn to the west north-west, which is what we

:50:28.:50:34.

were expecting. As it goes in the next couple of days, it will make a

:50:35.:50:38.

close approach to several of the islands of the Lesser Antilles. It

:50:39.:50:45.

will probably approach Puerto Rico at some point tomorrow. It should

:50:46.:50:51.

continue steadily in pretty much a straight path, West Northwest, at

:50:52.:50:56.

about 50 mph. And eventually to Florida? That is what the current

:50:57.:51:01.

forecast is calling. It could be at some point on Sunday. There is some

:51:02.:51:10.

uncertainty about that. There is a lack of consensus about different

:51:11.:51:13.

models. But the model agree that it will probably impact at some point

:51:14.:51:18.

over the weekend, yes. Personally, I you worried about your family in

:51:19.:51:25.

Puerto Rico? I can't say that I'm not, write? When I woke up this

:51:26.:51:27.

morning and I saw that Hurricane Irma had become a category five

:51:28.:51:32.

hurricane with 170 mph sustained winds, it's really hard to keep it

:51:33.:51:37.

together. I immediately called my family and saw how they were doing,

:51:38.:51:41.

if they were getting prepared. The current track forecasts that it will

:51:42.:51:47.

barely miss the island, so I am really crossing my fingers about

:51:48.:51:52.

that, because if that happens, at least the strongest winds will

:51:53.:51:55.

remain offshore. It does not mean it won't be a threat. There is the

:51:56.:52:02.

threat of tropical to hurricane force winds. I am still concerned

:52:03.:52:06.

about them. I told them I am going to call them tomorrow, and I've I

:52:07.:52:09.

think the situation will get worse, I will tell them to seek shelter.

:52:10.:52:14.

For now, they have put storm shutters on the house, they have

:52:15.:52:17.

readied the whole yard and everything, just to make sure that

:52:18.:52:21.

there isn't anything that could get in the way and damage our house.

:52:22.:52:27.

That was Gemma and Angel, speaking to me earlier about Hurricane Irma.

:52:28.:52:29.

Some of John Motson's greatest moments from his

:52:30.:52:35.

He's calling his final match at the end of the season.

:52:36.:52:39.

Before that though, he's been talking to our

:52:40.:52:46.

Dan asked him what the key to being able to commentate was.

:52:47.:52:50.

We will hear more from him in a moment, but first, some of his

:52:51.:52:57.

career highlights. Radford for Newcastle. Bradford again. Oh, what

:52:58.:53:06.

a goal! What they goal! Ronnie Radford. The crowd - the crowd are

:53:07.:53:12.

invading the pitch. And there it is will stop the crazy gang had beaten

:53:13.:53:21.

the culture club. Wimbledon have destroyed Liverpool's dreams of the

:53:22.:53:27.

double. Her Royal Highness supports one of the great cup shocks of all

:53:28.:53:38.

time. Platini through the middle... Goal! Platini, for Franz, with a

:53:39.:53:50.

minute to go. It is 3-2. I have not seen events like this in years.

:53:51.:53:56.

He cannot be shaken. In the end, the German bench get up to protest that

:53:57.:54:04.

Gascoigne's last challenge. Oh, dear. Oh, dear me. He's going to be

:54:05.:54:08.

out of the final if England get there. For the tackle on number 14,

:54:09.:54:15.

Gascoigne has had his second yellow card of the competition, and here is

:54:16.:54:19.

a moment that almost brings tears to his eyes.

:54:20.:54:26.

Free kick given. His arms are apt. Is it over? It is. It's dramatic,

:54:27.:54:31.

it's delightful. It's Denmark who are the European champions. He has

:54:32.:54:42.

been speaking to our sports editor, Dan, who asked them what is the

:54:43.:54:43.

secret to his commentary. It is like saying to your postman,

:54:44.:54:46.

how do you prepare the letters? People don't need to

:54:47.:54:49.

know that, do they? And people didn't need to know that

:54:50.:54:51.

I was spending two days in this office banging myself over the head

:54:52.:54:55.

with who the substitute was going They were only concerned

:54:56.:54:58.

with the end product, and I had to make that as good

:54:59.:55:02.

as I could. PRESENTER: If ever you thought

:55:03.:55:05.

that we sporting commentators always sit nicely warm in our commentary

:55:06.:55:09.

box, that is John Motson, reporting for us tonight on the Southend-

:55:10.:55:12.

Liverpool match, looking rather We are sending out a St

:55:13.:55:14.

Bernard to rescue him. The big breakthrough game

:55:15.:55:19.

for you was that big '72 cup match. Newcastle winning 1-0

:55:20.:55:22.

with five minutes to go. COMMENTATOR: Now Tudor has

:55:23.:55:36.

gone down for Newcastle. Whenever I meet Ronnie Radford,

:55:37.:55:40.

I say, you changed my life, Ronnie. And he said, that goal

:55:41.:55:52.

changed my career, which it did. And when they drag it out on cup

:55:53.:55:55.

weekend, and I hear myself commentating on that goal,

:55:56.:55:58.

and I remember when he hit it and it was flying

:55:59.:56:01.

towards the top corner of the net, and when I see it again,

:56:02.:56:05.

as I have hundreds of times, I still think to myself,

:56:06.:56:08.

please, go in, don't hit the post. If that hadn't nestled

:56:09.:56:13.

in the Newcastle net, I'm afraid that Mark West

:56:14.:56:15.

and Martin O'Neill are a few days longer if they're

:56:16.:56:25.

going to add another chapter to Wycombe's famous cup history,

:56:26.:56:29.

because as you can see, this part of Buckinghamshire

:56:30.:56:31.

is absolutely snowbound, and there is a gale hurtling

:56:32.:56:33.

around me now. The sheepskin coat has sort

:56:34.:56:35.

of entered folklore now. It is such a normal thing to do,

:56:36.:56:37.

to have a warm overcoat. Did you think at the time it

:56:38.:56:42.

could be your trademark? Because you couldn't buy

:56:43.:56:45.

a sheepskin full-length coat. It was only a jacket

:56:46.:56:49.

you could get in the shops. So I started having

:56:50.:56:52.

these made-to-measure. People started saying,

:56:53.:56:53.

you are the bloke in the sheepskin. Where were you when

:56:54.:56:56.

you were in the snow? I didn't set out to make that

:56:57.:56:58.

a trademark, honestly. We can't get down there to actually

:56:59.:57:02.

find out what has happened, but I think Trevor Brooking

:57:03.:57:06.

is next to me. I did my first-ever commentary

:57:07.:57:08.

for BBC television from this very gantry, and in those days,,

:57:09.:57:14.

nobody had heard of the internet, although I can vouch for the fact

:57:15.:57:17.

that I did say once upon a time, What do you think made you a great

:57:18.:57:21.

commentator, looking back now? I think you've got to be

:57:22.:57:24.

passionate about it. I also feel you've got to remember

:57:25.:57:31.

as well that it's only While people are listening

:57:32.:57:34.

to football matches or commentating on them, there are people

:57:35.:57:38.

going to the cinema, I think one or two people

:57:39.:57:40.

tend to forget that. I was going to say it was like being

:57:41.:57:50.

paid for your hobby. But there is a little bit

:57:51.:57:53.

of hard work involved. You know, the preparation

:57:54.:57:57.

and the homework, and watching players and going to see games

:57:58.:58:00.

so that you can do the one you were going to do next a bit

:58:01.:58:03.

better, it was a challenge, but it was a challenge

:58:04.:58:06.

that I always enjoyed. John Watson is going to end his 50

:58:07.:58:14.

year career with the Help's being arranged, love.

:58:15.:58:20.

Stay on the line with me. For a cardiac arrest we always

:58:21.:58:38.

send two, in case CPR's needed,

:58:39.:58:43.

Nurses protest against pay cap.

The refugee doctors being trained to work for the NHS.

Endometriosis affects 10% of women but diagnosis takes on average 7 years.