19/01/2018 Victoria Derbyshire


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19/01/2018

Chloe Tilley talks to the producer of a film about 'Pad Man', a school drop-out from southern India who helped millions of women by designing cheap sanitary towels.


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LineFromTo

Hello it's Friday, it's 9

o'clock, I'm Chloe Tilley,

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welcome to the programme

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A simple blood test

to diagnose cancer.

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Scientists in America are trialling

a test which can detect eight

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forms on the disease.

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It's being hailed as

a major breakthrough.

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I look forward to a time in 10 years

where we all go to the pharmacy,

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we buy our shampoo,

we give a blood test.

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And we get on with our lives.

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The NHS is spending more

money on diagnostics

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than treating the disease.

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We'll have all the details

and ask when it might be

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available in the UK.

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The Californian couple

accused of imprisoning,

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abusing and torturing their 13

children plead not guilty in court.

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We'll have the latest.

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The true story of a man

from Southern India who helped

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millions of women by designing cheap

sanitary towels is made

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into a major Sony picture.

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Woman strong, mother son,

sister strong, then country strong.

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Woman strong, mother strong,

sister strong, then country strong.

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Hello...

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Welcome to the programme,

we're live until 11 this morning.

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A new study has found that work

is taking a heavy toll on parents,

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affecting their health

and family lives.

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The research from the charity

Working Families found many

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parents were putting in more

than their contracted hours

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because of intense work loads.

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It found almost two in five do not

get home in time to say

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goodnight to their children.

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Is that your experience? We want to

hear from you this morning.

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Do get in touch with your

experiences - use the hashtag

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Victoria LIVE and If you text,

you will be charged

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at the standard network rate.

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Our top story today...

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Scientists in the US

are close to a major

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cancer breakthrough,

after trials for a new universal

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blood test detected eight common

forms of the disease.

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Overall, the test found

70% of the cancers -

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but researchers are cautiously

optmistic, saying more work

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is needed to verify its accuracy.

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Here's our health correspondent,

James Gallagher.

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More than 14 million people find

out they have cancer

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each year worldwide.

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The sooner they're diagnosed,

the more likely they are to survive.

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The test, called CancerSEEK,

is a new approach that looks

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for mutated DNA and proteins

that tumours release

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into the bloodstream.

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It was tested on eight

common times of cancer,

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including ovarian,

pancreatic and lung.

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In the study, on more than 1,000

patients known to have cancer,

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the test correctly diagnosed

seven in 10 patients.

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The researchers at Johns Hopkins

University in Baltimore say more

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work is needed and are starting

trials to see if the test can find

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cancers in seemingly healthy people.

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They say such tests could

have an enormous impact

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on cancer mortality.

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Experts in the UK said the approach

had massive potential.

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I look forward to a time in 10

years where we all go

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to the pharmacy and buy shampoo,

we get a blood

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test, and we get on with our lives.

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The NHS is spending more money

diagnosing than treating disease

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because if we can diagnose it early

then we can treat it sooner.

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The researchers' vision is an annual

test that can catch cancer early

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and save lives.

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James Gallagher, BBC News.

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Annita McVeigh is in the BBC

Newsroom with a summary

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of the rest of the days news.

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Living conditions at Liverpool

prison are the worst that inspectors

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have ever seen, according to a new

report. Her Majesty's prison and

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probation service has said it has

already taken immediate action by

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appointing a new governor and

cleanliness has also improved. Our

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health correspondent Adina Campbell

reports.

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"Dirty, infested and hazardous" -

these are conditions hundreds

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of inmates are facing

at Liverpool Prison,

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according to a new report

by the prison watchdog.

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As well as problems with rats,

broken windows and blocked toilets,

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it has also found two thirds

of inmates had easy access to drugs,

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often smuggled by the growing use

of drones, with more than one

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seized every week.

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And violence had also increased.

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More than a third of prisoners

said they felt unsafe

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at the time of the inspection.

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I was horrified when

I read this report.

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It's the worst report I have ever

seen into a British prison

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and that's the assessment,

too, of the very experienced

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inspectorate team.

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They said these were the worst

living conditions for prisoners

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that they had ever experienced.

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Her Majesty's Prison

and Probation Service

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acknowledged that the conditions

at the prison were unacceptable.

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It said it's already

taken immediate action

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by appointing a new governor,

and that cleanliness

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has also improved.

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It also says it has put a huge

amount of energy and money

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into trying to improve the prison

healthcare service there.

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The inspection took place

in September last year,

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but last month, whistle-blowers told

the BBC that inmates

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at Liverpool Prison had died or been

injured due to poor care,

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which Lancashire Care NHS

Foundation Trust has apologised for.

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Today's report comes

after the government was ordered

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to make immediate improvements

to Nottingham Prison

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over safety concerns.

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Eight men there are believed to have

taken their own lives in two years.

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Adina Campbell, BBC News.

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A couple from California who are

accused of abusing their 13 children

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have pleaded not guilty to charges

of abuse, torture and false

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imprisonment. David and Louise

Turpin were arrested on Sunday after

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one of their children escaped

through a window from their home.

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Police found them severely

malnourished with some in shackles.

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Our North America correspondent

James Cook reports.

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..Give up that right.

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David Turpin appearing in court

to deny torturing his own children

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and sexually abusing one

of his young daughters.

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His wife, Louise, also

pleaded not guilty.

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Prosecutors say the siblings endured

the abuse for years as their parents

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plumbed the depths

of human depravity.

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One of the children at age 12

is the weight of an average

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7-year-old.

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Several of the victims have

cognitive impairment and neuropathy,

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which is nerve damage,

as a result of this extreme

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and prolonged physical abuse.

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The children were supposedly

schooled here in their home,

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but the district attorney said

some didn't even know

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what a police officer was.

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They were reportedly allowed

to shower just once a year

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and were taunted with food

that they were forbidden to eat.

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The 17-year-old, who raised the

alarm after climbing out of the home

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through a window, had been plotting

the escape for two years.

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One of her sisters made it out

with her, but turned back

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out of fear.

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This case has sent waves

of revulsion across

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the United States and beyond.

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The authorities say the siblings

are doing well, but some of them

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at least have almost certainly

suffered irreparable physical

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and mental damage.

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The parents are due

in court again next month.

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If convicted, they

face life in prison.

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James Cook, BBC News,

Riverside in California.

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Two fishermen are missing

after their boat capsized off

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the coast of Western Scotland.

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Lifeboats were launched

after receiving a distress signal

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from Loch Fyne in Argyll

and Bute yesterday evening.

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Royal Navy divers have been

helping in the search.

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Another man who was rescued

is recovering in hospital.

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Funds earmarked to help transform

the NHS have instead been spent

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on managing existing pressures,

that's according to a report

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from the National Audit Office.

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In 2017, trusts received

more than £3 billion

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of additional cash injections

to help fund day-to-day activities.

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But it said growing pressures

and surging demand had caused

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a reallocation of resources.

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Increasing costs on the build

of the UK's new aircraft carrier

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programme is putting

the budgets of other

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defence projects at risk,

according to MPs.

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A Public Accounts Committee

report said the programme,

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which includes two new carriers

costing £6 billion,

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is hugely complex and costly.

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The MoD said that it was committed

to keeping costs down.

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda

Ardern has announced

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that she is pregnant.

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Ms Ardern said she and her partner,

Clarke Gayford, were expecting

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their child in June,

after which she planned

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to take a six-week break.

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Ms Ardern is now set to be

the second elected world leader

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to give birth while in office -

and the first to do

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so in almost 30 years.

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Winds from a storm across northern

Europe reached up to 200 kilometres

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per hour causing severe disruption

to travel and plunging thousands of

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homes into darkness.

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A car has ploughed into crowds close

to Copacabana beach in Brazil,

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killing a baby and injuring

a dozen more people.

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Eyewitnesses said the car

went over a bicycle path

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and across the promenade,

hitting people and crashing through

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the tables and chairs of a cafe.

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The driver, who was detained,

had an epileptic fit at the wheel,

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and drugs to treat the condition

were found by police

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in the vehicle, reports say.

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The duration of adolescence

is increasing - and now lasts

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from the age of 10 until 24,

according to scientists.

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They say that young people

continuing their education

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for longer, as well as delayed

marriage and parenthood, which has

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pushed back popular perceptions

of when adulthood begins.

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Writing in the Lancet health

journal, the researchers argue

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a change in the definition

of adolescence is needed

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to ensure laws and government

policy stay appropriate.

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Boris Johnson has proposed

building a 22 mile bridge

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across the English Channel,

saying he believes another link

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would further improve relations

between the two countries.

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He made the suggestion

at the meeting with the French

0:10:300:10:33

President Macron yesterday.

0:10:330:10:35

A source close to the Foreign

Secretary said he believed the fact

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the two countries are only connected

by one railway line was "crazy".

0:10:380:10:45

The British author Peter Mayle,

who wrote "A Year in

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Provence" has died aged 78.

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His publisher said he'd

suffered a short illness.

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The book, published in 1989,

told the story of his first year

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as a British expat in a village

in the South of France.

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It sold six million copies around

the world and was adapted for radio

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and television by the BBC.

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In 2002, the French government

awarded him a Knight

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of the Legion of Honour,

for his contributions to culture.

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That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 9:30am.

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Do get in touch with us

throughout the morning -

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use the hashtag Victoria LIVE

and if you text, you will be charged

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at the standard network rate.

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Let's get some sport,

Olly Foster is with us this morning.

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Lots going on in Australia

at the moment, tennis and cricket,

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let's start with Kyle Edmund.

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Kyle Edmund is still going strong in

Melbourne in the Australian open.

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He's the British number two. Andy

Murray didn't make it to the start

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line and there are no British women

left. But Kyle Edmund has equalled

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his best progress at a Grand Slam,

into the fourth round.

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The British number 2 beat

Nikoloz Basilashvili

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from Georgia in five sets.

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He won the first set, but lost the

next two. Areola pants down match

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with both men not at their best. Had

to dig very deep.

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to dig very deep. -- it was an up

and down match.

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Temperatures have been over 40

degrees for the second day running.

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A lot of players have been

complaining, thinking

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that the tournament

should be stopped.

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They do have a heat policy but it's

not just based on temperature.

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Kyle Edmund through, but he

certainly struggled.

It's a tough

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one, but it is professional sport,

it's meant to hurt. It's not meant

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to be easy, that's the point of it.

But I guess... Yeah, if people start

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to become ill than it might be a

concern. As far as I am aware,

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everybody is just getting through.

It is supposed to go a little bit

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cooler in the next couple of days in

Melbourne.

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Andy Murray was watching Edmund

and tweeted that it was

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the biggest win of his career.

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Told him congratulations.

0:13:160:13:22

Andreas Seppi is next up for Edmund.

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Rafael Nadal is on court right now.

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Also talk about increased pay for

tennis players. A big debate about

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it and an influential voice getting

involved.

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Novak Djokovic is the President

of the Players council and called

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a meeting before the tournament

and they are unhappy

0:13:400:13:48

that the Grand Slams pay out about

7% of their income on prize money.

0:13:490:13:52

They feel it should be a lot more.

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Roger Federer used to have that role

and he has kept quiet up to now

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about the pay issue.

0:14:000:14:01

When he was in charge there were

talks of player boycotts. It didn't

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come to that, they did get or prize

money. But he has kept quiet about

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it until now.

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And he thinks that the time has

come to up pay again.

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We are not partners, we are just

players. So it's always hard to

0:14:140:14:18

rally. We had a good agreement, in

my opinion, that made the grand

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slams happy, the players pretty

happy. It seems that has run its

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course. So the moment that happens,

there isn't the same increases any

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more, so players have to rally and

get back together again and put in

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the effort. The tournaments know

that and will only react when we do

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so. We are ready to do it and it

will be the same process over and

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over again.

When Roger Federer

speaks you imagine they will start

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listening. It's not just the winners

of the grand slams, they will take

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more than £2 million home. It's the

players to get knocked out the

0:14:540:15:02

players to get knocked out the in

the first round. They spend a lot of

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money travelling.

And let's talk

about the cricket with Ingram

0:15:040:15:07

starting the run chase in Brisbane.

0:15:070:15:10

England chased down over 300 to win

the first one-dayer.

0:15:100:15:14

That gave them a 1-0 lead in the

series.

0:15:140:15:18

Australia made 270-9

after winning the toss.

0:15:180:15:20

Aaron Finch made a century,

that's two in two matches,

0:15:200:15:22

but they couldn't get

a partnership going.

0:15:220:15:27

And their were a couple of wickets

each from Adil Rashid and Joe Root.

0:15:270:15:31

Jason Roy made a record 180

in the first one dayer

0:15:310:15:33

but he was out for just two

in the very first over

0:15:330:15:36

of the England reply,

caught by Finch off the bowling

0:15:360:15:39

of Mitchell Starc.

0:15:390:15:40

Alex Hales and Jonny Bairstow then

tried to outdo each other, racing to

0:15:400:15:44

50 each. Both going, Alex Hales at

57 and Jonny Bairstow out on 60.

0:15:440:15:53

England at 145-3 and racing towards

taking a 2-0 lead in the series. All

0:15:530:15:59

going well for England's cricketers

and we haven't said that much over

0:15:590:16:02

the winter!

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This weekend marks a year

since Donald Trump was sworn

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in as America's 45th President

and he's certainly made his mark.

0:16:090:16:12

In what's been an incredibly

eventful year, he's been

0:16:120:16:15

accused of being everything

from racist to incompetent.

0:16:150:16:21

But unemployment in the States

is at a 17-year low and many of his

0:16:210:16:24

supporters are as loyal as ever.

0:16:240:16:27

Let's have a look at some

of the key moments of

0:16:270:16:29

the last 12 months.

0:16:290:16:31

I, Donald John Trump,

do solemnly swear that

0:16:310:16:37

I will faithfully execute the office

of President of the United States.

0:16:370:16:40

Congratulations, Mr President.

0:16:400:16:46

No politician in history has been

treated worse or more unfairly.

0:16:460:16:52

We need strong programmes.

0:16:520:16:57

So that people that love us

and want to love our country

0:16:570:17:02

and will end up loving our country

are allowed in.

0:17:020:17:06

Not people that want to destroy us

and destroy our country.

0:17:060:17:14

I can often tell how I get along

with somebody very early,

0:17:160:17:20

and I believe we're going

to have a fantastic relationship.

0:17:200:17:24

We'll just let Obamacare fail.

0:17:240:17:25

We're not going to own it.

0:17:250:17:27

I'm not going to own it.

0:17:270:17:28

I can tell you the Republicans

are not going to own it.

0:17:280:17:33

We'll let Obamacare fail, and then

Democrats are going to come to us,

0:17:330:17:37

and there are going to say,

how do we fix it, how do we fix it?

0:17:370:17:41

I am not going to

give you a question.

0:17:410:17:43

Can you state categorically...

0:17:430:17:44

You are fake news.

0:17:440:17:47

More than anything, I just think

it was in the best interest

0:17:470:17:50

of our communications department,

of our press organisation,

0:17:500:17:52

to not have too many

cooks in the kitchen.

0:17:520:17:57

It's heartbreaking.

0:17:570:18:03

But for now, that's it.

0:18:030:18:09

The United States stands prepared

to defend itself and its allies

0:18:090:18:14

using the full range

of our unmatched military

0:18:140:18:18

capabilities if need be.

0:18:180:18:25

There are a lot of issues that

need to be talked about,

0:18:250:18:29

need to be brought to life.

0:18:290:18:33

Wouldn't you love to see one

of these NFL owners when somebody

0:18:330:18:35

disrespects our flag to say get that

son of a (BLEEP) off

0:18:350:18:38

the field right now?

0:18:380:18:39

Out!

0:18:390:18:40

He's fired!

0:18:400:18:42

It's the largest, I always

say the most massive,

0:18:420:18:46

but it's the largest tax cut

in the history of our country.

0:18:460:18:50

I consider it a work of fiction,

but just so you know,

0:18:500:18:54

I never interviewed with him

in the White House at all.

0:18:540:18:56

He was never in the Oval Office.

0:18:560:18:58

We didn't have an interview.

0:18:580:18:59

I never questioned

his mental fitness.

0:18:590:19:00

I have no reason to question

his mental fitness.

0:19:000:19:05

The first goal is, we want

Trump to apologise.

0:19:050:19:07

We deserve an apology

for his comment.

0:19:070:19:13

I am the least racist person

you have ever interviewed.

0:19:130:19:18

The Russia story is

a total fabrication.

0:19:180:19:22

It's just an excuse for the greatest

loss in the history of American

0:19:220:19:26

politics, that's all it is.

0:19:260:19:34

Joining us now is

0:19:350:19:39

Pearleen Sangha - she's

a Democrat who worked

0:19:390:19:42

on the Hillary Clinton

campaign in 2016.

0:19:420:19:48

And Jan Halper-Hayes,

from Republicans Overseas, former

0:19:480:19:52

Worldwide Vice President

of Republicans Overseas.

0:19:520:19:55

Good to speak to you both. Pearleen,

start with you, in some ways it

0:19:550:20:03

feels like years ago that I was in

Washington the inauguration but how

0:20:030:20:06

do you feel United States has

changed in the last year?

Good

0:20:060:20:11

morning, Chloe. Thank you for having

me on. One year and, it really feels

0:20:110:20:18

like the administration still hasn't

gotten off the ground. And the White

0:20:180:20:24

House is inundated with infighting,

resignations and firing. Despite

0:20:240:20:28

holding power in both houses of

Congress we still on the brink of a

0:20:280:20:35

government shutdown, the deadline

being tonight. The biggest change

0:20:350:20:38

that we have seen is that Trump's

presidency has been marked by policy

0:20:380:20:44

announcements on Twitter, something

we have never seen before. That has

0:20:440:20:48

included the Muslim band, a ban on

transgender people the army, both of

0:20:480:20:52

which have been struck down by the

courts. You know, the one thing

0:20:520:20:58

domestically that Trump has tried to

do is the tax change, which is not

0:20:580:21:14

a" when".

Can we get jammed's

thoughts on this? Jan, as 21 year

0:21:140:21:20

ago in Washington and you were

hugely optimistic about the time

0:21:200:21:25

ahead, -- when I saw you one year

ago. Is the country now more

0:21:250:21:31

divided, one your arm? Lacey the

thing is, the polarisation has been

0:21:310:21:34

going on for more than 20 years as

both parties have moved further to

0:21:340:21:38

the left and further to the right.

And one identity politics really

0:21:380:21:43

became the way in which they

captured voters, that polarisation

0:21:430:21:47

was there. I don't think it has

changed because the Democrats are

0:21:470:21:53

very happy to continue that. And the

Republicans in our own party, we've

0:21:530:21:59

got a bit of polarisation. Do you

think there is a special

0:21:590:22:04

relationship between the US and the

UK?

Whenever I get asked that, it is

0:22:040:22:12

kind of, what is the special

relationship? I think it is, the

0:22:120:22:18

fact that we are allies, but is the

leadership of each country changes I

0:22:180:22:23

think the definition of its changes.

You can definitely found on the US

0:22:230:22:28

with a trade agreement under Brexit.

And that is probably one of the most

0:22:280:22:34

important special relationships that

will exist.

Pearleen, do you think

0:22:340:22:39

there is that special relationship?

You know, I think there certainly

0:22:390:22:42

was. I think that despite Theresa

May being the first in line to meet

0:22:420:22:50

President Trump, one year ago, she

hasn't really gained anything from

0:22:500:22:54

it. The government over there is in

need of support, with Brexit. I

0:22:540:23:01

think it has been a stark difference

to what we have seen before. And his

0:23:010:23:07

relationship with the UK has not

proved friendly or fruitful. He has

0:23:070:23:13

actively attacked the Mayor of

London. And he has frankly forced to

0:23:130:23:19

made to slap him down when he shared

far right propaganda from Britain

0:23:190:23:24

First. And in addition to that,

Sadiq Khan's concerns and various

0:23:240:23:32

parliamentary address is led by a

number of MPs have been broadcast

0:23:320:23:35

over here on national news. They've

made it clear that Trump is neither

0:23:350:23:41

welcome nor wanted in the UK. So I

think that speaks volumes to the

0:23:410:23:45

state of the relationship at the

moment. It has clearly proved very

0:23:450:23:50

embarrassing for the administration.

And it has resulted in this bizarre

0:23:500:23:54

series of tweets and press

statements and why Trump will not be

0:23:540:23:58

travelling to London!

Forgive me,

Pearleen... Jan, how has President

0:23:580:24:06

Trump down on the world stage in the

last year. Pearleen has raised the

0:24:060:24:09

fact that he has insulted the Mayor

of London. Also the Twitter attacks

0:24:090:24:16

on North Korea and disparaging

language used just last week about

0:24:160:24:19

some countries, on a world stage how

has he done?

You would have to go

0:24:190:24:26

country by country, almost. If we

look at what the president of South

0:24:260:24:30

Korea says he was exceedingly

complementary and credited Trump as

0:24:300:24:36

being the catalyst that got North

Korea and South Korea to begin

0:24:360:24:41

talks, and the fact that they are

going to march together at the

0:24:410:24:46

opening of the Olympics under one

flag.

0:24:460:24:53

flag.

It is not successful

diplomacy...

Pearleen, please wait a

0:24:530:25:01

moment. Jan, please finish your

point, I know that's Pearleen is

0:25:010:25:06

keen to come in but she will wait

until you have finished.

I find that

0:25:060:25:12

very rude because I have not

interrupted her. I think there is

0:25:120:25:16

some hope at Davos because Theresa

May and Trump will have a cordial

0:25:160:25:20

conversation. I think that Trump

really does not mind all the

0:25:200:25:27

controversy. He brings it on.

Sometimes he shoots himself in the

0:25:270:25:32

foot but he has a very strategic

approach to his tweets. Some people

0:25:320:25:38

might not like it but would you have

told JFK to get of TV, Franklin

0:25:380:25:42

Roosevelt to get off the radio? This

is part of our culture today. And he

0:25:420:25:48

is playing and better than anyone

else have.

Strategic to say, I am a

0:25:480:25:55

very stable genius, on Twitter?

Well, look, come on! You know he's

0:25:550:26:07

going to respond to things like

that. We did some research and

0:26:070:26:10

people are getting so bored with

hearing us on the media talk about

0:26:100:26:12

his behaviour.

A fair point.

Pearleen, I know you want to make a

0:26:120:26:17

point.

I am not sure I agree with

most of that. It is not successful

0:26:170:26:23

diplomacy if Americans in Hawaii

were living in absolute fear the 30

0:26:230:26:27

minutes that be a missile strike

because Trump constantly wants to

0:26:270:26:32

argue with Kim Jong-un over who has

the bigger nuclear button. And

0:26:320:26:36

further to that is a he welcomes the

controversy isn't good enough. He's

0:26:360:26:41

making it harder for our allies and

friends to do business with America.

0:26:410:26:44

In the past week Mr Rogge tree

comments about Haiti and all those

0:26:440:26:50

other African countries -- his

derogatory comments, it has really

0:26:500:26:53

shown that he is the only one in any

kind of a hole at the moment. It is

0:26:530:26:58

just an acceptable. We need to move

past this -- it is just not

0:26:580:27:05

acceptable. And I think by

normalising it and creating a

0:27:050:27:10

conversation that makes it OK, that

is frankly, just, unreal.

Pearleen,

0:27:100:27:19

thank you for joining us, thank you

to Jan as well.

0:27:190:27:24

It's that time of the morning

where we bring you up to date

0:27:240:27:27

in the trial of former football

coach Barry Bennell.

0:27:270:27:29

The court heard how he made

a "veiled threat" to ruin the career

0:27:290:27:32

of one of his alleged victims.

0:27:320:27:34

Greg Dawson is here.

0:27:340:27:35

Tell us more.

0:27:350:27:36

Yes this is the trial,

as you've said, of Barry Bennell

0:27:360:27:38

who was a youth football coach

linked to a number of teams

0:27:380:27:41

including Manchester City

and Crewe Alexandra.

0:27:410:27:43

He faces a total of 48

charges of sexual abuse

0:27:430:27:46

between 1979 and 1991,

which he denies.

0:27:460:27:54

Yesterday was day

seven of the trial.

0:27:540:27:57

The jury was shown the video

of a police interview with a former

0:27:570:28:00

Crewe Alexandra youth player.

0:28:000:28:03

This man said he had been scouted

by Barry Bennell who then took him

0:28:030:28:06

for training sessions

at Manchester City

0:28:060:28:08

and to a soccer school.

0:28:080:28:09

He claimed he was later sexually

abused - both in Mr Bennell's

0:28:090:28:12

home and in his car.

0:28:120:28:13

The alleged victim left

Crewe Alexandra in 1986

0:28:130:28:15

to join another club.

0:28:150:28:23

It was at this point he said he made

allegations about the coach's

0:28:280:28:32

behaviour to others though he didn't

tell anyone he had

0:28:320:28:34

personally been abused.

0:28:340:28:35

It was at that point he said

he received a two page handwritten

0:28:350:28:38

letter from Mr Bennell

on Crewe Alexandra headed

0:28:380:28:40

notepaper asking why

he was making allegations.

0:28:400:28:42

He claimed the letter said:

"Football is a small world,

0:28:420:28:44

and troublemakers don't go far

in the game".

0:28:440:28:46

In the police interview the former

player described that

0:28:460:28:49

as a "veiled threat."

0:28:490:28:49

And there were also details

about Barry Bennell's health?

0:28:490:28:51

Yes.

0:28:510:28:53

The court heard how Barry Bennell

claimed he had part of his tongue

0:28:530:28:56

removed because of a tumour

and was unable to eat and drink.

0:28:560:29:04

The jury was read a transcript

of a police interview

0:29:050:29:07

with Mr Bennell himself.

0:29:070:29:08

In it the former coach said: "I got

cancer and I thought

0:29:080:29:11

'Well, it's karma?.

0:29:110:29:12

If you said to me 'lethal

injection', I'd take it."

0:29:120:29:15

In the interview, officers

questioned Mr Bennell

0:29:150:29:16

about allegations made

by another player.

0:29:160:29:19

Mr Bennell has admitted

one count of indecent

0:29:190:29:21

assault against this man.

0:29:210:29:24

But denies other charges

against him because -

0:29:240:29:26

he said - the alleged victim

"wouldn't allow it."

0:29:260:29:31

Mr Bennell also told police how

he had tried to kill himself

0:29:310:29:34

after allegedly abusing boys

because he was - in his words -

0:29:340:29:36

"out of control".

0:29:360:29:41

As I said, Mr Bennell denies a total

of 48 charges of sexual abuse

0:29:410:29:45

in this trial which

continues later today.

0:29:450:29:48

Greg Dawson, thank you for bringing

us up to date with this trial. We

0:29:480:29:55

spoke earlier about a study that

says two out of five parents do not

0:29:550:29:59

get to kiss their children good

night because they are so

0:29:590:30:02

overwhelmed with their workload. We

asked you to get in touch with your

0:30:020:30:06

experiences. Pam has sent this text,

I'm due to return to work after

0:30:060:30:12

eight months of struggling on

maternity pay, I had to accept going

0:30:120:30:16

back full-time otherwise I can't

afford childcare. My work overtime

0:30:160:30:19

to earn money and all my earnings

will go on childcare. Some nights I

0:30:190:30:23

won't be home to kiss my youngest

good night. Such an awful thought.

0:30:230:30:28

Thank you Pam. To shake your

experiences, contact us.

0:30:280:30:35

Now you'll really love this.

0:30:350:30:37

It's a TV promotion

for Channel 9 in Australia.

0:30:370:30:39

And they're clearly big fans of BBC

Breakfast as you'll see.

0:30:390:30:42

They've basically copied a Breakfast

promo word for word.

0:30:420:30:44

Have a look.

0:30:440:30:45

It is a brand-new day.

0:30:450:30:47

Good morning, Cal.

0:30:470:30:48

Good morning, Georgie.

0:30:480:30:49

Good morning, Karen.

0:30:490:30:50

Good morning.

0:30:500:30:51

This is BBC Breakfast.

0:30:510:30:53

Good morning, Dan.

0:30:530:30:54

Morning, Jenny.

0:30:540:30:55

It's an action packed day of sport

ahead with the FA Cup,

0:30:550:30:58

poppies, sports day.

0:30:580:30:59

The headlines are coming up.

0:30:590:31:00

Jack, your toast is burning.

0:31:000:31:01

The toast is burning.

0:31:010:31:03

And still ahead this morning.

0:31:030:31:04

Increasing petrol prices.

0:31:040:31:05

Changes to petrol prices

are affecting your commute...

0:31:050:31:07

It's going to be a wet one.

0:31:070:31:09

Start your day right

with BBC Breakfast.

0:31:090:31:13

Every morning from six on BBC One.

0:31:130:31:21

Don't they say copying is the

greatest form of flattery, something

0:31:220:31:26

like that. Clearly fans of BBC

breakfast.

0:31:260:31:30

Still to come.

0:31:300:31:33

He changed the lives

of millions of women -

0:31:330:31:36

providing low-cost sanitary towels

and revolutionising feminine

0:31:360:31:37

hygiene in India.

0:31:370:31:38

We'll be taking a look

at the the latest Bollywood smash

0:31:380:31:41

hitting the big screen.

0:31:410:31:43

We will be learning more about Pad

Man.

0:31:430:31:49

Time for the latest

news - here's Annita.

0:31:490:31:51

The BBC News headlines this morning.

0:31:510:31:52

Scientists in the US are close

to a major cancer breakthrough,

0:31:520:31:55

after trials for a new universal

blood test detected eight common

0:31:550:31:58

forms of the disease.

0:31:580:32:02

Overall, the test found

70% of the cancers -

0:32:020:32:04

but researchers are cautiously

optmistic, saying more work

0:32:040:32:06

is needed to verify its accuracy.

0:32:060:32:07

Their vision is an annual test

designed to catch cancer

0:32:070:32:10

early and save lives.

0:32:100:32:12

UK experts said it was

"enormously exciting".

0:32:120:32:17

Living conditions at

Liverpool Prison are the worst that

0:32:170:32:19

inspectors have ever seen,

according to a new report.

0:32:190:32:22

Inspectors say living

conditions at the jail

0:32:220:32:30

are the poorer than any other

reports they have undertaken..

0:32:420:32:44

However, Her Majesty's Prison

and Probation Service said it's

0:32:440:32:46

already taken immediate action

by appointing a new governor and

0:32:460:32:49

that cleanliness has also improved.

0:32:490:32:50

A couple who are accused

of imprisoning, abusing

0:32:500:32:52

and torturing twelve

of their children at their home

0:32:520:32:54

in California have pleaded not

guilty during their first court

0:32:540:32:56

appearance.

0:32:560:32:57

David and Louise

Turpin were arrested

0:32:570:32:59

on Sunday after one

of their children escaped

0:32:590:33:01

through a window of their home.

0:33:010:33:02

Police found the children severely

malnourished with some in shackles.

0:33:020:33:05

The duration of adolescence

is increasing - and now lasts

0:33:050:33:07

from the age of 10 until 24,

according to scientists.

0:33:070:33:09

They say that young people

continuing their education

0:33:090:33:11

for longer, as well as delayed

marriage and parenthood, which has

0:33:110:33:14

pushed back popular perceptions

of when adulthood begins.

0:33:140:33:16

Writing in the Lancet Health

Journal, the researchers argue

0:33:160:33:18

a change in the definition

of adolescence is needed

0:33:180:33:20

to ensure laws and government

policy stay appropriate.

0:33:200:33:27

Boris Johnson has proposed

building a 22 mile bridge

0:33:270:33:30

across the English Channel,

saying he believes another link

0:33:300:33:37

would further improve relations

between the UK and France.

0:33:370:33:39

He made the suggestion

at the meeting with the French

0:33:390:33:41

President Macron yesterday.

0:33:410:33:42

A source close to the Foreign

Secretary said he believed the fact

0:33:420:33:45

the two countries are only connected

by one railway line was "crazy".

0:33:450:33:48

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

0:33:480:33:50

Here's some sport now

with Olly Foster.

0:33:500:33:56

Kyle Edmund is through to the 4th

round of the Australian Open

0:33:560:33:58

after a five set win over

Georgia's Nikoloz Basilashvili

0:33:580:34:06

with the match lasted over three

and half hours in sweltering

0:34:060:34:08

temperatures of over 40

degrees in Melbourne.

0:34:080:34:10

The british number 2

will face Andreas Seppi next.

0:34:100:34:12

Roger Federer has given his backing

to increased prize money

0:34:120:34:15

at the four Grand Slams.

0:34:150:34:20

Novak Djokovic, who heads up

the player's council,

0:34:200:34:22

has called for a greater percentage

of tournament profits to be

0:34:220:34:24

passed on to the players.

0:34:240:34:27

England's cricketers are chasing

down 271 in Brisbane to try to take

0:34:270:34:32

a 2-0 series lead in the one day

series against Australia. Alex Hales

0:34:320:34:37

and Jonny Bairstow shared a century

stand for the second wicket. England

0:34:370:34:41

wobbling slightly, 157-4 from 27

overs.

0:34:410:34:50

And the overnight joint leader

Tommy Fleetwood has begun his second

0:34:500:34:53

round at the HSBC Championship

in Abu Dhabi - he made a birdie

0:34:530:34:58

on the second but he's currently

five shots behind current leader

0:34:580:35:05

the Belgian Thomas Pieters

0:35:050:35:07

A couple accused of torturing,

abusing and imprisoning their 13

0:35:070:35:10

children for at least eight years

have appeared in court in California

0:35:100:35:12

where they denied the charges.

0:35:120:35:15

57-year-old David Turpin

and his wife Louise, who is 49,

0:35:150:35:19

were arrested on Sunday after one

of their daughters escaped

0:35:190:35:22

through a window from the squalid

family home in the city of Perris

0:35:220:35:25

and called the police.

0:35:250:35:26

Mr Turpin is further charged

with sexually abusing one

0:35:260:35:28

of his younger daughters.

0:35:280:35:33

Prosecutors say the parents

tormented their starving children

0:35:330:35:35

allowing them to look at apple

and pumpkin pies

0:35:350:35:37

but not to eat them.

0:35:370:35:38

They were allegedly allowed

to shower just once a year

0:35:380:35:41

and if they were caught washing

they were punished by beatings,

0:35:410:35:44

strangulation and being

chained to their beds.

0:35:440:35:47

The siblings are said to be stunted

and severely malnourished.

0:35:470:35:50

The local district lawyer

in Riverside County -

0:35:500:35:53

Mike Hestrin - told reporters more

about their condition.

0:35:530:36:01

One of the children

at age 12 is the weight

0:36:050:36:08

of an average seven-year-old.

0:36:080:36:12

The 29-year-old female

victim weighs 82lb.

0:36:120:36:18

Several of the victims have

cognitive impairment and neuropathy,

0:36:180:36:20

which is nerve damage,

as a result of this extreme

0:36:200:36:22

and prolonged physical abuse.

0:36:220:36:28

Supposedly home-schooled,

the children lacked even...

0:36:290:36:32

They lack a basic knowledge of life.

0:36:320:36:36

Many of the children didn't know

what a police officer was.

0:36:360:36:40

The 17-year-old, when asked

if there was medication

0:36:400:36:44

or pills in the home,

didn't know what medication

0:36:440:36:46

or pills were.

0:36:460:36:49

About the only thing

the children were allowed to do

0:36:500:36:54

in their rooms or chained up

was to write in journals.

0:36:540:36:56

We now have recovered those

journals, hundreds of them.

0:36:560:36:59

And we are combing

through them for evidence.

0:36:590:37:04

All 13 of the victims,

including the defendants,

0:37:040:37:10

typically go to sleep around four

or five in the morning,

0:37:100:37:14

sleep all day and then be up

all through the night.

0:37:140:37:17

The victims report that

as a punishment, starting many years

0:37:210:37:27

ago, they began to be tied up.

0:37:270:37:31

First with ropes.

0:37:310:37:35

One victim at one point

was tied up and hogtied,

0:37:350:37:40

and then when that victim was able

to escape the ropes,

0:37:400:37:46

these defendants eventually began

using chains and padlocks to chain

0:37:460:37:49

up the victims to their beds.

0:37:490:37:54

These punishments would last

for weeks or even months at a time.

0:37:540:38:00

The 17-year-old victim that escaped

had been working on a plan

0:38:010:38:06

with her siblings to escape this

abuse for more than two years.

0:38:060:38:12

She escaped through a window and

took one of her siblings with her.

0:38:120:38:18

That sibling eventually turned back,

became frightened and turned back,

0:38:180:38:20

and went back into the house.

0:38:200:38:28

It's been infested with rats

and cockroaches, and seriously ill

0:38:280:38:31

prisoners are waiting days to be

treated, we'll be asking how can

0:38:310:38:34

Liverpool Prison turn itself around.

0:38:340:38:40

Next - a taboo-smashing comedy

featuring Bollywood superstar

0:38:400:38:43

Akshay Kumar on a surprising theme.

0:38:430:38:47

"Pad Man" is inspired by the life

of Arunachalam Muruganantham -

0:38:470:38:51

a school-drop out from a poor family

in southern India who changed

0:38:510:38:54

the lives of millions of women

across the world by inventing

0:38:540:38:57

a machine to make

cheap sanitary pads.

0:38:570:38:59

Let's have a look at a clip

from the film's trailer.

0:38:590:39:07

You're thinking I'm mad,

but mad only becoming famous.

0:39:270:39:30

Let's speak now to Pad Man

producer Twinkle Khanna-

0:40:320:40:38

A woman's activist and one of

India's bestselling authors.

0:40:390:40:45

And wife of the film's star

Akshay Kumar, who plays Pad Man.

0:40:450:40:49

How did you find out about the

story?

I was doing research on a

0:40:490:40:55

column about menstruation. I write

columns for the Times of India. I

0:40:550:40:59

read about him and was completely

fascinated. Here was a man from a

0:40:590:41:04

very simple and Conservative village

and he encountered a problem and

0:41:040:41:07

realised that his wife was using

unhygienic rags.

Really unhygienic

0:41:070:41:15

as well.

A normal man would say, if

I can't afford sanitary pads then I

0:41:150:41:22

will earn more money to buy them for

my wife. But Arunachalam

0:41:220:41:28

Muruganantham is a very eccentric

and idiosyncratic character. He

0:41:280:41:33

decided to make a cheaper version.

His wife got fed up of testing the

0:41:330:41:37

pads for him. He got fed up of

waiting month after month. He had to

0:41:370:41:45

wait a month for each trial as well.

No other woman was willing to test

0:41:450:41:49

it out. He had a contraption with a

pig's blather furled with pig 's

0:41:490:41:56

blood. He went cycling around with

this.

He replicated having a period.

0:41:560:42:07

It still leaked. The people in a

village thought he was a pervert or

0:42:070:42:11

hay had a sexual disease. He tells

me that some people even thought he

0:42:110:42:17

was a vampire secretly sucking blood

from animals and people overnight.

0:42:170:42:24

He was ostracised, but still made

this sanitary pad.

He lost

0:42:240:42:28

everything, lost his wife, was

ostracised from the village.

Even

0:42:280:42:32

his mother left him. He was

abandoned completely. His sense of

0:42:320:42:39

determination just pulled him

through that period and he

0:42:390:42:44

succeeded. And then his wife came

back.

That's good. Explain for

0:42:440:42:49

people who are not familiar with the

taboo and shame attached to having

0:42:490:42:53

periods in India.

I really don't

think it's just about India. I think

0:42:530:43:00

this is a problem that lots of women

face globally. In India there are

0:43:000:43:04

different taboo is. You can't touch

a pickle, it will get spoiled. You

0:43:040:43:09

can't go to temples because it's

blasphemy. In the Western world,

0:43:090:43:17

you'd take your handbag to the

toilet come you don't just take a

0:43:170:43:20

tampon or sanitary pad. There is

still a shame that is prevalent.

0:43:200:43:24

This August a 12-year-old girl was

pulled up by her school teacher

0:43:240:43:28

because she stained her uniform and

the bench with menstrual blood. She

0:43:280:43:32

went home and committed suicide by

jumping off a balcony. That's the

0:43:320:43:36

level of shame that this simple

biological function brings about.

0:43:360:43:40

The significance of this man's story

and what sounds like a very simple

0:43:400:43:44

and ingenious invention, that you

make a cheap sanitary pad. Sanitary

0:43:440:43:52

pads are very expensive and taxed at

12% in India.

That is something I

0:43:520:43:58

have been talking about repeatedly.

Brooms do not have tax. Apparently

0:43:580:44:07

in India is more important to keep

your house clean and your body. I

0:44:070:44:10

don't understand that. But to

reiterate, it's not just India. In

0:44:100:44:16

many states in America Viagra is

tax-free, but tampons are taxed,

0:44:160:44:22

because policies are made by six to

five-year-old men with erectile

0:44:220:44:25

dysfunction! -- with 65-year-old

men.

How odd was it to go out and

0:44:250:44:35

make the film, how did you get the

funding?

Is surprising, but the

0:44:350:44:39

biggest obstacle in making the movie

was too convinced Arunachalam that I

0:44:390:44:45

should be able to make it. He wasn't

interested because he's not a man

0:44:450:44:49

who wants to be famous or who is

interested in money beyond the

0:44:490:44:53

point. He lives a very simple life.

When I was visiting his house, we

0:44:530:45:02

sat on a flight eight off banana

leaves. He was getting excited

0:45:020:45:05

because he was getting bed for his

daughter, the first bed in the

0:45:050:45:10

household. His philosophy is very

simple. We are a world of

0:45:100:45:15

unnecessary consumers. If you are

satisfied, and your chair is broken

0:45:150:45:18

and you can just put a book and to

balance, why not do that.

So it

0:45:180:45:22

wasn't difficult to go to a film

company and make this into a huge

0:45:220:45:25

feature film, and get the cash for

somebody like Pad Man. It's talking

0:45:250:45:30

about periods.

0:45:300:45:36

I'd already written the story in my

book. When we went for funding

0:45:360:45:41

surprisingly we had no problem with

it. The only problem while filming,

0:45:410:45:45

we had two junior artists on the

set, and on the second day of

0:45:450:45:51

filming they felt sanitary pads and

they ran away because they were

0:45:510:45:57

mortified at holding menstrual

product.

How important was that to

0:45:570:45:59

get your husband on board, a

Bollywood superstar, because

0:45:590:46:04

presumably then it will get more

people to watch the film.

Exactly,

0:46:040:46:09

when I began I thought we'd make a

small arthouse film. Then I realised

0:46:090:46:14

the mission was to have as many

people watching it, for it to go

0:46:140:46:18

across households in India, and

globally as well and if the Indian

0:46:180:46:22

people see one of their idols

holding a sanitary pad in his hand

0:46:220:46:26

then half the taboos will be

dispelled. I thought it was a good

0:46:260:46:29

idea and it was much easier because

he lives in the same house as me!

0:46:290:46:34

You could annoy him until he said

yes! How much is this about the

0:46:340:46:39

message? It is a comedy. It is

important to have fun and make sure

0:46:390:46:45

this isn't just bridging at people.

The unique part is that

0:46:450:46:50

Muruganantham is very whimsical. His

tackling serious problem but he

0:46:500:46:54

doesn't take himself seriously. And

we stayed true to that because in

0:46:540:46:58

the film. The other thing we tried

to do was make sure the message was

0:46:580:47:03

clear that you can come to the movie

with your children, and you should

0:47:030:47:08

do, and with your grandmother

because the grandmother is the one

0:47:080:47:10

saying that the wife can't enter the

kitchen and has to be segregated. So

0:47:100:47:15

we came up the comicstrip. Again so

that this child friendly. So we've

0:47:150:47:19

been very clear with that messaging.

How has it been received in India?

0:47:190:47:26

We were very apprehensive before the

trailer because we thought people

0:47:260:47:31

would say, this is a movie about

menstruation and we don't want to

0:47:310:47:33

watch it. But the response has been

overwhelming, it is the most watched

0:47:330:47:38

trailer of any Indian film. People

are interested. I think a lot of

0:47:380:47:42

people will go to see it and will

drag conservative family members to

0:47:420:47:47

watch it.

In the UK where will we be

able to watch it?

0:47:470:47:59

able to watch it?

At the Odeon...

Everywhere! A widespread release!

0:47:590:48:01

Thank you so much for coming in,

Twinkle.

Thank you so much.

0:48:010:48:04

Severely ill patients

at Liverpool Prison are waiting days

0:48:040:48:06

to be seen due to poor care

and a lack of staff resulting

0:48:060:48:11

in a "substantial clinical risk",

according to an assessment of mental

0:48:110:48:14

healthcare at the jail by a senior

psychiatrist seen by BBC News.

0:48:140:48:17

In a separate report,

which is published today

0:48:170:48:19

but was leaked to the BBC last

month, inspectors say living

0:48:190:48:21

conditions at the jail

are the worst they've ever seen,

0:48:210:48:24

with the prison infested

with rats and cockroaches.

0:48:240:48:32

Let's speak now to Mark Fairhurst,

a prison officer at Liverpool Prison

0:48:320:48:34

and chairman of the Prison Officers'

Association.

0:48:340:48:40

Conservative MP Bob Neill, who is

Chairman of the Justice Committee.

0:48:400:48:42

And Peter Clarke, HM

Chief Inspector of Prisons.

0:48:420:48:49

Let me make my way over to meet you

all, gentlemen. Thank you so much

0:48:490:48:54

for coming in. Peter, if I could

start with you. For people who

0:48:540:48:59

didn't see the report that was

leaked to the BBC last month, give

0:48:590:49:03

us a sense of what was found at

Liverpool Prison.

The team of

0:49:030:49:10

inspectors who went to Liverpool

were very experienced, between them

0:49:100:49:13

they have been to hundreds of

prisoners over the years. And they

0:49:130:49:17

found conditions they describe as

the worst they could ever remember.

0:49:170:49:20

What we had were prison cells that

were dirty and damp, hundreds of

0:49:200:49:25

windows were broken. Lavatories were

blocked, sinks were leaking, there

0:49:250:49:33

were piles of letter in which they

saw rats running around and

0:49:330:49:36

cockroaches were photographed on the

floors. And the letter. I remember

0:49:360:49:41

asking a senior member of staff,

pointing it out and asking what is

0:49:410:49:44

this about, why haven't you cleaned

it up. He says, it's got so bad that

0:49:440:49:49

we can't use prison orderlies to

clean it up because it's a health

0:49:490:49:54

and safety issues we need external

contractors to do it. I said, you

0:49:540:49:58

are telling me that you've allowed

this prison to become too dirty to

0:49:580:50:02

be cleaned. Extraordinary. And that

is part of what sits behind our

0:50:020:50:06

report.

I want to bring you in as

well, Mark. You are a prison officer

0:50:060:50:15

at Liverpool prison. Just explain

how bad things are on a day to day

0:50:150:50:22

basis, to work there, and for the

inmates?

It is quite sad that we

0:50:220:50:27

have to rely on achieving spectre

reporting things that have been

0:50:270:50:30

going on for some time, that

management and staff have reported

0:50:300:50:35

to the prison service directors. And

they've taken no action. Most of

0:50:350:50:39

this report, and there's a theme in

Mr Peter's inspectors reports

0:50:390:50:45

throughout the country, they state

that prisons are dilapidated. That

0:50:450:50:49

is down to the private sector

contractor in charge of maintenance,

0:50:490:50:52

who is clearly not fit for purpose,

not doing their job. It takes less

0:50:520:50:57

than one hour to repair a broken

window, yet prisoners are getting

0:50:570:51:01

put in prison cells not fit for

human habitation. The governor of

0:51:010:51:07

Liverpool has notified this for some

time but he has got the answer, it's

0:51:070:51:15

a space, it's a bed, you are getting

a body. I feel he has been made a

0:51:150:51:19

scapegoat. Things are improving. I

was there on Boxing Day. It is a lot

0:51:190:51:23

cleaner and stuff for implementing

an improved regime.

Just explain the

0:51:230:51:28

impact on the behaviour of inmates,

to live in an environment like that.

0:51:280:51:33

Because we hear so often about

prison officers feeling under

0:51:330:51:38

pressure and it's a difficult

environment to work in any way.

0:51:380:51:42

Added to this, how challenging is

and for all of you?

You have to

0:51:420:51:47

understand that we are staff. We

don't want to put a prisoner in a

0:51:470:51:53

cell that we think is not fit for

habitation. But when you are forced

0:51:530:51:56

to buy the hierarchy you have to put

them in a cell. That leads to

0:51:560:52:00

frustration is because anybody with

a broken sink or blocked toilet and

0:52:000:52:04

waiting months for that repair to

get done, they bear the brunt of the

0:52:040:52:07

frustration. The stuff in the front

line take the flak for something

0:52:070:52:11

that isn't their fault. And this is

down to private contractors. We need

0:52:110:52:17

those services. As Carillion Proops,

get them back in the public sector

0:52:170:52:21

and get them back now. They are not

fit for purpose. They are causing

0:52:210:52:26

stability issues in our prisons.

Bob, do you acknowledge that is the

0:52:260:52:33

problem?

No, there are some very

well maintained private sector

0:52:330:52:38

prisons and some badly maintained

public sector ones. Where Mark is

0:52:380:52:41

right is that there are systemic

failures because the people on the

0:52:410:52:45

ground were not being supported by

the regional and national leadership

0:52:450:52:48

of the prison service. That's why we

have some and a director of the

0:52:480:52:53

prison service and the top

management to explain it away. The

0:52:530:52:55

first time we've ever done that in

respect of an individual prison

0:52:550:52:59

report, that is because it

0:52:590:53:06

report, that is because it was so

bad, it is a systemic failure and

0:53:100:53:11

that is when we need answers.

So

what needs to change? I am

0:53:110:53:14

interested in all your points of

view. Peter?

You would expect me to

0:53:140:53:16

say this but I would like to see

inspection reports taken more

0:53:160:53:19

seriously than they have been in

recent years.

So they forced to do

0:53:190:53:21

what you recommend in the report?

They should taken seriously. It is

0:53:210:53:26

clear that in recent years there's

been a steady decline in the number

0:53:260:53:30

of our recommendations taken

seriously. If we take the urgent

0:53:300:53:34

notification that I made yesterday

about Nottingham prison, where we

0:53:340:53:38

found it to be fundamentally unsafe,

on the last inspection two years ago

0:53:380:53:44

we made 13 recommendations

specifically about safety, and when

0:53:440:53:47

we inspected last week we found only

two of those had been achieved.

0:53:470:53:52

That's sort of ignoring, I have to

put it that way because it feels as

0:53:520:53:56

of our reports are being ignored,

that sort of ignoring will

0:53:560:54:01

inevitably lead to a decline in

standards.

Bob, you are a

0:54:010:54:07

Conservative MP, is your government

ignoring what Peter Clarke is saying

0:54:070:54:11

in these reports.

Any ignoring is

happening on the part of the prison

0:54:110:54:18

service, that is something that we

intend to raise, the government was

0:54:180:54:29

proposing to make it a statutory

obligation, I'd like to see it

0:54:290:54:36

again, that sadly was lost in the

dissolution of parliament, we need

0:54:360:54:39

to return to that and we need to

increase pressure on that and make

0:54:390:54:46

sure top civil servants are up to

the job and if they are not

0:54:460:54:50

supporting people on the front line

that won't leave the safe and decent

0:54:500:54:54

environment which is the obligation

we need.

Mark, I want you to read a

0:54:540:55:04

statement we've had from the trust

in charge of health care at

0:55:040:55:08

Liverpool prison. They said they put

huge amounts into trying to improve

0:55:080:55:13

services but they say they haven't

seen the improvements they would

0:55:130:55:16

have rights they sorry about that.

This in the prison has hired a

0:55:160:55:20

significant number of new officers

and the prison is now fully staffed.

0:55:200:55:26

They say urgent steps are being

taken to look into the running of

0:55:260:55:29

health care services in prison.

It's

being subjected to a bid process

0:55:290:55:36

because the Lancashire authorities

don't want it any more. We don't

0:55:360:55:39

know who will win the bid yet. What

has happened at Liverpool is what we

0:55:390:55:44

want for all prisons, we want

investment from the government to

0:55:440:55:48

improve living conditions for

prisoners and for staff the working

0:55:480:55:52

conditions, is going to be a long

overdue process. We just one senior

0:55:520:55:56

managers in the prison service to

listen to staff and management and

0:55:560:56:00

prisons that are experiencing

difficulties. We want safe prisons

0:56:000:56:05

and decent living conditions for

prisoners and decent working

0:56:050:56:09

conditions for staff. Staff have the

right to work in a safe environment

0:56:090:56:13

and prisoners have the right to live

in a safe environment and we want

0:56:130:56:17

that decency agenda full on with the

investment and resources in place.

0:56:170:56:22

Gentlemen, thank you so

0:56:220:56:24

much for coming to speech to us. A

lot of you have been getting in

0:56:240:56:33

touch about the movie Pad Man, which

is set in India and is talking about

0:56:330:56:38

periods, it hugely taboo subject.

One tweet says, I loved too talking

0:56:380:56:45

about Pad Man. Martha says I'm so

proud to see Twinkle grazing a

0:56:450:56:50

programme to talk about Pad Man,

Bollywood is taking the world by

0:56:500:56:56

storm. Twinkle is the producer of

the movie Pad Man, who came in to

0:56:560:57:00

talk to us about it. Keep your

messages coming in. A simple blood

0:57:000:57:05

test to diagnose cancer is being

hailed as a major breakthrough.

0:57:050:57:10

We'll have more details shortly.

First the weather with Simon.

0:57:100:57:15

We'll have more details shortly.

First the weather with Simon.

0:57:150:57:21

Another wintry start across the

north of the UK, and in Scotland, in

0:57:210:57:25

the Highlands, a lot of snowfall,

look at this, real snow day, the

0:57:250:57:29

roads around Glasgow looking pretty

treacherous, it will continue with

0:57:290:57:33

snow showers moving in, particularly

across the West of Scotland,

0:57:330:57:38

Northern Ireland, even across

north-west England snow showers of a

0:57:380:57:41

higher ground. One or two rain

showers as well, as we go through

0:57:410:57:47

the day, particularly south-west

Scotland, we could see travel

0:57:470:57:50

disruption because of heavy snow and

also ice. The Met Office has is it

0:57:500:57:56

an amber warning, be prepared, south

of Glasgow towards Dumfries and

0:57:560:57:59

Galloway because of their heavy

snow, eagerly towards the north and

0:57:590:58:03

west of Scotland, snow showers in

Northern Ireland and the north-west,

0:58:030:58:08

first the 70s looking dry and

bright. At three o'clock we could

0:58:080:58:12

see between ten and 15 centimetres,

more perhaps on higher ground, less

0:58:120:58:17

than that lower levels, enough to

cause disruption. Some wintry

0:58:170:58:21

showers into the Pennines, North

Wales, the South might see a bit of

0:58:210:58:26

sleet, maybe some hail developing in

South Wales and south-west England,

0:58:260:58:30

otherwise dry with bright spells,

some sunshine this afternoon across

0:58:300:58:33

the South and east. It will pretty

cold, and there, the temperatures on

0:58:330:58:39

the thermometer might say two or

three degrees in the north of the

0:58:390:58:44

UK, but with a brisk westerly wind

it will feel much colder. Maybe -1

0:58:440:58:51

or minus two degrees further north.

Snow continues other south-west

0:58:510:58:54

Scotland, and other night more

wintry showers. Rain spreading into

0:58:540:58:58

South Wales and southern England by

Saturday morning. Some snow over the

0:58:580:59:02

Brecon Beacons, clearer skies to the

north and east mean it will be a

0:59:020:59:07

cold and icy night. Saturday morning

a bit of snow of the Chilterns and

0:59:070:59:12

the Cotswolds, although that should

clear away and for many of us it's

0:59:120:59:18

dry on Saturday, dryer towards the

north and east of the UK. As we go

0:59:180:59:23

through Saturday into Sunday, a very

different sort of day for most of

0:59:230:59:26

us, this weather front pushing in

will bring some heavy rain for a

0:59:260:59:30

time, stronger winds on Sunday and

four times snow, over the Pennines,

0:59:300:59:35

the uplands, into the Grampians and

the Highlands for a time. But rain

0:59:350:59:41

pushing east, although becoming

Buddha, 11 degrees towards the

0:59:410:59:44

south-west, still keeping the cold

air in the and east. -- becoming

0:59:440:59:49

milder. That's all from me. Hello,

it's Friday, it's ten o'clock, and

0:59:490:59:56

Chloe Tilly.

0:59:560:59:59

A simple blood test

to diagnose cancer.

0:59:591:00:01

Scientists in America are trialling

a test which can detect eight

1:00:011:00:04

forms on the disease.

1:00:041:00:05

It's being hailed as

a major breakthrough.

1:00:051:00:06

I look forward to a time in 10 years

where we all go to the pharmacy,

1:00:061:00:10

we buy our shampoo,

we give a blood test.

1:00:101:00:12

And we get on with our lives.

1:00:121:00:14

The NHS is spending more

money on diagnostics

1:00:141:00:16

than treating the disease.

1:00:161:00:18

We'll be asking just how significant

this is and what hope does it offer?

1:00:181:00:22

This weekend marks a year

since Donald Trump was sworn

1:00:221:00:27

in as America's 45th President.

1:00:271:00:29

but what a year it's been -

we'll be asking just how has the US

1:00:291:00:33

changed over his first year

in the White House.

1:00:331:00:36

And she lost three of her daughters

within seven years -

1:00:361:00:39

but Samantha Dorricott had to stay

strong for her grandchildren -

1:00:391:00:43

it's no surprise many

are hailing her "supergran".

1:00:431:00:47

She tells us how she keeps the

memories of her daughters alive.

1:00:471:00:52

Talking about them every day,

making sure these children

1:00:521:00:54

are happy, you know,

just stay strong.

1:00:541:01:02

Here's Annita in the BBC Newsroom

with a summary of today's news.

1:01:091:01:12

Scientists in the United States have

taken a step towards one

1:01:121:01:20

of the biggest goals in medicine -

a universal blood test for cancer.

1:01:221:01:25

The method - known

as "Cancer Seek" -

1:01:251:01:27

detects eight common forms

of the disease.

1:01:271:01:33

Overall the research found 70% of

cancers.

1:01:331:01:35

Researchers are cautiously

optmistic, saying more work

1:01:351:01:37

is needed to verify its accuracy.

1:01:371:01:38

UK experts said it was

"enormously exciting".

1:01:381:01:41

Living conditions at

Liverpool Prison are the worst that

1:01:411:01:43

inspectors have ever seen,

according to a new report.

1:01:431:01:51

They found filthy cells and inmates

living among infestations

1:02:151:02:17

of rats and cockroaches.

1:02:171:02:18

Her Majesty's Prison

and Probation Service says it's

1:02:181:02:20

already taken action by appointing

a new governor and that cleanliness

1:02:201:02:22

has also been improved.

1:02:221:02:23

A couple who are accused

of imprisoning, abusing

1:02:231:02:25

and torturing twelve

of their children at their home

1:02:251:02:28

in California have pleaded not

guilty during their first court

1:02:281:02:30

appearance.

1:02:301:02:31

David and Louise

Turpin were arrested

1:02:311:02:32

on Sunday after one

of their children escaped

1:02:321:02:34

through a window of their home.

1:02:341:02:36

Police found the children severely

malnourished with some in shackles.

1:02:361:02:38

Two fishermen are missing

after their boat capsized off

1:02:381:02:40

the coast of Western Scotland.

1:02:401:02:42

Lifeboats were launched

after receiving a distress signal

1:02:421:02:43

from Loch Fyne yesterday evening.

1:02:431:02:45

Another man who was rescued

is recovering in hospital.

1:02:451:02:47

Eight people, including two

firefighters, have been killed as

1:02:471:02:49

hurricane strength winds swept

across northern Europe.

1:02:491:02:53

Winds from storm Friederike Europe

reached up to 200 kilometres

1:02:531:02:55

per hour causing severe disruption

to travel

1:02:551:02:57

and plunging thousands

of homes into darkness.

1:02:571:03:01

Retail sales in the UK fell by more

than expected in December. Sales

1:03:011:03:06

volumes dropped 1.5% from November,

according to the Office for National

1:03:061:03:11

Statistics. It's the biggest month

on month fall since June of 2016

1:03:111:03:16

when the UK voted to leave the

European Union, as well as the

1:03:161:03:20

weakest December performance for

seven years.

1:03:201:03:23

The duration of adolescence

is increasing - and now lasts

1:03:231:03:25

from the age of 10 until 24,

according to scientists.

1:03:251:03:29

They say that young people

continuing their education

1:03:291:03:33

for longer, as well as delayed

marriage and parenthood, which has

1:03:331:03:36

pushed back popular perceptions

of when adulthood begins.

1:03:361:03:42

Writing in the Lancet Health

Journal, the researchers argue

1:03:421:03:44

a change in the definition

of adolescence is needed

1:03:441:03:46

to ensure laws and government

policy stay appropriate.

1:03:461:03:54

The inquest into the death

of The Cranberries singer,

1:03:571:04:01

Dolores O'Riordan has

opened and adjourned.

1:04:011:04:05

They are awaiting results of medical

tests.

1:04:051:04:09

Dolores O'Riordan was found dead

at the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane

1:04:091:04:12

on Monday morning.

1:04:121:04:13

Her death is not being

treated as suspicious.

1:04:131:04:16

That's a summary of the latest BBC

News - more at 10:30am.

1:04:161:04:19

Here's some sport now

with Olly Foster.

1:04:191:04:26

The British number two Kyle Edmund

is into the fourth round of the

1:04:261:04:30

Australian open after beating the

Georgian Nikoloz Basilashvili in

1:04:301:04:33

five sets. He won the first set, but

Edmund lost that next to a Mac, he

1:04:331:04:38

had to dig very deep to see out the

mat. It's the second five set match

1:04:381:04:44

of the tournament. It's only the

second time that Edmund has got this

1:04:441:04:48

fight in a grandson. He reached the

US open fourth round a couple of

1:04:481:04:53

years ago. Temperatures have hit 40

degrees for the second day running.

1:04:531:04:57

Lots of players have been

complaining and saying that play

1:04:571:04:59

should be stopped. Organisers

haven't done that but they say they

1:04:591:05:06

will review their heat policy at the

end of the tournament.

It's a tough

1:05:061:05:11

one. Its professional sport, it's

meant to hurt, it's not meant to be

1:05:111:05:15

easy. But I guess, yeah, if people

start to become ill then it might be

1:05:151:05:22

a concern but as far as I am aware,

everyone is just getting through.

1:05:221:05:26

Roger Federer has given his backing

to an increase in prize money at the

1:05:261:05:32

grand slams. Novak Djokovic, as

president of the players Council, a

1:05:321:05:37

few days ago called a meeting before

the tournament. He is unhappy that

1:05:371:05:42

the major tournaments pass on only

about 7% of their income to players.

1:05:421:05:49

We are not partners, we are just

players. So it's always hard to

1:05:491:05:52

rally. We had a good agreement, in

my opinion, that made the grand

1:05:521:05:58

slams happy, the players pretty

happy. It seems that has run its

1:05:581:06:03

course. The moment that happens,

there isn't the same increases any

1:06:031:06:09

more so players have to rally and

get back together again and put in

1:06:091:06:12

the effort. The tournaments know

that and will only react when we do

1:06:121:06:16

so. We are ready to do it and it

will be the same process over and

1:06:161:06:20

over against about England's

cricketers are chasing 271 in

1:06:201:06:24

Brisbane to take a 2-0 series lead

in the one-day series against

1:06:241:06:28

Australia. Australia made 270-9

after winning the toss. Aaron Finch

1:06:281:06:35

made a century, that's his second in

two matches.

But they could get a

1:06:351:06:40

partnership going. There were a

couple of wickets each for Adil

1:06:401:06:45

Rashid and Joe Root. Jason Roy made

a record 180 in the first 1-dayer,

1:06:451:06:50

but he was out just in the first

over of the England reply, caught

1:06:501:06:54

out by Aaron Finch off the bowling

of Mitchell Starc. Alex Hales and

1:06:541:06:58

Jonny Bairstow then try to outdo

each other, racing to 50 each. Joe

1:06:581:07:03

Root and Jos Buttler at the crease

at the moment, England 194-4 and on

1:07:031:07:08

course for victory. Ross Fisher is

now leading the

1:07:081:07:17

now leading the -- now the leading

Briton at the Abu Dhabi golf

1:07:171:07:23

championship. Tommy Fleetwood has

fallen off the pace. Fisher shot a

1:07:231:07:28

round of 67 for the second day in a

row to move to ten under. That's two

1:07:281:07:32

shots off the lead. Perfect distance

from the outset on the course. Ryder

1:07:321:07:38

Cup star Thomas Pieters took

advantage, hitting some sensational

1:07:381:07:41

shots in a round of 65 which put him

one clear at the top of

1:07:411:07:50

one clear at the top of the the

leaderboard. Fleetwood is five shots

1:07:501:07:52

off the pace.

1:07:521:07:54

Scientists have taken a step towards

one of the biggest goals in medicine

1:07:541:07:57

- a universal blood test for cancer.

1:07:571:07:59

Scientists at Johns Hopkins

University in the US have developed

1:07:591:08:02

a test that screens for common forms

of the disease.

1:08:021:08:04

It was tested on eight types

of cancer including ovarian,

1:08:041:08:06

pancreatic and lung.

1:08:061:08:07

The study was of 1,005 patients

who were known to have cancer.

1:08:071:08:10

The test correctly

diagnosed 7 in 10 cases.

1:08:101:08:12

So just how significant is this

and what hope does it offer?

1:08:121:08:15

Let's talk to Professor Sam Janes,

who leads on lung cancer at

1:08:151:08:18

University College London Hospital,

and Jane Murphy who is

1:08:181:08:20

a Clinical Nurse Specialist

at the charity Breast Cancer Care.

1:08:201:08:27

Thanks for coming in. How excited

should we be by this?

I think this

1:08:271:08:33

is a really exciting breakthrough.

If you imagine, the big problem with

1:08:331:08:38

cancer is that it can often grow

inside our bodies. And actually

1:08:381:08:43

spread around our bodies before we

even realise we have it. We have no

1:08:431:08:47

symptoms, and eventually something

feels wrong and we might go to the

1:08:471:08:51

GP or a hospital doctor and they

tell us we have cancer, but

1:08:511:08:55

unfortunately it has spread. We have

relatively limited treatments. It

1:08:551:09:01

might help us live longer and

improve our quality of life, but it

1:09:011:09:04

will not cure us. The big vision for

scientists now is that we diagnose

1:09:041:09:10

cancer early. So even when we are

without symptoms and don't know we

1:09:101:09:16

have it. This test is a significant

step in that direction.

What does

1:09:161:09:21

the tests do in simple terms?

The

test is very clever, it's almost

1:09:211:09:27

like a blood biopsy, a liquid

biopsy. You go and have a blood

1:09:271:09:32

test, and what the test is looking

for is signs of cancer somewhere in

1:09:321:09:36

the body. When a cancer grows, the

cells of the cancer also sometimes

1:09:361:09:43

break up a bit. What they do when

they break up is release little bits

1:09:431:09:47

of DNA or protein into the blood.

With the blood test, what we are

1:09:471:09:54

aiming to do is find that abnormal

protein, or abnormal DNA that has

1:09:541:09:59

come from cancer and is not our

normal DNA that floats around in our

1:09:591:10:02

blood all the time.

Bringing in

Jamie Murphy... --

1:10:021:10:14

Jamie Murphy... -- Jane Murphy. Are

you excited about this?

We are

1:10:141:10:18

always excited to hear of any test

or development that could lead to

1:10:181:10:22

the earlier detection and diagnosis

of breast cancer. It's something

1:10:221:10:27

that we will be interested to hear

more about. We know how early this

1:10:271:10:33

is, but it has a lot of potential

that we are interested to hear more

1:10:331:10:36

about.

The worry is always giving

false hope to people stop your.

1:10:361:10:48

There is still a long way to go.

This was done in people who already

1:10:481:10:57

had cancer, not healthy individuals.

We are a long way of knowing more

1:10:571:11:01

about this and before it will be

routinely applied to the population.

1:11:011:11:05

With breast cancer we have the

screening programme already in

1:11:051:11:09

place. That's one way of detecting

and picking up cancers early. We

1:11:091:11:15

speak to lots of women on the

helpline who are worried about how

1:11:151:11:18

to check themselves and the breast

aware. It's something that can aid

1:11:181:11:26

in early diagnosis and detection,

and that's interesting. But it is

1:11:261:11:29

very early days.

In terms of

studies, a thousand people, all of

1:11:291:11:35

them had cancer, and it detected

seven in ten cases. Is that

1:11:351:11:40

particularly good? Compare to other

studies, is that impressive?

The

1:11:401:11:46

study itself it's very impressive.

This blood biopsy has worked better

1:11:461:11:53

than previous studies that have been

done. I think, as has been raised,

1:11:531:11:59

the real challenge now, those

thousand people were already

1:11:591:12:03

patients that we knew had cancer

because they had symptoms or because

1:12:031:12:08

they were detected some other way.

The real challenge now is whether we

1:12:081:12:13

can screen people in the community,

use it as the new screening test of

1:12:131:12:18

the future. That's going to be a

real challenge and that is some way

1:12:181:12:22

away. We need large studies to show

that's worthwhile.

When we save some

1:12:221:12:27

way away, are we talking many years?

I think the investigators of the

1:12:271:12:32

study that has been published have

already got a study like that

1:12:321:12:37

planned. There are other major

studies planned that will look at

1:12:371:12:42

screening populations to see if

these blood tests work.

Jane, would

1:12:421:12:46

you like to see this almost become

like a mammogram or something like

1:12:461:12:51

that, it becomes a stable part of

health protection in the future?

I

1:12:511:12:59

think it has that potential. But I

think it's still a bit too early to

1:12:591:13:03

see exactly how it will work with

the current screening programme and

1:13:031:13:06

how it will complement that. There

will be different approaches, the

1:13:061:13:12

mammogram, ultrasound and blood

test. The more information we can

1:13:121:13:17

get earlier on, it leads to better

and more effective treatments. Often

1:13:171:13:21

less treatment is needed for breast

cancer in the earlier stages. So

1:13:211:13:26

yes, it could potentially be part of

a screening programme but quite how

1:13:261:13:30

it would look in the future, I think

it's a bit too early to say at the

1:13:301:13:35

moment.

Presumably this is a

relatively quick thing?

Yes, it's a

1:13:351:13:44

blood test, it has to get sent off

to a laboratory somewhere. That

1:13:441:13:49

laboratory presumably takes a couple

of weeks or so to run the test.

1:13:491:13:52

Actually there is quite a lot of

biological information that needs to

1:13:521:13:57

be extracted from the results before

you get those results. I would

1:13:571:14:02

stress at this point that it's not

commercially available. It's

1:14:021:14:06

something the US team hope to

commercialise but we will have to

1:14:061:14:10

wait and see exactly what it looks

like and exactly in what way they

1:14:101:14:14

believe it should be used.

Thank you

for coming on to explain to us.

1:14:141:14:21

This weekend will mark a year

since Donald Trump was sworn

1:14:231:14:26

in as America's 45th President.

1:14:261:14:30

He has made his mark in what has

been an incredibly eventful year. He

1:14:301:14:35

has been accused of being

incompetent and racist.

1:14:351:14:43

Yet unemployment in the States

is at a 17 year low.

1:14:481:14:50

So how has America changed

in the last 12 months -

1:14:501:14:53

with Donald Trump as its leader?

1:14:531:14:56

I, Donald John Trump,

do solemnly swear that

1:14:561:14:58

I will faithfully execute the office

of President of the United States.

1:14:581:15:01

Congratulations, Mr President.

1:15:011:15:03

No politician in history has been

treated worse or more unfairly.

1:15:031:15:08

We need strong programmes.

1:15:081:15:12

So that people that love us

and want to love our country

1:15:121:15:17

and will end up loving our country

are allowed in.

1:15:171:15:20

Not people that want to destroy us

and destroy our country.

1:15:201:15:28

I can often tell how I get along

with somebody very early,

1:15:301:15:34

and I believe we're going

to have a fantastic relationship.

1:15:341:15:37

We'll just let Obamacare fail.

1:15:371:15:39

We're not going to own it.

1:15:391:15:41

I'm not going to own it.

1:15:411:15:43

I can tell you the Republicans

are not going to own it.

1:15:431:15:46

We'll let Obamacare fail, and then

Democrats are going to come to us,

1:15:461:15:51

and they are going to say,

how do we fix it, how do we fix it?

1:15:511:15:55

I am not going to

give you a question.

1:15:551:15:58

Can you state categorically...

1:15:581:15:58

You are fake news.

1:15:581:16:00

More than anything, I just think

it was in the best interest

1:16:001:16:03

of our communications department,

of our press organisation,

1:16:031:16:06

to not have too many

cooks in the kitchen.

1:16:061:16:10

It's heartbreaking.

1:16:101:16:18

That they won't let me be an

officer.

1:16:181:16:23

The United States stands prepared

to defend itself and its allies

1:16:231:16:27

using the full range

of our unmatched military

1:16:271:16:30

capabilities if need be.

1:16:301:16:37

There are a lot of issues that

need to be talked about,

1:16:371:16:40

need to be brought to life.

1:16:401:16:44

Wouldn't you love to see one

of these NFL owners when somebody

1:16:441:16:48

disrespects our flag to say get that

son of a (BLEEP) off

1:16:481:16:51

the field right now?

1:16:511:16:52

Out!

He's fired!

1:16:521:16:57

It's the largest, I always

say the most massive,

1:16:571:17:01

but it's the largest tax cut

in the history of our country.

1:17:011:17:04

I consider it a work of fiction,

but just so you know,

1:17:041:17:08

I never interviewed with him

in the White House at all.

1:17:081:17:10

He was never in the Oval Office.

1:17:101:17:13

We didn't have an interview.

1:17:131:17:13

I never questioned

his mental fitness.

1:17:131:17:15

I have no reason to question

his mental fitness.

1:17:151:17:20

The first goal is, we want

Trump to apologise.

1:17:201:17:24

We deserve an apology

for his comment.

1:17:241:17:28

I am the least racist person

you have ever interviewed.

1:17:281:17:31

The Russia story is

a total fabrication.

1:17:311:17:36

It's just an excuse for the greatest

loss in the history of American

1:17:361:17:39

politics, that's all it is.

1:17:391:17:42

Let's speak now to Alana Horowitz,

1:17:511:17:58

who is Senior Editor

of Breaking News, HuffPost and to

1:17:581:18:02

Professor Inderjeet Parmar,

Professor in International

1:18:021:18:04

Politics School of Arts

and Social Sciences City,

1:18:041:18:06

University of London.

1:18:061:18:11

Thank you both for joining us.

Alana, from a journalistic point of

1:18:111:18:16

view,

how do you view Donald Trump's

first year in office?

It has been a

1:18:161:18:23

year of unprecedented actions on his

part. There are so many things, we

1:18:231:18:27

knew going into this that this would

not be like covering Bush, Clinton,

1:18:271:18:33

Balmer, any other president because

he shatters every norm. But we did

1:18:331:18:37

not realise how much, how many norms

he would shudder. He's gone above

1:18:371:18:43

and beyond in attacking the press,

levels resembling those of Nixon,

1:18:431:18:49

from my perspective that has been a

major issue. It has also been

1:18:491:18:52

interesting to watch his presidency

in line with Russia and Korea,

1:18:521:19:03

decisions he has made has that

inquiry has progressed.

Professor

1:19:031:19:08

Palmer, how would you break down his

first year, primarily successful or

1:19:081:19:12

unsuccessful?

I think success and

failure are to be seen depending on

1:19:121:19:19

which constituencies someone belongs

to. You could say either that it's

1:19:191:19:24

been a success if you happen to

belong to the corporate community

1:19:241:19:28

and your own large numbers of stocks

and shares, so the Dow Jones index

1:19:281:19:33

has broken records, so the airspace

and military have broken all records

1:19:331:19:39

as well and if you are in a big

corporation and you earn a large

1:19:391:19:42

amount of money and you have wealth,

then the tax reforms will count for

1:19:421:19:48

a great deal, and you will be free

of regulation. And you can drill and

1:19:481:19:55

dump as much pollution in rivers.

And if you happen to belong to

1:19:551:19:59

people in the middle class of the

working class, to whom the president

1:19:591:20:05

promised that he would kind of

restore their position and their

1:20:051:20:09

prospects, I think the position is

much bleaker. And that is shown in

1:20:091:20:14

the low levels of approval and the

very high levels of disapproval of

1:20:141:20:18

his administration among ordinary

voters. Although he is pretty

1:20:181:20:25

popular with Republican voters.

Alana he is popular with his base

1:20:251:20:31

but as the professor says, really

low approval ratings for president.

1:20:311:20:35

Yet the best economy in 17 years,

lowest unemployment?

That's another

1:20:351:20:41

way in which his presidency is

unprecedented. People take economic

1:20:411:20:46

wins, the high stock market, low

unemployment and they see that as a

1:20:461:20:51

sign of a successful presidency.

Whether it is deserved is up for

1:20:511:20:55

debate. That tends to be linked. The

fact that he has such a great

1:20:551:20:59

economy and low approval rate and

his approval ratings are so low it

1:20:591:21:05

proves how devious if he is. It is a

sign of that. This is really peaked

1:21:051:21:11

with the number of people divided,

and among the people who don't

1:21:111:21:17

support him he is very unpopular.

Any evidence, Professor Palmer,

1:21:171:21:22

about the divided state? We hear

this a lot, that the United States

1:21:221:21:28

is more divided than ever.

That's

right, there's a great deal of

1:21:281:21:32

polarisation around the presidency

and he's been organising it. He

1:21:321:21:36

basically decided during the

campaign and thereafter to buck the

1:21:361:21:40

trend that the Republicans had

thought was going to govern the

1:21:401:21:43

electoral strategies. They thought

they would have to court minority

1:21:431:21:47

voters. He decided he didn't want to

do that. He is remaking American

1:21:471:21:52

identity. When he talks about

Muslims or refugees of foreigners or

1:21:521:21:57

immigrants, and Mexicans and last

week Africans, and say he prefers

1:21:571:22:02

Norwegians, when you hear him

talking about anti-fascists in

1:22:021:22:08

Charlottesville, saying that the

white supremacists are the

1:22:081:22:13

equivalent thereof, I think we can

see that this president is a white

1:22:131:22:17

supremacist. He claims to be the

leader of the world. That is what is

1:22:171:22:21

polarising opinion at home and also

internationally, the Gallup poll

1:22:211:22:26

released shows that the approval of

America around the world has

1:22:261:22:32

collapsed from around 48% to around

30%, and now Germany is now the most

1:22:321:22:37

approved of country in the world. So

today there's polarisation, at home

1:22:371:22:42

and abroad, around this president.

Alana let's pick up on the standing

1:22:421:22:49

of the US in the world and how

that's changed. If we look at the

1:22:491:22:53

Twitter spats with North Korea,

disparaging terms used about certain

1:22:531:22:58

countries, recognising Jerusalem as

the capital of Israel, yet there are

1:22:581:23:01

parts of the world that support him

early on. Earlier we heard from one

1:23:011:23:07

Republican who said South Korea was

very pleased with his intervention.

1:23:071:23:11

One of the few parts of the world

where the leaders are much closer

1:23:111:23:16

with Trump because of his strong

stance on North Korea. But I think

1:23:161:23:22

overall, globally, both in terms of

the officials and in terms of

1:23:221:23:25

regular ordinary citizens, he's

obviously very unpopular. A Gallup

1:23:251:23:30

poll you have just mentioned, the

role of US leadership has collapsed

1:23:301:23:37

and it's not just his Twitter spats,

its decision to pull out of the

1:23:371:23:42

Paris club at agreement, Syria is

part of that, although the US isn't

1:23:421:23:45

going to be part of that, his

decision to withdraw from the TPB,

1:23:451:23:50

his attacks on laughter. He is

really pursuing an America First

1:23:501:23:55

agenda. And if you are not part of

America that is an insult, in a way.

1:23:551:24:01

Professor, before we let you go, the

impact of the Russia inquiry on the

1:24:011:24:06

first year of president Trump, how

damaging has that been, not to his

1:24:061:24:12

core vote but to

1:24:121:24:18

core vote but to wider public across

America.

Two things. Those who

1:24:181:24:22

oppose him say he has colluded and

so forth. You would expect them to

1:24:221:24:26

say that, and his supporters say

they don't believe it. They even say

1:24:261:24:30

that if there is evidence coming

forward with major collision in the

1:24:301:24:33

election they will not believe it.

The other thing is that the whole

1:24:331:24:38

saga of the Russia probes and all

the various investigations, in

1:24:381:24:41

effect is a Washington drama. For

most ordinary American people who

1:24:411:24:46

voted either for Bernie Sanders all

for the so-called more progressive

1:24:461:24:51

Hillary Clinton and also for Donald

Trump they expect the next president

1:24:511:24:55

to deliver the White House to the

people. They wanted their problems

1:24:551:24:58

to be number one on the agenda of

American politics and government.

1:24:581:25:02

They haven't seen that. So the

alienation which got Trump into the

1:25:021:25:07

White House in the first place,

which got 13 million votes for

1:25:071:25:11

socialist candidate in the body of

Bernie Sanders, all those problems

1:25:111:25:16

remain. The Democratic party deeply

unpopular. Republican leadership,

1:25:161:25:23

generally speaking, deeply

unpopular, even less popular than

1:25:231:25:26

Trump. They see it as as usual. He's

carried on the government of a

1:25:261:25:34

hard-core conservative Republican

character at home, and most ordinary

1:25:341:25:37

people don't see any real benefits

of anything other than bleakness for

1:25:371:25:41

the future in the next figures.

Professor Palmer, thank you, thank

1:25:411:25:47

you also Alana.

1:25:471:25:50

The inquest into the death

of The Cranberries singer,

1:25:501:25:58

David Sillitoe is that the coroner

's Court. What have you heard.

1:26:021:26:08

It was revealed that she had been

found unresponsive in her hotel room

1:26:081:26:12

on Monday, the Ambulance Service was

called and she was declared dead at

1:26:121:26:18

the scene, the police were called

and said the death was treated as

1:26:181:26:22

not suspicious. And above tests have

been carried out but the results of

1:26:221:26:26

those will not be known for several

weeks to come. The inquest was

1:26:261:26:32

opened and will be adjourned again

until another hearing on April

1:26:321:26:35

three. David, thank you.

1:26:351:26:41

An appeal has been made

for construction companies to offer

1:26:411:26:43

training to hundreds of apprentices

affected by the collapse

1:26:431:26:45

of Carillion.

1:26:451:26:47

The firm went into liquidation

earlier this week, threatening

1:26:471:26:51

the future of 1,400 apprentices,

including trainee bricklayers,

1:26:511:26:53

carpenters and joiners.

1:26:531:26:55

With me in the studio

is Sarah Beale, chief executive

1:26:551:26:59

at the Construction Industry

Training Board, and Charlie

1:26:591:27:01

Williams, a Carillion apprentice,

who joins us from Maidstone.

1:27:011:27:09

Thank you both for coming in. Sarah,

first explain what you hope to do.

1:27:101:27:16

As the industry training board for

construction we run one of the

1:27:161:27:21

largest providers of apprenticeships

for construction. From Monday

1:27:211:27:24

morning when we heard about

Carillion's position we put together

1:27:241:27:29

a project teams that we could

contact every single one of those

1:27:291:27:36

young people impacted, which we have

been able to do. We want to meet

1:27:361:27:40

every them of face-to-face. By the

close of play we will have met 900

1:27:401:27:44

of those individuals face by face

and really understood that

1:27:441:27:49

individual circumstances. From then

on we can place them with a training

1:27:491:27:52

provider so they can complete their

apprenticeship and their full

1:27:521:27:56

training and we're looking for

employers to come forward so they

1:27:561:27:59

have employment and throughout that

apprenticeship and thereafter so

1:27:591:28:02

that they can join the construction

industry.

Charlie, you were on a

1:28:021:28:08

Carillion apprenticeship.

That's

right.

What were you doing, how did

1:28:081:28:12

you find out what was going on.

I

was doing a Coventry apprenticeship.

1:28:121:28:19

My on site assessor called, and all

he said was that the end was nigh.

1:28:191:28:26

Carillion trading had ceased. And

that we would have to pack up within

1:28:261:28:32

two weeks.

You must have been

gutted.

Not really. I was in a state

1:28:321:28:38

of shock, not severe shock but it

did call into question whether the

1:28:381:28:44

last year and a half, two years of

my life had been for nothing. And I

1:28:441:28:49

would not have gained the

qualification I had been working

1:28:491:28:51

for.

So you have been doing this for

two years.

One and a half to two

1:28:511:28:57

years.

Do you know what is going to

happen now, have you been contacted

1:28:571:29:03

by Sarah 's team.

Yes, we had a

meeting at the local holiday in

1:29:031:29:08

yesterday, we went to various

things, they have employers who are

1:29:081:29:18

willing to take on apprentices and

extra incentives are provided as

1:29:181:29:25

they take on apprentices who have

been laid off.

Is jolly's case is

1:29:251:29:33

typical, Sarah?

Yes, it has been a

worrying time for individuals who

1:29:331:29:36

thought they had a career just round

the corner. We hope to be able to

1:29:361:29:39

minimise that worry and now these

skills that Charlie has and many of

1:29:391:29:45

these apprentices, in bricklaying,

carpentry and joinery, are massively

1:29:451:29:49

in need in the construction

industry. We all know we have

1:29:491:29:53

hundreds of thousands of homes to

build and lots of infrastructure

1:29:531:29:56

projects. I'm very hopeful that many

of these apprentices, if not all of

1:29:561:30:02

them, will find proper employment

with a good employer and complete

1:30:021:30:05

their apprenticeship.

What about

Charlie wondering if the last year

1:30:051:30:09

and a half of his life has been

worth it, will he be able to

1:30:091:30:13

transfer that year and a half to a

new employer and get qualified?

1:30:131:30:18

Absolutely, it's not a waste at all.

Everything they have done has been

1:30:181:30:22

banked and we'll make sure they can

continue with the apprenticeship. It

1:30:221:30:25

is not about starting from scratch.

Charlie and people in these

1:30:251:30:29

occupations are much needed, so we

need to help them as much as we can.

1:30:291:30:33

We've already had lots of employers

of all sizes coming forward to offer

1:30:331:30:39

employment to these people.

Sarah,

thank you for coming in. Charlie,

1:30:391:30:43

best of luck.

1:30:431:30:44

Thank you for speaking to us. Still

to come, the inspirational story of

1:30:441:30:52

a woman bringing up three

grandchildren after losing her three

1:30:521:30:56

daughters. And hair to the throne,

Prince William's new cut has made

1:30:561:31:04

headlines, we ask how one goes about

getting the perfect number one all

1:31:041:31:07

over?

1:31:071:31:10

Time for the latest

news - here's Annita.

1:31:101:31:18

Scientists in the United States have

taken a step towards one

1:31:181:31:21

of the biggest goals in medicine -

a universal blood test for cancer.

1:31:211:31:24

The method - known

as "Cancer Seek" -

1:31:241:31:26

detects eight common forms

of the disease.

1:31:261:31:28

Researchers are cautiously

optmistic, saying more work

1:31:281:31:30

is needed to verify its accuracy.

1:31:301:31:32

UK experts said it was

"enormously exciting".

1:31:321:31:39

The inquest into the death

of The Cranberries singer,

1:31:391:31:41

Dolores O'Riordan has

opened and adjourned.

1:31:411:31:43

They are awaiting results

of medical tests.

1:31:431:31:44

Dolores O'Riordan was found dead

at the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane

1:31:441:31:47

on Monday morning.

1:31:471:31:48

Her death is not being

treated as suspicious.

1:31:481:31:54

Retail sales in the UK fell by more

than expected in December.

1:31:541:31:56

Sales volumes dropped 1.5%

from November, according

1:31:561:31:58

to the Office for National

Statistics.

1:31:581:32:03

It's the biggest month-on-month fall

since June of 2016 when the UK voted

1:32:031:32:06

to leave the European Union,

as well as the weakest December

1:32:061:32:09

performance for seven years.

1:32:091:32:13

Living conditions at

Liverpool Prison are the worst that

1:32:131:32:15

inspectors have ever seen,

according to a new report.

1:32:151:32:21

They found filthy cells and

prisoners living in infestations of

1:32:211:32:25

rats and cockroaches.

1:32:251:32:27

However, Her Majesty's Prison

and Probation Service said it's

1:32:271:32:30

already taken immediate action

by appointing a new governor and

1:32:301:32:32

that cleanliness has also improved.

1:32:321:32:33

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda

Ardern has announced

1:32:331:32:35

that she is pregnant.

1:32:351:32:36

Ms Ardern said she and her

partner, Clarke Gayford,

1:32:361:32:38

were expecting their child in June,

after which she planned

1:32:381:32:41

to take a six-week break.

1:32:411:32:43

That's a summary of

the latest BBC News.

1:32:431:32:45

Here's some sport now

with Olly Foster.

1:32:451:32:50

Kyle Edmund is through to the fourth

round at the Australian open. He had

1:32:501:32:55

a five set victory over Georgia's

Nikoloz Basilashvili. Lasted more

1:32:551:33:01

than three and a half hours in

sweltering temperatures of more than

1:33:011:33:04

40 degrees in Melbourne. Edmund

po-faced Andreas Seppi next. Roger

1:33:041:33:09

Federer has given his backing to

increased prize money at the four

1:33:091:33:13

grand slams. Novak Djokovic, who

heads up the player's Council, has

1:33:131:33:18

called for a greater percentage of

tournament profits to be passed on

1:33:181:33:21

to the players. England's cricketers

are chasing 271 in Brisbane to take

1:33:211:33:27

a 2-0 series lead in the one-day

series against Australia. Despite

1:33:271:33:32

losing Jos Buttler and Moeen Ali in

quick succession, currently 232-6

1:33:321:33:36

and on course for victory. Ross

Fisher is the leading Briton at the

1:33:361:33:42

Abu Dhabi golf championship, two

behind Belgian Thomas Pieters after

1:33:421:33:48

two rounds. I will be back after 11

on BBC News.

1:33:481:33:54

It's every parent's worst nightmare

to lose a child, but my next

1:33:541:33:57

guest, Samantha Dorricott,

1:33:571:33:58

lost three daughters

within seven years.

1:33:581:34:02

Devastated by the individual

tragedies, she is now bringing

1:34:021:34:06

up her two young grandchildren

with her remaining son,

1:34:061:34:09

Nathan, and best

friend Bev Williams.

1:34:091:34:11

Whilst trying to deal

with her own personal grief,

1:34:111:34:13

Sam has become a bit of a supergran

and is determined to give her

1:34:131:34:17

grandkids a positive

and joy-filled life,

1:34:171:34:18

just as their mums

would have wanted.

1:34:181:34:23

I spoke to her earlier and she told

me about the impact of losing her

1:34:231:34:26

daughters.

1:34:261:34:30

Shock, devastation.

1:34:301:34:31

Absolutely.

1:34:311:34:32

Nightmare, you know,

just terrible like, you know.

1:34:321:34:40

I know you don't want to go

into lots of detail in front

1:34:411:34:44

of the children about what happened.

1:34:441:34:45

Just explain to us, if you would,

you lost your first

1:34:451:34:48

daughter when she was 15.

1:34:481:34:51

Just turned 15, Emilie did, yes,

that was eight years ago.

1:34:511:34:59

And it was just heartbreaking

as well, shocking.

1:35:011:35:03

We were all shocked.

1:35:031:35:04

Just terrible, it was.

1:35:041:35:06

And for you Nathan, as a brother,

that's really tough.

1:35:061:35:08

Yes, because he was only

young as well, see.

1:35:081:35:11

Do you remember it?

1:35:111:35:16

Yeah, I do but obviously I didn't

know what was going on.

1:35:161:35:19

Then obviously I realised.

1:35:191:35:23

As I got older.

1:35:231:35:24

It was hard.

1:35:241:35:29

So you tried to pick yourselves up

as a family as best you can,

1:35:291:35:31

clearly there is a huge hole there,

you do your best.

1:35:311:35:38

And then moving forward

a few years, Amy, your

1:35:381:35:40

And then moving forward a few years,

Amy, your daughter,

1:35:401:35:43

had health issues.

1:35:431:35:44

From the age of 18 months

she was in hospital,

1:35:441:35:49

all her life until she

was 21 in hospital.

1:35:491:35:51

She had over a thousand

operations as well.

1:35:511:35:58

And Amy passed away at 21, she was

21, and that was heartbreaking.

1:35:581:36:02

All over again, like.

1:36:021:36:04

Of course all over

again, second daughter.

1:36:041:36:07

Grieving again, you know.

1:36:071:36:12

Absolutely, but this time leaving...

1:36:121:36:16

Jenson, he was 11

months old at the time.

1:36:161:36:22

A little baby.

1:36:221:36:26

It was really hard,

grieving at the same time.

1:36:261:36:28

That's what I wanted to ask you.

1:36:281:36:30

And bringing the baby up.

1:36:301:36:32

You have an 11-month-old baby,

clearly very demanding.

1:36:321:36:34

Very!

1:36:341:36:39

You have Nathan and

your other daughter.

1:36:391:36:40

You are trying to be a mum.

1:36:401:36:48

Was it an instant decision to say

I'll will look after Jenson?

1:36:491:36:52

Yes, straightaway.

1:36:521:36:54

My other daughter was six months

pregnant at the time.

1:36:541:36:56

She was 15 as well.

1:36:561:36:57

Just had to be strong,

really, you know.

1:36:571:37:01

And we did.

1:37:011:37:09

Does Jenson...

1:37:101:37:14

He doesn't remember his mum...

1:37:141:37:17

Ge doesn't.

1:37:171:37:19

He looks at photographs

and says, this is my mummy.

1:37:191:37:22

He doesn't really talk much, you

know.

1:37:221:37:27

As if that wasn't enough

that you endured.

1:37:271:37:29

You lost your third.

1:37:291:37:32

My third daughter.

1:37:321:37:34

She was 19.

1:37:341:37:39

Chantelle was three.

1:37:391:37:46

That was absolutely awful,

shocking, a nightmare.

1:37:461:37:48

Upset and grieving

again all over again.

1:37:481:37:51

The third time.

1:37:511:37:54

I had Chantelle then

straightaway as well.

1:37:541:37:58

I just got on with it.

1:37:581:38:04

Chantelle, can you see

the pictures, who is

1:38:041:38:06

that a picture of?

1:38:061:38:13

Abbie.

1:38:131:38:18

Mummy, look.

1:38:181:38:19

Can you see the pictures

behind of all of

1:38:191:38:21

your family as well.

1:38:211:38:25

Chantelle, do you talk

a lot about mummy?

1:38:251:38:27

She talks about her everyday.

1:38:271:38:30

You can always rely on children

to say the right thing.

1:38:301:38:38

I guess that's a really important

thing for you, to keep that alive.

1:38:401:38:44

We talk about her everyday.

1:38:441:38:45

It just keeps us going.

1:38:451:38:47

Stay strong and be strong.

1:38:471:38:48

Do you have pictures

around the home?

1:38:481:38:50

Give us a sense.

1:38:501:38:51

I have, what do you

call it, a shrine.

1:38:511:38:57

It has four doors and

lights all around it.

1:38:571:39:02

Angels and candles.

1:39:021:39:06

And Bev is sitting at the end.

1:39:061:39:09

She is like my sister.

1:39:091:39:11

How much of a network do

you have supporting you?

1:39:111:39:18

Bev is absolutely amazing, she is.

She would babysit as well.

Sam used

1:39:181:39:28

to babysit for my oldest two

children. Chantelle, Amy and Abbie

1:39:281:39:36

used to come to the youth club as

well. Emilie was my daughter's

1:39:361:39:41

friend. She spent a lot of time at

the house as well. Abbie and Sam had

1:39:411:39:47

built up a bond because she had lost

her two girls, there were two left.

1:39:471:39:52

When she went, it was just

horrendous. You can't even say the

1:39:521:39:56

straw that broke the camel's back

because that had already gone. It

1:39:561:40:01

was unthinkable. Every day she gets

out of bed, gets up and get these

1:40:011:40:05

two to school.

Does that help you?

You have Nathan and clearly you

1:40:051:40:11

still have to be a mother to Nathan.

He's a big lad.

He's still my baby!

1:40:111:40:19

Chantelle and Jenson need you, don't

they?

Debut. And I love them so

1:40:191:40:25

much. -- they do. They are really

hard work, but, yeah. It's very

1:40:251:40:32

rewarding.

Nathan, what has it been

like for you in the last few years?

1:40:321:40:40

Unbelievable. My niece and nephew...

He does a lot of things as well.

1:40:401:40:47

He's a strong boy.

My niece and

nephew...

In some ways you almost

1:40:471:40:58

like a dad them, weirdly?

Yeah.

You

are there as the big uncle.

And his

1:40:581:41:06

father as well, he's really good

with them.

One of the things you

1:41:061:41:11

really focus on is positivity. You

are smiling and happy here now and

1:41:111:41:16

that's really important for you to

bring into Chantelle and Jenson's

1:41:161:41:21

life. Tell us about holidays and

memories, things you want to create.

1:41:211:41:26

We have loads of memories,

Disneyland, we have been to Spain

1:41:261:41:30

last year as well. There is a photo

there... We have caravan holidays as

1:41:301:41:43

well.

We go out and about.

We go out

for meals and everything.

They are

1:41:431:41:53

the happiest little kids you will

ever meet. So loving as well,

1:41:531:41:56

marvellous.

All the teachers like to

say that they are really happy

1:41:561:42:02

children.

Chantelle, do you know

where that is? Is that in Spain? And

1:42:021:42:08

you've been to Disneyland?

It was

absolutely freezing.

What was the

1:42:081:42:16

most fun in Disneyland?

The

1:42:161:42:25

most fun in Disneyland?

The Castle.

The big Princess castle. Who did you

1:42:251:42:30

meet there, Mickey Mouse?

The

Princess.

Which one?

Else.

Did you

1:42:301:42:40

love Frozen?

Yeah.

And did Jenson

and Disneyland. He's shy, that's OK.

1:42:401:42:49

He's just playing with his

microphone, having fun. Probably

1:42:491:42:53

helping the sound department. Did

you like Disneyland, Jenson?

1:42:531:43:02

you like Disneyland, Jenson?

Yeah,

you liked the rides, didn't you, the

1:43:021:43:05

Dumbo ride. And the Lego, he's got a

lot of money's worth of Lego!

They

1:43:051:43:16

are so happy, and clearly these two

are very special children and they

1:43:161:43:19

bring you a lot of joy.

Yes, yeah,

because they are my girl's.

Do you

1:43:191:43:28

see facial expressions?

Definitely.

100%, the three of them.

Amy and

1:43:281:43:37

Abbie...

Definitely in this one

because Amy was the wicked one. And

1:43:371:43:43

Chantelle is like her mummy.

For

you, for the future, what are your

1:43:431:43:53

priorities? Clearly keeping your

girls memories alive.

Talking about

1:43:531:43:59

them every day, making sure the

children are happy. Just stay

1:43:591:44:06

strong.

Nathan, how is your

relationship changing with your mum?

1:44:061:44:14

Is there a lot more attention paid

to you and does she worry about him

1:44:141:44:18

or?

Yeah, she phones me every time

I'm out, when I'm walking home,

1:44:181:44:23

where are you?

If he's out with the

boys.

I don't drink or smoke.

He's a

1:44:231:44:30

good boy.

1:44:301:44:40

He has trouble seeing in both eyes

as well.

He's going for a cornea

1:44:411:44:45

transplant.

You have enough

challenges, haven't you? It has been

1:44:451:44:52

lovely to meet you as you are so

happy. Clearly Chantelle and Jenson,

1:44:521:44:58

you are very lucky little people.

1:44:581:45:07

And Oxford University student who

spent two and a half years under

1:45:071:45:11

investigation for rape had his case

dropped just two and a half days

1:45:111:45:15

before going to court. Danny Gilford

is at Crown Court.

1:45:151:45:18

This student was 19 and at Oxford

University when he was arrested on

1:45:251:45:30

suspicion of rape and indecent

assault, that was in 2015, two and a

1:45:301:45:34

half years ago. He was actually

charged with the offences in June

1:45:341:45:38

last year so it has taken some time

to get to this point. A trial was

1:45:381:45:44

due to take place on Monday. The

judge today has recorded formerly a

1:45:441:45:49

verdict of not guilty against Oliver

Mears because the prosecution has

1:45:491:45:55

offered no evidence against him. The

judge, Jonathan Black, ask the

1:45:551:46:01

prosecution to explain why they had

taken a decision, given the length

1:46:011:46:05

of time in this case. The

explanation was given by Sarah Ludoc

1:46:051:46:12

by the prosecution, she said further

material had been obtained in

1:46:121:46:15

watches and was a finely balanced

case. Additional material had tipped

1:46:151:46:20

the balance. She was asked by the

judge to explain what that material

1:46:201:46:24

was. She talked about a diary

containing sensitive material

1:46:241:46:28

relating to the complainant. She

talked about digital evidence as

1:46:281:46:32

well. It appears, although she did

not say this, that there was

1:46:321:46:37

certainly some, possibly in

criticism of the police for the

1:46:371:46:41

length of time and had taken for

this material to emerge -- some

1:46:411:46:47

implicit criticism. At the end of

the proceedings the judge said there

1:46:471:46:51

were unnecessary delays in this

case. He said Oliver Mears and the

1:46:511:46:56

complainant had these matters

hanging over their heads were two

1:46:561:46:59

years and demanded a full

explanation from the head of the

1:46:591:47:03

rape and sexual assault unit of the

Crown Prosecution Service within 28

1:47:031:47:07

days. Thank you, Danny.

1:47:071:47:11

Next this morning -

the Duke of Cambridge sported

1:47:111:47:13

a newly trimmed hairstyle

when he visited a children's

1:47:131:47:15

hospital yesterday.

1:47:151:47:16

The 35-year-old heir to the throne

revealed the close-shaven style

1:47:161:47:19

at the launch of an event

where he met military veterans.

1:47:191:47:23

Does he look better?

1:47:231:47:29

With me is Errol Douglas -

he's an award-winning celebrity hair

1:47:291:47:31

stylist with clients including

Lewis Hamilton and Brad Pitt.

1:47:311:47:33

And in Nottingham,

Spencer Stevenson.

1:47:331:47:36

he's a leading hair loss mentor

who has spent more than £40,000

1:47:361:47:39

on his hair since he noticed it

thinning in his 20s.

1:47:391:47:44

Thank you both for joining us.

Errol, first of all, does Prince

1:47:441:47:49

William look better with shorter

hair.

He looks amazing. What I like

1:47:491:47:53

about his hair is the confidence.

Before, he looked as if he was kind

1:47:531:47:58

of cheating on his hair and now he

looks really confident and I think

1:47:581:48:03

he looks more handsome.

From his

body language he looks more

1:48:031:48:06

confident?

He's holding himself, he

looks more upright. When you have a

1:48:061:48:13

hairstyle like that you will ask

your spouse so I am sure he must

1:48:131:48:17

have asked if it was looking good.

He does look good. He almost looks

1:48:171:48:22

taller as well.

Let me bring your

in, Spencer. £40,000 is a huge

1:48:221:48:28

amount of money to spend on your

hair. Clearly boarding for men is

1:48:281:48:33

quite an emotional issue.

It is a

massive emotional issue. It dents

1:48:331:48:40

your self-esteem and confidence.

You're framing of your face, your

1:48:401:48:47

identity, your hair is part of that

so if it is taken from you it can

1:48:471:48:51

have emotional repercussions which

can affect guys, old guys, younger

1:48:511:48:56

guys, nobody wants to lose their

hair at the end of the day.

You

1:48:561:48:59

began losing your hair in your early

20s.

Yes, at the age of 21. I'm 42

1:48:591:49:08

now and tried various different

treatments to start with, sadly the

1:49:081:49:11

hair loss injury is a plethora of

bogus treatments, likely in this day

1:49:111:49:18

and age there are proven treatments

that actually work. I've had a

1:49:181:49:25

combination of proven treatments and

hair transplants, surgery is a last

1:49:251:49:32

resort. If you want to take action

against your hair loss, not everyone

1:49:321:49:37

does, all power to Prince William,

he does look a great deal better.

1:49:371:49:42

But it's certainly advisable to try

that, if your hair is thinning, try

1:49:421:49:47

to shape it and see what to look

like. He is carrying it off. It'll

1:49:471:49:51

be interesting to see if he

continues to sport but hairstyle. He

1:49:511:49:55

might grow a bit further. He

certainly looks better and he looks

1:49:551:50:00

younger in my opinion.

Errol, are

there certain hairstyles that are an

1:50:001:50:05

absolute no-no if you are boarding

and others that you should embrace?

1:50:051:50:09

Absolutely. It depends how much are

you got at the sides. Certain men

1:50:091:50:16

have more fullness and then have

density on top. That's why I can

1:50:161:50:20

understand spending money on

transplants. But at the end of the

1:50:201:50:23

day it is getting your face and the

line of your eyes balanced up. So if

1:50:231:50:30

you balance it up it is good but if

it looks like it is too long or

1:50:301:50:34

you've got a ponytail or it just

looks odd, that tends to draw more

1:50:341:50:39

attention to you.

Like you are

trying to distract attention from

1:50:391:50:44

the fact that you are balding. Is

the only answer to embrace it and go

1:50:441:50:49

short like Prince William has?

You

don't have to do an extreme, it's

1:50:491:50:54

just testing. I always say, try to

grow your hair out and see what it

1:50:541:50:59

looks like, if you buzz it off that

is up to you but try different

1:50:591:51:03

things. This is not a last resort,

this is something he wants to do.

1:51:031:51:08

And that's confidence in itself. If

you want to spend money, remember I

1:51:081:51:13

am in the head business, hairs about

vanity. If you want to spend that

1:51:131:51:18

money, great but and is confidence

as well. That's the big thing, it is

1:51:181:51:22

how you feel as a person.

You've got

some huge clients, Brad Pitt, Lewis

1:51:221:51:29

Hamilton. Have you ever had to have

an awkward conversation with

1:51:291:51:33

somebody who has perhaps got a

combover going on?

It's not really

1:51:331:51:39

my place! If I am doing a makeover

you'll have to give as much advice

1:51:391:51:46

as you can, that is the business I

am in. If someone wants to keep

1:51:461:51:49

their hair then they can keep it

that the main thing is that it looks

1:51:491:51:53

in proportion and doesn't look

silly.

Spencer...

He looks great.

It

1:51:531:52:01

is clearly worked feel.

I intervened

quite early, I had the same loss

1:52:011:52:07

pattern as Prince William and just

to reiterate, this is about self

1:52:071:52:11

esteem. There is an element of

vanity but it's about wanting to

1:52:111:52:15

better yourself. Nobody wants to

lose their hair. Losing your hair,

1:52:151:52:22

until you have experienced it it's a

difficult concept to comprehend. You

1:52:221:52:26

take your hair for granted but it

frames your face and gives you your

1:52:261:52:30

identity. I have been fortunate

through the processes and the

1:52:301:52:35

trials, and now I educate others to

avoid those mistakes.

But as you say

1:52:351:52:41

it is hugely emotive for many men. I

am sure many men watching will feel

1:52:411:52:46

the same. Thank you both for coming

in.

1:52:461:52:54

in. Thank you for your comments on

the Tobu smashing comedy

1:52:541:53:00

taboo-smashing comedy featuring

1:53:001:53:01

Bollywood superstar Akshay Kumar

on a surprising theme.

1:53:011:53:04

is about a man who invented

something simple. He was a poor

1:53:041:53:09

school dropout in India but he

changed the lives of millions of

1:53:091:53:12

women across the world by inventing

the machine to make cheap sanitary

1:53:121:53:16

pads. Let's see a clip from the

trailer.

1:53:161:53:22

I came across this story when I was

researching a column for The Times

1:53:221:53:26

of India. I was completely

fascinated. Here was a man from a

1:53:261:53:31

very simple, conservative village,

and he encountered a problem when he

1:53:311:53:34

realised that his wife was using

unhygienic rags.

Really unhygienic.

1:53:341:53:40

He said he wouldn't clean his

bicycle with them.

A normal man

1:53:401:53:45

would say, if I can't afford these,

let me earn some money to buy some

1:53:451:53:50

for my wife. But Arunachalam

Muruganantham is a very

1:53:501:53:55

idiosyncratic character and he

decided, why not just make a cheaper

1:53:551:54:00

bad. And he went ahead with it. His

wife got fed up of testing his pads

1:54:001:54:05

and he got fed up of waiting month

after month because there's a gap,

1:54:051:54:11

he has to wait a month every time,

no other woman was willing to this

1:54:111:54:15

out so he devised a contraption from

a bladder that he filled with pig 's

1:54:151:54:23

blood, by keep it between his legs

and he went cycling.

He literally

1:54:231:54:28

replicated having a period while on

a bike.

Yes, his bag leaked so he

1:54:281:54:34

had blood on his pants and the

people in his village 40 was a

1:54:341:54:37

pervert or that he had a sexual

disease. -- they thought he was a

1:54:371:54:42

pervert. He told me some people even

40 was a vampire, secretly sucking

1:54:421:54:46

blood from animals and women at

night! But he was ostracised, yet he

1:54:461:54:53

persevered and made this machine.

He

lost his wife, it was ostracised

1:54:531:54:58

from the village.

His mother left

him, he was abandoned, completely.

1:54:581:55:04

But his sense of determination just

pulled him through that entire time

1:55:041:55:10

period and he succeeded. And then

his wife came back, thank God!

With

1:55:101:55:15

all this in mind how difficult was

it for you to say, we will make this

1:55:151:55:19

into a film, I need funding.

It's

really surprising but the biggest

1:55:191:55:25

obstacle in making the movie was to

convince Murugantham that I should

1:55:251:55:29

be able to make it. He was not very

interested because he is not a man

1:55:291:55:34

who wants to be famous or who is

interested in money, beyond the

1:55:341:55:40

point. He lives a very simple life.

When I visited his house we were

1:55:401:55:45

sitting on the floor eating off

banana leaves. He was excited

1:55:451:55:48

because he was getting a bed for his

daughter and it was the first bed in

1:55:481:55:52

his household. His philosophy is

simple. He feels that we are a world

1:55:521:55:58

of consumers, and necessary

consumers, and if you are satisfied,

1:55:581:56:01

if your chair is a bit broken and

you can put a book underneath it and

1:56:011:56:06

balance it, why not do that?

So it

wasn't difficult to go to a film

1:56:061:56:10

company and make this into a huge

feature

1:56:101:56:17

feature film, Pad Man, talking about

periods.

I'd already written the

1:56:171:56:20

story in my book and when I went for

funding we have is absolutely no

1:56:201:56:24

problem with that. The only problem

we had while filming, we had two

1:56:241:56:30

junior artists on the set and we

filmed with them on the first day,

1:56:301:56:33

on the second day they had to hold

sanitary pads and they run away. We

1:56:331:56:39

had to shoot abortion again because

they were mortified at holding and

1:56:391:56:41

menstrual product. -- we had to

shoot that portion again.

How hard

1:56:411:56:47

was it to get your husband on board,

a Bollywood superstar, presumably

1:56:471:56:51

that will get more people to watch

the movie.

When we began I thought

1:56:511:56:55

at first I would make a small

arthouse film but then we thought

1:56:551:56:58

the mission is to have as many

people as possible watching it,

1:56:581:57:03

across households and globally as

well. And if Indian people see one

1:57:031:57:07

of their idols holding a sanitary

pad then half the tabloids are

1:57:071:57:10

dispelled right at that moment.

1:57:101:57:16

Soon you will be able to see that

film right across the UK. Let's

1:57:161:57:20

watch the clip.

1:57:201:57:25

You're thinking I'm mad,

but mad only becoming famous.

1:57:451:57:53

Just a flavour of the film Pad Man,

lots of people are getting in touch

1:57:591:58:04

about this, once as my daughter was

in India working for a charity to

1:58:041:58:08

bring awareness of periods to the

girls, I was shocked at the level of

1:58:081:58:17

shame there is attached to this

biological function.

1:58:171:58:20

BBC Newsroom live is coming up next.

1:58:201:58:22

Thank you for your company today.

1:58:221:58:23

Have a good day.

1:58:231:58:31

Chloe Tilley talks to the producer of a film about 'Pad Man', a school drop-out from southern India who helped millions of women by designing cheap sanitary towels. Researchers welcome the development of a simple blood test for several different kinds of cancer. Plus, one year since President Trump's inauguration, how has America changed with him in charge?