13/07/2016 Wednesday in Parliament


13/07/2016

Highlights of Wednesday 13 February in Parliament, presented by Keith Macdougall.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to Wednesday in Parliament.

:00:13.:00:16.

A Prime Minister departs, but not without first

:00:17.:00:18.

No one had a clue who I was until eventually someone

:00:19.:00:24.

said, "Hey, Cameron, Prime Minister's Questions,

:00:25.:00:26.

A show that, inevitably, reflects on upheaval

:00:27.:00:31.

inside the Conservatives and bitter in-fighting within Labour.

:00:32.:00:34.

We've had resignation, nomination, competition and coronation.

:00:35.:00:39.

They haven't even decided what the rules are, yet!

:00:40.:00:43.

After publication of the Iraq inquiry report, MPs debate

:00:44.:00:48.

whether action should be taken against Tony Blair.

:00:49.:00:52.

This Parliament at this stage should hold him accountable.

:00:53.:00:58.

Theresa May is Britain's new Prime Minister.

:00:59.:01:01.

David Cameron's six-year tenure at 10 Downing Street is over,

:01:02.:01:04.

two General Election successes to his name,

:01:05.:01:06.

The transition of power from outgoing leader to incoming

:01:07.:01:15.

leader followed long-standing tradition, complete with executive

:01:16.:01:17.

During the late morning, David Cameron had made the familiar,

:01:18.:01:26.

short journey from Downing Street to the Commons, for his 182nd

:01:27.:01:30.

and final session of Prime Ministers Questions as PM.

:01:31.:01:34.

The chamber, not surprisingly, was packed.

:01:35.:01:36.

Mr Speaker, this morning I had meetings with ministerial

:01:37.:01:45.

Other than one meeting this afternoon, with Her Majesty

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The Queen, the diary for the rest of my day is remarkably light.

:01:51.:01:54.

As he prepares to leave Downing Street, can I encourage him

:01:55.:01:57.

to return to the Big Society agenda that I know he's so passionate

:01:58.:02:00.

about and can I ask him if he remembers saying shortly

:02:01.:02:05.

before becoming Prime Minister, politicians are a mixture of egotism

:02:06.:02:08.

and altruism and you just hope the right one wins out

:02:09.:02:11.

so people do the right thing, rather than the politically

:02:12.:02:14.

It seems to me that he stayed on the right side of that divide

:02:15.:02:18.

in the last six years, not least in the manner

:02:19.:02:21.

of his departure and I think this country is going to miss him

:02:22.:02:24.

As for the Big Society, yes, we should use a stronger economy

:02:25.:02:28.

to build a bigger and stronger society and one of the things

:02:29.:02:31.

that we are doing is introducing National Citizens Service,

:02:32.:02:33.

200,000 young people have taken part in that programme and I hope

:02:34.:02:35.

by the end of this Parliament it will be the norm for

:02:36.:02:38.

In 33 years in this House, watching five Prime Ministers

:02:39.:02:48.

and several ex-Prime Ministers, I've seen him achieve a mastery

:02:49.:02:51.

at that despatch box, unparalleled in my time.

:02:52.:02:54.

Prime Minister's Questions for all it's theatrics does

:02:55.:02:57.

have a purpose because it's a time when every week the Prime Minister

:02:58.:03:00.

has to know absolutely everything that is going on in Whitehall

:03:01.:03:03.

and often you find out things that you want to stop pretty quickly

:03:04.:03:06.

I believe that politics is about public service

:03:07.:03:10.

in the national interest and that is what I've always

:03:11.:03:13.

This session does have some admirers around the world.

:03:14.:03:17.

I remember when I did his job and I met Mayor Bloomberg

:03:18.:03:21.

in New York and we walked down the street and everybody knew

:03:22.:03:24.

Mayor Bloomberg and everybody said, "Mayor, you're doing a great job."

:03:25.:03:26.

Nobody had a clue who I was until eventually someone

:03:27.:03:30.

said, "Hey, Cameron, Prime Minister's Questions,

:03:31.:03:32.

May we thank the Prime Minister for all his hard work

:03:33.:03:39.

and his leadership and particularly his commitment to the union

:03:40.:03:48.

and to Northern Ireland, visiting it often and swimming

:03:49.:03:54.

in Lough Erne and maybe he'd like to come and

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We look forward, the Ulster Unionist Party, to working with the next

:03:58.:04:01.

Prime Minister and I'm told that there are lots of leadership

:04:02.:04:04.

There's the England football team, there's Top Gear.

:04:05.:04:09.

There's even across the big pond a role that needs filling.

:04:10.:04:14.

Let me thank the honourable gentleman for his kind remarks

:04:15.:04:16.

and fascinating suggestions for future jobs, I think most

:04:17.:04:19.

I believe that Northern Ireland is stronger than it was six years ago.

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58,000 more people in work, the full devolution of justice

:04:28.:04:34.

and home affairs delivered under this Government.

:04:35.:04:37.

Mr Speaker, it's only right that after six years as Prime Minister

:04:38.:04:40.

we thank the Honourable member for Witney for his service.

:04:41.:04:42.

Jeremy Corbyn said he'd been listening to what Theresa

:04:43.:04:45.

And she said it's harder than ever for young people to

:04:46.:04:49.

So, does the Prime Minister think this is because of record low house

:04:50.:04:59.

building or his Government's apparent belief that ?450,000

:05:00.:05:01.

First of all, let me say at the despatch box how warmly

:05:02.:05:09.

I congratulate the Home Secretary on becoming leader of

:05:10.:05:12.

the Conservative Party and when it comes to women Prime Ministers,

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I'm very pleased to be able to say pretty soon it's going to be 2-0.

:05:16.:05:21.

On the issue of housing and homelessness, as I said,

:05:22.:05:32.

He asks about this issue of affordability,

:05:33.:05:36.

When I became Prime Minister because of what had happened

:05:37.:05:41.

to the mortgage market, a first-time buyer often needed

:05:42.:05:43.

to have as much as ?30,000 to put a deposit down.

:05:44.:05:54.

Because of the combination of Help to Buy and shared ownership,

:05:55.:05:57.

some people are actually able to get on the housing ladder now

:05:58.:06:00.

with a deposit of as little as ?2000 and with low mortgage rates as well

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and the new houses we're building, we're

:06:05.:06:06.

Mr Speaker, the malaise seems a little deeper still.

:06:07.:06:10.

The Home Secretary said, talking of the economy,

:06:11.:06:12.

she said, so that it really does work for everyone,

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because it is apparent to anyone in touch with the real world that

:06:16.:06:18.

people do not feel our economy works that way.

:06:19.:06:29.

Isn't she right that too many people in too many places in Britain

:06:30.:06:32.

feel their economy has been destroyed in towns

:06:33.:06:37.

they're in because the industries have gone, there are levels of high

:06:38.:06:40.

unemployment or underemployment and a deep sense of malaise?

:06:41.:06:48.

And to be accused of sloth in delivery by the right honourable

:06:49.:06:51.

gentleman, let's just take the last week.

:06:52.:06:53.

We've both been having these leadership elections.

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We've had resignation, nomination, competition and coronation.

:06:55.:06:57.

They haven't even decided what the rules are, yet!

:06:58.:07:01.

If they ever got into power it would take them about a year

:07:02.:07:04.

Democracy is an exciting and splendid thing and I'm

:07:05.:07:12.

The Home Secretary, Mr Speaker, talking of the economy,

:07:13.:07:28.

she said many people find themselves exploited by unscrupulous bosses.

:07:29.:07:30.

I can't imagine who she is referring to!

:07:31.:07:39.

Let me say something to him about the democratic process

:07:40.:07:45.

of leadership elections because I did say

:07:46.:07:47.

a couple of weeks ago that

:07:48.:07:48.

I thought, I have to say, I'm beginning to admire his tenacity.

:07:49.:07:53.

He has reminded me of the Black Knight in Monty

:07:54.:07:55.

He has been kicked so many times but he says, keep going,

:07:56.:08:00.

Mr Speaker, I would like the Prime Minister to address

:08:01.:08:11.

another issue that the House voted on last week.

:08:12.:08:19.

I've got a question from Nina, it's a question from somebody

:08:20.:08:21.

She says, I would like to know if there is any possibility that

:08:22.:08:32.

a European Union citizen, who has lived in Britain for 30

:08:33.:08:37.

years, can have their right of permanent residence

:08:38.:08:39.

revoked or deported, depending on the Brexit

:08:40.:08:41.

We are working hard to do what we want, which is to give

:08:42.:08:47.

a guarantee to EU citizens that they will have their rights

:08:48.:08:50.

respected, all those who have come to this country.

:08:51.:08:52.

I'm glad he mentions e-mails because actually I've

:08:53.:08:54.

Now, I got this and I'm not making this up, I promise,

:08:55.:09:03.

I got this on the 16th September 2015 from someone called

:09:04.:09:05.

"Please, please keep dignity and not triumphalism during the first PMQs

:09:06.:09:10.

She said, "because Tom Watson, who may oust Jeremy Corbyn,

:09:11.:09:16.

He's experienced, organised and far more dangerous in the long-term."

:09:17.:09:25.

She goes on, "so sensible and polite answers to Mr Corbyn, let him

:09:26.:09:28.

After this is over I've got to find Judith and find out

:09:29.:09:32.

Jeremy Corbyn wished Mr Cameron's family well.

:09:33.:09:37.

I'd also like him to pass on my thanks to his mum

:09:38.:09:43.

for her advice about ties and suits and socks.

:09:44.:09:46.

It's extremely kind of her and I'd be grateful if he'd pass that

:09:47.:09:50.

I'm reflecting on the lesson that she offered.

:09:51.:09:55.

I will certainly send his good wishes back to my mother.

:09:56.:09:58.

He's looking absolutely splendid today.

:09:59.:10:06.

But it gives me the opportunity to put a rumour to rest

:10:07.:10:09.

as well, even more serious than the Strictly Come Dancing one

:10:10.:10:12.

and he'll appreciate this because El Gatto,

:10:13.:10:14.

his cat, is particularly famous, and the rumour

:10:15.:10:16.

And I have photographic evidence to prove it.

:10:17.:10:21.

He belongs to the House and the staff love him

:10:22.:10:25.

The jokes flying thick and fast at PMQs.

:10:26.:10:31.

David Cameron had, back in 2010, been the Prime Minister

:10:32.:10:35.

of a Coalition Government when the Tories were in power

:10:36.:10:37.

Despite that, the Speaker didn't call any Lib Dem MP to contribute

:10:38.:10:43.

These days the third party in the Commons is the SNP.

:10:44.:10:47.

Its leader wished the outgoing Prime Minister well, but he said

:10:48.:10:52.

some of the issues his successor would be handling were unlikely

:10:53.:10:55.

The first vote of her premiership is likely to be imposing Trident

:10:56.:11:02.

against the wishes of almost every single MP from Scotland.

:11:03.:11:06.

she says she plans to plough on...meanwhile, she plans

:11:07.:11:16.

to plough on with Brexit, regardless of the fact that Scotland

:11:17.:11:21.

How does the outgoing Prime Minister think that all of this will go

:11:22.:11:26.

On Trident, there will be a vote in this House

:11:27.:11:34.

should decide and actually many in Scotland support our nuclear

:11:35.:11:39.

deterrent, maintaining it and the jobs that come in Scotland.

:11:40.:11:41.

He asks about the record of this Government when it comes to Scotland

:11:42.:11:44.

140,000 more people in work in Scotland, massive investment

:11:45.:11:48.

in the renewable industries in Scotland, the two

:11:49.:11:50.

in our history built in Scotland, a powerhouse parliament,

:11:51.:11:56.

a referendum that was legal, decisive and fair and I might add,

:11:57.:12:00.

a Scotsman winning Wimbledon twice while I was Prime Minister.

:12:01.:12:04.

Nevermind Indy Two, I think it's time for Andy Two.

:12:05.:12:15.

The end of the half-hour session allowed David Cameron to sign off

:12:16.:12:18.

with some thoughtful, valedictory comments, in the style

:12:19.:12:20.

of Tony Blair nine years before, though he was simultaneously

:12:21.:12:23.

resigning as a Member of the Commons.

:12:24.:12:24.

For the last question at this PMQs, the Speaker called a veteran former

:12:25.:12:27.

Can I ask that, as no doubt he will have some plans

:12:28.:12:39.

for a slightly more enjoyable and relaxed Wednesday

:12:40.:12:40.

morning and lunchtime, nevertheless he will still be

:12:41.:12:46.

an active participant in this House as it faces a large number

:12:47.:12:51.

As no two people know what Brexit means at the moment,

:12:52.:12:57.

we need his advice and his statesmanship as much

:12:58.:12:59.

Can I thank my right honourable friend for his very kind remarks.

:13:00.:13:07.

I remember one of the toughest conversations I had in politics

:13:08.:13:10.

was actually when I was Leader of the Opposition and I was trying

:13:11.:13:13.

to get him to join my front bench and he was on a bird-watching

:13:14.:13:16.

holiday in Patagonia and it was almost impossible

:13:17.:13:18.

He is not always the easiest person to get hold of.

:13:19.:13:22.

We tried, but Tory modernisation has never quite got as far as getting

:13:23.:13:25.

Kenneth Clarke to carry a mobile phone.

:13:26.:13:28.

He did briefly have one, but he said the problem is people

:13:29.:13:31.

We had to move, I seem to remember in Opposition,

:13:32.:13:40.

we had to move our morning meeting to accommodate his

:13:41.:13:42.

But I will watch these exchanges from the backbenches.

:13:43.:13:47.

I will miss the roar of the crowd, I will miss the barbs

:13:48.:13:54.

from the Opposition, but I will be willing you on.

:13:55.:14:00.

And when I say willing you on, I don't just mean willing

:14:01.:14:04.

on the new Prime Minister at this despatch box or indeed just willing

:14:05.:14:07.

on the front bench defending the manifesto that I helped to put

:14:08.:14:10.

together, but I mean willing all of you on, because people come

:14:11.:14:12.

here with huge passion for the issues they care about.

:14:13.:14:15.

They come here with great love for the constituencies

:14:16.:14:17.

They are also willing on this place because, yes,

:14:18.:14:20.

we can be pretty tough and test and challenge our leaders, perhaps

:14:21.:14:23.

more than some other countries, but that is something we should be

:14:24.:14:26.

proud of and we should keep at it and I hope you will all keep at it

:14:27.:14:30.

The last thing I'd say is that you can achieve a lot

:14:31.:14:35.

You can get a lot of things done and that in the end,

:14:36.:14:39.

the public service, the national interest, that is

:14:40.:14:41.

Nothing is really impossible if you put your mind to it.

:14:42.:14:45.

After all, as I once said, I was the future, once.

:14:46.:14:47.

The Commons giving Mr Cameron an ovation he'll probably

:14:48.:15:18.

Well, four hours after those moments in the Palace of Westminster came

:15:19.:15:22.

David Cameron, plus family, walked out of Number 10

:15:23.:15:28.

and after a final few words to the waiting media,

:15:29.:15:32.

and those final, final photographs on the Downing Street steps,

:15:33.:15:35.

the outgoing PM was taken, complete with police escort,

:15:36.:15:39.

to that other Palace, namely Buckingham Palace.

:15:40.:15:43.

There, he tendered his resignation to the Queen.

:15:44.:15:47.

And a matter of minutes later, Her Majesty met Theresa May and

:15:48.:15:54.

Theresa May is Britain's 54th Prime Minister,

:15:55.:16:02.

the second woman to hold the job, the late Margaret Thatcher

:16:03.:16:05.

Mrs May addressed the nation in Downing Street.

:16:06.:16:14.

I have just been to Buckingham Palace where Her Majesty The Queen

:16:15.:16:20.

has asked me to form a new government and I accepted.

:16:21.:16:27.

You're watching our round-up of the day at Westminster.

:16:28.:16:29.

Peers recall the so-called 'battle of Orgreave' during the long

:16:30.:16:32.

drawn-out miners' strike of 32 years ago.

:16:33.:16:39.

MPs have begun a two day debate on Sir John Chilcot's report

:16:40.:16:42.

It concluded that the UK went to war before the peace

:16:43.:16:49.

process was exhausted, that intelligence was flawed

:16:50.:16:52.

and that the post war planning was inadequate.

:16:53.:16:54.

The then Prime Minister, Tony Mr Blair, said the report

:16:55.:16:57.

should lay to rest allegations of bad faith, lies or deceit.

:16:58.:17:01.

But as MPs sought to tease out the lessons that needed to be

:17:02.:17:04.

learned there were deep divisions over Mr Blair's responsibility

:17:05.:17:07.

and whether action should be taken against him.

:17:08.:17:12.

A reading of Sir John's report, however, suggests flaws,

:17:13.:17:14.

Tony Blair's point to Parliament on the 18th March 2003,

:17:15.:17:21.

"I have never put our justification for action as regime change," only

:17:22.:17:25.

to find in a private note from Blair to Bush just a week later

:17:26.:17:29.

on the 26th March, "that's why Iraq's weapons of mass destruction,

:17:30.:17:33.

the immediate justification for action is ridding

:17:34.:17:36.

Iraq of Saddam Hussein and that is the real prize."

:17:37.:17:38.

These findings relate to decisions taken at that time

:17:39.:17:41.

and the arrangements and processes in place at the time.

:17:42.:17:46.

It is, therefore, for those who were ministers at the time

:17:47.:17:50.

This government's role is not to seek to apportion blame

:17:51.:17:57.

It is to ensure that the lessons identified by Chilcot are learned

:17:58.:18:03.

and that they have already led to changes or the changes

:18:04.:18:07.

While Chilcott finds there were no deliberate attempts

:18:08.:18:13.

made to mislead people, the intelligence on which the war

:18:14.:18:15.

was based was clearly flawed and it did not justify the certainty

:18:16.:18:20.

which was attached to it by the government.

:18:21.:18:22.

Can I ask my right honourable friend whether she's aware of an attempt

:18:23.:18:25.

to call a contempt motion for the House to consider

:18:26.:18:30.

against Tony Blair and does she agree with me that whatever else

:18:31.:18:37.

is in the Chilcot report, it does not give grounds

:18:38.:18:40.

There has been no admission of deliberately misleading this

:18:41.:18:45.

House and so therefore, if I may just finish,

:18:46.:18:47.

therefore if this house was to attempt to make a factual

:18:48.:18:51.

finding, in my view it would be a kangaroo court.

:18:52.:18:55.

In my view it would not be allowing the person accused to be able

:18:56.:18:58.

to represent themselves or be able to speak and in those circumstances

:18:59.:19:02.

it would fly in the face, in my view, of the established

:19:03.:19:05.

One thing this makes quite clear is nobody has committed any crime

:19:06.:19:10.

and as one who was present at the time, I have absolutely no

:19:11.:19:14.

doubt that nobody acted at the time on any other basis

:19:15.:19:17.

than that they believed passionately they were acting

:19:18.:19:21.

This Parliament at this stage should hold him accountable.

:19:22.:19:29.

Not because it's a matter of pursuing the former

:19:30.:19:32.

Prime Minister but because it will demonstrate and illustrate that

:19:33.:19:36.

even retrospectively, if a Parliament is systematically

:19:37.:19:39.

misled they will say up with it, they shall not put.

:19:40.:19:44.

When the Prime Minister told this house that he believed that

:19:45.:19:49.

Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,

:19:50.:19:52.

he believed it implicitly to be true.

:19:53.:19:55.

He was not making up the intelligence.

:19:56.:19:58.

He was not telling this house anything other

:19:59.:20:00.

than what he believed to be true, let alone sort of inventing a lie,

:20:01.:20:04.

The Iraq war has tarnished our reputation, ignored

:20:05.:20:09.

international law, undermined international institutions

:20:10.:20:12.

like the United Nations, which we worked so hard at building

:20:13.:20:15.

It destroyed public confidence in our leaders and in Parliament

:20:16.:20:20.

and it made it infinitely more difficult for a government to make

:20:21.:20:23.

the case for war by making the prospect of humanitarian

:20:24.:20:26.

intervention all the more unpalatable to many.

:20:27.:20:33.

So, how will Britain's departure from the EU,

:20:34.:20:35.

commonly known as Brexit, impact on the troubled

:20:36.:20:38.

In a debate in Westminster Hall, the Business Minister,

:20:39.:20:41.

Anna Soubry said continuing access to the EU market without

:20:42.:20:45.

The United Kingdom steel sector exported 6.3 million

:20:46.:20:52.

tonnes of steel last year, 3.3 million tonnes of which went

:20:53.:20:56.

That's how important the EU is when it comes to the exporting

:20:57.:21:02.

of steel, so access to that single market, I would suggest,

:21:03.:21:07.

is absolutely critical, not just for steel but indeed

:21:08.:21:10.

Let's turn to the automotive sector, which has been a massive success

:21:11.:21:17.

Huge numbers of cars are exported to EU markets and many of them

:21:18.:21:21.

I went to Nissan only the other week and I was reminded 45%

:21:22.:21:27.

of the steel used by Nissan is made here in Britain.

:21:28.:21:32.

The situation we now face is probably one of the most

:21:33.:21:36.

What we do now will have serious consequences for our future.

:21:37.:21:41.

The pound is plummeting and investment is going elsewhere.

:21:42.:21:44.

This experiment with an EU referendum to satisfy Tory

:21:45.:21:49.

backbenchers has completely backfired and it's now apparent

:21:50.:21:53.

There is no industrial plan, there is no industrial strategy

:21:54.:21:59.

but there is no plan for going forward.

:22:00.:22:01.

The vote on the 23rd June has produced an enormous

:22:02.:22:05.

Because of that uncertainty, businesses quite reasonably

:22:06.:22:10.

and logically might want to pause on their investment plans.

:22:11.:22:13.

Let's just wait the next quarter and the quarter after that in order

:22:14.:22:16.

to invest in new plants and machinery.

:22:17.:22:19.

If we are in a global race with regards to economic progress

:22:20.:22:22.

we can't afford to be pausing for a quarter or two,

:22:23.:22:25.

we will be left behind and our competitiveness will be

:22:26.:22:29.

eroded as a result, so what is the government doing

:22:30.:22:31.

in order to ensure that we provide as much clarity as possible?

:22:32.:22:38.

Probably the most vivid and certainly some of the most

:22:39.:22:41.

violent images of the miners' strike in the 1980s were those witnessed

:22:42.:22:44.

at the Orgreave coking plant, near Sheffield.

:22:45.:22:46.

There, a virtual pitched battle was fought on several days in June

:22:47.:22:49.

1984 between police and thousands of striking miners.

:22:50.:22:55.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has this week ruled that

:22:56.:22:59.

a full report into allegations of police misconduct at Orgreave

:23:00.:23:02.

In the Lords, a Labour peer said it was high time

:23:03.:23:08.

Could the noble Lord the Minister just confirm that media reports have

:23:09.:23:15.

revealed the previously redacted sections of the Independent Police

:23:16.:23:19.

Complaints Commission report from June of last year,

:23:20.:23:23.

which exposed striking similarities between the personnel and alleged

:23:24.:23:27.

practices of South Yorkshire Police at Orgreave and Hillsborough.

:23:28.:23:32.

Could he also confirmed in a letter to the Home Secretary last month,

:23:33.:23:35.

several MPs called for a public enquiry and said that trust

:23:36.:23:40.

would never truly be restored until we found out the entire truth

:23:41.:23:47.

about Orgreave and the wider policing of the miner's strike,

:23:48.:23:50.

including the allegations of police mistreatment of striking miners.

:23:51.:23:52.

The IPCC has specifically pointed out that a decision on an enquiry

:23:53.:24:00.

at this stage could cross over the further investigations

:24:01.:24:03.

of the criminal or potential criminal prosecutions.

:24:04.:24:06.

With regard to the disclosure of the unredacted report

:24:07.:24:09.

by a newspaper on the 4th of May 2016, the entire unredacted

:24:10.:24:14.

report was not disclosed, however that which was disclosed did

:24:15.:24:17.

show a number of senior officers acting in common in regard

:24:18.:24:21.

As regards to the observations that have been made by the temporary

:24:22.:24:28.

Chief Constable and the MPs, I agree those observations were made.

:24:29.:24:31.

I represented a mining community in the other house.

:24:32.:24:45.

The primary responsibility for what happened rests with the leaders of

:24:46.:24:50.

the mining community who brought many numbers of people to the site

:24:51.:24:55.

and were prepared to use force and threats of force in order to

:24:56.:24:58.

implement policies which were as much political as they were

:24:59.:25:02.

industrial and have basic seeded, that would have subverted the

:25:03.:25:08.

principles of democratic government. I represented the mining community

:25:09.:25:10.

in the other house. I was very active during the strike

:25:11.:25:12.

in 1980 to 1984 and I must say, I saw police violence as well

:25:13.:25:17.

and I do feel there ought to be an enquiry, generally,

:25:18.:25:21.

about policing of the miners' strikes because it is one

:25:22.:25:23.

of the reasons for the disenchantment with politics

:25:24.:25:25.

that we saw three weeks ago I'm not going to anticipate

:25:26.:25:27.

a decision that will be made I would observe that

:25:28.:25:31.

following the incident at Orgreave there were 51 picketers

:25:32.:25:34.

who were injured and 72 But do join us for our

:25:35.:25:42.

next daily round-up. Until then, from me,

:25:43.:25:48.

Keith Macdougall, goodbye

:25:49.:25:53.

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